Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 156

Bachelor of Science

(Housing, Building & Planning) and Bachelor of Architecture


Academic Session 2012 /2013

USM Vision Transforming Higher Education for a Sustainable Tomorrow

USM Mission USM is a pioneering, transdisciplinary research intensive university that empowers future talent and enables the bottom billions to transform their socio-economic well being

STUDENTS PERSONAL DATA


Full Name I.C Number Current Address

Permanent Address

E-mail address House Phone No. Mobile Phone No. (if any) School Programme

ii

CONTENTS I. II. III. 1.0 UNIVERSITY MISSION AND OBJECTIVE CONTENTS ACADEMIC CALENDAR 2012/2013 INTRODUCTION 1.1 School of Housing, Building and Planning 1.2 The School's Vision 1.3 The School's Mission and Objectives 1.4 Main Administrative Staff 1.5 Programme Chairman 1.6 Academic Staff PROGRAMME STRUCTURE/CURRICULUM 2.1 Bachelor of Science (Housing, Building and Planning) 2.2 Bachelor of Architecture Programme 2.3 Study Path at the School of HBP 2.4 Unit Requirement 2.5 Course Duration 2.6 Studio Courses 2.7 List of Courses 2.7.1 Construction Management Programme 2.7.2 Building Technology Programme 2.7.3 Quantity Surveying Programme 2.7.4 Urban and Regional Planning Programme 2.7.5 Interior Design Programme 2.7.6 Architecture Programme 2.7.7 Building Surveying Programme 2.7.8 Bachelor of Architecture Programme 2.8 Course Synopsis 2.8.1 Common Studios and Practical Training 2.8.2 Courses in Construction Management 2.8.3 Courses in Building Technology 2.8.4 Courses in Quantity Surveying 2.8.5 Courses in Urban and Regional Planning 2.8.6 Courses in Interior Design 2.8.7 Courses in Architecture 2.8.8 Courses in Building Surveying 2.8.9 Courses in Bachelor of Architecture 2.9 Information on Course Code SCHOOL'S REQUIREMENT 3.1 Core Courses 3.2 Elective Courses 3.3 Practical Training

PAGE NO. i ii vi 1 1 3 3 4 5 6 10 10 11 12 13 13 14 15 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 24 24 27 38 49 56 66 76 88 93 165 107 107 107 107

2.0

3.0

iii

CONTENTS 4.0

PAGE NO. 108 108 115 115 120 124 129 130 131 131 131 133 135 136 137

ACADEMIC SYSTEM AND GENERAL INFORMATION 4.1 Course Registration Activity 4.2 Interpretation of Unit/Credit 4.3 Examination System 4.4 Unit Exemption/Credit Transfer 4.5 Academic Integrity 4.6 USM Mentor Programme 4.7 Student Exchange Programme UNIVERSITY'S REQUIREMENT 5.1 Summary of University Requirement 5.2 Bahasa Malaysia 5.3 English Language 5.4 Local Student - Islamic and Asian Civilisations/ Ethnic Relations/Core Entrepreneurship 5.5 International Students - Malaysian Studies/Option 5.6 Third Language/Co-Curriculum/Skill Courses/Options GENERAL INFORMATION OF PROGRAMMES/ SCHOOL 6.1 Career Prospects 6.2 Alumni 6.3 Conferments and Awards 6.3.1 School Level 6.3.2 University Level 6.3.3 Professional Bodies Level 6.4 School Association 6.5 Graduate Studies 6.6 Overseas Learning Scheme 6.7 School Website 6.8 Facilities 6.8.1 Physical Facilities 6.8.2 Resource Centre/Branch Library 6.8.3 Laboratories 6.8.4 General Workshop 6.8.5 Structure Laboratory 6.8.6 Soil, Concrete and Cement Technology Laboratory 6.8.7 Environmental Physical Laboratory 6.8.8 Information Technology Laboratory (IT Lab) 6.8.9 Photography and Audio Visual Laboratory 6.9 Industry Advisory Panel (IAP) 6.10 Administrative/Technical/Laboratories Staff

5.0

6.0

142 142 142 142 142 142 142 143 143 143 143 144 144 144 144 144 144 145 145 145 146 147 148

iv

CONTENTS

PAGE NO.

APPENDIX A : School of Housing, Building and Planning Curriculum

III

ACADEMIC CALENDAR ACADEMIC SESSION 2012/2013 [10 SEPTEMBER 2012 8 SEPTEMBER 2013 (52 WEEKS)] Registration For New Students - 1-2 SEPTEMBER 2012

WEEK 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 -52

DATE Monday, 10/09/12 - Friday, 14/09/12 Monday, 17/09/12 - Friday, 21/09/12 Monday, 24/09/12 - Friday, 28/09/12 Monday, 01/10/12 - Friday, 05/10/12 Monday, 08/10/12 - Friday, 12/10/12 Monday, 15/10/12 - Friday, 19/10/12 Monday, 22/10/12 - Friday, 26/10/12 Monday, 29/10/12 - Friday, 02/10/12 Monday, 05/11/12 - Friday, 09/11/12 Saturday, 10/11/12 - Sunday,18/11/12 Monday, 19/11/12 - Friday, 23/11/12 Monday, 26/11/12 - Friday, 30/11/12 Monday, 03/12/12 - Friday, 07/12/12 Monday, 10/12/12 - Friday, 14/12/12 Monday, 17/12/12 - Friday, 21/12/12 Saturday,22/12/12 - Thursday,01/01/13 Wednesday, 02/01/13 - Saturday,05/01/13 Monday, 07/01/13 - Saturday, 12/01/13 Monday, 14/01/13 - Friday, , 19/11/13 Saturday, 19/01/13 - Sunday, 17/02/13 Monday, 18/02/13 - Friday, 22/02/13 Monday, 25/02/13 - Friday, 01/03/13 Monday, 04/03/13 - Friday, 08/03/13 Monday, 11/03/13 - Friday, 15/03/13 Monday, 18/03/13 - Friday , 22/03/13 Monday, 25/03/13 - Friday , 29/03/13 Monday, 01/04/13 - Friday , 05/04/13 Saturday,06/04/13 - Sunday,14/04/13 Monday, 15/04/13 - Friday, 19/04/13 Monday, 22/04/13 - Friday, 26/04/13 Monday, 29/04/13 - Friday, 03/05/13 Monday, 06/05/13 - Friday, 10/05/13 Monday, 13/05/13 - Friday, 17/05/13 Monday, 20/05/13 - Friday, 24/05/13 Monday, 27/05/13 - Friday, 31/05/13 Saturday, 01/06/13 - Sunday,09/06/13 Monday, 10/06/13 - Friday, 14/06/13 Monday, 17/06/13 - Friday, 21/06/13 Monday, 24/06/13 - Friday, 28/06/13 Sunday, 29/06/13 - Sunday, 08/09/13

ACTIVITIES ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ]

Teaching Learning Period

MID-TERM BREAK Teaching Learning Period Revision Week Examinations SEMESTER BREAK

Teaching Learning Period

MID-TERM BREAK

Teaching Learning Period

Revision Week Examinations LONG VACATION

COURSE DURING LONG-TERM BREAK [KSCP] 43 - 45 46 - 47 48 49 - 52 Saturday, 29/06/13 Monday, 22/07/13 Monday, 29/07/13 Sunday, 03/08/13 Sunday, Friday, Friday, Sunday, 21/07/13 26/07/13 02/08/13 08/08/13 Break Teaching Examination Break

Courses in Health Campus will begin/end earlier due to different holiday schedules.

vi

1.0 1.1

INTRODUCTION School of Housing, Building and Planning

The School of Housing, Building and Planning, Universiti Sains Malaysia was established in 1972 with the aim of producing skilled personnel capable of implementing the relevant planning, design and development processes necessary for Malaysia's development. After more than three decades, the school has made tremendous progress in teaching, research, consultancy and publication. The academic staff currently exceeds seventy; more than half of whom have doctoral degrees in their respective fields. Currently they are seven undergraduate programme offered by the school, some are recognized by the respective professional bodies such as the Malaysian Institute of Planners (MIP), Board of Architects Malaysia (LAM) the Board of Quantity Surveyors Malaysia and Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors (RICS). The broad-based approach combined with specialisms provide our graduates the edge in dealing with the construction and development processes in a more holistic manner. The globalization era is upon the School of HBP and inevitably brings with it the winds of change and challenges. The School acknowledges the need to understand and accommodate these challenges, with its inherent problems and obstacles by re-aligning strategies, adopting a different but fresh outlook on staffing and equipment issues. Undeniably, the integrated, hybridized nature of the curriculum has been spared but the focus on teaching, learning, research, consultancy and administration will require rethinking and re-focusing. The realization of the Schools vision as a center of excellence in the Built Environment requires wholesome support and proper implementation of sound policies and strategies. Clearly, HBPs mission is to prepare a platform which can generate structures and society that are eco and environmental friendly, besides allowing for an academic legacy that will be respected, emulated and sustained. There are eight major issues that have been identified with performances monitored in order to enhance efficiency and effectiveness periodically. 1. Human Resources To strengthen academic quality to the highest level. This can be exemplified by the recognition given to the academic staff in the field of exhibition design; in other words staff are directly responsible in enhancing the quality of learning and teaching. Teaching-Learning To enhance the quality of staff work to enable them to confront the world of information at light speed. Research To develop and produce research findings in the context of local and regional development such as ferrocement and light weight concrete, which has received international recognition. These are major assets in the global transaction.

2.

3.

4.

Internationalisation To develop mutual networks between individuals and universities. Management To strive for productivity. a higher level of transparency, quality and

5. 6. 7.

Finance To improve upon sources of income. Infrastructure Infrastructure capabilities can be strengthened by enhancing the hardware components, building upon software licenses and allowing for the rapid movement of interactive experimental websites. It is hoped that this will be able to stimulate smart partnerships. Partnership To enhance and improve upon the demand of offering courses.

8.

Premised upon this overall strategy, it is hoped that students of HBP will be sensitive to the current needs and adapt their mind-sets ready to change their points of view, be able to overcome future obstacles and most importantly to be able to use their knowledge and experience in HBP to attempt to, build and develop an environmentally conscious society, and subsequently a healthy world.

In general, HBP graduates are expected to contribute their expertise in various sectors as an administrator and professional of building and construction projects. Many have extended their studies to obtain higher levels of professional qualifications as well as higher academic qualifications.

VISION Nurturing a Sustainable Built Environment through Holistic Higher Education THE SCHOOLS MISSION HBP is a leading, broad-based multidisciplinary school in built environment studies, fostering excellent education, research, consultancy and community engagement that empowers future talents as a leaders in enhancing the quality of life of the bottom billions. THE SCHOOLS OBJECTIVES 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. To create holistic intellectual capital by producing competent graduates in the built environment field for a more sustainable future. To engage in state of the art research promoting knowledge discovery and innovation in a sustainable built environment through a multidisciplinary approach. To deliver quality consultancy and contract research in cultivating smart university-industry partnership. To enhance community engagement for socio-economic transformation through collaborative outreach programs. To pursue professional leadership and global recognition in academics and research through international collaborative endeavors.

CLIENT CHARTER To provide optimum academic, research and consultancy services in fulfilling the Schools vision ans mission as well as achieving clients satisfaction.

1.4

Main Administrative Staff

DEAN

Professor Ir. Dr. Mahyuddin Ramli

DEPUTY DEAN

Assoc. Prof. Dr. NorAini Yusof (Academic & Students Development)

Prof. Dr. Abu Hassan Abu Bakar (Research & Postgraduate Studies)

Ms. Wan Mariah Wan Harun (Industry & Community Network)

SENIOR ASSISTANT REGISTRAR

ASSISTANT REGISTRAR

Mr. Md Kamal Shari Pinansa

Mr. Subramaniam Govindan

1.5

PROGRAMME CHAIRMAN

Assoc.Prof. Ar. Dr. Abdul Malek Abdul Rahman (Architecture)

Assoc.Prof. Dr. Fuziah Ibrahim (Interior Design)

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Nazirah Zainul Abidin (Quantity Surveying)

Dr. Abd. Hamid Kadir Pakir (Construction Management)

Dr. Azizan Marzuki (Urban & Regional Planning)

Dr. Hanizam Awang (Building Technology)

1.6

Academic Staff
Tel. No. 3173 3449 2820 3174/4108 2816 2833 2817 2819 2506 2821 2810 2804 3741 2835 2808 3279 2807 3740 2834 2844 2695 2806 E-Mail mahyudin@usm.my omar-o@usm.my aghafar@usm.my abhassan@usm.my arashid@usm.my bada@um.my julaihi@usm.my sghani@usm.my abdaziz@usm.my abmajid@usm.my malik@usm.my anaser@usm.my puad@usm.my sanusi@usm.my aldrin@usm.my alip@usm.my azizi@usm.my araofud@usm.my fuziah@usm.my hassim@usm.my ilias @usm.my jamel@usm.my

Names of Lecturers Mahyuddin Ramli, Professor. Ir. Dr. D.J.N., P.J.K. Dean Omar Osman, Professor. Dato Dr. Vice Chancelor A Ghafar Ahmad, Dr. Professor Abu Hassan Abu Bakar, Dr. Professor Abdul Rashid Abdul Aziz, Sr Dr. Professor Badaruddin Mohamed, Dr. Professor Julaihi Wahid, Dr. Professor Abdul Ghani Salleh, Dr. S.M.Z*. Professor Abdul Aziz Hussin, A.M.N. Associate Professor Abdul Majid Ismail, Ar. Dr. * Associate Professor Abdul Malek Abdul Rahman, Ar. Dr. Associate Professor Abdul Naser Abdul Ghani, Ir. Dr. Associate Professor Ahmad Puad Mat Som, Dr. Associate Professor Ahmad Sanusi Hassan, Dr. Associate Professor Aldrin Abdullah Dr. Associate Professor Alip Rahim, Dr.* Associate Professor Azizi Bahauddin, Dr. Associate Professor Azlan Raofuddin Hj. Nuruddin, Sr Associate Professor Fuziah Ibrahim, Dr. Associate Professor Hassim Mat, Dr. Associate Professor Ilias Said, Sr Dr. Associate Professor Jamel Ariffin, Mr. LAr. Associate Professor

Ku Azhar Ku Hassan, Ar. Dr. Associate Professor Kausar Hj. Ali, Dr. Associate Professor Lee Lik Meng, Dr. Associate Professor Lim Yoke Mui, Sr Associate Professor Mastura Jaafar @ Mustapha, Sr Dr. Associate Professor Mohd. Rodzi Ismail, Dr. Associate Professor Mohd. Wira Mohd Shafiei, Dr. Associate Professor Muna Hanim Abdul Samad, Dr. Associate Professor Nazirah Zainul Abidin, Dr. Associate Professor Nor Aini Yusof, Dr. Associate Professor Nik Fuaad Nik Abllah, Ir. Associate Professor Nurwati Badarulzaman, Dr. Associate Professor Sharifah Fairuz Syed Fadzil, Dr. Associate Professor Tan Guat Lin, Evelyn, Dr. * Associate Professor Abd. Hamid Kadir Pakir, Dr. Senior Lectures Abdul Ghapar Othman, Mr Senior Lectures Abdelnaser Omran Ali, Dr. Senior Lectures Ahmad Hilmy Abdul Hamid, Dr. Senior Lectures Amin Akhavan Tabassi, Dr. Senior Lectures Atasya Osmadi, Dr. Senior Lectures Arman Abdul Razak, Mr. Senior Lectures Azizan Marzuki, Dr. Senior Lectures Hasnanywati Hassan,Sr Dr. Senior Lectures Ernawati Mustapa Kamal, Dr. Senior Lectures Hanizam Awang, Dr. Senior Lectures Jamil Jusoh, Mr. Senior Lectures

2846 2831 2842 2838 3176 2841 2828 2814 3183 3174 3793 2822 3209 2843 2837 2502 2839 2882 2827 2829 3457 2501 5923 5932 2815 2818

kuazhar@usm.my kausar@usm.my lmlee@usm.my ymlim@usm.my masturaj@usm.my rodzi@usm.my wira@usm.my mhanim@usm.my nazirah_za@usm.my ynoraini@usm.my nfuaad@usm.my nurwati@usm.my sfsf@usm.my glt@usm.my hamka1@usm.my ghapar@usm.my naser_elamroni@usm.my hilcom@usm.my akhavan@usm.my a.osmadi@usm.my arm.raz@usm.my chik72@usm.my hasnany@usm.my ernamustafa@usm.my hanizam@usm.my jjamil@usm.my

Linariza Haron, Dr. Senior Lectures Mazran Ismail, Dr. Senior Lectures Md Azree Othuman Mydin, Sr Dr. Senior Lectures Mohd. Hanizun Hanafi, Dr. Senior Lectures Mohd. Yahaya Mohd. Daud, Mr Senior Lectures Mohd Zailan Sulieman, Dr. Senior Lectures Mohd Zaid Yusof, Ir. Dr. Senior Lectures Norazmawati Md. Sani @ Abd. Rahim, Dr. Senior Lectures Nor Azam Shuib, Mr. LAr Senior Lectures Nur Zarifah Maliki, Dr. Senior Lectures Norizal Md. Noordin, Dr. Senior Lectures Noor Faisal Abas, Dr. Senior Lectures Rahmat Azam Mustafa, Dr. Senior Lectures Roslan Hj. Talib, Mr. Senior Lectures Ruhizal Roosli, Dr. Senior Lectures Radzi Ismail, Dr. Senior Lectures Shardy Abdullah, Dr. Senior Lectures Syarmila Hany Haron, Dr. Senior Lectures Wan Mariah Wan Harun, Ms. Senior Lectures Yeoh Oon Soon, Ar. Senior Lectures Zulkifli Osman, Mr. Senior Lectures Ahmad Zakiiulfuad Yahaya, Ar. * Lectures Haris Fadzilah Abd Rahman, Ar Lectures Hakimi Ahmad, Mr. Lectures

3164 5397 5906 2883 3162 3163 2812 3161 2836 2881 2811 3170 2805 4525 5396 5925 2809 5027 5235 3185 3970 3171 5907 3314

lriza@usm.my mazran@usm.my azree@usm.my hanizun@usm.my myahaya@usm.my mzailan@usm.my zaid_ysf@usm.my norazmawati@usm.my norazam@usm.my norzarifah@usm.my norizal@usm.my nfaisal@usm.my razam@usm.my roslantalib@usm.my ruhizal@usm.my radhi.ismail@gmail.com shardy@usm.my syarmilahany@usm.my mariah@usm.my osyeoh@usm.my zulosm@usm.my azaki@usm.my arhafadz@gmail.com kimi@usm.my

Mohd Najib Mohd Salleh, Ar. Lectures Norhidayah Md Ulang, Dr. Lectures Zalena Abd. Aziz, Ar. * Lectures Zulkarnain Harun, Dato Ar* Lectures * Contract Lecturers

4207 5938 3184 -

najib@usm.my norhidayah.mu@usm.my zaa_sb@yahoo.com.my Zulh59@yahoo.com

2.0 2.1

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE/CURRICULUM Bachelor of Science (Housing, Building and Planning)

The School of Housing, Building and Planning (HBP) offers a curriculum that is unique amongst programmes of advanced education dealing with the built environment. Whereas curricula in architecture, quantity surveying, engineering or planning are generally based upon a professional training in one of these disciplines, the School eschews professional specialism in favour of a broadly based education cutting across both professional and disciplinary boundaries. As such, it is more correct to describe the broad focus of education at the School as a field of knowledge and skills, rather than the more narrowly focused concept of a single discipline. The students of HBP therefore draw upon many different disciplines during the course of their studies, in so far as they are all relevant to the activities of housing, building and planning. Both the structure and content of the Schools curriculum reflect the main aim of the School to develop integrative and creative skills across a broad spectrum of knowledge and activities dealing with built environment. The structure of the curriculum is based upon the unit system, whereby the individual student exercises a considerable degree of choice in arranging his/her own programme of studies, so long as he/she satisfies the minimum and maximum requirements for units to be taken in each subject area and course. In addition to the considerable latitude afforded by the unit system, in their second and third year of study, all students have the opportunity to major in one of a number of optional programmes, each dealing with a particular emphasis on Architecture, Interior Design, Urban and Regional Planning, Building Technology, Construction Management, Quantity Surveying and Building Surveying. Studio projects are the keystone of the curriculum providing the essential creative exercises by which all students, no matter their individual programmes, learn to integrate the many diverse skills and forms of knowledge that comprise the total field of housing, building and planning. Studio projects also provide the most important objective test of each students proficiency and creativity. Further integration is provided by the special treatment given to the teaching of theory and methodology in the School. Rather than treating theory and methodology as separate from each other and from other subjects, the School takes the position that all subjects have a theoretical and a methodology component, to be dealt with as an integral part of each subject area. Both theory and practice are therefore identified in the curriculum as mutually inter related components, cutting across and occurring at all levels of the curriculum. These theoretical and practical components are grouped in the curriculum according to the following categories: 1. Courses in theory and methodology 2. Studio projects 3. Laboratory projects 4. Practical training 5. Research

10

Appendix A shows the summary of curriculum in the programme 2.2 Bachelor of Architecture Programme

Bachelor of Science (HBP)

The Bachelor of Architecture (B.Arch) Programme in the School of HBP is unique among courses offering LAM Part II accreditation. This is a continuation of Bachelor of Science HBP (Architecture) or a similar Degree from other local universities or abroad with LAM Part I or equivalent. In addition to training future architects to be competent in exploring the design process and related skills vital to a professional architect, it also provides opportunities for students to conduct a special area of study touching on contemporary issues such as sustainability, special technologies, conservation or other areas of special interests. The course comprises of two years where the first year aims at exposing students to a housing design of unique nature as a human settlement concept and also multi-storey building design with emphasis on technological aspects, as the two major projects. Students are also expected to explore smaller projects of different variety, sites context and scale. In the final year students are expected to do an independent design thesis study of a challenging typology that suits their interest and touches on wider architectural issues. An important element of the design is the energy efficient consideration as one of the objectives to produce future designers who are energy conscious, forward thinking and sensitive at exploring architecture design within an array of contemporary issues and styles. The pre-requisite to enter the course is to have undergone a total duration of 6 months practical training (can be in two consecutive training 3 months & 3 months). The path to Bachelor of Architecture that is offered by the School of HBP is as shown below: Bachelor of Science (HBP) (Architecture) 3 years (Awarded LAM Part I) Bachelor in Architecture from other recognised universities (LAM Part I)

4th Year

5th Year

Bachelor of Architecture (Awarded LAM Part II)

11

2.3

Study Path at The School of HBP

The study path of students from undergraduate to postgraduate level at the School of HBP is summarised as below:
STPM (SCIENCE & ARTS) DIPLOMA RELATED TO BUILT ENVIRONMENT

MATRICULATION SCIENCE

SPECIAL INTAKE

(Intake into Architecture, Quantity Surveying and Interior Design through interview) YEAR 1 Multi Disciplinary Courses in Housing, Building and Planning (Design Courses) (Multi Disciplinary Courses)

YEAR 2

Architecture

Interior Design

Urban & Regional Planning

Construction Management

Building Technology

Quantity Surveying

Building Surveying

Practical Training (12 Weeks)

YEAR 3

Architecture

Interior Design

Urban & Regional Planning

Construction Management

Building Technology

Quantity Surveying

Building Surveying

Bachelor of Science (Housing, Building and Planning)(Hons)

