Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 7

Naryan Murthy and Julia Munslow

NHD 2013

Annotated Bibliography
Primary Sources A.L.A. Schechter Poultry Corporation v. United States. 295 US. 1935. Print. This Supreme Court case file contains information pertinent to one of the hearings concerning the New Deal programs. It explicitly labels the new Deal as unconstitutional, demonstrating quite clearly how some thought that the New Deal programs transgressed the powers afforded to the government. This extensive source helped us gain a more inclusive picture of the new Deal. The American Memory Project. Library of Congress, n.d. Web. 20 Dec. 2012. This program by the Library of Congress allowed us to search for images specific to our focus on the New Deal. It provided us with various works of art, including the travel posters that we published on the site. This website provided many primary source photographs from the time of the New Deal. There were pictures of people without jobs as a result of the Great Depression, people with the jobs provided by the New Deal, propaganda about the New Deal, and other images relating to the time period. Digital Vaults. National Archives, n.d. Web. 20 Dec. 2012. This website provided about 10 primary source images. Every one of these was used in the creation of our website. Additionally, it drew connections between various images and documents, providing a new perspective on certain aspects of the New Deal. "Dear Mr. Hopkins." American Decades Primary Sources. Ed. Cynthia Rose. Vol. 4: 1930-1939. Detroit: Gale, 2004. 553-555. Gale U.S. History In Context. Web. 16 Dec. 2012. This primary source document was a correspondence concerning health conditions during the period of the Depression and the New Deal. It conveyed the devastation of the Great Depression, as well as how the New Deal was able to help overcome some of this and aid the health of the people. "Educational Contribution of the Civilian Conservation Corps." American Decades Primary Sources. Ed. Cynthia Rose. Vol. 4: 1930-1939. Detroit: Gale, 2004. 186189. Gale U.S. History In Context. Web. 20 Dec. 2012. This source discussed how the boys who went through the CCC program were educated beyond the training and the job they received through the program. The article discusses how the boys would learn life skills which would improve

their chances in being successful even after exiting the program, showing how meritocracy was an important ideal in the New Deal. Library of Congress. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Dec. 2012. This website provided a few photos that we were able to use in the creation of our website. it also provided all important citation information about the original image, including the date (if known), the location, and even the rights to publish the image online. The New Deal Network. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Dec. 2012. This website also provided a plethora of primary source images. About twenty (or possibly more) or the images on our site came from this portal. It organized the images into different aspects, such as art, reconstruction, etc, making it extremely easy to locate pertinent photos. On top of this, it provided the date (when known), the New Deal program that relates to the image, and the source of the image for ease of citation. Roosevelt, Franklin Delano. "Fireside Chat on the Purposes of the Recovery Program."The Great Depression and the New Deal. Woodbridge, CT: Primary Source Media, 1999. American Journey. Gale U.S. History In Context. Web. 20 Dec. 2012. This fireside chat by FDR allowed us to hear about the purposes of the recovery program and the intents behind it. Coming from FDR himself, it allowed us to convey, in certain terms, the purpose of the New Deal. ---. "Fireside Chat Outlining the New Deal." The Great Depression and the New Deal. Woodbridge, CT: Primary Source Media, 1999. American Journey. Gale U.S. History In Context. Web. 20 Dec. 2012. This fireside chat outlined the New Deal. This showed us both an overview of the New Deal and the way that FDR communicated his plans to the public. ---. "On the Bank Crisis." 12 Mar. 1933. Speech. This is FDR's first "Fireside chat," in which he communicated his plans to the public. This provided insight into FDR's economic plans for the nation. ---. "On the Works Relief Program." 28 Apr. 1935. Speech. This speech showed us why the people put their trust in FDR, and how effective his programs proved to be. We were able to take some clips from this speech and publish them on the site, too.

---. "Radio Address Roosevelt's Defense of the New Deal." Social Policy: Essential Primary Sources. Ed. K. Lee Lerner, Brenda Wilmoth Lerner, and Adrienne Wilmoth Lerner. Detroit: Gale, 2006. 172-176. Gale U.S. History In Context. Web. 16 Dec. 2012. This transcript showed us FDRs defense of the New Deal, and consequently, showed us the type of Republican opposition he faced. This information was included in our site, as it was important to see that although quite popular, the New Deal wasnt unanimously accepted. Secondary Sources Adler, Jerry. "1934: The Art of the New Deal." Smithsonian.com. Smithsonian Institution, 2009. Web. 20 Dec. 2012. This article was useful in explaining exactly why an emphasis was placed on arts during the New Deal. This made it easier to portray on our website. "African Americans and the New Deal." Digital History. N.p., 2013. Web. 8 Mar. 2013. This reliable, educational website article explains how the New Deal programs impacted African Americans in their campaign for civil rights. It explains both sides of the issue briefly, making it a truly useful source to have during the construction of this site. "African Americans and the New Deal: A Look Back in History." Roosevelt Institute. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Mar. 2013. This web page portrayed how the New Deal affected African Americans in their struggle for civil rights. It was an invaluable source to have while adding that particular section of the Public Sentiments page. The source was balanced, explaining precisely how the New Deal had beneficial aspects, but also left many of the civil rights issues unresolved.

Beschloss, Michael, and Hugh Sidey. "The Presidents of the United States of America." The White House. The White House Historical Association, 2009. Web. 20 Dec. 2012. This is the Presidential biography of Franklin Delano Roosevelt from the official website of the White House. It provided insight into the life of FDR, which was included in his biographical information on our site. It provided some helpful quotes that we published, too.