YEAR 4
and

Bachelor of Architecture

YEAR 5

MSc in Landscape Architecture (Practical Training: 10 weeks)

MSc in Planning (Practical Training: 10 weeks)

MSc in Project Management

MSc in Housing

MSc in Building Technology

MSc in Tourism Development

MSc by Coursework

MSc and Ph.D by Research in Built Environment

12

2.4

Unit Requirement

Unit requirement for graduation is as follows:(A) Bachelor of Science (Housing, Building and Planning with Honours) (3 years). B.Sc. (HBP) Programme Core Courses Elective Courses University Courses Total (B) Bachelor of Architecture (Additional 2 years) The programme is an additional 2 years course from the normal HBP course which stream-line towards the degree of Architecture. B.Arch. Programme Core Courses Electives Courses Additional remedial courses of 12 units required (for non-BSc HBP (Architecture) graduate) Total 2.5 Course Duration Period Minimum semesters Maximum semesters B.Sc. (HBP) 6 10 B.Arch. 4 6 Units 57 12 Units 72 36 19 127

69

13

2.6

Studio Courses

Studio courses are mandatory for all students to pass, i.e. with achievements of Grade C and above. Students obtaining Grade C- and below will be required to repeat the course.
CORE COURSES (14 Units) Code Title RUS 104/7 - Integrated Studio I RUS 105/7 - Integrated Studio 2 Code RMS RMS RMS RMS Code RES RES RES RES Code RDS RDS RDS RDS Code RAS RAS RAS RAS Code RPS RPS RPS RPS Title - Management Studio 1 - Management Studio 2 - Management Studio 3 - Management Studio 4 Title Building Technology Studio 1 Building Technology Studio 2 Building Technology Studio 3 Building Technology Studio 4 Title Interior Design Studio 1 Interior Design Studio 2 Interior Design Studio 3 Interior Design Studio 4 Title Architecture Studio 1 Architecture Studio 2 Architecture Studio 3 Architecture Studio 4 Title Urban and Regional Planning Studio 1 Urban and Regional Planning Studio 2 Urban and Regional Planning Studio 3 Urban and Regional Planning Studio 4

OR

RUS 106/7 - Design Studio

CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT (28 Units) 201/7 202/7 303/7 304/7

BUILDING TECHNOLOGY (28 Units) 201/7 202/7 303/7 304/7 -

INTERIOR DESIGN (28 Units) 201/7 202/7 301/7 302/7 -

ARCHITECTURE (28 Units) 203/7 204/7 305/7 306/7 -

URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING (28 Units) 201/7 202/7 303/7 304/7 -

QUANTITY SURVEYING (28 Units) Code Title RQS 201/7 - Quantity Surveying Studio 1 RQS 202/7 - Quantity Surveying Studio 2 RQS 303/7 - Quantity Surveying Studio 3 RQS 304/7 - Quantity Surveying Studio 4 BUILDING SURVEYING (28 Units) Code RBS RBS RBS RBS 203/7 204/7 305/7 306/7 Title Building Surveying Studio 1 Building Surveying Studio 2 Building Surveying Studio 3 Building Surveying Studio 4

14

2.7 2.7.1

List of Courses Construction Management Programme

A. Core Courses (72 Units) Code and Title Unit RUS 104 - Integrated Studio I 7 RUS 105 - Integrated Studio 2 7 RAG 121 - Environmental Science 1 3 RPG 131 - Applied Quantitative Methods 3 RAG 132 - Introduction to Built Environment & Human Settlement 3 RMK 153 - Principles of Construction Economics 3 RAG 161 - Building Construction I 3 REG 162 - Introduction to Structures 3 RMS 201 - Management Studio I 7 RMS 202 - Management Studio 2 7 RMK 231 - Building and Civil Engineering Quantities 3 RMK 252 - Principles of Project Management 3 RUL 274 - Compulsory Practical Training 6 RMS 303 - Management Studio 3 7 RMS 304 - Management Studio 4 7 B. Elective Courses (36 units) Code and Title REG 232 - Land Surveying* RMK 232 - Pricing And Estimating* RMK 254 - Legal Studies* REG 261 - Building Services RAG 265 - Building Construction 2 RMK 336 - Valuation* RMK 350 - Administrative Law RMK 353 - Property Management RMK 354 - Construction Law* RMK 362 - Construction and Finance Management 1* RMK 364 - Construction and Finance Management 2* RMK 357 - Land Administration* RMK 363 - Construction Economics* REG 361 - Methods of Construction* REG 360 - Industrialised Building System
* Recommended courses

Semester 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 2 1&2 1 2

Unit 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Semester 1 2 1 2 2 2 1 1 2 1 2 2 1 1 1

15

2.7.2

Building Technology Programme

A. Core Courses (72 Units)


Code and Title Unit Semester

RUS RUS RMK RAG REG RES RES REG REG REG RUL RES RES REG REG

104 105 153 161 162 201 202 232 261 262 274 303 304 361 367

Integrated Studio I Integrated Studio 2 Principles of Construction Economics Building Construction I Introduction to Structures Building Technology Studio 1 Building Technology Studio 2 Land Surveying Building Services Structural Design Compulsory Practical Training Building Technology Studio 3 Building Technology Studio 4 Methods of Construction Design of Concrete Structures

7 7 3 3 3 7 7 3 3 3 6 7 7 3 3

1 2 1 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 1&2 1 2 1 2

B. Elective Courses (36 units)


Code and Title Unit Semester

RAG RPG RAG RMK RMK REG RMK REG REG REG REG REG REL RMK RMK RMK RMK

121 131 132 231 232 265 252 370 363 360 368 369 370 354 362 364 363

Environmental Science I* Applied Quantitative Methods* Introduction to Built Environment & Human Settlement* Building and Civil Engineering Quantities Pricing And Estimating Infrastructure Technology* Principles of Project Management* Building Forensic and Maintenance* Site Investigation* Industrialised Building System* Road and Transportation* Steel Structure Building Technology Studies* Construction Law Construction and Finance Management 1 Construction and Finance Management 2 Construction Economics

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

1 2 1 1 2 1 2 2 1 1 1 2 2 2 1 2 1

* Recommended courses

16

2.7.3

Quantity Surveying Programme

A. Core Courses (72 Units) Code and Title RUS 104 - Integrated Studio I RUS 105 - Integrated Studio 2 RAG 121 - Environmental Science I RAG 161 - Building Construction I REG 162 - Introduction to Structures RQS 201 - Quantity Surveying Studio I RQS 202 - Quantity Surveying Studio 2 RQG 236 - Measurement 1 RQG 237 - Measurement 2 RQK 255 - Professional Practice for Quantity Surveyors RQK 259 - Cost and Value Management 1 RUL 274 - Compulsory Practical Training RQS 303 - Quantity Surveying Studio 3 RQS 304 - Quantity Surveying Studio 4 RQL 370 - Quantity Surveying Studies Unit 7 7 3 3 3 7 7 3 3 3 3 6 7 7 3 Semester 1 2 1 1 2 1 2 1 2 2 1 1&2 1 2 2

B. Elective Courses (36 units) Code and Title Unit RPG 131 - Applied Quantitative Methods* 3 RAG 132 - Introduction to Built Environment & Human Settlement* 3 RMK 153 - Principles of Construction Economics* 3 RMK 252 - Principles of Project Management* 3 RMK 254 - Legal Studies* 3 REG 232 - Land Surveying* 3 REG 261 - Building Services* 3 RAG 265 - Building Construction 2* 3 REG 265 - Infrastructure Technology * 3 RMK 353 - Property Management 3 RMK 354 - Construction Law * 3 RQG 359 - Cost and Value Management 2* 3 REG 361 - Methods of Construction 3 REG 370 - Building Forensic and Maintenance 3 Semester 2 1 1 2 1 1 2 2 1 1 2 2 1 2

* Recommended courses

17

2.7.4

Urban and Regional Planning Programme

A. Core Courses (72 units) Code and Title Unit RUS 104 - Integrated Studio I 7 RUS 106 - Design Studio 7 RAG 121 - Environmental Science I 3 RPG 131 - Applied Quantitative Methods 3 RAG 132 - Introduction to Built Environment & Human Settlement 3 RPS 201 - Urban and Regional Planning Studio 1 7 RPS 202 - Urban and Regional Planning Studio 2 7 RPK 231 - Principles of Planning 3 RPK 233 - Methods of Planning Analysis 3 RPG 235 - Geographic Information System and Computer Aided 3 Design for Planning RUL 274 - Compulsory Practical Training 6 RPS 303 - Urban and Regional Planning Studio 3 7 RPS 304 - Urban and Regional Planning Studio 4 7 RPK 343 - Social Aspects in Planning 3 RPK 351 - Urban and Regional Economics 3 B. Elective Courses (36 units) Code and Title RMK 153 - Principles of Construction Economics* RAG 161 - Building Construction I* REG 162 - Introduction to Structures* RPK 222 - Conservation* REG 232 - Land Surveying* RMK 252 - Principles of Project Management* REG 265 - Infrastructure Technology* RPK 321 - Landscape Planning* RPK 323 - Tourism Planning and Development* RPK 332 - Urban Design* RPK 334 - Traffic Planning* RMK 336 - Valuation RMK 357 - Land Administration* RAK 345 - Housing Studies Unit 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Semester 1 1 2 2 1 2 1 1 2 2 1 2 2 2 Semester 1 2 1 2 1 1 2 1 2 2 1&2 1 2 2 1

Recommended courses

18

2.7.5

Interior Design Programme

A. Core Courses (72 units) Code and Title RUS RUS RAG RDS RDS RAG RDG REG RDG RUL RDS RDS RDG RDG RDG 104 106 161 201 202 234 235 261 262 274 301 302 334 336 366 Integrated Studio I Design Studio Building Construction I Interior Design Studio 1 Interior Design Studio 2 Computer Aided Design for Architecture Ergonomics Building Services Interior Design Lighting Compulsory Practical Training Interior Design Studio 3 Interior Design Studio 4 Theory and History of Design Professional Practice for Interior Design Furniture Design Unit 7 7 3 7 7 3 3 3 3 6 7 7 3 3 3 Semester 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 1&2 1 2 1 2 2

B. Elective Courses (36 units) Code and Title Unit Semester RAG 121 - Environmental Science I* 3 1 RPG 131 - Applied Quantitative Methods* 3 2 RAG 132 - Introduction to Built Environment & Human Settlement* 3 1 RMK 153 - Principles of Construction Economics* 3 1 REG 162 - Introduction to Structures* 3 2 RDB 217 - Exhibition and Display* 3 2 RAK 232 - Principles of Architectural Design 3 1 RMK 252 - Principles of Project Management* 3 2 RDG 313 - Design Workshop* 3 1 RDB 314 - Design Management 3 2 RDG 323 - Design Presentation Techniques* 3 2 RAG 333 - Advanced Computer Aided Architecture Design* 3 1 RAK 345 - Housing Studies 3 2 * Recommended courses

19

2.7.6

Architecture Programme

A. Core Courses (72 units) Code and Title Unit Semester RUS 104 - Integrated Studio I 7 1 RUS 106 - Design Studio 7 2 RAG 121 - Environmental Science I 3 1 RAG 132 - Introduction to Built Environment & Human Settlement 3 1 RAG 161 - Building Construction I 3 1 REG 162 - Introduction to Structures 3 2 RAS 203 - Architectural Studio 1 7 1 RAS 204 - Architectural Studio 2 7 2 RAK 232 - Principles of Architecture Design 3 1 RAG 265 - Building Construction 2 3 2 RAK 344 - History and Theory in Architecture 1 3 2 RUL 274 - Compulsory Practical Training 6 1&2 RAS 305 - Architectural Studio 3 7 1 RAS 306 - Architectural Studio 4 7 2 RAK 346 - History and Theory in Architecture 2 3 1 B. Elective Courses (36 units) Code and Title RMK 153 - Principles of Construction Economics* RAG 232 - Architectural Working Drawing & Documentation* RAG 234 - Computer Aided Design for Architecture* RMK 252 - Principles of Project Management* REG 261 - Building Services* REG 262 - Structural Design* RAG 322 - Environmental Sains 2* RAG 333 - Advanced Computer Aided Architecture Design* RAK 345 - Housing Studies* RMK 354 - Construction Law * REG 360 - Industrialised Building System* RAL 371 - Measured Drawing*
* Recommended courses

Unit Semester 3 1 3 1 3 1 3 2 3 2 3 1 3 2 3 1 3 2 3 2 3 1 3 1

20

2.7.7

Building Surveying Programme

A. Core Courses (72 units) Code and Title Unit Semester RUS 104 - Integrated Studio I 7 1 RUS 105 - Integrated Studio 2 7 2 RAG 121 - Environmental Science I 3 1 RPG 131 - Applied Quantitative Methods 3 2 RAG 132 - Introduction to Built Environment & Human Settlement 3 1 RMK 153 - Principles of Construction Economics 3 1 RAG 161 - Building Construction I 3 1 REG 162 - Introduction to Structures 3 2 RBS 203 - Building Surveying Studio 1 7 1 RBS 204 - Building Surveying Studio 2 7 2 RBK 231 - Principle of Building Surveying 3 1 RUL 274 - Compulsory Practical Training 6 1&2 RBS 305 - Building Surveying Studio 3 7 1 RBS 306 - Building Surveying Studio 4 7 2 RBK 351 - Professional Practice for Building Surveyor 3 2 B. Elective Courses (36 units)
Code and Title Unit Semester

RPK REG RQG RQG RMK REG REG REG RAG RMK RBG RMK REG REG REG RBL

222 232 236 237 252 261 265 262 322 336 351 354 361 362 363 371

Conservation* Land Surveying* Measurement 1* Measurement 2* Principles of Project Management* Building Services* Infrastructure Technology* Structural Design Environmental Science 2 Valuation* Building Mantenance* Construction Law Methods of Construction* Building Forensic and Maintenance* Site Investigation Building Surveying Studies*

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

2 2 1 2 2 2 1 2 2 2 1 2 1 2 2 2

Recommended courses

21

2.7.8

Bachelor of Architecture Programme

A. Core Courses Code and Title RAS 403 - Architecture Studio 5 RAS 404 - Architecture Studio 6 RAT 430 - Energy Efficient Building Design Technology RAS 503 - Architecture Studio 7 RAS 504 - Architecture Studio 8 RAK 552 - Professional Practice in Architecture RAG 562 - Building Technology RUL 574 - Dissertation Unit Semester 8 1 8 2 3 1 12 1 12 2 3 2 3 1 8 1&2 57

B. Elective Courses (Choose 12 units only) Code and Title RPK 332 - Urban Design RMK 363 - Construction Economics I REG 361 - Methods of Construction RHS 505 - Law and Housing RPK 535 - Regional and Rural Planning REG 562 - Building Services Technology Unit Semester 3 2 3 1 3 1 3 2 3 2 4 1 12

C. Remedial Courses (only for non-BSc (HBP) (Architecture) graduate) (12 units) Code and Title RAG 232 - Architectural Working Drawing and Documentation RAG 265 - Building Construction 2 RAG 322 - Environmental Science 2 RPK 332 - Urban Design (Requisite for Bachelor of Architecture is 69 units) Unit Semester 3 2 3 2 3 2 3 2 12

22

C. Course Structure for Year 4 and Year 5


YEAR 4 1. 2. 1st Semester RAS 403 - Architecture Studio 5 RAT 430 - Energy Efficient Building Design Technology RMK 363 - Constructions Economic REG 361 - Methods of Construction REG 562 - Building Services Technology 1st Semester RAS 503 - Architecture Studio 7 RAG 562 - Building Technology RUL 574 - Dissertation Unit 8 3 2nd Semester RAS 404 - Architecture Studio 6 RPK 535 - Regional and Rural Planning RHS 505 - Housing Law Unit 8 3

3. 4. 5.

3 3 4 21

14 2nd Semester RAS 504 - Architecture Studio 8 RUL 574 - Dissertation RAK 552 - Professional Practice in Architecture Unit 12 3 16

YEAR 5 1. 2. 3.

Unit 12 3 4 19

23

2.8 2.8.1

Course Synopsis Common Studios and Practical Training

RUS 104 Integrated Studio 1 This course exposes the basic elements used in designs. Students are transdisciplinary guided to come up with spatial designs based on design elements learned from exercising projects either individual or in groups. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Explore on design elements (C3, CTPS) (ii) Reproduce spaces spatial using design elements (P3, TS) (iii) Explain the applied design elements (A3, CS) Reference 1. Laseau, P. (2001). Graphic Thinking For Architects & Designers 3rd Edition. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc 2. Mills, C. (2000). Designing With Models: A Studio Guide To Making And Using Architectural Design Models. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 3. Ching, F.D.K. (1996). Architecture: Form, Space & Order. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 4. Lin, Mike W. (1993). Drawing And Designing With Confidence: A Step-By-Step Guide. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. RUS 105 Integrated Studio 2 This course emphasizes on the overall building property process application. This comprises of development, planning, tender supply process and its implementation. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Prepare proposal of properties development concept in detail (C3, CTPS). (ii) Produce suitable method of properties development and determine its suitability for planning works which alliance with project requirements (P3, CTPS). (iii) Report findings in collective way reagarding the properties development which suitable with the propose location. (A3, TS, CS) References 1. Cartlidge, D. (2002). New Aspects of Quantity Surveying Practice. London : Butterworth Heinemann 2. Nor Aini Yusof (1996). Penilaian dan Pembangunan Projek. Pulau Pinang: Penerbit USM 3. Abu Hassan Abu Bakar (1993). Pengurusan Projek Binaan. Pulau Pinang: Penerbit USM 4. Illingworth, J.R. (1993). Construction Methods and Planning. London: E & FN Spon 24

RUS 106 Design Studio The content of the course focuses on the process of design based on the requirement of function, aesthetic and technology. It focuses on environmentally friendly planning and sustainable and emphasises the process of data collection, site analysis and synthesis. Students are trained to design a small project on a real-life site not exceeding 2-storey height. It introduces students to the basic understanding of concept design, construction technology such as the integration of structure, materials and environmental aspects. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) To prepare proposed conceptual design dan report proposed development on a detailed smaller scale based on planning and design process, procedure and guidelines(C3, CTPS) (ii) To produce an appropriate design for a construction and to identify the appropriate function, aesthetics and technology towards project requirments based on site analysis, space hierarchy and requirements pertaining to form and space. (P3, CTPS) (iii) Report and present project findings individually or in groups relating to understanding towards appropriate design concept and planning proposed. (A3, TS, CS) References 1. Lin, Mike W. (1993). Drawing and designing with confidence: A step-by-step Guide. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 2. Ching, F.D.K. (1996). Architecture: Form, Space & Order. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 3. Laseau, P. (2001). Graphic thinking for architects & designers 3rd edition. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 4. Mills, C. (2000). Designing with models: a studio guide to making and using architectural design models. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 5. Ibrahim, Wahab (1991), Perancangan Bandar: Aspek Fizikal dan Kawalan Pembangunan, Kuala Lumpur: Dewan Bahasa dan Budaya. 6. Doyle, M.E. (1999). Color drawing: design drawing skills and techniques for architect, landscape architects and interior designers 2nd edition. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 7. Kasprisin, R. (1999). Design media: techniques for watercolor, pen & ink, pastel and colored marker. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

RUL 274 Compulsary Practical Training This course emphasizes on compulsory practical training to students regarding the practicing professional in related fields.

25

Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Identify tasks assign by firm or organization in professional ways (C4, EM) (ii) Display the ability to solve problems base on working field (P4, CTPS) (iii) Solve relevant design issues via teamwork (A4, TS)

26

2.8.2

Courses in Construction Management

RMK 153 Principles Of Construction Economics This course emphasizes on market structure,supply and demand in marketing building industry. It intriduces the economic concepts; main economic problems; demand, supply and market equilibrium; economic structure; cost and production are also being discussed. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Demonstrate the ability to relate economic principles to the construction industry market (C3, CTPS). (ii) Reproduce economic development models based on current situations (P3, CTPS). (iii) Study the problems within the construction industry based on the volatility of the economy system (A3, CTPS) (iv) Report the findings on the relationship between economy and the construction industry (A3, LL, CS) References: 1. Abdullah, F. (2004), Construction Industry & Economic Development : The Malaysia Scene, Penerbit UTM, Johor 2. Warren, M (1993). Economics for the Built Environment, Butterworth Heinemann, Great Britain 3. Ruddock, L. (1992). Economics For Construction And Property, Edward Arnold, Great Britain. 4. Beardshaw, J. (1992), Economics: A Students Guide, Elbs Pitman

RMS 201 Management Studio 1 This foundation course is a studio based environment where students will be first introduced to the mainstay of project management which consist of the basic elements of project development. Students will be exposed to the different phases of the construction project as well as key elements of the process of managing projects. The studio will enable students to work within groups and/or individually to get a feel of the actual project team environment. This core subject will also delve into the internal and external factors that weight into project development and how these factors co-exist within the project environment. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: i) Discover the basic elements of project management and development (C3) ii) Organize the appropriate methods and to determine their suitability within the basic elements of project management and development (P4,CTPS)

27

iii) Propose and present study findings on the basic elements of project management and development (A3, CTPS) iv) Report group study findings on the basic elements within the aspects of project management and development (A3, TS) v) Explain, report and evaluate project development processes (A3, CS) References 1. Housing Development Act (Revised) 2007 2. Uniform Building By-Laws (Revised) 2007 3. Laws Relating to Housing & Construction in Malaysia (1998). MDC Publishers 4. Kamarudin Mohd. Ali (1993). Tender dan Kontrak Untuk Pembinaan, DBP. 5. Ibrahim Wahab (1985). Garispanduan dan Kriteria Untuk Perancangan, Penerbit USM.

RMS 202 Management Studio 2 This is the continuation of the foundation courses where students will be introduced to the costing processes, which consist of the basic elements of costing and estimating. Students will be exposed to the different types of the costing of projects. This course will be organised in two parts. Part One will expose students to the work of quantity surveyor in preparing taking off and bills of quantities. Part Two involves with pricing techniques used by contractors in pricing the tender documents. The studio will enable students to work within groups and/or individually to get a feel of the actual project team environment. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: i) Discover estimation concepts as well as preparing construction project development costs (C3) ii) Organize the appropriate methods of property development and to determine their suitability towards the preparation of construction project development cost estimates (P4,CTPS) iii) Propose and present study findings on the appropriate cost estimates for the projects studied (A3, CTPS) iv) Report group study findings on the appropriate cost estimates for the case study projects (A3, CTPS) v) Explain, report and evaluate project development processes (A3, CS) References 1. Ahamad Abdullah (2006). Anggaran Kos Kerja Bangunan. Pearson, Prentice Hall: Malaysia 2. Abdullah, A. dan Abdul Rashid, K. (2003). Pengukuran Kuantiti Bangunan. Pearson, Prentice Hall: Malaysia

28

3 4.

Malaysian Standard Method of Measurement of Building Works. Second Edition (2000). Petaling Jaya: The Institute of Surveyor, Malaysia Kamaruddin Mohd Ali (1993). Tender dan Kontrak untuk Pembinaan. Dewan Bahasa dan Pustaka, Malaysia

RMK 231 Building and Civil Engineering Quantities This course introduces the students to quantity measurement for building and civil engineering works based on SMM2 and CESMM measurement standards. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Prepare quantity measurements for buildings and civil engineering works using the standard measurement methods of SMM2 and CESMM (C3) (ii) Measure each element of building and civil engineering works in detail in order to be able to measure each quantity precisely (P4,CTPS) (iii) Share and join other students in collecting the necessary information towards producing quantity measurement works ( A3,TS) References: 1. The Institution of Surveyors (2000), Malaysian Standard Method of Measurement of Building Works 2nd edition, Petaling Jaya: ISM Malaysia. 2. CESMM 3. Rosli Abd Rashid (1996), Pengenalan Ukur Kuantiti Binaan, Kuala Lumpur: Dewan Bahasa dan Pustaka. 4. Chudley, R. (1988), Building Construction Handbook, Oxford : Heinemann Newnes 5. Snape W.C. (1980), Measurement of Construction Work, 2nd Ed., London: Godwin Limited

RMK 232 Pricing And Estimating This course introduces the students to detailed elemental measurement techniques for building works in contractors organisation. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Prepare pricing and estimating elements for main building works (C3) (ii) Assemble each building element in detail in order to prepare a precise estimation for all quantities (P4,CTPS) (iii) Share and join other students in obtaining the necessary information in producing up-to-date and detailed elemental measurement works (A3,TS)

29

References 1. B. Spain and Partners (1990). Spons Budget Estimating Handbook. E & F.N. Spon 2. Bentley, J.I.W. (1987). Construction Tendering and Estimating. Spon, London 3. Braid, S.R. (1984). Importance of Estimating Handbook, CIB, Ascot, Berks. 4. Lewis, J.R. (1983). Basic Construction Estimating. Prentice Hall 5. Peuritory, R.L. (2002). Estimating Construction Costs. 5th Ed. McGraw-Hill

RMK 252 Principles of Project Management This course discusses on managing the construction industry encompassing the methods of basic planning, monitoring and controlling use a in project management. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Differentiate the various basic concepts within the aspects of management and organization (C4) (ii) Manipulate the organizational objectives and structure as well as to identify the organizational environment (P4,CTPS) (iii) Explain the psycho-social aspects of management and organization (A3, CS) (iv) Demonstrate the methods of project management (A3, CS) References 1. Levy, Sidney M. (2002). Project Management in Construction, 4th Ed. McGraw-Hill Professional 2. Hillebrandt, P. and Cannon, J. (1994), The Management of Construction Firms Aspects of Theory. The Macmillan Press Ltd. 3. Daft, R.K. (1993). Management. 3rd Ed. The Dryden Press 4. Helreigel, D., Slocum, W. (1992). Management, 6th Ed. Addision-Wesly Pub. Co. RMK 254 Legal Studies In this course, students are exposed to the Malaysian legal system, laws that are relevant to construction projects, criminal law, law of contract, company law, partnership law and of torts. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Demonstrate the elements of the Malaysian legal system (C3) (ii) Organize the legal conflicts and problems related to construction projects (P4,CTPS) (iii) Demonstrate and apply the relevant legal provisions in the construction process (A3, EM) (iv) Propose and review the current and most appropriate legal provisions in line with company and partnership laws as well as the Laws of Tort (A3, LL)

30

References 1. Abdul Aziz Hussin , (2009), Pengenalan Kepada Undang-Undang Kontrak. Edisi Ke-2, Kuala Lumpur : Dewan Bahasa dan Pustaka 2. Abdul Rashid Ab. Aziz & Ab. Aziz Hussin, (2000). Aspek Undang-Undang Tort Dalam Projek Pembinaan : Pulau Pinang, Penerbit USM. 3. Beatson, J. (1998). Ansons Law of Contract, (1998), 27th Edition. Oxford : Oxford University Press. 4. Clerk & Lindsell on The Law of Torts. (1982), 5th Edition, London: Sweet and Maxwell Limited

RMS 303 Management Studio 3 An appreciation of the needs of preliminary studies in property development and the integration of multi disciplinary member in the process. Students are required to apply various principle and techniques of quantity surveying management, economics, facilities management, property valuation and project management in various projects, seminars and case studies. Project given are based on pre-contract and post-occupation periods covering preparation of feasibility studies, market studies, and legal aspects of property development and facility management. Students are introduced to the actual approach of conducting these studies on site. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Discover the concepts of property development and management (C3) (ii) Organize the appropriate property development and management methods as well as to determine their suitability towards preparing an accurate management report (P4,CTPS) (iii) Propose and present study findings on suitable property development and management methods based on the sites of the case study projects (A3, CS) (iv) Report group study findings on the practical property development and management approaches based on the site locations of the projects studied (A3, TS) References 1. The Aqua Group (1999). Tenders and Contracts for Building. Blackwell Publishing 2. Law Relating to Housing and Construction in Malaysia (1998). MDC Publishers 3. Kamarudin Mohd Ali (1993). Tender dan Kontrak untuk Pembinaan. Dewan Bahasa dan Pustaka 4. Abdul Hakin Mohamad dan Wan Min Wan Mat (1991). Teknologi Penyenggaraan Bangunan. Dewan Bahasa dan Pustaka

31

RMS 304 Management Studio 4 This studio based foundation course is tailored to enable students to apply their knowledge in a practical approach with focus on property development and management. Students will be required to use actual real life study cases as their references in applying management techniques and tools. Students will also be exposed to the legal aspects of property development as well as financial costing and analysis. The course will also expose students to actual project site planning and organization with emphasis on management and problem solving. Students will also be introduced to project management planning and scheduling software. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: i) Discover the practical management concepts and techniques of actual construction projects (C3) ii) Organize the appropriate methods and to determine their practical suitability within the management of actual construction projects (P4,CTPS) iii) Propose and present study findings on practical management of actual construction projects (A3, CS) iv) Report group study findings on practical management aspects of actual construction projects (A3, TS) References 1. The Aqua Group (1999). Tenders and Contracts for Building, Blackwell Publishing 2. Laws Relating to Housing & Construction in Malaysia (1998). MDC Publishers 3. Abdul Hakim Mohamad & Wan Min Wan Mat (1991). Teknologi Penyenggaraan Bangunan, DBP. 4. Walker, A. (1989). Project Management in Construction, 2nd Edition, BSP Professional Book

RMK 336 Valuation This course introduces the students to the basic concept of valuation which covers the concept of value, the economic basis of property valuation, valuation and investment principles and factors affecting property value. Emphasis is given on the five valuation methods and their application to the main types of property and also valuation for legal purposes. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: i) Distinguish and explain the factors that influence property value based on the different types of properties (C2) ii) Explain the principles and fundamentals related to the field of valuation (P2, CTPS)

32

iii) Demonstrate and explain the use of financial mathematical formulas involved in calculating property values based on specific valuation methods (A3, CTPS) iv) Identify and use the appropriate valuation methods according to the different types and purposes of property valuation (A1, EM) References 1. Eldred, G.W. (2002). Value Investing in Real Estate. John Wiley & Sons Ltd. 2. Scarrett, Douglas (1991). Property Valuation; the Five Methods. London. E & F.N. 3. Spon Isaac, D. and Steley, Terry (1991). Property Valuation Techniques. MacMillan 4. Millington, A.F. (1978). An Introduction to Property Valuation. Estate Gazette

RMK 350 Administrative Law This course exposes the students to the aspect of power/authority and the use of power (including power based on self-consideration), organization and local government control, laws that are related to housing and planning control, laws related to meetings (including all types of project meetings) and administration power of the land administrator in the processes of land acquisition and procurement. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: i) Analyze the elements of administrative law (C4) ii) Study and solve problems relating to administrative law within the construction context (A3, CTPS) iii) Share and apply the approaches discovered through the study of problems related to administrative law in construction (A3, EM) iv) Report and review the aspects of administrative law in the construction industry (A3, LL) References 1. Abdul Aziz Hussin (2004). Aspek Undang-Undang dalam Pengurusan Projek Pembinaan. Pulau Pinang: Penerbit USM 2. Abdul Aziz Hussin (2004). Pembangunan Harta Tanah: Perundangan dan Prosedur Pengurusan. Pulau Pinang: Penerbit USM 3. Abdul Aziz Hussin, Wan Hazimah Wan Hariri dan Nazri Zakaria (2004). Setinggan: Isu Pengurusan, Undang-Undang dan Pembangunan Harta Tanah. Pulau Pinang: Penerbit USM 4. Abdul Aziz Hussin (2002). Undang-Undang dalam Pengambilan dan Pemerolehan Tanah. Kuala Lumpur: Dewan Bahasa dan Pustaka

33

RMK 363 Construction Economics This course encompasses cost estimation, control and management in the design and construction process. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Point out the importnance of the construction industry as well as its related processes (C4) (ii) Organize the theories and principles practised by all professionals within the construction industry in relation to construction economics (P4, CTPS) (iii) Study the comparison between the different techniques practised in construction economics (A3, EM) (iv) Demonstrate the aspects of construction project economic viability/feasibility (A3, KK) References 1. Ferry, D.J. et.al (1999), Cost Planning of Buildings (7th Edition), Blackwell Science. 2. Seeley, Ivor H (1996), Building Economies (4th Edition), MacMillan. 3. Ashworth Allan (1994), Cost Studies of Building (2nd Edition), Longman 4. Brandon, P.S. et. al (1992) Quantity Surveying Techniques New Directions, Blackwell Science.

RMK 353 Property Management This course introduces a diverse range of topics in the property management profession. These include the functions of property management, property market and legislations that influence the profession. Operational aspects like the elements of leasing; acquisition and disposal of property; record keeping and office organisation including the occupants liabilities and real estate marketing techniques are also introduced. Besides that, the maintenance section offers an impact study of design on future building maintenance, the principle and techniques of its administration and management; maintenance budget; methods of systematic maintenance; maintenance process relating to the various building elements; and innovation in building maintenance management. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: i) Distinguish the aspects of the property market as well as the components of property management (C2) ii) Study and solve problems relating to the property market and management (A3, CTPS) iii) Explain and elaborate on the findings of property market and management studies (P2, CTPS)

34

iv) Explain the conditions related to property market and management as well as to suggest methods of improvement according to the current needs of the construction scenario (A3, KK) References 1. Stapleton, T. (1981), Estate Management, Practice, London: Estates Gazette. 2. Thorncroft, M. (1965), Principles of Estate Mangement, London: Estates Gazette. 3. Scarrett, D., (1991), Pengurusan Harta, Kuala Lumpur: DBP. 4. Gurjit Singh (1996), Property Management in Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur: Times. 5. Lee, R., (1987), Building Maintenance Management, Oxford: BSP Professional Books. 6. Palmer, D. (2006), Maintenance Planning and Scheduling Handbook, New York: McGraw-Hill 7. Ivor Seeley (1996), Building Economics 4th. Edition, MacMillan. 8. Norton, B.R. & McElligott, W.C. (1995), Value Management in Construction, MacMillan, 9. Abdul Hakim Mohamad & Wan Min Wan Mat. (1991), Teknologi Penyenggaraan Bangunan, Kuala Lumpur:DBP. 10. Liska, R. & Liska, J. (2001), Building Maintenance Forms, Checklists and Procedures, United State: Prentice Hall. 11. Kelly, A. (2006), Strategic Maintenance Planning, Oxford: Butterworth-Heinemann. 12. Bogan, C. & English, (1994) Benchmarking for Best Practices: Winning Through Innovative Adaptation, New York: McGraw-Hill, Inc.

RMK 354 Construction Law This course discusses building contracts, professionals, workmen compensation, and arbitration pertaining to property development including planning. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Discover the laws pertaining to the construction industry (C3) (ii) Dismantle the problems for each related law (P4,CTPS) (iii) Demonstrate and apply the provisions of law at the work place. (A3, EM) (iv) Explain and review the suitability of current law provisions (A3, LL) References 1. Abdul Aziz Hussin. (2006). Ahli-ahli Profesional Projek Pembinaan, Pulau Pinang: Penerbit Universiti Sains Malaysia. 2. Abdul Aziz Hussin & Abdul Rashid Abdul Aziz, (2001), Undang-undang Pembinaan Bon-bon Gerenti Dalam Kontrak Pembinaan, Pulau Pinang: Penerbit Universiti Sains Malaysia 3. Abdul Aziz Hussin & Abdul Rashid Abdul Aziz, (2000), Aspek Undang-undang Tort Dalam Projek Pembinaan, Pulau Pinang: Penerbit Universiti Sains Malaysia.

35

4.

Abdul Aziz Hussin, (1997), Undang-undang Berkaitan Rahsia Rasmi, Kuala Lumpur:Dewan Bahasa dan Pustaka.

RMK 362 Construction and Finance Management 1 This course introduces the students to the importance and methods of financial analysis in construction. This subject emphasizes on the fundamentals and application of financial management in construction. Students are also exposed to the elements of accounting systems and financial statements as well as the available banking facilities in the market. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: i) Analyze the importance of financial analysis (C4). ii) Organize the implementation of analytical methods of financial management in the construction industry (P4, CTPS) iii) Report the findings of financial analysis within an actual construction industry environment (A3, CS). References 1. Moyer, R.C., McGuigan, J.R. and Rao, R.P. (2007). Fundamental of Contemporary Financial Management. Eagan, Minn: Thomson/ South-Western. 2. Peterson, S.J. (2005). Construction Accounting and Financial Management. Upper Saddle River. New Jersey:.Prentice Hall. 3. Lasher, W.R. (2003). Practical Financial Management. 3rd Edition.Thomson, South-Western, 4. Frank, J. Fabozzzi & Pamela P. Peterson (2003). Financial Management & Analysis. Upper Saddle River. New Jersey: Prentice Hall.

RMK 357 Land Administration This course aims to introduce the students to the current practices of land administration in Malaysia and to give an understanding to them about various issues that are related with land administration especially on its implication to property market and development process. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: i) Identify and understand the basics of the relevant legal system within the scope of the Malaysian land administration (C2). ii) Identify and solve problems pertaining to land administration concerning the property development process (A4, CTPS). iii) Explain and demonstrate the approaches discovered through the study of land administration within the context of property development or construction (A3, TS). 36

iv) Study the compliance to legal provisions related to land administrative matters based on current development process implementation methods (A3, EM). References 1. Jabatan Tanah dan Galian Persekutuan (1980). Buku Panduan Pentadbiran Tanah. 2. Ridzuan Awang (1994). Undang-undang Tanah Islam: Pendekatan Perbandingan. Kuala Lumpur: Dewan Bahasa dan Pustaka. 3. Sihombing, J.E. (1999). National Land Code: A Commentary. Singapore/Kuala Lumpur: Malayan Law Journal. 4. Salleh Buang (2007). Malaysian Torrens System. Kuala Lumpur: Dewan Bahasa dan Pustaka. 5. Teo and Khaw (1995). Land Law in Malaysia; Cases and Commentary.2nd Edition. Malaysia: Butterworth.

RMK 364 Construction and Finance Management 2 This course is a continuation of the previous semesters subject on construction management and finance. The main objective of this subject is to make students understand the impact of finance in construction. Basically this subject is divided into two main sections; which are: 1) Issues relating to organisation, contractual, administration, procurement methods and tendering, project planning and controlling, site management and communication; 2) Issues related to finance in construction management. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: i) Classify the importance of construction and financial management (C4). ii) Organize the implementation of construction and financial management methods within the construction industry (P4, CTPS) iii) Report the findings of the analysis on construction and financial management within the context of the actual construction industry environment (A3, CS). iv) Identify business potentials within construction projects and organizations (A4, KK). References 1. Asry Yusof (1996). Memahami Asas Kewangan. Dewan, Bahasa dan Pustaka 2. B.C. Ghosh (1990). Finance for Managers. Pelanduk Publication 3. Mott, Charles H. (1981). Accounting and Financial Management for Construction. Willey Interscience Series on Construction Management. John Willey and Sons 4. D.J. Leech (1982). Economics & Financial Studies for Engineers. Ellis Horwood Publisher 5. Abdul Rashid Abdul Aziz & Abdul Aziz Hussin (1999). Pengurusan Projek: Perspektif Industri Pembinaan. Penerbit USM 6. Abdul Hakim Mohamed & Ishamuddin Ahmad (1995). Pengurusan Projek Binaan. Dewan Bahasa dan Pustaka 7. Rusdi Mustafa (1992). Pengurusan Projek Pembinaan. Dewan, Bahasa dan Pustaka

37

2.8.3

Courses in Building Technology

REG 162 Introduction of Structures This course comprise of the introduction of basic foundation of statics including concept of forces, distribution of forces, direct forces, moments, combination forces, polygons and triangular forces and equilibrium forces. This course also focuses on building frame structures, trusses using methods of force distribution, etc, in determining shear force, bending moments and deflection of static structure. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Identify the engineering properties of structure in critical way (C4, CTPS). (ii) Calibrate the method of solutions for structure and concepts of bending moment and shear force in beam (P4, CTPS). (iii) Study collectively about the forces in framework, stress in structure and methods of solution. (A3, TS) References: 1. Morgan, W., Williams, D., Durka, F. & Al Nageim, H. (2002). Structural Mechanics: Loads, Analysis, Design and Materials. Prentice Hall. 2. Smith, P. (2001). An Introduction to Structural Mechanics. Palgrave Macmillan. 3. Hulse, R. & Cain. J. (2000). Structural Mechanics. Palgrave Macmillan. 4. Morgan, W. (1996). Elements of Structures, Edited by Burke, I.G. Pitmann.

RES 201 - Building Technology Studio 1 This course emphasizes on laboratory and site tests. Students will be exposed to the knowledge of soil mechanics, building materials, structural testing, analysis and design of structures. Students will also be exposed to technical report preparation. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Explain the characteristics of soil, building material and structure analysis for building construction requirements and problem solving.(C4, CTPS) (ii) Conduct different types of soil test, building material, structure test and correlate with the construction. ( P4, CTPS, LS). (iii) Identify and study test result and prepare technical report according to the requirements of related parties (C4, A3, TS).

38

References 1. Morgan, W. and buckle, I.G. (1987). Elements of Structure: An Introduction to the Principles of Building and Structural Engineering. Longman 2. Neville, A.M. (1997). Properties of Concrete, 4th Edition. Prentice Hall 3. Mahyuddin Ramli (1992). Pengujian Bahan dan Struktur. Dewan Bahasa dan Pustaka. 4. Smith, G.N. (1982). Elements of Soil Mechanics for Civil and Mining Engineers. Granada 5. Vichers, B. (1983). Laboratory Work in Soil Mechanics, 2nd Edition. Granada Primavera

RES 202 - Building Technology Studio 2 This studio course emphasizes on building services, building science, building defects and indoor environment of buildings. Students will be exposed to the analysis of the impact of technology on environment during project planning or after implementation. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Elaborate the procedure and building services documents, building science, defects and the surroundings in building construction professionally. (C4, CTPS, EM) (ii) Sketch different types of building system in constructing building and solve any problem within teamwork (P4, CTPS, LS) (iii) Differentiate and explain building services problems and defects towards the surroundings. (C4, A3, EM). References 1. Hall, F. & Greeno, R. (2005). Building Services Handbook, 3rd Edition. Elsevier Butterworth-Heinemann 2. Chadderton, D.V. (2000). Building Services Engineering, 4th Edittion, E&FN Spon. 3. Wise, A.F.E. & Swaffield, J.A. (2002). Water, Sanitary & Water Services for Building, 5th Edition, Butterworth-Heinemann. 4. Cowan, H.J & Smith, P.R. (1983). Environmental System, Van Nostrand Reinhold International 5. Greeno, R. (1997). Building Services Technology and Design. Longman . 6. Uniform Building By-Laws Malaysia (1984)

REG 232 Land Surveying This course covers the basic principles of surveying works including exploratory survey, level survey, traverse survey, theodolite survey, compass survey and tacheometric surrvey. Contour survey, contour development, determination of volumes in cut and fill

39

works and also construction site survey will also be covered. Besides, introduction to GPS, control dan monitoring survey dan latest technology will also be introduced. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to (i) Apply the basic principles of land survey. (C3, CTPS). (ii) Analyze data and prepare land survey report. (C4, TS). (iii) Determine the problems that exist in building engineering. (P4, CTPS). (iv) Explain problems related to soil engineering and construction. (A3, CTPS). References 1. Bannister, A., Raymond, S. & Baker, R. (1998). Surveying. 7th Edition, Longman 2. Irvine, W (1995), Surveying for Construction. 4th Edition, McGraw-Hill, London 3. Bannister, A & Baker, R (1995) Surveying. Longman Scientific & Technical 4. Wilson, R.J.P (1983), Land Surveying. McDonalds & Evans

REG 261 - Building Services This course discusses on the efficiency of the building services and its design system. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Elaborate every principles of basic building services component. (C4, CTPS). (ii) Display the ability of analyzing and preparing building services in a teamwork. (P4, TS). (iii) Propose teories and techniques in designing building services systems (A3, CTPS). References 1. Hall, F. & Greeno, R. (2005). Building Services Handbook, 3rd Edition. Elsevier Butterworth-Heinemann 2. Wise, A.F.E. & Swaffield, J.A. (2002). Water, Sanitary Waste Services for Building. 5th Edition. Butterworth-Heinemann 3. Chadderton; D.V. (2000). Building Services Engineering. 4th Edition. E & FN Spon 4. Greeno, R. (1997). Building Services Technology and Design. Longman

REG 262 Structural Design This course focuses on the loading of structures and the relationship between stress-strain. Various types of loads and load-static, resultant force, moment and reaction theories will be discussed. Students will be exposed to analysis of beam reaction, shear and moment diagrams. Composite columns and beams analysis will also be covered. It also emphasized on the strength of materials in structures, analysis of determinate and indeterminate structures. Students are required to carry out laboratory experiments in 40

addition to assignments and lectures. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Identify critically determinate and undeterminates structure and their characteristics (C4, CTPS). (ii) Unveil the concept of bending moment distribution and shear force, and also structure solving techniques. (P4, CTPS). (iii) Study the material strength and building structure and also problem solving method professionally. (A3, EM). References 1. Morgan, W., Williams, D., Durka, F. & Al Nageim, H. (2002). Structural Mechanics: Loads, Analysis, Design and Materials. Prentice Hall 2. Bhatt, P. and Nelson, H.M. (1990). Marshall & Nelson's Structures. Longman 3. Morgan, W. and Buckle, I.G. (1987). Elements of Structure: An Introduction to the Principles of Building and Structural Engineering. Longman 4. Mosely, W. H., Bungey, J.H. and Hulse, R. (1999). Reinforced Concrete Design, 5th Edition. Palgrave Macmillan

REG 265 Infrastructure Technology This course exposes the infrastructure components and basic amenities that support development. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Explain the principles of each components of basic facilities needed for development. (C4, CTPS) (ii) Manipulate the theories and techniques in designing the infrastructure system. (P4,EM) (iii) Shape the infrastructure component and practice work professionally. (A3,EM) References 1. Lay, M.G. (2009). Handbook of Road Technology. 4th Edition. Spon Press 2. Chudley, R. & Greeno, R. (2005). Construction Technology. 4th Edition. Prentice Hall. 3. Geyer, F. & Okun (2004). Water & Waste Water Engineering. John Wiley 4. Garber, J.G. & Hoel, L.A . (2001). Traffic and Highway Engineering. CL Engineering

41

RES 303- Building Technology Studio 3 This is the first part of final year Building Technology studio. It will focus on the practical aspect of land and project development. It covers three (3) main approach namely training and workshop on planning and design of land development project, Next is exposure to common infrastructure provisions in land development and finally studies of building and infrastructure safety and security Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Identify the difference of planning concept, design of land development approval process, in addition to imparting awareness on the role of component group in project construction. (C4, CTPS). (ii) Elaborate and explain the needs of mechanical and electrical requirement and identify problems in building construction. (C5, CTPS). (iii) Sketch water supply system and practical aspects in sanitary and sewerage construction based on the requirements of the authority and entrepreneuriaship orientatation. (P5, KK). (iv) Elaborate and solve problems in land development through effective and professional leadership. (C5, A4, EM, TS). References 1. Sadgrove, B.M. (1993). Setting Out Procedures. CIRIA. Butterworth-Heinemann 2. Dowberry and Davis (1996). Land Development Handbook. McGrawHill 3. Colley, B.C. (1993). Practical Manual of Land Development. McGraw-Hill. RES 304- Building Technology Studio 4 This course emphasizes on construction management and the process, taking off the quantity and costing and measurement of the quality of a workmanship of a construction base on the relevant approved standard. This course also focuses on the design of reinforced building structures both manually and using computer software. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Elaborate the steps in construction management and documentation effectively. (C4, CTPS). (ii) Summarize the building structure design concept both manually and using computer software. (C5, CTPS) (iii) Detail the building structure design based the current standard requirements. (P5, CTPS, LS). (iv) Plan and prepare quantity of working drawing and estimate the cost of the projects, and also solve cost estimation problem ethically . (C5, A4, EM, LS).