"Biogrphy of Franklin D. Roosevelt." Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Dec. 2012. This website proved very helpful during the creation of this project. It provided a good number of pictures that we were able to use, as well as some useful quotes. This biography, in particular, also provided a deeper understanding of FDR. Bureau of Labor Statistics. "U.S. Unemployment Rate, 1930-1945." American Social Historical Project. N.p., 1970. Web. 20 Dec. 2012. This is a graph compiled with statistics from the time period. It was incredibly useful in illustrating the true effects of the New Deal and the impact it had on unemployment rates during its term. Brinkley, Alan. The End of Reform: New Deal Liberalism in Recession and War. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1995. Print. This source had information about the New Deal and how the liberalism of the idea was taken by the public. It told how Roosevelt implemented his New Deal policies in relation to the war and the recession. The Century of the Self. The BBC. British Broadcasting Corporation, n.d. Web. 20 Dec. 2012. This documentary provided a plentitude of clips which we were able to publish on our website. Portions of the extensive informational video were able to portray important aspects of the Great Depression and the New Deal to our viewers, including FDR's actions and people's subsequent reactions. It even included some primary source speeches by FDR, which we published on our site. Civilian Conservation Corps Legacy. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Dec. 2012. This is a website by a non-profit research organization dedicated to research, preservation, and education about the Civilian Conservation Corps and its continuing contribution to American culture and life. It provided insight into the role of the Civilian Conservation Corps, which was included on our site. In addition, we were able to take one or two quotes from this source, too. Cushman, Barry. "New Deal (Constitutional Significance)." Encyclopedia of the American Constitution. Ed. Leonard W. Levy and Kenneth L. Karst. 2nd ed. Vol. 4. Detroit: Macmillan Reference USA, 2000. 1797-1798. Gale U.S. History In Context. Web. 15 Dec. 2012. This source was a helpful debate about the constitutionality of the New Deal. It portrayed both sides of the controversial argument, both past and present. Therefore, it was helpful in understanding the opposition to the New Deal.

Duchemin, Michael. "Water, power, and tourism: Hoover Dam and the making of the New West." California History 86.4 (2009): 60+. Gale U.S. History In Context. Web. 20 Dec. 2012. This source was helpful in providing an overview of some of the conservation programs and new sense of America as a tourist destination. It was not used much for quotes or pictures. "Franklin Delano Roosevelt." Contemporary Heroes and Heroines. Vol. 2. Gale, 1992. Gale Biography In Context. Web. 19 Dec. 2012. This biography is the same biography that we published to give an overview of FDR. It was selected because it portrays his determination, leadership qualities, and historical background, thereby providing intimations into his character and motivations. The Great Depression and New Deal, 1929-1940s. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Dec. 2012. This educational website was helpful only in providing an overview of the new Deal policies and their purpose. No notably pertinent information was used from this source. Horowitz, David A. "The New Deal and people's art: market planners and radical artists." Oregon Historical Quarterly Summer 2008: 318. Gale U.S. History In Context. Web. 20 Dec. 2012. This article pertained to artists and their work under the New Deal. While not particularly helpful for quotes or images, this source did show the emphasis on art durin the New Deal period. Leuchtenburg, William E., and Editors of LIFE. Volume 11: 1933-1945. New York: Time Incorporated, 1964. Print. This source had many quotes and pictures that we incorporated into our website, especially about the political aspects of the New Deal. It also had a general overviews about the different programs in the New Deal. Nevins, Allan. The New Deal and World Affairs. New York: Yale University, 1950. Print. This source provided information about the international affairs of FDR while he was in office. It demonstrated how the New Deal affected the foreign affairs of America, particularly in relation to the World Wars.

"New Deal Programs, Chart, 1933-1938." Gale Encyclopedia of U.S. Economic History. Ed. Thomas Carson and Mary Bonk. Detroit: Gale, 2010. Gale U.S. History In Context. Web. 20 Dec. 2012. This chart was a useful summary for the New Deal programs. We transcribed it so that it could be more easily read and published it on our site. "New Deal Remedies." The Great Depression and the New Deal. Woodbridge, CT: Primary Source Media, 2010. American Journey. Gale U.S. History In Context. Web. 20 Dec. 2012. This political cartoon shows FDR as a doctor and his New Deal programs as remedies for the nation. It accurately conveyed the number of New Deal programs, as well as their purpose, so we published it on our site. "Presidents graded on economy, FDR tops." UPI NewsTrack 5 Nov. 2012. Gale Biography In Context. Web. 19 Dec. 2012. This scientific study about the U.S. Presidents was able to prove that FDR was the best President in terms of economic standing. This meant that his economic programs were deemed successful, so a quote from this source was put on our site. Szostak, Rick. "Great Depression." Dictionary of American History. Ed. Stanley I. Kutler. 3rd ed. Vol. 4. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 2003. 44-49. Gale U.S. History In Context. Web. 20 Dec. 2012. This article provided a basic overview of the Great Depression. We were able to quote extensively from it to provide historical context for our web site. Its overview also provided a foundation upon which we could formulate our page layout and content. Taylor, David. "What's the Deal about New Deal Art?" Smithsonian.com. Smithsonian Institution, 2009. Web. 20 Dec. 2012. This article from the Smithsonian was helpful in learning about the significance of the art programs associated with the New Deal. This information was included in the corresponding section on our website. Taylor, Nick. E-mail interview. Mar. 2013. This brief email interview was helpful in providing insight about some of the questions that were a bit more difficult to answer. Mr. Taylor provided thorough and valuable answers, which we took into careful consideration when constructing this site and formulating our support. A complete transcript can be found posted in the "Documents" section of the website.

White, G. Edward. The Constitution and the New Deal. Cambridge: Harvard University, 2000. Print. This source discussed the constitutionality of the New Deal. It examined the way the New Deal policies worked for the American people, revealing both positive aspects and potential controversies. Both sides of this debate were important to understand when making this project.