42

References 1. Mosley, W.H., Bungey, J.H. & Hulse, R. (1997). Reinforced Concrete Design. 5th Edition. Palgrave Macmillan 2. Kong, F.K., Evans R.H., Cohen, E. & Roll, F. (1983), Handbook of Structural Concrete. Pitman. 3. Macginley, T.J. & Choo, B.S. (1990). Reinforced Concrete: Design Theory and Examples. E & FN Spon

REG 360 Industrialised Building System (IBS) The course introduces the concept of IBS as a sustainable construction in Malaysia. A comparative study of conventional and IBS building process and construction shall be introduced. Various IBS materials, technologies, financial and economic aspects will also be discussed in the course. Aspects of Modular coordination, Modular Design Rules and Structural Design concepts using components and assemblies will be introduced. Project management principles are also applied to IBS. Case study and site visits will be organised. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Explain the concept of IBS in building construction (C2, CTPS). (ii) Explain with figure the design concepts of IBS and modular coordination in building construction. (C4, CTPS, EM). (iii) Demonstrate the skills in applying financial and economic application of IBS. (P4, KK, EM). (iv) Elaborate and show the calculation of IBS Score. (C4, A3, LS) References 1. Trikha & Abang Ali (2004). Industrialised Building Systems, UPM Press and CIDB 2. CIDB (2000) Modular Design Guide. CIDB Malaysia 3. Christian Meyer (1995) The Design of Building Structures. Prentice Hall. 4. CIDB (1999) Structural Precast Concrete Handbook. CIDB Malaysia

REG 361 - Methods of Construction This course prepares students with the knowledge on the process and methods of construction. Students are given practical exposure on site management, earth work including cleaning, cut and fill, dewatering process from the construction site. They are also exposed to the basic design and preparation of concrete construction and removal of formwork for the prefabricated construction system, pre-stressed concrete construction and high rise construction

43

Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Identify construction characteristics and methods critically. (C4, CTPS). (ii) Explain graphically the construction method and building material used in construction. (C4, TS, LS). (iii) Unveil and suggest the latest and suitable methods use in current construction industry. (P4, A3, CTPS). References 1. Tomlinson, M.J.(2007). Foundation Design and Construction. Viewpoint Publication, London 2. Mahyuddin Ramli and Noor Faisal Abas (2006). Construction Technology in Developing Countries. Universiti Sains Malaysia Press, P. Pinang . 3. Neville, A.M. (1997). Properties of Concrete. 4th Edition Prentice Hall 4. Peurifot, R.L. et al. (1996). Construction Planning, Equipment and Methods. McGraw Hill

REG 363 Site Investigation This course encompasses soil suitability research theoretically and practically, requirements for stability and foundation types. Students will learn how to carry out analysis and how to implement basic foundation design by doing laboratory testing and site testing. This will ensure a safe foundation for building construction. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Elaborate soil suitability and carry out laboratory site investogations in group. (C4, CTPS). (ii) Measure soil engineering properties and building and infrastructure stability (P4, CTPS, TS). (iii) Propose the current design which is suitable with the site and its importance in building construction planning (A3, LL, CTPS). References 1. Mahyuddin Ramli (1992). Pengujian Bahan dan Struktur. Dewan Bahasa dan Pustaka 2. Meor Othman Hamzah and Mahyuddin Ramli (1992). Asas Mekanik Tanah. Universiti Sains Malaysia 3. Vichers, B. (1983). Laboratory Work in Soil Mechanics. 2nd Edition.Granada 4. Craigh, R.F. (1983). Soil Mechnaics. 3rd Edition. Van Nostrand Reinhold

44

REG 367 Design of Concrete Structures This course equip students with the knowledge on reinforced concrete design. Knowledge on the behaviour and properties of concrete is explained. The ultimate limit state concept design in reinforced concrete will also be explained. Students are exposed to the knowledge of design analysis of main structure; slab, beam, column and footing. Students are also exposed to the basic design of reinforced concrete in accordance with the relevant British Standard BS 8110. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Explain the behaviour and characteristics of reinforced concrete. (C3, CTPS). (ii) Explain graphically the concept of limit in reinforce concrete structure design. (C4, CTPS). (iii) Unveil the problems in reinforced concrete structure analysis using BS 8110 code. (P4, CTPS, CS, KK). (iv) Recommend a step-by step-guide on the reinforced concrete structure design ethically and professionally. (A3, EM) References 1. British Standard Institute, (1997). British Standard 8110 2. Mosley, W.H., Bungey, J.H. & Hulse, R. (1997). Reinforced Concrete Design. 5th Edition. Palgrave Macmillan 3. Kong, F.K., Evans R.H., Cohen, E. & Roll, F. (1983), Handbook of Structural Concrete. Pitman 4. Macginley, T.J. & Choo, B.S. (1990). Reinforced Concrete: Design Theory and Examples. E & FN Spon 5. Allen, A.H. (1988). Reinforced Concrete Design to B.S.8110: Simply Explained. Spon Press

REG 368 Road and Transportation This course comprises of the planning of road and transport system (Introduction to road category and hierarchy, road and land transport administration in Malaysia, road in land and development projects, route reserve, slope reserve and land acquisition); fundamentals of land transport planning (facilities design other modes); road and transport system design (design standards and code, calculation of horizontal and vertical alignment, pavement design especially flexible pavement). The construction and technology including earthworks, slope and soil stabilization, hydraulics structures and calculations, traffic control devices and systems are also will be introduced. The material in road construction such as soil, aggregates, concrete, asphalt are also will be included.

45

Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Relate road administration category and land transport system with related rights and design work flowchart, site construction administration and roles played by various paties during construction.(C3, CTPS). (ii) Identify the properties and uses of materials in road construction. (C4, CTPS). (iii) Organize system, machinery and road construction technology and related land transportation system. (P4, EM) (iv) Study the traffic growth, demonstrate the design of road geometry, road pavement and land transportation system. (A3, CTPS, LL) References 1. Derucher, K.N., Korfiatis, G.P. and Ezeldin, A.S. (1998). Materials for Civil and Highway Engineers. 4th Ed. Prentice Hall 2. JKR Malaysia. Arahan-arahan Teknik Jalan 3. Colley, B.C. (1993). Practical Manual of Land Development. McGraw-Hill. 4. Ghani, A.N.A. (2009). Perancangan, Rekabentuk dan Pembinaan Jalan dan Lebuhraya. Modul/Text REG 366.

REG 369 Steel Structure The subject offers studies into the - steel structures, structural elements, structural design, design methods, design calculation, steel as construction materials-design considerations, steel section, steel properties, the basic of structural design- limit state design principles, serviceability limit states, design of material strength, joint-basic concepts (connections)types of connections, ordinary bolts, welded connections, further consideration in design of connections . Students are also exposed to axially loaded column-loads on compression members, classification of cross section, axially loaded compression member, beams- beam loads, classification of beam cross-sections, bending stresses and moment capacity, deflection of beams, beam connection, purlins, tension members-uses, types and design considerations, end connections, structural behavior of tension members, design of tension member. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Identify the characteristics of material, behavior and concepts of steel structure design. (C4, CTPS) (ii) Unveil the behavior of the steel structure. (P4, CTPS) (iii) Select the fabrication method, joint technique and installation procedure of steel structure. (A2, LL). (iv) Solve the design of steel structure components and joints based on BS 5950 in hte most economic manner.(A3, EM)

46

References 1. MacGinley, T.J (1988) Structural Steel work : design to limit state. Butterworth 2. British Standard 5950 (1997) British Standard Institute 3. David A. Nethercot, (2001) Limit States Design of Structural Steelwork. Spon Press 4. Peter Knowles (1987), Design of Steel Structuralwork. Surrey University Press REG 370 Building Forensic and Maintenance This course covers on the introduction to building technology appraisal and its uses with reference to the building maintenance technology and building pathology performance. Building maintenance technology can be broadly defined as the application of scientific principles to the care and preservation of built asset. More specifically it incorporates the skills and knowledge attained through training, education and experience to inspect, manage, maintenance, clean, renovate, retrofit and restore buildings. Building pathology dealing with specific diagnosis, prognosis and repair issues associated with buildings and structures also will be discussed. It is embraces a holistic approach to the repair of building and structures. This involves a detailed understanding of how the structure is built, the materials of which it is constructed, how it has been used, how it has performed over time, and all the factors that have affected its current condition. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Analyze the building maintenance technology, building pathology, characteristics of building pathology and the tests involve. (C4, CTPS (ii) Check building defects and damages, give information on repair techniques, and discuss maintenance problems with the monitoring on the cost and sustainability continuously. (P4, CTPS). (iii) Unveil and demonstrate building damage diagnosis methods professionally, taking into consideration the sensitivity of the society. (P4, A3, EM, LS) References James Douglas & Bill Ransom (2007). Understanding Building Failures. Taylor & Francis Susan Macdonald (2003). Concrete Building Pathology. Blackwell Publishing Dobrawolski, J.A. (1998). Concrete Construction Handbook. 4th Edition. McGraw Hill Clive Briffett (1995). Building Maintenance Technology in Tropical Climates. Singapore University Press Lee How Son & George C.S. Yuen (1993). Building Maintenance Technology. The Macmillan Press Ltd Derek Miles & Paul Syagga (1987). Building Maintenance A management manual. Intermediate Technology Publication Peter Harlow (1984). Managing Building Maintenance. The Chartered Institute of Building

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

47

REL 370 Building Technology Studies This course can help and guide students to prepare dissertation through the right research approach. Systematic and scientific research approach will be exposed to student based on following courses. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Explore the reading from building technology and construction field to generate research problem. (C3, CTPS) (ii) Generate problems related to issues in building construction, and explore problem solving techniques to produce structured and systematic writings. (C6, CTPS, EM) (iii) Adapt research findings, measure performance and suggest solutions to research problem. (P6, CTPS, LS). (iv) Elaborate, recommend and present research findings in writing and verbal forms, that are relevant to the building technology. (C6, A5, CS). References 1. Sharp, J.A. and Howard, K. (1996) The Management of a Student Research Project. Gower Publishing Ltd. Hants, England 2. Tan, W. (2001) Practical Research Methods. Practice Hall, Singapore 3. Salkind, N.J. (2003) Exploring Research. Person Education Inc., New Jersey, USA. 4. Glaser, B. (1992) Basics of Grounded Theory Analysis: Emergence Versus. Sociology Press, California, USA 5. Strauss, A. and Corbin, J (1998) Basics of Qualitative Research: Techniques and Procedures for Developing Grounded Theory. SAGE Publications Inc. California, USA.

48

2.8.4

Courses in Quantity Surveying

RQS 201 Quantity Surveying Studio 1 This course introduces professional QS practices with emphasis on pre-contract aspects as well as exposes students to the work processes through projects that mirror the requirement in the industry. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Describe the role that a quantity surveyor plays in the various stage of work in a construction project (C4, CTPS) (ii) Differentiate the various standard forms of contract available in the industry and to produce a tender document (C4, CTPS) (iii) Take-off quantities and produce bill of quantities for a building (P4, CTPS) (iv) Develop interactional skills and the ability to work effectively in a group (A3, CS, TS) References 1. The Institution of Surveyors (2000), Malaysian Standard Method of Measurement of Building Works, 2nd Edition, Petaling Jaya: The Institution of Surveyor, Malaysia. 2. Willis, C. J. and Newman, D. (1994) Elements of Quantity Surveying 8th edition, Oxford, England: BSP Professional Books. 3. Rosli Abd. Rashid (1996), Pengenalan Ukur Kuantiti Binaan Kuala Lumpur: Dewan Bahasa dan Pustaka. 4. Wilcox C. and Snape J.A. (1980), Measurement of Construction Work Vol. 1 & 2 Second Edition. London: George Godwin Limited.

RQS 202 Quantity Surveying Studio 2 This course is an extension of RQS 201. The students are exposed to more pre-contract aspects namely, construction contracts, procurement method, tendering process and contract documentation. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Describe the contents of a tender report as well as contract documents for construction projects and advise clients on suitable procurement methods for a project based on the requirements of the client. (C4, CTPS) (ii) To Apply the understanding in construction law to solve contractual disputes and problems. (P4, CTPS, LL) (iii) Take-off quantities and prepare bill of quantities using computer. (P4, CTPS) (iv) Develop interactional skills and the ability to work effectively in a group. (A3, CS, TS)

49

References 1. The Institution of Surveyors (2000), Malaysian Standard Method of Measurement of Building Works. Second Edition, Petaling Jaya: The Institution of Surveyor, Malaysia. 2. Griffiths P. (2006), Estimating and Tendering for Construction Works Contract Practice for Surveyor. Butterworth Heinemann. 3. Robinson, N. M. (2002), Construction Law in Singapore & Malaysia 2nd Edition Butterworths Asis. 4. Ashworth, A. (2008), Pre-contract Studies. Wiley-Blackwell Publishers

RQG 236 Measurement 1 This course explains the basic principles of building measurement according to the Malaysian Standard Method of Measurement for Building works (SMM2) and covers the method of measuring quantities for all major building elements which includes substructure, superstructure, finishing and external works. Preparation of the Bills of Quantities (BQ) will also be included. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Demonstrate measurement works by using Standard Method of Measurement 2 (SMM2) (C3, CTPS) (ii) Measure quantities for each building elements comprehensively and accurately (P4, CTPS) (iii) Form detail descriptions of building elements clearly (A3, LL) References 1. The Institution of Surveyors (2000), Malaysian Standard Method of Measurement of Building Works. 2nd edition, Petaling Jaya: ISM Malaysia. 2. Rosli Abd Rashid (1996), Pengenalan Ukur Kuantiti Binaan. Kuala Lumpur: Dewan Bahasa dan Pustaka. 3. Chudley, R. (1988). Building Construction Handbook. Oxford:Heinemann Newnes 4. Wilcox C. and Snape J.A. (1980). Measurement of Construction Work. 2nd Ed., London: Godwin Limited

RQG 237 Measurement 2 This course is an extension of course RQG236. It covers the measurement of more building elements and small civil works in according with the Malaysian Standard Method of Measurement for Building works (SMM2) and Malaysian Standard Method of Measurement for Civil Engineering Works (CESMM). It also covers computerised measurement skills.

50

Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Demonstrate measurement of civil engineering works systematically by using Civil Engineering Standard Method of Measurement (C3, CTPS) (ii) Measure quantities of additional works for building and civil engineering works comprehensively (P4, CTPS) (iii) Organise conventional quantities measurement to electronic means using measurement software (P4, CTPS) (iv) Form detail descriptions of building elements clearly (A3, TS) References 1. The Institution of Surveyors (2000), Malaysian Standard Method of Measurement of Building Works. 2nd edition, Petaling Jaya: ISM Malaysia. 2. Construction Industry Development Board (2003), Malaysian Standard Method of Measurement for Civil Engineering Works. 1st edition, Kuala Lumpur: CIDB Malaysia. 3. Rosli bin Abd. Rashid (1996), Pengenalan Ukur Kuantiti Binaan. Kuala Lumpur: Dewan Bahasa dan Pustaka 4. Willis C.J. & Newman D. (1994), Elements of Quantity Surveying. 8th Edition, Oxford: BSP Professional Books.

RQK 255 Professional Practice for Quantity Surveyors This course focuses on ethical conduct of the professional Quantity Surveyor and the relevance of various statutory instruments governing the profession. New and contemporary practice management concepts will be explored, apart from traditional service. A comparative analysis of the relevant institutions and establishing key performance indicators (KPI) for benchmarking, a critical analysis of the functions and purpose of the BQ and post contract documentations will be carried out. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Identify of professional Quantity Surveying practices in Malaysia and relate it with responsibility and ethics of Quantity Surveyors (C4, EM) (ii) Unleashed new ideas in management boutique firm, client relationships with consultants and construction procurement cost management at pre and post contract stages (P4, CTPS, KK) (iii) Explain clearly aspect of the Quantity Surveyors innovation in new fields through critical and creative assignment discussions (A3, CS, LS)

51

References 1. Willis, C.J. and Ashworth. A (1994). Practice and Procedure for the Quantity Surveyor. 9th. Edition, Blackwell Scientific Publications. 2. Turner, Dennis F. (1996). Quantity Surveying-Practice and Administration. 3rd. Edition, George Godwin. 3. Seeley, I. H., (2000), Quality Surveying Practice. MacMillan. 4. Hughes, G. (1981), Anatomy of Quantity Surveying. 2nd. Edition, Construction Press.

RQG 259 Cost and Value Management 1 This course focuses on cost management and its implications to construction projects. It also explores the use and significance of the RIBA Plan of Work nomenclature and the concept of construction economics upon a variety of project types with focus on the costing process, its objectives, together with the impact of proper cost planning and cost control. The effects of design on project estimates and cost plans and the analytical review of building components, morphology in respect to elemental costs are also discussed comprehensively. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Understand the concept, principles and processes of design cost management as well as the factors affecting cost planning and control at both the pre and post-contract stages (C3,CTPS) (ii) Descibe about construction economics and show the relationship and implications of cost and value management (C4,CTPS,LL) (iii) Illustrate the relationships between feasibility studies, cost analyses of previous projects, building cost indices and the ability to adapt the information with construction cost management and the significance of early cost advice to clients (A4, CS, EM) (iv) Analyse, utilise and appreciate the importance of cost and value management approaches with regards to the practical role of the Quantity Surveyor in the construction industry (P4, KK). References 1. Jaggar, D et. al (2002). Building Design Cost Management. Blackwell Science 2. Kirkam, R (2008). Ferry And Brandons Cost Planning of Buildings. 8th Edition, Blackwell Science 3. Ashworth A. (2008). Pre Contract Studies.Wiley Blackwell 4. Seeley, I. (1996). Building Economies. 4th Edition, MacMillan 5. Kelly, et. al (2004). Value Management of Construction Project. Blackwell Science

52

RQS 303 Quantity Surveying Studio 3 This course is a continuation of the course RQS 202. It emphasizes on the duties of a Quantity Surveyor at the post-contract stage namely progress payment, variation works, extension of time and damages, final accounts and dispute resolution. This studio prepares students directly to the professional work environment. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Relate post-contract procedures with actual practice, thereby enhancing analytical skills on what is actually practised and what should be done (C5, CTPS, EM). (ii) Adapt to quantity surveying work environment while at the same time receive new untried ideas (P5, LL) (iii) Solve problems relating to duties of a quantity surveyor (A4, LS, CS). References 1. Robinson, N. M. (2002), Construction Law in Singapore & Malaysia. 2nd. Edition, Butterworths Asis. 2. Rajoo, S. (2004), The Malaysian Standard Form of Building Contract (The PAM 1998 Form). 2nd Edition, Malaysian Law Journal. 3. Ashworth, A. and Hogg, K. (2002), Williss Practice and Procedure for the Quantity Surveyor.12th Edition, London, England: Wiley-Blackwell. 4. Seeley, I. (1997), Quantity Surveying Practice. London, Palgrave Macmillan

RQS 304 Quantity Surveying Studio 4 This studio is an extension of RQS 303. Students are exposed to the creation and management of quantity surveying firms. Professional and business ethics are also covered in the studio. This studio not only prepares the students for professional work environment, but also to become future employers. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Elaborate on professional and corporate practices which should be applied. Understand ethical issues indepth so that affective decisions can be made (C5, EM, CS). (ii) Absorb and embrance the quantity surveying corporate world so that they can become potential industry leaders (P5, LL, LS) (iii) Summarise best, ethical and virtuous professional and corporate behaviour as well as identify job opportunities at the professional and corporate level (A4, EM, KK).

53

References 1. Cartlidge, D. (2002), New Aspects of Quantity Surveying Practice. Oxford: Elsevier Butterworth-Heinemann. 2. Norton, B. R. and McElligott, W. C. (1995), Value Management in Construction. London: Macmillan. 3. Ashworth A. and Hogg K. (2007), Williss Practice and Procedure for the Quantity Surveyor. London: Blackwell Publishers 4. Langford D and Male S (2001), Strategic Management in Construction. 2nd Edition, London: Wiley-Blackwell

RQG 359 Cost and Value Management 2 This course is an extension of RQG 259 and will build upon cost management concepts introduced with emphasis on Post-Contract cost control as well as techniques like Whole Life Costing and Cost Benefit Analysis. Particular emphasis will be given to Value Management especially techniques in VM studies for both the design and strategic variant. Numerous VM workshops will be conducted to appreciate VM outcomes and the use of facilitators will be encouraged. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Understand and relate the various strategies pertaning to Cost Planning, Whole Life Costing, Development Economics, Cost Benefit Analysis to the requirements of Cost & Value Management at both the pre & post-contract phases in a critical and creative manner (C5, CS, KK) (ii) Describe and apply value management methodologies, techniques and designs effectively within the context of real situation applications.(C3, LL (iii) Organise a series of Value Management Workshops including understanding the roles and functions of the Quantity Surveyors and the relationships between projects, firms and other consultants (P6, CS, EM) (iv) Analyse and review design decisions and their impact on costs obtained through VM approaches as well as understanding the importance of clients objectives in construction projects (A4, LS) References 1. Jaggar, D et. al (2002), Building Design Cost Management. Blackwell Science 2. Kirkam, R (2008), Ferry And Brandons Cost Planning of Buildings. 8th Edition, Blackwell Science 3. Ashworth Allan (1994), Cost Studies of Buildings. 2nd Edition, Longman 4. Kelly, et. al (2004), Value Management of Construction Project. Blackwell Science 5. Norton, B.R & McElligot, W.C (1995), Value Management in Construction. MacMillan

54

RQL 370 Quantity Surveying Studies This course requires the students to conduct research individually under the supervision of a lecturer. Through systematic research approach, this course guides students on how to decide on good research topic, how to conduct research and how to prepare dissertation Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Connect the results of the study to form research problems (C5,CTPS) (ii) Develop a structured and systematic writing of the study (P5,LL) (iii) Set up field work and suggest solutions to the problems of the study (P6, EM) (iv) To maintain the results of research in written and oral test with a strong and confident (A4, CS) References 1. Glaser, B. (1992), Basics of Grounded Theory Analysis: Emergence Versus. Sociology Press: California, USA. 2. Sharp, J.A. and Howard, K. (1996), The Management of a Student Research Project. Gower Publishing Ltd. Hants: England. 3. Strauss, A. and Corbin, J (1998), Basics of Qualitative Research: Techniques and Procedures for Developing Grounded Theory. SAGE Publications Inc. California: USA 4. Tan, W. (2001), Practical Research Methods. Practice Hall: Singapore. 5. Salkind, N.J. (2003), Exploring Research. Person Education Inc: New Jersey, USA.

55

2.8.5

Courses in Urban and Regional Planning

RPG 131 Applied Quantitative Methods This course introduces the data quantitative analysis research data. The difference between the descriptive and inferential is explained. Students are being exposed to the methods of application the techniques of analyzing quantitative data. The method of analyzing descriptive and inferential will be explained and student are to summarize the research outcomes. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Elaborate method of data quantitative analysis in research (C4, CS). (ii) Determine the suitable quantitative analysis which suitable to data (P4, CTPS). (iii) Report study analysis result through presentation (A3, CS) References 1. Bryman, A. & Creamer, D. (1997). Quantitative Data Analysis with SPSS for Windows: A Guide for Social Scientist. London: Routledge. 2. Amir Hussin Baharuddin (1989). Kaedah Kuantitatif Suatu Pengenalan. Kuala Lumpur: Dewan Bahasa dan Pustaka. 3. De Vaus, D. A. (1986). Surveys in Social Research. London: Unwin Hyman. 4. Zainal Mat Saad (1985). Pengantar Statistik. Petaling Jaya: Fajar Bakti

RPS 201 Urban and Regional Planning Studio 1 Planning Studio 1 focuses on acquiring research analytical skills as well as preparing technical reports.Studentss ability to go through the planning process will be constantly monitored and developed. Their ability to partake research exercises will also be evaluated. Students will be given life relevant projects where eveluation is based on their abilities to perform individually as well as in group Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Understand the planning process through the applications of real and hypotetical case studies. (CS, CTPS, EM, A3, P4,C2) (ii) Build good relations and interactions with others as well as cooperate in more efective ways. ((CS, CTPS, EM, TS, LS, P4) (iii) Colect and analyze data and infrmation to produce professional reports. (CTPS, EM, LL, C3, P4) (iv) Deliver ideas and make presentations more effective and confident using latest technologies. (CS, CTPS, LL, C3, P4,A2)

56

References 1. Laseau, P. (2001). Graphic Thinking For Architects & Designers 3rd Edition. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 2. Mills, C. (2000). Designing With Models: A Studio Guide To Making And Using Architectural Design Models. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 3. Ching, F.D.K. (1996). Architecture: Form, Space & Order. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 4. Lin, Mike W. (1993). Drawing And Designing With Confidence: A Step-By-Step Guide. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

RPS 202 Urban and Regional Planning Studio 2 Planning Studio 2 prepares students with the knowledge on urban planning and the preparation of layout and master plan. It discusses on the application and development of new and old physical planning concepts and offers knowledge on site evaluations and the preparation and implementation of development proposals.. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Enchance quality of work, presentations and planning design proposals (CS,CTPS,EM, A3, P4, C2) (ii) Expose students to alternative presentation aspects. (CS,CTPS, EM, TS, LS, P4) (iii) Understand the planning and development process through real and hyphotetical aspects. (CTPS,EM,C3,P4) (iv) Generate creative activities towards sustainable environment. (CTPS, EM, LL, C3, P4) (v) Deliver ideas and make presentations more effective and confident using latest technologies. (CS, CTPS, LL, TS, C3, P4,A2) References 1. Laseau, P. (2001). Graphic Thinking For Architects & Designers 3rd Edition. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 2. Mills, C. (2000). Designing With Models: A Studio Guide To Making And Using Architectural Design Models. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 3. Ching, F.D.K. (1996). Architecture: Form, Space & Order. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 4. Lin, Mike W. (1993). Drawing And Designing With Confidence: A Step-By-Step Guide. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

57

RPK 222 Conservation This course comprises of urban and natural resources conservation with emphasis on ideas and concept as well as political and social actions. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: i) Indetify the conflicting issues of urban and resource conservation. (C4, CTPS) ii) Understand and elaborate the conflicts among parties apposed to conservation. (CTPS, P4) iii) Suggest conservation solutions for the issues raised. (A3, CS, CPTS) References 1. Sahabat Alam Malaysia, 2002, Malaysian Environment: Alert 2001, Pulau Pinang. 2. Undang-undang Malaysia 1991. Akta Kualiti Alam Sekeliling. International Law Book Service, Kuala Lumpur. 3. Jacques Yves Cousteau, 1982, The Cousteau Almanac, Doubleday Books, New York. 4. Jabatan Alam Sekitar (terkiniberubah dari tahun ke tahun). Laporan Kualiti Alam Sekitar, Kuala Lumpur.

RPK 231 Principles of Planning This course offers an understanding the basic principle in planning practices which includes the laws and regulation in planning, the related Development Plans at the national and local level, different procedures for preparation of layout plan, technical plans and basic requirement for planning submissions. The course also elaborate components that are related to development such as infrastructure, transportation, facilities, landscaping and engineering which are related new township development, rural planning and urban renewal. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Explain the concept and philosophy of sustainable planning that influences the development of Asian cities. (C2, P1, CTPS) (ii) Elaborate and differentiate various development and urban planning methods from Western and Islamic perspectives. (A3, CT2, LL) (iii) Demonstrate and execute the basic of preparing development plans at local, state and national level towards the preparation of Planning Development Plan. (A2, C3, CS2, LL) (iv) Explain and relate the principle of regional and rural development proses and its relationship on economy, social, physical and environmental aspect. (A3, P1, CT1)

58

References 1. Badaruddin M, Rahmat Azam M et.al, (2001) Prinsip-Prinsip Perancangan, Prentice Hall: Kuala Lumpur. 2. Ibrahim Wahab, (1991) Perancangan Bandar, DBP. Kuala Lumpur. 3. Ratcliffe, John, (1993) An introduction to town and Country Planning, 2nd Edition, UCL Press Limited. London. 4. Rancangan Fizikal Negara, (2005) Kementerian Perumahan dan Kerajaan Tempatan. 5. Marsh Catherine, (1991) Exploring Data: An Introduction to Data Analysis fro Social Scientists. Oxford: Polity Press. 6. Krueckeberg, Donald A. and Arthur L. Silvers, (1974) Urban Planning Analysis: Methods and Models. New York: 7. Undang-undang Malaysia, Akta Perancang Bandar dan Desa Malaysia, Akta 172 , Akta 933 1995 (pindaan).

RPK 233 Methods of Planning Analysis This course focuses on an understanding and application of quantitative and qualitative techniques and models for analysis, projection and evaluation in dealing with spatial and socio-economic planning of cities and regions. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) To conduct the process of data analysis using statistical packages and to undergo the process of sampling and data collection in the field to ensure data validity and realibility. (CTPS, C4) (ii) To review and apply quantitative and qualitative techniques and models to address planning problems. (CTPS, P4) (iii) To examine the implications of population growth on related planning sectors (CS, P3) (iv) To evaluate alternative plans that address planning issues and problems. (CTPS, A3) References 1. Babbie, Earl R..(2001). The Practice of Social Research, 9th Edition. Belmont, CA.: Wadsworth. 2. Berg, B.L. (2004). Qualitative Research Methods for the Social Sciences, 5th edition, Boston: Pearson. 3. Klosterman, Richard E. (1990). Community Analysis and Planning Techniques. New York: Rowman and Littlefield Publishers, Inc. 4. Krueckeberg, Donald A. and Arthur L. Silvers (1974). Urban Planning Analysis: Methods and Models. New York: John Wiley and Sons. 5. Marsh, Catherine (1991). Exploring Data: An Introduction to Data Analysis for Social Scientists. Oxford: Polity Press. 6. Ghosh, Sumit and Lee, Tony (2000). Intelligent Transportation Systems: New Principles and Architectures, Boca Raton, FL.: CRC Press. 59

RPG 235 Geographic Infromation System and Computer Aided Design for Planning This course utilizes geographic information system (GIS) and computer aided design (CAD) to produce maps and working plans. Hands-on learning approach is applied. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Demonstrate the use of instructions in GIS and CAD software to produce maps and plans in a format that meets markets requirements and standards (C3, CTPS, LL) (ii) Describe and differentiate the concepts and features between GIS and CAD software. (C2, P1) (iii) Prepare analyze and presnt planning data and plans using GIS and CAD (C3, C4, A2, CS3, LL) (iv) Generate and manipulate primary and secondary data ini the form of maps and plans from manual to digital using real-earth coordinates. (C3, P4, LL) References 1. Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc (1996). Using Arcview GIS. ESRI, Redlands, California, USA. 2. Demers, Michael N. (2005). Fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems. John Wiley & Sons Inc, USA 3. Omura, George (2006). Mastering AutoCAD 2007 and AutoCAD LT 2007, Autodesk. San Rafeal, California, USA

RPS 303 Urban and Regional Planning Studio 3 Projects conducted in this studio involve the preparation of physical plans such as Structure Plan, Local Plan, Special Area Plan, etc, as documented in the Town and Country Planning Act Malaysia (1976) (Act 172). Comprehensive and in-depth understanding of related planning issues and problems from the physical, social, economic, environmental and technology aspects is achieved. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Ability to investigate planning issues and problems from a holistic pradigm, including physical, social, cultural, economy, environmental, technology, etc. (C4, CTPS, EM) (ii) Ability to evaluate and apply the principles of sustainable development and local Agendi 21 in local planning context (A3, CS4, CTPS) (iii) Ability to respond to issues and problems through a conceptual framework to define planning issues, including research design, methodology, analysis, plan assessment and costing. (CS4, P3, CTPS, EM)

60

(iv) Ability to develop organization, leadership, entrepreneurship and decision-making skills. (A3, LS,TS) References 1. American Planning Association (2006). Planning and Urban Design Standards,Student Edition. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons. 2. Babbie, Earl R. (1990). Social Research Method, 2nd edition, Belmont, CA.:Wadsworth 3. Babbie, Earl R. (2001). The Practice of Social Research, 9h edition, Belmont, CA.: Wadsworth 4. 5. Berke, Philip R., David R. Godshalk, and Kaiser, Edward J. (2006). Urban Land Use Planning, 5th edition. Chicago : University of Illinois Press. Dept. of Town and Country Planning Malaysia (2005). National Physical Plan, KL:JPBD

RPS 304 Urban and Regional Planning Studio 4 Comprehensive and in-depth understanding of related planning issues and problems from the physical, social, economic, environmental, technology, etc. aspects, as well as identifying intra- and inter sectoral linkages. Understanding and application of the requirement, guidelines and regulations related to the relavent technical department in property development sector. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Ability to investigate planning issues and problems from a holistic pradigm, including physical, social, cultural, economy, environmental, technology, etc. (C4, CTPS, EM) (ii) Ability to evaluate and apply the principles of sustainable development and local Agendi 21 in local planning context (A3, CS4, CTPS) (iii) Ability to respond to issues and problems through a conceptual framework to define planning issues, including research design, methodology, analysis, plan assessment and costing. (CS4, P3, CTPS, EM) (iv) Ability to develop organization, leadership, entrepreneurship and decision-making skills. (A3, LS,TS) References 1. Cieciek, G.(2006) Lare Review Section & Practice Problem : Inventory, Analysis, and Program Development. Professional Pubns Inc. 2. Hanna, K.C.(2000) GIS for Landscape Architects. Esri Pr. 3. Hannebaum, L.G.(1990) Landscape Design : A Practical Approach (2nd Edition). 4. Hopper,L., Droge,M. (2005) Security and Site Design : A Landscape Architectural Approach to Analysis. Assessment and Design Implementation. John Wiley & Sons Inc.

61

5.

Simonds,J.O.(1997) Landscape Architecture : A Manual of Site Planning and Design. McGraw-Hill.

RPK 321 Landscape Planning This course introduce relationship between human and environment. It emphasize planning technique, ecological aspects, landscape evaluation, choice of materials, principles of planting design and site planning. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Able ro identify the techniques in planning and landscape assessment. (C4, CTPS) (ii) Able to elaborate the issues of the environments and restricted resources in planning. (P4, CTPS) (iii) Able to lead anf share info and new ideas for human habitat and environment health. (A3, EM, LS) References 1. Rutledge, A. (1981). A Visual Approaches to Park Design. NY Press. 2. Rutledge, A. (1986). Anatomy of Parks. Mc Graw & Hill 3. Ariffin, J. (2006). Pengenalan Kepada Senibina Landskap. Amber Solara Pub. 4. Ariffin, J. (2003). Koleksi Tanaman Hiasan Di Malaysia. Amber Solara Pub 5. McHarg (1992). Design with Nature. New York J.Wiley.

RPK 323 Tourism Planning and Development This course introduces basic understanding of tourism planning and development which covers the concepts, theories and models in tourism. Analysis of current issues and trends in sustainable tourism as well as impacts of tourism on economy, environment and socioculture will also be covered. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Research and analysis on the theory and models tourism planning and development. (C4, CTPS,) (ii) Identify and analysis current issues on tourism development in the context of sustainabale tourism. (P4,CTPS) (iii) Study the impact of tourism development on economy, environment and cultural values in relation to local and foreign cases. (A3,EM, LS)

62

References 1. Badaruddin Mohamed (2006). Pelancongan Mampan. Kuala Lumpur: DBP 2. Gunn, C.A. (2002). Tourism planning: Basics, Concepts, Cases. Fourth Edition. New York: Routledge. 3. Hall, C.M. (2000). Tourism Planning: Policies, Processes and Relationships. Harlow: Prentice Hall. 4. Inskeep, E. (1991). Tourism Planning: An Integrated and Sustainable Development Approach. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold. 5. Mill, R.C. and Morrison, A.M. (1998). The Tourism System: an Introductory Text. New Jersey: Prentice-Hall

RPK 332 Urban Design This course will concentrate on urban design from the perspective of town planning, architecture, history and heritage, economic as well as the policy that controls it. It covers the basic concepts in urban design and the transformation process from the proto and colonial period up to the 21 century. Urbanization method and practices implemented by the public and private sectors will be discussed. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) To diffirentiate the urban design approach between the part and the current situation and design perspective from the Asian and European cities and also introduced. (C4, CTPS, LL) (ii) Reorganisation of the basic urban design in urban palnning. (P4, CTPS, LL) (iii) Be able to analyze the development palns and explore the best strategy in solving urban planning issues. (A3, LL) References 1. Cliff Moughtin, R. Cuesta, C. Sarris, P. Signoretta, (1999). Urban Design: Method and Techniques. 2. Kementerian Perumahan dan Kerajaan Tempatan Malaysia,(2006) Dasar Perbandaran Nasional, Jabatan Perancangan Bandar dan Desa, Kuala Lumpur. 3. Hassan,A.S.,(2005), Rekabentuk Bandar di Semenanjung Malaysia Kuala Lumpur dan Bandar Baru di Sekitarnya,Penerbit USM. 4. Gallion, E. (1975), The Urban Pattern, D. Nostrand Company, New York, Toronto, London 5. Larice, M,(editor), (2005) The Urban design Reader, University of California, USA, Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group. 7. Hall,Peter,(1988), Cities of Tomorrow, Oxford, Blackwell

63

RPK 334 Traffic Planning This course describes urban traffic issues and problems and outlines the methods and techniques for systematic traffic planning to achieve effective traffic management, land use planning, public transport planning, pedestrian and parking facilities, etc.. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Relationship between theory and practice with the understanding of traffic planning processed do an important development of the nation. (C3, CTPS, P4, A3, LL3) (ii) Elaborate traffic and problems that effects the city environment. (C4, A1, CTPS, CS3) (iii) Translate traffic management policy abd aduacate of the best strategy manage flow in the city. (C2, A3, LL3) References 1. Banks, J. H. (2002) Introduction to Transportation Engineering. 2nd ed. New York, America McGraw Hill. 2. Bruton, Michael J., (1985), Introduction to Transportation Planning, 3rd edition, Hutchinson, London 3. ITE (2009) Institute of Transportation Engineers Transportation Planning Handbook. 6th Edition. 4. Khisty, C. J. and Lall, B. K. (2003) Transportation Engineering: An Introduction. 3rd ed. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458: Prentice-Hall, Pearson Education, Inc..

RPK 343 Social Aspects in Planning This undergraduate seminar course reflects various social issues related to the development field, generally, and in the field of housing, building and planning, specifically. In general, discussions with sociological tinge will be conducted such as: social change and social planning; social and physical development, relationship between the two social issues and questions related to housing and community planning; social aspects of urban structure. Measurement of social cost and benefit, contribution of social indicators, from the perspective of social change and their usage in the fields of housing and planning. Students are required to choose from a selected few topics, within the Malaysian context, for their seminar paper presentation purposes. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Understand the dimensions of social planning and development. (CS, CTPS, EM, A3,P4,C2) (ii) Introduce subjects related to social planning evolution exemplify develop worl experiences. (CS, CTPS, EM, TS, LS, P4) 64

(iii) Balancing physical development with social planning and development aspects focusing on sustainable development concept. (CTPS, Em, C3, P4) (iv) Expose global trends in social planning and development relevance to social context. (CTPS, Em, LL, C3, P4) References 1 Conyers, Diana (1982). Introduction to Social Planning in the Third World, John Wiley, New York. 2 Stein, Jay M. (ed) (1995). Classic Readings in Urban Planning. McGraw-Hill Inc. New York. 3 Hardy, Dennis (1991). From Garden Cities to New Towns. Chapman & Hall, London. 4 Hardy, Dennis (1991). From New Towns to Green Politics. Chapman & Hall, London. 5. Goh, Ban Lee (2002). Non Compliance A Neglected Agenda in urban Governance. Institute Sultan Iskandar, Skudai, johor

RPK 351 Urban and Regional Economics Concept and theories of urban and regional economy and their application to urban and regional spatial structure. Methods of economic analysis of urban and regional growth. Evaluation of economic impacts of urban and regional development. Development of strategies and policies for urban and regional development Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Clerify the issues and problems of urban planning and regional economics (C2, A3, CTPS) (ii) Able to apply analytical method in urban and regional economics. (P3, LL) (iii) Able to evaluate urban and regional economic growth in structural and spatial context. (C4, P4, CTPS) (iv) Able to formulate urban and regional development policies and strategies. (A3, LL2) References 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Regional and Urban Economics. Richardson, H.W., Pitman (1979). Urban and Regional Economics. McCann, Philip, Oxford University Press (2001). Urban Economics. OSullivan, A., Irwin (1996). Urbanisation and Regional Development in Malaysia. Ghani Salleh, Utusan Publication & Distributors (2000). Urban Economics. Mills, E.S. and Hamilton, B.W., Harper Collins (1994). Urban Economics: Theory and Policy. Button, K.J., Macmillan Press (1981).

65

2.8.6

Courses in Interior Design

RDS 201 - Interior Design Studio 1 This course stresses the understanding of form to space in Interior Design. The projects involve the space planning of various categories of interior space such as social, cultural institutional, industrial as well as commercial. Design issues such as green and universal design are incorporated in the projects. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Identify the hiearchy of space and the interior design elements. (C4,CTPS) (ii) Apply the understanding of design skills and team work. (P3, TS,CS). (iii) Differentiate the level of solving problems in accordance to the types of projects, starting from concept, space planning until presentation. (A3, LS) References 1. Wendy R. Mcclure (Author), Tom J. Bartuska (Editor), (2007) The Built Environment: a collaborative inquiry into design and planning, Hoboken : John Wiley & Sons. 2. N.J. Habraken and J. Teicher, (2000) editors, The Structure of the Ordinary: Form and Control in the Built Environment. MIT Press. 3. J. Charles and J. Kibert, (1999) Reshaping the Built Environment: Ecology, Ethics, and Economics. Island Press. 4. N. Crowe, (1997) Nature and the Idea of a Man-made World: An Investigation into the Evolutionary Roots of Form and Order in the Built Environment, MIT Press.

RDS 202 - Interior Design Studio 2 This course is a continuation of the course RDS 201 Interior Design Studio 1 offers in Semester I. Similarly it stresses on the planning of interior spaces from various category such as commercial, institutional, hospitality and residential facilities. The Projects are designed to strengthen the students knowledge in preparation for the practical training at the end of the semester. The exposure is undertaken to fulfil the working market requirements. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Link human factor, physical factor and emotional factor in interior design. (C4, CS, CTPS) (ii) Give respond to space and human senses. (P5, TS). (iii) React with design environment more effectively. (A3, LL)

66

References 1. Wendy R. Mcclure (Author), Tom J. Bartuska (Editor), (2007) The Built Environment: a collaborative inquiry into design and planning, Hoboken : John Wiley & Sons. 2. N.J. Habraken and J. Teicher, (2000) editors, The Structure of the Ordinary: Form and Control in the Built Environment. MIT Press. 3. J. Charles and J. Kibert, (1999) Reshaping the Built Environment: Ecology, Ethics, and Economics. Island Press. 4. N. Crowe, (1997) Nature and the Idea of a Man-made World: An Investigation into the Evolutionary Roots of Form and Order in the Built Environment, MIT Press.

RDB 217 Exhibition and Display This course is a 100% course work. Its aim is to introduce the students to the principles of designing an exhibition as well as techniques of displaying objects. The design aspects include theory, concept, function, exhibition categories, planning, special effect techniques, art installation and techniques to present ideas through construction works. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Apply the principles of display design in interior design. (C4, CS, CTPS) (ii) Appreciate the different aspects of design display, including theory, concept, function and exhibition categories. (P3, TS). (iii) Apply the arts of display and the technique of presentation which is infused through technical drawings. (A3, LL) References 1. Trade Fair Stand Design. (1997). New York: RotoVision. 2. Boschi, A. ed. (2001). Showrooms. Kempen: teNeues. 3. Retail Interiors. (1998). Gloucester: Rockport. 4. Visual Merchandising. (2002). Cincinnat: Media Group International. 5. Manroe, C.O. (1997). Uncluttered: Storage Room by Room. New York: Friedman/Fairfax. 6. Through the understanding of design and specific functions 7. Through the understanding of environment created by exploring means of communications and by required specifications 8. Through presentation skills and verbal skills in strengthening the presentation of ideas

67

RDG 235 Ergonomics The human factors of man, physical and emotional. Examination of how man's senses are affected by space, form, colour, light, sound and motion. Study of the ecology of man and how tools, products and systems affects his behaviour and environment. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Incoorporate human factors, physical and emotion into interior spaces. (C4, CS, CTPS) (ii) Respond to the space and human sense. (P3, TS). (iii) Respond to the design environment more effectively. (A3, LL) References 1. Lighting Handbook. (1984). North American Philips Lighting Corporation. 2. Flavin, Dan. (2000). The Architecture of Light. New York: Guggenheim Museum. 3. Storey, Sally. (2003). Lighting. London: Quadrille. 4. Myerson, Jeremy. (1996). International Lighting Design. Laurence King: London. 5. Gordon, G. (2003) , Interior Lighting, John Wiley & Sons. 6. Whitehead, Randall (2004). Residential Lighting: A Practical Guide. John Wiley & Sons Inc; Hoboken, NJ. 7. Phillips, Derek (2000).Lighting Modern Buildings. Architectural Press; Oxford.

RDG 262 Interior Design Lighting Students will be exposed to the principles of lighting, light application and the development of lighting field. The students will also be exposed to lighting technology, which is expanding rapidly, and the familiarization of the methods in applying lighting technologies. Research and findings of lighting will also be explored. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Understand and apply natural and artificial lighting elements for interior space. (C4,CTPS) (ii) Respond to the concept of lighting mechanism in any interior space. (P4, TS3). (iii) Apply various artificial lighting in choosing appropriate space. (A3, LL) References 1. Lighting Handbook. (1984). North American Philips Lighting Corporation. 2. Flavin, Dan. (2000). The Architecture of Light. New York: Guggenheim Museum. 3. Storey, Sally. (2003). Lighting. London: Quadrille. 4. Myerson, Jeremy. (1996). International Lighting Design. Laurence King: London. 5. Gordon, G. (2003) , Interior Lighting, John Wiley & Sons.

68

6. 7.

Whitehead, Randall (2004). Residential Lighting: A Practical Guide. John Wiley & Sons Inc; Hoboken, NJ. Phillips, Derek (2000).Lighting Modern Buildings. Architectural Press; Oxford.

RDS 301 Interior Design Studio 3 This course offers a comprehensive schematic project with a minimum of 2500sq meter of space. The chosen projects lean heavily on the students interests. Students are exposed to site requirements context. If offers continues understanding of current technological theory, current market demand and services in design aspects. Elements such as structures, green building issues, choosing of proper material in accordance to current technological demand are emphasised. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Incorporate the interior design concepts to produce various functional projects. (C5,CTPS) (ii) Display the leadership characteristics in producing dynamic and high potential design proposals. (A5 , LS). (iii) Differentiate the level of solutions according to the types of projects, starting from concept, space planning until presentation. (A3, LS3) (iv) Built potential design while exploring wider scope. (P7 CS7, KK3) References 1. Wendy R. Mcclure (Author), Tom J. Bartuska (Editor), (2007) The Built Environment: a collaborative inquiry into design and planning, Hoboken : John Wiley & Sons. 2. N.J. Habraken and J. Teicher, (2000) editors, The Structure of the Ordinary: Form and Control in the Built Environment. MIT Press. 3. J. Charles and J. Kibert, (1999) Reshaping the Built Environment: Ecology, Ethics, and Economics. Island Press. 4. N. Crowe, (1997) Nature and the Idea of a Man-made World: An Investigation into the Evolutionary Roots of Form and Order in the Built Environment, MIT Press. 5. Zevon, S. (1997). Inside Architecture. Rockport: Mitchell Beazley. 6. Pegler, M. (1992). Storefronts and Facades. New York: Retail Reporting. 7. Pehler, M. (2001). Stores of the Year. New York: Visual Reference. 8. Cook, P. and George Rand. (1989). Morphosis. New York: Rizolli. 9. Visual Merchandising. (2002). Cincinnati: Media Group International. 10. Retail Interiors. (1998). Gloucesterr: Rockport. 11. Andreini, L. ed. (2000). Cafes and Restaurants. Kempen: teNeus Verlag GmbH = Co KG. 12. Mcgowan, M. (2004) Interior Graphic Standards: Student Edition. New Jersey: John Wiley and Sons. Inc.

69

13. Hannah, B. (2004). Becoming a Product Designer. New Jersey: John Wiley and Sons, Inc. 14. Gordon, G. (2003). Interior Lighting for Designers. New Jersey: John Wiley and Sons.

RDS 302 Interior Design Studio 4 This course is a continuation of the course RDS 301 Interior Design Studio 3. It aims is to challenge the students ability as designers. They are encouraged to communicate with actual clients. They need to be well verse with the management and costing aspect in accordance to current developmental issues. The end results are balance between aesthetic quality, the needs of the and users, the clients requirement as well as commercial viability. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Translate the schematic projects comprehensively. (C6,CTPS) (ii) Design comprehensive projects starting from concept until cost presentations. (P8, TS). (iii) Display confidence and professionalism. (A5, LS, EM) (iv) Suggest designs which are competitive to the outside industry. (A5, LL, CS, KK) References 1. Wendy R. Mcclure (Author), Tom J. Bartuska (Editor), (2007) The Built Environment: a collaborative inquiry into design and planning, Hoboken : John Wiley & Sons. 2. N.J. Habraken and J. Teicher, (2000) editors, The Structure of the Ordinary: Form and Control in the Built Environment. MIT Press. 3. J. Charles and J. Kibert, (1999) Reshaping the Built Environment: Ecology, Ethics, and Economics. Island Press. 4. N. Crowe, (1997) Nature and the Idea of a Man-made World: An Investigation into the Evolutionary Roots of Form and Order in the Built Environment, MIT Press. 5. Zevon, S. (1997). Inside Architecture. Rockport: Mitchell Beazley. 6. Pegler, M. (1992). Storefronts and Facades. New York: Retail Reporting. 7. Pehler, M. (2001). Stores of the Year. New York: Visual Reference. 8. Cook, P. and George Rand. (1989). Morphosis. New York: Rizolli. 9. Visual Merchandising. (2002). Cincinnati: Media Group International. 10. Retail Interiors. (1998). Gloucesterr: Rockport. 11. Andreini, L. ed. (2000). Cafes and Restaurants. Kempen: teNeus Verlag GmbH = Co KG. 12. Mcgowan, M. (2004) Interior Graphic Standards: Student Edition. New Jersey: John Wiley and Sons. Inc. 13. Hannah, B. (2004). Becoming a Product Designer. New Jersey: John Wiley and Sons, Inc.

70

14. Gordon, G. (2003). Interior Lighting for Designers. New Jersey: John Wiley and Sons. Inc.

RDG 313 Design Workshop This course expands by visual awareness, developing visual techniques and tools for research and designing in black and white. Projects include design and execution of an appropriate communication covering; formal, functional and technical solutions to design problems. The emphasis is on presentation, materials, methods, form and design development. The course comprised of techniques and process of design in 2-D presentations. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Correlate knowledge, understanding and identify concept, inventory and problems. (C5, ,CS3, CTPS) (ii) Respond to the language of design according to specific concept in the black and white theme. ( P4) (iii) Differentiate the characteristics of the sketch media by using black and white tools. (A3, LL3, KK) References 1. Ching, Francis D.K. (1979). Architecture: Form, Space & Order. New York: Van Nostrand & Reinhold. 2. Kautzky, Ted. (1979). The Ted Kautzky Pencil Book. New York: Van Nostrand & Reinhold. 3. Levinson, Frances. (1983). Architectural Rendering Fundamental. Miami: Mc Graw Hill. 4. OConnell, William. (1985). Graphic Communications in Architecture. Champaign: Stipes. 5. Portet, Tom & Sue Goodman. (1982). Manual of Graphic Techniques 2. New York: Scribners. 6. Simmons III, Seymour & Marc S.A. Winer. (1977). Drawing: The Creative Process. New Jersey; Prentice Hall.

RDB 314 Design Management The emphasis of this course is on the understanding of materials and technology, their uses and sources their relation to interior architecture. It stresses the responsibility of the designer to adapt to evolving technologies to his needs from the early process of designing until the product/design is marketed.

71

Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Correlate the whole process of product development from idea generation, product specification, communication, product status, until completion. (C4, CS6, CTPS4) (ii) Respond to various characteristics of creativity and the creative individuals. (P3, TS). (iii) Differentiate the characteristics of bad product or product failure effectively. (A3, LL3, LS2) Reference 1. T.Levitt [1986], The Marketing Imagination, Macmillac Inc. 2. Hollins,B & Pugh Stuart, [1990], Successful Product Design, Butterworth & Co. Ltd. 3. Baxter, [1995], Product Design. Practical Methods for the Systematic Development of New Products, Chapman & Hall, London. 4. Majaro,S. [1992], Managing Ideas for Profit: The Creative Gap, McGraw-Hill Interim Ltd 5. CIPD. Center for Innovative in Products Development. http://web/mit.edu/cipd/

RDG 323 Design Presentation Techniques This course exposes the students to the colored presentation techniques that are available and applicable in market. This course stresses on various media that are applied by interior designers as tools for presentation. The media applied are pencil colour, water colour, markers, gouache, air brush, computer enhanced and computer generated presentation, in producing final presentations. These skills enhance the creative thinking in designing. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Correlate knowledge, understanding and identify concept, inventory and problems. (C5, ,CS3, CTPS) (ii) Respond to the design language according to specific concept in the colour theme. ( P4) (iii) Differentiate the characteristics of sketch media using colour presentation tools. (A3, LL3, KK) References 1. Ching, Francis D.K. (1979). Architecture: Form, Space & Order. New York: Van Nostrand & Reinhold. 2. Kautzky, Ted. (1979). The Ted Kautzky Pencil Book. New York: Van Nostrand & Reinhold. 3 Levinson, Frances. (1983). Architectural Rendering Fundamental. Miami: Mc Graw Hill.

72

4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

OConnell, William. (1985). Graphic Communications in Architecture. Champaign: Stipes. Portet, Tom & Sue Goodman. (1982). Manual of Graphic Techniques 2. New York: Scribners. Simmons III, Seymour & Marc S.A. Winer. (1977). Drawing: The Creative Process. New Jersey; Prentice Hall. Carter, David. (1998). The Complete Paint Book. London: Conran Octopus. Roddon, Guy. (1995). Pastel Painting Techniques. London: Burlington. Drpic, Ivo D. (1988). Sketching and Rendering Interior Spaces. New York: Whitney.

RDG 334 Theory and History of Design The course covers the development of interior design from an early date to the present. The course aims to introduce and explore different theoretical perspectives on contemporary society and culture to examine historical issues relevant to the production of Interior Design and related fields. It also aims to develop the student's intellectual and critical awareness to enable students to become familiar with information sources, and develop their research and design ability. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Explore the distinctive theoretical perspectives in the contemporary society and their culture which are relevant to interior design. (C4,CTPS) (ii) Link the social, cultural and political events in interior design in accordance with the period of occurrence. (C4, ,CS, CTPS) (iii) Have critical awareness on how design effects the society and their culture. (P7, TS). (iv) Understand the contemporary design and the role of designers in pioneering local design culture. (A3, LL3) References 1. Sparke,P. [1987] Design in Context, Quarto Publishing plc 2. Doordan,D.P. [1995], Design History; an Anthology, The MIT Press. 3. Sparke,P. [1986], An Introduction to Design & Culture in the Twentieth Century. Routledge, London. 4. Sir Banister Fletcher, [1996], A History of Architecture, 20th Edition, Architectural Press 5. Moffet,M, Fazio,M & Wodehouse,L. [2003], A World History of Architecture, Laurence King Publishing. 6. Blakemore,R.G. & Rabun,J.L. [1997], History of Interior Design and Furniture: From Ancient Egypt to Nineteeth-Century Europe. John Wiley and Sons, Inc.

73

RDG 336 Professional Practice for Interior Design The course introduces the creative potential of designing related to interior architecture. Exposure to the aspects of professionalism of interior design : the Architect Act of 1967, the registration of L.A.M., P.A.M and the professional code of conduct of behaviour and responsibility, the work scope of the society, and professional fees; the appointment and relationship with clients, consultants and contractors. It emphasises administrative, legal and financial aspects of Interior Design Practice. Projects will be designed to challenge pre-conceptions, release creative potential, develop analytical thinking and co-operative working environment. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Understand the professional relationship of interior design with the other professions working as a team. (C6, CS6, CTPS) (ii) Respond to the need of understanding of rules and by-laws which are related with contact documentation (P9, TS3, EM2). (iii) Plan and execute the scope of interior design services including fees and compensations. (A4, LL3, KK3,LS2) References 1. Roland Ashcroft, (1992). Construction for Interior Designers. 2. Victor Papanek, (1995). The Green Imperative. 3. Pearson D., (1989). The Natural House Book. 4. Piotrowski, Christine M. (2001). Professional practice for interior Designers- 3rd Ed. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. 5. H.Siegel, (1982). A Guide to Business Principles and Practices for Interior Designer,. 6. Roland Ashcroft, (1992). Construction for Interior Designers. 7. Victor Papanek, (1995). The Green Imperative. 8. Pearson D., (1989). The Natural House Book. 9. H.Siegel, (1982). A Guide to Business Principles and Practices for Interior Designer,.

RDG 366 Furniture Design Furniture is one of the important component in the interior design field. This course will assist students understanding in designing the furniture, trend in design and the relevant history for the design of furniture in relation to the ways of completing the design process.

74

Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Understand the methods of choosing appropiate furniture including abitrating the appropriate function, technology, manufacturing, presentation, visual and safety to the clients. (CS5,CTSP) (ii) Display the skill of choosing the appropiate type of furniture. (TS3) (iii) Acquire the basic knowledge regarding materials, technique and the trend of traditional, eastern and western style of furniture. (LL3) References 1. Kilmer,W.O. & Kilmer,R. (2003) Construction Drawings and Details for Interiors. John Wiley & Sons. 2. Pile,J. (2005) A History of Interior Design, Laurence King Publishings. Second Edition. 3. Richard T. Bynum & Danial L. Rubino (1998). Handbook of Alternative Materials in Residential Construction, Mc-Graw-Hill. 3. Byars, M. (2005), The Best Tables, Chairs and Lights, RotoVision. 4. Fuad-luke,A. (2004), The Eco-Design Handbook, Thames abd Hudson. New Edition. 1. Saville,L. (2006), Design Secrets: Furniture., Rockport Publishers.

75

2.8.7

Courses in Architecture [Lam Part I]

RAG 121 Environmental Science 1 This course discusses on physical environmental issues and its measurement methods. The student is to decide on design especially from the scientific aspects of the natural and built environment. Sustainability issues on natural resources and its relationship with the physical development will be discussed. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Relate issues in physical environment with principles of design (C3, CTPS). (ii) Reproduce basic alternative list of resources energy to deal conservation issues (P3, CTPS). (iii) Propose laboratory and field measures suitable to gauge climate element (A3, CS). References 1. Abdul Malek Abdul Rahman et al. (2009), Towards A Low-Energy Building Design For Tropical Malaysia. USM Publisher. 2. Ken Yeang (2006). Ecodesign: A Manual for Ecological Design. Wiley- Academy. 3. Mat Santamouris (editor) (2006). Environmental Design of Urban Buildings: An Integrated Approach. 4. Christian S (editor) (2003). In Detail Solar Architecture. Birkhauser Publisher for Architecture, Munchen.

RAG 132 Introduction to Built Environment & Human Settlement This course introduces the origins of human settlement on a various scales. The theory of the built environment and the regulations associated with it will be discussed. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Relate the elements in built environment with the history of human settlement (C3, CTPS) (ii) Understand and practice regulations associated with built environment (EM, C2). (iii) Respond in the way of group discussion about issues associated with human settlement (P3, TS) (iv) Differentiate sustainable build environment in critical way (CTPS, A3).

76

References 1. Wendy R. Mcclure (Author), Tom J. Bartuska (Editor), (2007) The Built Environment: a collaborative inquiry into design and planning, Hoboken : John Wiley & Sons. 2. N.J. Habraken and J. Teicher, (2000) editors, The Structure of the Ordinary: Form and Control in the Built Environment. MIT Press. 3. J. Charles and J. Kibert, (1999) Reshaping the Built Environment: Ecology, Ethics, and Economics. Island Press. 4. N. Crowe, (1997) Nature and the Idea of a Man-made World: An Investigation into the Evolutionary Roots of Form and Order in the Built Environment, MIT Press.

RAG 161 Building Construction 1 This course introduces basic comprehension pertaing to building and materials used in the building components, beginning with systems, basic structure and its building relationship. It covers the main component of substructure, superstructure and roof systems. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Indentify construction materials which used in constructions (C4, CTPS) (ii) Organize types of materials suitable for constructions and sketch construction system in simple way (P4, CTPS) (iii) Propose materials and construction system which are suitable for building constructions (A3, LL) References 1. Edward, A & Joseph I (2004), Fundamentals of Building Construction Material & Methods 4th Edition, John Wiley & Sons, USA. 2. Seeley, I.H. (1995) Building technology 5th Edition, Mac Millan. 3. Walton, D.W. (1987) Building Construction: A Handbook for Diploma Students, Mac Millan. 4. Francis DK Ching, Building Construction Illustrated, Van Norstrand-Reinhold.

RAS 203 Architecture Studio I This course translate the basic and major elements used in buildings and environmental designs. Students are guided to come up with spatial designs based on design elements learned from exercising problem based projects either individual or in groups. Students are also required to exhibit and explain the design products.

77

Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will acquire the: (i) Explore design elements. (C3, CTPS). (ii) Produce again spatial spaces using design elements (P3, TS) (iii) Clarify design elements being used. (A3, CS). References 1. Laseau, P. (2001). Graphic Thinking For Architects & Designers 3rd Edition. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 2. Mills, C. (2000). Designing With Models: A Studio Guide To Making And Using Architectural Design Models. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 3. Ching, F.D.K. (1996). Architecture: Form, Space & Order. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 4. Lin, Mike W. (1993). Drawing And Designing With Confidence: A Step-By-Step Guide. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

RAS 204 Architecture Studio 2 This course translate the basic and major elements used in buildings and environmental designs. Students are guided to come up with spatial designs based on design elements learned from exercising problem based projects either individual or in groups. Students are also required to exhibit and explain the design products. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will acquire the: (i) Explore design elements (C3, CTPS). (ii) Produce again spatial spaces using design elements (P3, TS) (iii) Clarify design elements being used. (A3, CS). References 1. Laseau, P. (2001). Graphic Thinking For Architects & Designers 3rd Edition. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 2. Mills, C. (2000). Designing With Models: A Studio Guide To Making And Using Architectural Design Models. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 3. Ching, F.D.K. (1996). Architecture: Form, Space & Order. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 3. Lin, Mike W. (1993). Drawing And Designing With Confidence: A Step-By-Step Guide. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

78

RAK 232 Principles of Architectural Design The course encompasses the scope and definition of architecture language and vocabulary which includes elements of architecture design such as lines, shapes, color, texture, space, volume and scale. It also touches on architectural principles such as unity, contrast, proportion, harmony, balance, dominance and subordination, gradation; time and sequence. The course uses selected examples from historical and contemporary architecture. Relationship between form and function, technology, art, society and other elements and their effect on design. The course also covers case studies of important contemporary and past figures in architecture. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will acquire the: i) Define the architectural elements and principles. (C1) ii) Interpret and sketch the product critically (C2, CTPS, P4) iii) Relate and report the architectural element and principles with the case studies. (C4, CTPS, CS, A2) References 1. Zulkifli Hanafi (1985) Kompendium Sejarah Seni Bina Timur. USM 2. Zulkifli Hanafi (1986) Prinsip-prinsip Rekaan Seni Bina. USM 3. Zulkifli Hanafi (1988) Tokoh-tokoh Seni Bina Moden. USM 4. D.K.Ching, Francis, Architecture, Form, Order & Space, 2nd Edition, Van Bostrand Reinhold, 1993 5. Faulkner, Waldron. Architecture and colour. New York: John Wiley-Interscience, 1972. RAG 232 Architectural Working Drawing and Documentation Introduction to the role and status of drawings and other documents in the legal, contractual, administrative and technical context through the various project stages from pre-contract to post-contract. Students will be introduced to information structuring for working (submission/tender/contractual/production) drawings, schedules, detailing and specifications. This course is studio based and is coordinated with design studio where each student will prepare a set of working drawings and specification for a previously designed single storey building, preferably a detached house. Students learn by doing as Drawing and Specification project work runs the full semester with intermittent. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will acquire the: (i) Identify the role and status of drawings and other documents in the legal, contractual, administrative and technical context through the various project stages from precontract to post-contract. (C1)

79

(ii) Draw clearly and comprehensively using correct graphic symbology to convey accurate instructions on built form, sizing, technology, materials, construction suitable for statutory, contractual and building purposes. (C5, CS3) (iii) Select between different materials, finishes and technology to best reflect client or project requirements and aspirations. Write in a succint and concise manner, a specification document describing the quality of workmanship and material to be used with a set of project drawings. (A3, P5, CTPS3) References 1. Bowyer, Jack (1985)." Practical Specification Writing - for Architects and Surveyors" 2nd ed., Hutchinson & Co., London. 2. Ayers, C (1975). "Specifications : for Architecture, Engineeering and Construction" USA. 3. Willis, A.J. (1971)." Specification Writing for Architects and Surveyors" 6th edn., GB. 4. Dunham, C.W. (1971). "Contracts, Specification and Law for Engineers" 2nd edn., McGrawHill, New York. 5. Goldsmith, G. (1948). "Architect's Specifications" AIA. Washington D.C., USA. RAG 234 Computer Aided Design for Architecture This course is to provide exposure, training and to develop skills to produce 2 dimensional architectural drawings like plans, elevations, sections and detailing through the application of computer aided design software (AutoCAD). Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will acquire the: (i) Developing 2 dimensional architectural drawing skills using AutoCAD software (C3, CTPS) (ii) Producing drawings using the available commands in the AutoCAD software and having the ability to use all the commands to produce drawings (P4, CTPS) (iii) Discussing as a team and presenting the edited and printed drawings according to required scale and paper sizes. (A2, TS, CS) References 1. Hassan, Ahmad Sanusi, Two Dimensional AutoCAD Design Drawings Five Star Publisher 2011 2. Thomas, Robert M. Encyclopedia AutoCAD Sybex Tech Asian Edition 1991. 3. Omura, George. Mastering AutoCAD 2000 Premium Edition. Sybex 2000. 4. Snyder, James. Architectural Construction Drawings with AutoCAD John Wiley and Sons 1998.

80

RAG 265 Building Construction 2 This course is a continuation of Building Construction 1 with emphasis on more complex building systems and advanced material. The scope covers construction systems from substructure such as pilings, retaining walls and basement constructions. It also elaborate on super structure of in-situ reinforced concrete, precast concrete as well as steel frames and their various component from columns, beams and floorings such as two-way, one-way, ribbed, waffle and precast slabs as well as composite floors. This course also outlines the wide span roof structures, construction and finishes. It also covers on state-of-the-art building envelope and finishes such as curtain walling and different types of claddings. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will acquire the: i) Elaborate on types of materials, components and details of construction system,(C4) ii) Illustrate and explain critically, the systems according to appropriate use for construction and detailings (CTPS 3, P4) iii) Collect and analyse case study data through observation and interviews as well as report and present information in a critical manner. (CTPS 3, A3, CS 3) iv) Interact, respect other group members and participate in a research as a team player. (TS3, A3) References 1. Edward, A & Joseph I (2004), Fundamentals of Building Construction Material & Methods 4th Edition, John Wiley & Sons, USA. 2. Warszawski, A (1999), Industrialised and Automated Building System, A Managerial Approch, E & FN Spon, London. 3. Everett, A. (1994) Materials 5th Edition, Fed. Res. Bank of Boston. 4. Illingworth, JR (1993) Construction Methods and Planning, E & FN Spon, London 5. Uniform Building By-Laws 1985, Laws of Malaysia

RAS 305 Architecture Studio 3 The course guides the students to acquire a solid understanding of the design process involving medium storey buildings located in rural or natural environment. Exposure focuses on a sustainable and ecological approach to the planning and design of the site and building architecture. Guidance is given to integrate environmental friendly structure, building services, technology, materials and construction. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will acquire the: (i) Explore and explain elements and principles based on sustainable and ecological concept in architecture design. Analyse planning and site design and existing architecture which encompasses analysis of form, space, aesthetic, technology,

81

structure, building services, material and construction. Explain the choice of building design explored and analysed through oral, graphic and architectural sketches. (CTPS, CS, P, C4, A2, A3). (ii) Reproduce individually and collaboratively in groups, the site planning and design, form and space by using the design elements and principles based on the sustainable and ecological concept. (CTPS, TS, C5, P3, A4). (iii) Organize and sketch the architectural building form, spaces and integrating the structure, building services, technology, material and construction based on the sustainable and ecological concept. (CTPS, CS, C5, P4, A4). References 1. Kilbert, C.J (2005). Sustainable Construction: Green Building Design and Delivery. New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 2. McHarg, I (1992). Design with Nature. New York: John Wiley & Sons Inc. 3. Pearson, D (2001). New Organic Architecture: The Breaking Wave. London: Gaia Books Limited. 4. Halliday, S (2007). Sustainable Construction. Oxford: Butterworh-Heinemann. 5. Yeang, K (2007) . Eco Skyscrapers. Australia: The Images Publishing Group Pty Ltd.

RAS 306 Architecture Studio 4 Students are guided to acquire a sound understanding of the processes, elements and principles involved in the urban design context. Freedom are given to handle projects involving a comprehensive planning and design of a building which focuses on the integration of structure, building services, technology, materials and construction in an urban area. Students will be exposed to elements and principles or urban design with urban infill characteristics. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will acquire the:(i) Explore elements and principles of urban planning and design. Analyze urban planning and design which encompasses the analysis of form, space, aesthetic, historical aspects, and heritage building. (CTPS, CS, P, C4, A2, A3). (ii) Reproduce individually and collaboratively in groups, the site planning and design, form and spaces using urban design elements for a medium storey building which fulfills the requirement of local authority and uniform building by-law (UBBL). (CTPS, TS, C5, P3, A4). (iii) Organize and sketch the architectural building form and spaces by integrating the structure; material and construction; and building services. (CTPS, CS, C5, P4, A4).

82

References 1. Lagro Jr., James A & Lin, Mike W, Site Analysis Drawing & Designing with Confidence. Asia, 1999. 2. Antoniades, Anthony, Poetic of Architecture: Theory of Design. Van Nostrand Reinhold, 1992. 3. Lynch, Kelvin, The Image of The City. MIT Press, 1961. RAG 322 - Environmental Science 2 This course enhances the understanding of building environmental control passively and actively, highlighting its capability and limitations integrated with the building system. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will acquire the: (i) Connect physical environmental issues and impact of challenges on buildings, maintenance and energy savings. (C3, CTPS). (ii) Evaluate actual passive and active environmental quality control situation (C6, CTPS). (iii) Connect the physical environment impact on buildings and innovative climatic design solutions (A4, CS). References 1. Abdul Malek Abdul Rahman et al. (2009), Towards A Low-Energy Building Design For Tropical Malaysia. USM Publisher. 2. KenYeang (2006). Ecodesign: A Manual For Ecological Design. Wiley Academy. 3. Mat Santamouris (editor) (2006). Environmental Design of Urban Buildings: An Integrated Approach. 4. Christian S (editor) (2003). In Detail Solar Architecture. Birkhauser - Publisher for Architecture, Munchen.

RAG 333 Advanced Computer Aided Architecture Design This course is to develop skills and creativity in producing 3 dimension drawings and movie animation in architecture and interior design using computer aided technology (3dStudio Max software). Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will acquire the: (i) To obtain the skill to sketch both exterior and interior in 3D dimension and to animate building using the Studio 3D Studio Max(C3, CTPS). (ii) To document the drawings drawn manually into digital drawing(P4, CTPS). (iii) To produce a digital presentation based on CAD creative product. (A2, CS).

83

References 1. Hassan, Ahmad Sanusi, Module Teaching: Architectural Movie Animation, Unpublished Handbook (digital). Universiti Sains Malaysia, 2010. 2. _____, 3D Studio Max 11: Users Manual. USA: Autodesk Inc. 2011. 3. _____, AutoCAD 2011: Users Manual. USA: Autodesk Inc. 2011. 4. Hassan, Ahmad Sanusi, Lukisan Dua Dimensi AutoCAD. Penang: Five Star Publisher, 2002. 5. _____, Audiograbber: Users Manual. USA: Audiograbber Inc. 2010. 6. _____, Window Movie Maker, USA: Microsoft Inc. 2010 RAK 344 History and Theory of Architecture This course covers design history and theory in architecture from prehistoric to before modern period (Renaissance). This understanding is important in giving conceptual description linking with design history and theory to the design root of contemporary architecture and its development, an influence to the architecture in Malaysia and the rest of the world. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will acquire the: (i) Understanding Design History of Architecture with reference to eastern and western world view of the architecture evolution with current influence and approach (C2, CTPS). (ii) Corelated design history and theory of architecture to style, construction, building structures, religion, economy, politics, philosophy etc. (P3, CTPS). (iii) Integrating knowledge in architectural design through design history and theory to the studio design and practices (A3, CS). References 1. Abdul Ghani, Muhammad Ilyas. (2003). Sejarah Mekah (History of Makkah). translated by Mesyhadi, Anang Rikza, Jakarta: Menteri Agama Republik Indonesia. 2. Al-Ahmadi, Abdul Rahman. (1990). Bangunan Kuno Masjid Kampung Laut: Hubungannya dengan Campa dan Demak (Old Building Kampung Laut Mosque: Its relation to Champa and Demak. Warisan Kelantan IX (Kelantan Heritage IX). Edited by N.M. Nik Mohd. Salleh. Kota Bharu: Kelantan State Museum Corporation. 3. Boyd, A. (1962). Chinese Architecture and Town Planning. London. 4. Govinda, Lama Anagarika. (1976). Psycho-cosmic Symbolism of the Buddhist Stupa. Emeryville: Dharma Press. 5. Dawson, Barry & Gillow, John. (1994). The Traditional Architecture of Indonesia. London: Thames and Hudson Ltd. 6. Fletcher, Banister. (1999). A History of Architecture. 20th edition. Edited by Cruickshank, Dan. New Delhi: CBS Publishers & Distributors. 7. Knapp, Ronald G. (1989). Chinas Vernacular Architecture: House Form and Culture. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press.

84

Kuban, Dogan. (1974). Muslim Religious Architecture: Part 1 The Mosque and Its Early Development. Edited by P.V. Baaren, L. Leertouwer, F. Leemhuis & H. Buning. Leiden: E.J. Brill. 9. Leacroft, Helen & Richard. (1976). The Buildings of Early Islam. London: Hodder & Stoughton. 10. Trachtenberg, M. dan Hyman, I., (1986), Architecture: From Prehistory to PostModernism/The Western Tradition. New York: Harry N. Abrams Inc. 11. _____, Tillotson, G.H.R. (ed.) (1998). Paradigms of Indian Architecture. Surrey: Curzon Press. RAK 345 Housing Studies This course discusses the housing concept, related policies and human settlement. It analyse the connection between urban and housing including quality and housing supply. It also discusses the housing sources such as land, support and technology. It also exposes to the student regarding housing strategy and alternative approach including project planning, site analysis, probabilities, social aspects and physical housing including issues of government plan implementation transformation, house typology. Housing concepts and others to rationalise the Act enforcement and the regulations related to the housing industry. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will acquire the: (i) To connect the housing concepts towards existing housing development physical conditions (C3, CTPS). (ii) Analyse and identify cause and effect from policy implementation as well as the regulations in improving the delivery effort / housing supply to the public. (P3, CTPS). (iii) To propose solutions to existing housing issues identified from research findings by way of group collaboration (A3, CS, TS, LL). References 1. French, Hilary (2006), New Urban Housing. Laurence King Publishing Ltd, United Kingdom. 2. Goodchild, Barry (1997), Housing and Urban Environment: A Guide to Housing Design, Renewal, and Urban Planning. Blackwell Science Ltd, London. 3. Colquhoun, I. and Fauset, P.G. (1991) Housing Design in Practice. Longman Scientific and Technical, Harlow, Essex. 4. Day, C. (1993) Places of the Soul. The Aquarian Press, London. 5. Howard, E. (1985) Garden Cities of Tomorrow. Attic, Eastbourne. 6. An Introduction to Housing Layout: A GLC Study. The Architectural Press, London (1978). 7. Habraken, N.J. (1971) Supports: An Alternative to Mass Housing. The Architectural Press, London. 8. David Drakakis Smith (1981) Perbandaran Perumahan dan Proses Pembangunan (Terjemahan: Alip Rahim dan Rahmat Azam Mustafa), USM, P.Pinang 85

8.

9.

Abdul Hakim Mohamed (1990), Perancangan Projek Binaan. Dewan Bahasa dan Pustaka, Kuala Lumpur 10. Nabeel Hamidi (1991) Housing Without Houses. Van Nostrand Rteinhold Publication 11. Ghani Salleh and Meng, LL (1997), Low Cost Housing in Malaysia. Utusan Publication RAK 346 History and Theory In Architecture 2 This course covers history and theory in architecture from before colonial time to the present day in Malaysia. This understanding is important in giving conceptual description linking with history and theory to the root design of contemporary architecture and its development, and its influence to the local architecture in Malaysia. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will acquire the: (i) Understanding Design History of Architecture in Malaysia and its influence to the local architecture (C2, CTPS). (ii) Corelated design history and theory of architecture with analysis of the existing buildings. (P3, CTPS). (iii) Integrating knowledge in architectural design through design history and theory to the studio design and practices (A3, CS). References 1. Elmagalta, Aymen Mohamed, Hassan, Ahmad Sanusi & Ku Hassan, Ku Azhar, (2010), Resort Architecture in Langkawi, Malaysia, Penang: USM Press. 2. Fletcher, Banister, (1999), A History of Architecture. 20th edition. Edited by Cruickshank, Dan. New Delhi: CBS Publishers & Distributors. 3. Hassan, Ahmad Sanusi, (2001), Issues in Sustainable Development of Architecture in Malaysia, Penang: USM Press 4. Hassan, Ahmad Sanusi, (2011), Heritage Buildings in George Town, Malaysia, Penang: USM Press 5. Trachtenberg, M. dan Hyman, I., (1986), Architecture: From Prehistory to PostModernism/The Western Tradition, New York: Harry N. Abrams Inc. 6. Cagamas Berhad (1997) Housing the Nation. Cagamas Bhd, Kuala Lumpur 7. 1st to 9th Malaysian Plan, Government of Malaysia 8. Edward, B (2000). Sustainable Housing Principles and Practice. London: E & FN Spon 9. UBBL and relevant laws of Malaysia

86

RAL 371 - Measured Drawing A documentation or record of a particular building in the form of scaled drawings and special reports. The drawings are to include the building location, site, floors, elevations, sections, 3-D drawings and detailing of special features of the building. The report is a compilation of the buildings historical background, ownership and design development involved. Aspects of design concept, spatial function, technique of construction, building orientation and decoration will be investigated and reported. Techniques of building measurement include the application of theodolites, measuring tapes, photography and sketches on site. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will acquire the: (i) To Prepare a scaled measured drawing of selected heritage building . (C3, CTPS) (ii) To relate the design of the above building with its background history and beginning. (P1, P3, CTPS) (iii) To present a product of work in the form of scaled drawing and comprehensive report of the selescted building. (A5, CS) References 1. Lim, J.Y. (1987), The Malay House: Rediscovering Malaysias Indigenous Shelter System. Penang, Institut Masyarakat 2. Fletcher, Banister, (1999), A History of Architecture. 20th edition. Edited by Cruickshank, Dan. New Delhi: CBS Publishers & Distributors. 3. Nasir, A.H. (1987), Traditional Malay Wood Carving. Kuala Lumpur, DBP 4. Hanafi, Z. (1999), Siri Lukisan Rumah Melayu Di Pulau Pinang, Kulim. Amber Solara Pub 5. Koenig, P.A. (2006) Design Graphic; Drawing Technique for Design Professionals. 2nd Edition, Pearson Prentice Hall

87

2.8.8

Courses in Building Surveying

RBS 203 Building Surveying Studio 1 This course introduces the building services, technical information, guidelines and building by-laws including the application of Road, Drainage and Building Acts; Uniform Building Bye-Laws (UBBL), etc Learning Outcome At the end of the course students will acquire the: (i) Linking of ideas based on technical information and solves problems. (C5, CTPS). (ii) Demonstrated skills to understand the Laws of the Uniform Building and its application in the design. (P5, CTPS, LS). (iii) Evaluate the standard procedures set by others and adjust the planning / design in accordance with the requirements of local authorities. (A3, TS). References 1. Building Surveying Faculty (2005). Stock Condition Surveys, 2nd Edition. - RICS Books 2. Peter Glover (2005). Building Surveys. 6th Edition. Butterworth-Heinemann. 3. Barry, R. (1999). The Construction of Buildings in Vol.1 Vol. 5. 7th ,5th , 4th,3rd Editions respectively. Blackwell 4. Lembaga Penyelidikan Undang-Undang (Hingga Jun 2007). Undang-Undang Kecil Bangunan Seragam 1984 [P.W. 5178/85]. ILBS.

RBS 204 Building Surveying Studio 2 This course focuses on the investigation and evaluation of historical buildings by site visits observing the building conditions, its appropriateness and its surroundings. Emphasis is given to the building defect diagnosis, repair methods and research report preparation. Learning Outcome At the end of the course students will acquire the: i. Merging the results of investigations into the buildings so that the results of repair of buildings across the front. (C5, CTPS) ii. Demonstrate a professional attitude in building restoration projects in progress. (P5, EM) iii. Implementation of procedures to conclude the work disability diagnosis, methods of improvement through the provision of reports as a team (A4, LS).

88

References 1. Peter Glover (2006). Building Surveys, 6th Edition, Butterworth-Heinemann 2. Edward A. Noy, James Douglas. (2005). Building Surveys and Reports Blackwell Publishing 3. Building Surveying Faculty (2003). Dilapidations. - RICS Books 4. David Chappell. (1996). Report Writing For Architects and Project Managers. 3rd Edition. Blackwell Science 5. Watt D, Swallow P. (1996). Surveying Historic Buildings. Don head Publishing Limited. 6. Lembaga Penyelidikan Undang-Undang (Hingga Jun 2007). Undang-Undang Kecil Bangunan Seragam 1984 [P.W. 5178/85]. ILBS

RBK 231 Principle of Building Surveying This course outlines the general principles and responsibility of the professionalism in building surveying. The main scope of work and responsibilities focusses on the administration and building control; building management and development; building evaluation and conservation; building maintenance and insurances. Learning Outcome At the end of the course students will acquire the: (i) Identify the real needs of the field survey of buildings by certain categories (C4) (ii) Follow the standards and understand the implications of building the data (P3, CTPS) (iii) Comply with requirements to ensure the quality of construction through the analysis of the facts and the latest information (A2, LL) (iv) Describe the health and safety issues along with the built environment professions, other professions (A3, EM) References 1. Glover, Peter. (2006). Building Surveys. 6th Edition. Butterworth-Heinemann Oxford: Reed Elsevier 2. Edward A. Noy & Douglas (2005). Building Surveys and Reports. 3rd Edition. J. Blackwell Publishing. 3. Westwood, Fiona. (2001). Achieving Best Practice: Shaping Professionals for Success. McGraw Hill 4. Chappel D. (1996). Report writing for Architects and Project Managers. 3rd Edition. Blackwell Science.

RBS 305 Building Surveying Studio 3 This course focuses on analyzing building defects. It consists of detail plan assessment on building facilities and automation, which also include layout plan, location, size, lighting and fire prevention systems. 89

Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will acquire the: (i) Systematically assess the data and is capable of finding solutions. (C6, CTPS) (ii) Review and improve building maintenance management system oriented entrepreneurship (P6, KK) (iii) Perform maintenance work through effective leadership and professional (A5, TS4, EM) References 1. Building Surveying Faculty (2005). Stock Condition Surveys. 2nd edition. - RICS Books. 2. Malcolm Hollis (2005). Surveying Buildings. 5th Edition. - RICS Books. 3. Building Surveying Faculty (2003) Dilapidations - RICS Books. 4. Jennings, A (1995). Accounting and Finance for Building and Surveying - Palgrave Macmillan. 5. Lembaga Penyelidikan Undang-Undang (Hingga Jun 2007). Undang-Undang Kecil Bangunan Seragam 1984 [P.W. 5178/85]. ILBS.

RBS 306 Building Surveying Studio 4 This course includes advanced study of building pathology and diagnosis of building defects. Assessment of plans using current methods and instrumentation to acquire accurate and relevant information with current issues. Study encompasses air ventilation, lighting and fire prevention system in buildings.
Learning Outcome At the end of the course students will acquire the:

(i) Assess and fully responsible for the work of the building and construction management effectively. (C6, CTPS) (ii) Develop methods of investigation on the building and explore business opportunities in this field. (P7, KK). (iii) Execute responsibilities for building management problems quickly and accurately to the public interest. (A5, LS, EM3). References 1. Building Surveying Faculty (2005). Stock Condition Surveys. 2nd edition. RICS Books. 2. Malcolm Hollis (2005). Surveying Buildings. 5th Edition. - RICS Books. 3. Building Surveying Faculty (2003) Dilapidations - RICS Books. 4. State Govt of Penang (Feb 2008). Heritage Management Plan: Historic City of George Town 5. Lembaga Penyelidikan Undang-Undang (Hingga Jun 2007). Undang-Undang Kecil Bangunan Seragam 1984 [P.W. 5178/85]. ILBS.

90

RBK 351 Professional Practice for Building Surveyor. This course emphasize on the professional practices of Building Surveyors in Malaysia and its evolution within the framework of Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyor (RICS) United Kingdom and commonwealth countries. It includes ethics and behavior of professional, their responsibilities and services, appointment of consultants including agreement and scale of professional fees, and also enforcing of related laws & regulations Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will acquire the: (i) Adjudicate the issues of disputes and the ability to make a decision agreed by all parties. (C6, CS) (ii) Following the survey of professional practice and explore the building with responsibility for producing an ethical consultant (P3, LL, EM). (iii) Recommend the terms of reference and professional papers (A3, KK). References 1. Edward A. Noy (Revised by James Douglas). (2005). Building Surveys and Reports, 3rd Edition. Blackwell Publishing. . 2. Murdoch, John (2002). Negligence in Valuation and Surveys. London: RICS Books. 3. Westwood, Fiona.(2001). Achieving Best Practice: Shaping Professionals for Success. McGraw Hill Publishing Company. 4. ISM Building Surveyor Section (1995). Akta (Deraf) Juruukur Bangunan. Institution of Surveyors Malaysia.

RBG 351 Building Maintenance This course focuses on planned maintenance program for building, encompassing conservation, preservation and delapidated buildings as well as building space usage. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will acquire the: (i) Interpret the concept of short and long term maintenance of the building in a systematic manner (C6) (ii) Diversification techniques and new technologies while monitoring the impact and sustainability of the ongoing costs (P6, KK, CTPS) (iii) Solve problems related to maintenance of historic buildings by taking into account the sensitivities of people and property "mixed" in a professional manner (A5, EM, LS)

91

References 1. Edited by Keith Alexander et al. (2004). Facilities Management Innovation and Performance. Spon Press. 2. Richardson, Barry A. (1995). Remedial Treatment of Buildings Construction. Press Ltd., Second Edition. 3. Mills, Edward D. Butterworth. (1990). Building Maintenance and Preservation, A Guide for Design and Management. Heinemann, Surrey 4. Ivor H. Seeley. (1977) Building Maintenance. Macmillan Press Ltd

RBL 371 Building Surveying Studies This course focuses on the academic study in building surveying. Research methods includes variuos aspects of building environment which emhasize on preparation of report and oral presentation of research output. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will acquire the: (i) Formulate problems associated to buildings, local issues and proven solutions in details (C6, CTPS, EM) (ii) Building a research model in line with the objectives of the study alone or in groups (P7, CTPS, LS) (iii) Propose and present the research findings relevant to the needs of design, construction and safety features of buildings (A5, CS). References 1. Salkind, N.J. (2003) Exploring Research, Person Education Inc. New Jersey, USA. 2. Tan, W.(2001). Practical Research Methods, Prentice Hall, Singapore 3. Straus, A (1998). Basics of Qualitative Research: Techniques and Procedures for Developing Grounded Theory, SAGE Publication Inc. California, USA 4. Sharp, J.A. and Howard, (1996). The Management Of A Student Research Project, K. Gower Publishing Ltd. Hants, England. 5. Sheffield University. Undergraduate Dissertation; Available: http://www.dcs.shef.ac.uk/teaching/projects

92

2.8.9

Courses in Bachelor of Architecture [LAM Part II)

RAS 403 Architecture Studio 5 This first studio of the Bachelor in Architecture Program focus on strengthening the various skills in the building design process and accumulated theory and ideas in architecture. Emphasis is given to issues involving community and ways of solving housing problems. The course accentuates the social, cultural, place-making, sustainability needs in developing neighbourhoods and human settlement. Course Objectives The objectives of this course, therefore, can be stated as follow: i. To expose students to a much wider scope of the built environment and architectural issues and problem solving ii. To strengthen students sensitivity in human settlement design iii. To train students to systematically and independently handle projects based on a given brief iv. To reinforce students theoretical framework and philosophical views v. To consolidate application of regulatory and legal framework Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will acquire the: Ability to reflect, identify and apply architecture theory in a small scale design and present the ideas Ability to conduct architecture research on housing theory and issues hence to insightfully derive conclusions suitable to local context Ability to gather documentary evidence and analyze site conditions, social and environmental data and identify design opportunities and limitations. Ability to appraise design options on human settlement/housing and derive sensitive solutions to solve contextual, social, cultural, environmental issues and integrate built form, space, aesthetics, technology, structure, construction, materials and regulatory requirements Ability to present ideas in a concise and effective manner in drawings and verbal communication Ability to write in succinct and concise manner a Design Project Report References 1. French, Hilary (2006), New Urban Housing, Laurence King Publishing Ltd, United Kingdom. 2. Goodchild, Barry (1997), Housing and Urban Environment: A Guide to Housing Design, Renewal, and Urban Planning. Blackwell Science Ltd, London. 3. Colquhoun, I. and Fauset, P.G. (1991) Housing Design in Practice. Longman Scientific and Technical, Harlow, Essex. 4. Day, C. (1993) Places of the Soul, The Aquarian Press, London.

93

5.

Lawson, B (2001). The Language of Space, The Reed Educational and Professional Publishing Ltd, London 6. Fathy, H (1973) Architecture for the Poor, An Experiment in Rural Egypt. Chicago and London: The University Chicago Press 7. Habraken, N.J. (1971) Supports: An Alternative to Mass Housing, The Architectural Press, London. 8. Nabeel Hamidi (1991) Housing Without Houses, Van Nostrand Rteinhold Publication 9. Edward, B (2000). Sustainable Housing Principles and Practice. London: E & FN Spon 10. Town and Country Planning Act 1976, UBBL 1985 and relevant laws and guidelines of Malaysia RAS 404 Architecture Studio 6 This studio design exercises consist of 2 projects a minor project as warm up exercise and a major project on multi-storey design. The main project focuses on the design of multi-storey buildings and the challenges and complexity of integrating design elements with technological requirements such as structural, construction, services systems as well as the green design elements. Students are exposed to solving basement car-parking and vertical movement and circulation for occupants and services. They must also attempt to apply the passive and active approach in renewable energy and energy efficient concept as well as features to test their understanding on sustainable design. Course Objectives The objectives of this course, therefore, can be stated as follow: i. ii. iii. iv. v. To strengthen students capability in developing design ideas and transform them into building spaces, layout and built form. To train students in handling the complexities and integrations between various design elements and components especially structural and services To reinforce students sensitivity towards green design and its application (training sustainable literate architects of the future). To familiarize students with all the requirements and guidelines on building services and their application To develop skill in problem solving process with aspects such as of theory, spatial, visual, technology, to the functionality requirements

Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will acquire the: Ability to reflect, identify and apply architecture theory in a small scale design and present the ideas Ability to conduct architecture research on high-rise building and issues. Ability to gather documentary evidence and analyse site conditions, social and

94

environmental data and identify design opportunities and limitations. Ability to appraise design options for high-rise and derive sensitive solutions to solve contextual, functional, environmental issues and integrate built form, space, aesthetics, technology, structure, construction, materials services and regulatory requirements Ability to present ideas in a concise and effective manner in drawings and verbal communication Ability to write in succinct and concise manner a Design Project Report

References 1. Kibert. C.J. (2005) Sustainable Construction, Green Building Design and Delivery, John Wiley and Sons, USA 2. Lynn,S.B et al (1990), Tall Buildings ; 2000 and Beyond, Council on Tall Buildings & Urban Habitat 3. Abdul Rahman, A.M. (2000), Usaha-usaha Mencapai Keselesaan Terma Dalaman di Malaysia, Penerbit USM, Malaysia 4. Hall,F & Greeno, R (2005), Building Services Handbook, 3rd Edition, Elsevier Butterworth-Heinemann 5. Riley, T and Nordenson, G, (2003), Tall Buildings, The Museum of Modern Art, New York 6. UBBL 1985 and relevant laws and guidelines of Malaysia

RAT 430 Energy Efficient Building Design Technology Students are exposed to design a characteristics which highlights energy saving consumption. The governments initiatives are to reduce energy consumption without affecting the tangible and intangible production efficiency. The current situation show that much of energy is wasted to cool the building fabric for human thermal comfort using air-conditioning. As much as 65% to 70% of energy is used for air-conditioning the building interiors and cold rooms for food storage. This course hopes to instill awareness on the importance of saving energy without compromising on the efficiency of the building design function and other aspects. The approach of this course is first to introduce passive solar design elements, then the active approach, followed by the installation of the photovoltaic system. Energy auditing is introduced to the architectural students to demonstrate further where actual savings can be made. It also touches on the effective management system and incentives. Besides the awareness on the importance of energy savings, students are also made aware of the socio-psychological comfort factors and feedback of building users. Course Objectives The main objective of this course is to create awareness that future design of buildings must take into consideration the energy issues and that the form-energy relationship is now the direction to take for tropical architecture.

95

Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will acquire the: Ability to explain the integrating elements for energy officient buildings Ability to identify the natural endowments at the building site Ability to outline design solutions that reduce radiant heat Ability to explain design solutions that generate air movement/natural ventilation Ability to identify strategies for daylight and lighting systems Ability to relate understanding of space cooling and innovative M&E systems Ability to relate understanding of the theory and application of solar electricity Ability to identify other hybrid and active systems such as green roof/landscape/rain water harvesting in reducing energy. Ability to devise own program of energy management at domestic and organization level Ability to apply understanding what have been taught above in a project that incorporates all aspect References 1. Abdul Malek Abdul Rahman, (2004). Low Energy Cooling Technology for Malaysian Homes, USM Publisher 2. Kibert. C.J. (2005) Sustainable Construction, Green Building Design and Delivery, John Wiley and Sons, USA 3. Williamson, T, Radford (2004). A and Bennets, H, Understanding Sustainable Architecture, Spon Press. London. 4. Abdul Malek Abdul Rahman, Muna Hanim Abdul Samad, Mohd. Rodzi Ismail and Azizi Bahauddin, (2009), Towards a Low-Energy Building Design for Tropical Malaysia, USM Publisher.

RAS 503/504 Architecture Studio 7/8 Architecture Studio 7/8 aims to train students in producing a design thesis with emphasis on the various professional aspects of an architects job in relation to design. Students are guided to be competent in preparing project briefs, selecting suitable sites, conducting feasibility studies, defining issues and design requirements, overcoming the constraints and challenges involved in the inception of solutions on a proposed building of their interest. They are required to independently select a project with the appropriate scale and complexities to reflect their capabilities in handling a comprehensive design scheme. The recommended building typologies are: Health Complexes Transportation Centres Educational Institutions Cultural and Community Centres Commercial Buildings Public Institutional Buildings 96

In the Architecture Studio 7 students are required to complete the design process from inception, data collection to analysis and theories, and product synthesis. They should demonstrate the understanding of architectural philosophies, design statement, conceptual proposals, site planning and layout, space planning and organization, massing and facade treatment as well as sensitivity to the surrounding context. Architecture Studio 8 is a continuation of the above studio, whereby students are required to improve and finalise their design scheme. They should then proceed with the technological issues, i.e. the structure, the construction and materials, as well as the services requirements which is to be integrated in the design. This is to test the required level of understanding in this aspect before they can graduate as an architect. Students are advised to select a special feature or a unique aspect of their design as part of the technological studies to demonstrate their competency and building interest. Examples are acoustics requirements of a performance hall or other aspects such as lighting and thermal comfort. Course Objectives Architecture Studio 7 & 8 represents two consecutive semesters of final year student initiated Architectural Design Thesis. "The Design Thesis is a creative outcome of applied research. This is manifested as Design information mainly in graphics form with some supplementary text." Students find and choose their own thesis topic. Although studio based, this thesis course is conducted like applied research and students learn by doing via a series of learning outcomes during vivas and critiques. Stu dents must pass Architecture Studio 7 in the first semester before being allowed to proceed to Architecture Studio 8 during the second and final semester. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will acquire the: Ability to identify design thesis methodology by referencing the professional architects basic scope of work project stages. Ability tp ask relevant questions and listen attentively during client briefing or information gathering. Ability to independantly select project/thesis of appropriate scale and complexity. Ability to correctly interact in written form and verbally with client, experts and regulatory authorities for the intended message/question to be conveyed and feedback/response/result received. Ability to establish the thesis/project scope of works by interpreting client's requirements and aspirations as a Project Brief. Ability to conduct literature review of a related aspect of design Ability to identify design style, philosophy, technical, environmental, economic, cultural or social issues relevant to the design thesis. Ability to gather documentary evidence and analyse similar built designs as case studies. Ability to analyse site conditions and identify design opportunities and limitations.

97

Ability to identify project and site related building, planning and related statutory regulations/requirements. Ability to analyse and prioritise client's (Brief) requirements and aspirations in the form of interaction matrices, work flow diagrams and spatial/organizational charts Ability to paraphrase the project brief and design theory into a Design Hypothesis/Concept/Approach. Ability to demonstrate ability to develope and present a design from inception to detailing Ability to solve the matrices, flow diagrams and charts into planar graphs or bubble diagrams Ability to construct and test probable solutions to meet various aspects of the design hypothesis or statutory requirements for a real or semi-real project. Ability to create a space and building based on tested solutions for the design hypothesis, site context and other considerations. Ability to revise, redesign, detail and develope to improve the spatial and building outcome considering site planning, massing, space planning, aesthetics, creativity, cost, philosophy, theory and technology. Ability to integrate built form, space, aesthetics, technology, structure, construction, materials and services into an elegant and buildable outcome. Ability to write in succint and concise manner appropriate for the building industry, a Project Brief as a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) document related to a professional architect's appointment. Ability to progressively appraise own design proposals against hypothesis and other requirements. Ability to justify and defend design outcomes during public vivas. Ability to support or criticize colleague's research findings and design outcomes during public vivas. Ability to select the most effective and elegant design solution of own work. Ability to verbally and graphically present and discuss the outcome of progressive stages of design at a public viva and to the supervisor. Ability to discuss intelligently with experts in relevant fields to help derive or improve the design outcome. Ability to draw clearly and comprehensively to illustrate design ideas and prototype, consistent with an architect's presentation. Ability to coordinate the use of computer aided design, graphics and photo editors, multimedia and word processing software on computers and other supporting equipment. Ability to make and use physical site or building models to record, simulate, analyse or communicate existing conditions and design ideas. Ability to share gratitute to client, other experts (design team consultants), regulatory authorities, supervisors, and other design colleagues. Ability to demonstrate self reliance and resilience in accepting criticism of design outcomes. Ability to adhere to ethical standards when designing without wholesale copying of ideas.

98

Ability to prioritize verbal and graphical explaination of the design outcome consistent with hypothesis/theory, design stage and target audience. Ability to manage personal time and fianancial resources in order to complete design thesis through inception, data collection, analysis and theory, preliminary scheme design, design development and detailed design. Ability to write in succint and concise manner appropriate for the building industry, a Design Project Report .

References Varied, depending on individual design topic.

RAK 552 Professional Practice in Architecture Exposure to the aspects of professionalism of architects: the Architect Act of 1967, the registration of L.A.M., P.A.M and the professional code of conduct of behavior and responsibility, the work scope of the society, and professional fees; the appointment and the relationship with clients, consultants and contractors; stages and the offerment of working procedure; internal and external office of control project; organization and office-staffing, professionals references, consultancy status, appointment rules and workscopes. Course Objectives The main objective of this course is to expose students on the aspects of professionalism of architects. These aspects include the Architect Act of 1967, examination/membership registration of LAM & PAM, types of architectural practices, professional codes of conduct of behavior and responsibility, minimum professional fees, appointment and relationship with clients, consultants and contractors, building contracts and general project management etc Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will acquire the: Ability to explain the importance of Registration with LAM & PAM Ability to explain the significance of Part 111 Examinations. Ability to determine the Types of Architectural practices & Case Studies Ability to identify the various shortcomings of Types of Practices Ability to determine the relevance of Architect Act 1967 Ability to expose to the Codes of Professional Conducts and Responsibility Ability to understanding the importance of Scale of Minimum Professional Fees Ability to understanding the roles of other consultants involved in construction Ability to understanding the management and advertisement of architectural services Ability to understanding the importance of UBBL in design/construction Identify the various planning and project implementation procedures Ability to understanding of the PAM Form of Contract 99

Identify the various planning and project implementation procedures Ability to understanding the types of building contracts involved Ability to identify the building tender procedures in construction

References 1. Rajoo, Sundra (1999). The Malaysian Standard Form of Building Contarct, Malayan Law Journal. 2. Murdoch & Hughes (2002) Construction Contract Law & Management, CIOB

RAG 562 Building Technology This course is an advanced level of the building construction and building components and its integration with other building technology systems and building services. It starts with an outline on the development and evolution of technologies and materials followed by optimum integration of the structural and construction systems with the services systems with emphasis on high-rise buildings. Course Objectives The objectives of this course are as follow: i. ii. To reinforce the understanding on the various aspects of building technology, its integration and application to more complex buildings. To strengthen the understanding of optimum integration between the structural and construction with the services systems such as air-conditioning systems, water and electrical supply, fire-fighting systems, building intelligent/automation systems and other special systems required for a certain type of building. To train students in making critical analysis on the appropriate use and design of the technology systems with the functional requirements of different types of buildings and their actual performance on real buildings.

iii.

Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will acquire the: Ability to identify suitable subject in the form of case study buildings similar with design thesis Ability to follow the evolution of building technology and its relation to the theory behind their development Ability to explain the various high-rise structural systems Ability to explain and derive the ways of integrating structural components with the building Services Requirements Ability to explain and appraise the appropriate use of building envelope with building functions Ability to explain the concept and systems of fire fighting for high-rise buildings and law requirements

100

Ability to explain the integration between passive and active intelligent systems Ability to gather information and appraise the appropriateness of technology from visit of case study buildings Ability to make critical analysis and appraisal on the appropriate use and design of the technology systems with the functional requirements of different types of buildings and their actual performance on real buildings. Ability to present findings of analysis verbally by using simple media and in a concise report

References 1. Kibert. C.J. (2005) Sustainable Construction, Green Building Design and Delivery, John Wiley and Sons, USA 2. Illingworth.J.R. (1993) Construction Methods and Planning, E &FN Spon 3. Lynn,S.B et al (1990), Tall Buildings ; 2000 and Beyond, Council on Tall Buildings & Urban Habitat 4. Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat Committee 8A, (1992) Fire Safety in Tall Buildings, cGraw Hill, USA 5. Abdul Rahman, A.M. (2000), Usaha-usaha Mencapai Keselesaan Terma Dalaman di Malaysia, Penerbit USM, Malaysia 6. Hall,F & Greeno, R (2005), Building Services Handbook, 3rd Edition, Elsevier Butterworth-Heinemann 7. Riley, T and Nordenson, G, (2003), Tall Buildings, The Museum of Modern Art, New York 8. Edward, A & Joseph I (2004), Fundamentals of Building Construction Material & Methods 4th Edition, John Wiley & Sons, USA. 9. UBBL 1985 and relevant laws and guidelines of Malaysia RUL 574 Dissertation The main objective of this course is not on the originality of research area but more as an exercise in applied research pertaining to a special interest of various topics. It is aimed to expose students with the correct methodology of research work from topic selection to data collection and analysis and the right presentation. Students are encouraged to choose a topic relevant to their design thesis which will enhance their understandings of its issues and theories. It should also reflect an area related to Malaysian architecture. Course Objectives The main objective of this course is an exercise in applied research pertaining to a special interest on various topics and not necessarily on the originality of research area. This course extends over two semesters and exposes students to the correct methodology of research work from topic selection, problem identification, data collection, analysis and communication. Students are encouraged to choose a topic relevant to their design thesis that will enhance their understanding of design theory and pertinent issues. It should preferably reflect an area related to Malaysian Architecture.

101

Learning outcomes At the end of the course students will acquire the: Ability to identify issues and/or criteria relevant to aspect or area of design study as persued in Architectural Design Thesis. Ability to define a statement or hypothesis of the issue. Ability to describe the scope of study. Ability to outline steps required to conduct a statistically acceptable methodology for applied research. Ability to convert the methodology steps into actual tasks. Ability to explain and/or rewrite existing theory and practice relevant to the identified issue. Ability to predict and select probable checklist replies/outcomes in questionaire or document surveys. Ability to relate existing and discovered information to Design focus especially for the Architectural Design Thesis. Ability to analyse the documentary and field data Ability to distinguish the applied components from the abstract and/or basic components. Ability to differentiate the generic thoughts/theories/applications from the specific/ proprietary/applications. Ability to identify and prioritise the results derived from analysed data. Ability to rearrange the analysed data into distinct components relevant to hypothesis and scope of study. Ability to summarize and illustrate the possible use of component results in specific aspects or fields of design. Ability to compile a desertation possible for use as a design manual/reference in specific aspects or fields of design. Ability to write in succint and concise manner appropriate for the building industry while maintaining acceptable standards of referencing, quoting, indexing, copyright and acknowledgement. Ability to critique existing design applications or theoretical derivations of the identified components. Ability to compare the results with the stated issue/purpose of study or hypothesis and conclude on its accuracy and applicability in Design. Ability to ask the correct questions and listen attentively during survey. Ability to follow leads to uncovering relevant data. Ability to present and discuss the various stages or results of applied research to a Supervisor via a personal Viva. Ability to discuss intelligently relevant topics with survey respondents and/or laboratory personel. Ability to adhere to a systematic and ethical standards when conducting surveys and/or experiments without falsification of data. Ability to interact verbally and in written form with survey/research respondents / laboratory personel correctly for the intended message/question to be conveyed and

102

feedback/response/result received. Ability to interact constructively with administrative/laboratory/field personnel during the conduct of surveys/experiments. Ability to manage personal time and fianancial resources in order to complete survey.

RHS 505 Housing Law Students are exposed to building contracts (standard forms, defects liability, main-sub contractors relationship), law relating to housing, planing control, and other laws relating to property development. Course Objectives i. ii. iii. iv. v. vi. vii. To define housing law in construction practices. The ares in construction practices in which hosing law applies. The scope of housing law in project development/administraticon. Application of housing law principles and practrices in project administration. To differentiate appliability/non-applicability of housing law principles and practice To comply with housing law principles in construction management. To adopt housing law approach in construction environment.

Learning Outcome In the end of the course, students will acquire the: Ability to define housing law in construction practices Ability to identify areas in construction practices in which housing law applies. Ability to explain and discuss the scope of housing law in project development/administration. Ability to to apply housing law principles and practices in project administration. Ability to differentiate applicability/non-applicability of housing law principles and practice. Ability to practice housing law in project management environment. References 1. Abdul Aziz Hussin (2004). Aspek Undang-Undang Dalam Pengurusan Projek Pembinaan. Pulau Pinang: Penerbit USM 2. Abdul Aziz Hussin, Wan Hazimah Wan Hariri and Nazri Zakaria (2004). Setinggan: Isu Pengurusan, Undang-Undang dan Pembangunan Harta Tanah,. Pulau Pinang. 3. Abdullah Mahmood and Abdul Aziz Hussin (2004). Pembangunan Harta Tanah: Perundangan dan Prosedur Pengursan. Pulau Pinang: Penerbit USM 4. Hj. Salleh Buang. (1966). Housing Development Act

103

RPK 535 Regional and Rural Planning Concepts and theories of regional and rural development. Analysis of regional and rural activities and development of regional and rural development strategies. Course Objectives i. ii. iii. iv. To provide students with an understanding of theories and concepts of regional and rural development. To provide students with an understanding of analytical techniques of analysis of regional and rural development issues and problems. To provide students with a knowledge of globalisation and regional inequality their impact on regional and rural development. To provide students with a knowledge of developing strategies and policies for regional and rural development.

Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: Ability to apply knowledge of physical and social planning. Ability to communicate effectively not only with planners and other professionals related to the built environment but also with the community at large. Ability to acquire in-depth technical competence in the planning discipline. Ability to plan and anticipate future planning issues using innovative and proactive solutions. References 1. Alden, J. Dan R. Morgan, (1974). Regional Planning: A Comprehensive View, Leonard Hill Book: Leighton Buzzard. 2. Ahris Yaakup (Penterjemahan) J. Glasson, (1990). Pengenalan Perancangan Wilayah, DBP: Kuala Lumpur. 3. Abdul Mutalip Abdullah dan Ghani Salleh (1993). (Penterjemah) H.W. Richardson, Ekonomi Wilayah dan Bandar, DBP: Kuala Lumpur. 4. Cloke, P.J. (1979). Key Settlement in Rural Areas, Methuen: London. 5. Bendavid-Val, (1991). A. Regional and Local Analysis for Practioners. 4th Edition, Prager, New York. 6. Ghani Salleh, (2000). Urbanisation & Regional Development in Malaysia, Utusan Publications & Distributors: K. Lumpur. 7. Riddell, (1985). R. Regional Development Policy, Gower: Alder Shot. 8. Spinager, D, (1986). Industrialization Policies and Regional Economic Development in Malaysia, OUP: Singapore

104

REG 562 Building Services Technology This course covers the indoor air quality, noise control , room acoustics, electrical and mechanical systems in buildings which include the fire prevention and control services, transportation in building, lighting system, mechanical ventilation and air-conditioning, plumbing and sanitary services in buildings and building services management/ commissioning. The students will be exposed to the principle of the systems followed by the design of the systems and its management and commissioning. Course Objectives i. ii. iii. iv. v. To learn and understand the principle of building science. To learn and understand the principle of building services. To learn and understand the techniques of planning and design building services. To able to design on various systems in buildigns. To learn and understand the principle of building services management and commissioning.

Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: Understand the principle of building science. Understand the principle of building services. Understand and to be able to design services systems in buildings. Understand the principle of building services management and commissioning. References 1. Nik Fuaad Nik Abllah (1990). Bekalan Air, Pembentungan & Pengairan. Universiti Sains Malaysia, P. Pinang. 2. Chadderton; D.V. (2000). Building Services Engineering, 4th Edition. E & FN Spon. 3. Greeno, R. (1997). Building Services Technology and Design. Longman. 4. Hall, Building Services & Equipment,, Amazon, 1994. 5. Hall, F. & Greeno, R. (2005). Building Services Handbook, 3rd Edition. Elsevier Butterworth-Heinemann. 6. Hall, F. (1999). Building Services and Equipment. Butterworth. 7. Hall, Greeno, Roger , (2007). Bulding Services Handbook. 8. Institute of Plumbing (1977). Plumbing Services Design Guide. 9. Uniform Building By-Laws Malaysia (1984). 10. Wise, A.F.E. & Swaffield, J.A. (2002). Water, Sanitary & Waste Services for Building, 5th Edition. Butterworth-Heinemann.

105

2.9

Information on Course Code Each course has a course code, which is made up of 3 alphabets and 3 numbers, as follows:R A S 1 2 3 | | | | | | | | | | Courses in Series | | | | 00 - Studio | | | | 10 - Workshop/Laboratories | | | | 20 - Physical Environment Studies | | | | 30 - Theory and Methodology | | | | 40 - Cultural & Etiquette Studies | | | | 50 - Management Administration & Regulation | | | | 60 - Science and Technology | | | | 70 - Research and Practical | | | | Course Level | | | | | | Course Implementation: | | S = Studio | | B = Workshop/Laboratories | | K = Lecture only | | G = Combination of lectures and practicals | | T = Combination of lectures & tutorial/seminar | | L = Research | | | | Course Classification: | U = General | A = Architecture | P = Urban & Regional Planning | M = Construction Management | D = Interior Design | E = Building Technology | Q = Quantity Surveying | B = Building Surveying | | R - Code for the School of Housing, Building and Planning

106

3.0

SCHOOL'S REQUIREMENT

The requirements for students to at the School of HBP are summarised as follows: 3.1 Core Courses (72 Units)

These courses are mandatory for all students and they have to obtain a pass. These courses contain the fundamental topics of the School's curriculum and are coded 'T'. 3.2 Elective Courses (36 Units)

Elective courses are alternative courses offered by the School. Students who have chosen to major in one of the programmes, are required to take certain related electives that are classified as priority. When this requirement is satisfied, the student may register for any other electives of their own choice. Code to be used is 'Y'. 3.3 Practical Training

All B.Sc. (HBP) students are required to undergo Practical Training for a period of 12 weeks during their long term vacation in their second year. Practical training carries 6 units out of 72 units of core courses. Candidates undergoing B.Arch. programme are required to fulfill a practical training requirement of 12 weeks at suitable places during their third year long vacation.

107

4.0 ACADEMIC SYSTEM AND GENERAL INFORMATION 4.1 Course Registration Registration is an important activity during the period of study at the University. It is the first step for the students to sit for the examination at the end of each semester. Sign up for the right courses each semester will help to facilitate the graduation of each student from the first semester till the final semester. 4.1.1 Course Registration Secretariat for the Bachelor Degree and Universitys Diploma Student Student Data & Records Section (SDRP) Academic Management Division Registry (Level 1, Chancellory Building) Tel. No. Fax No. Website : : : 04-6532925/3169/4195 04-6574641 registry.usm.my/updr/

SDRP office is the secretariat / manager / coordinator of course registration for the Bachelor Degree and Diploma of the University. Further enquiries about course registration activities for the first degree and diploma can be made at any time at the office of the Student Data & Records Section. 4.1.2 Course Registration Platform i) E-Daftar (E-Registration) E-Daftar is a platform for course registration through website. The registration is done directly through Campus Online portal (campusonline.usm.my). Only students with active account are allowed to register for courses in the E-Daftar. Registration under E-Daftar for Semester 1 usually starts 1-2 days after the release of 'Official' examination result of the Semester 2 from the previous academic year. The system closes a day before Semester 1 begins (usually in September). E-Daftar registration for Semester 2 usually starts 1-2 days after Semester 1 Provisional examination result is released until a day before Semester 2 begins (normally in February). The actual timing of registration under E-Daftar will be announced by the Student Data & Records Section usually during the Revision Week of every semester and will be displayed on the schools/centres/hostels

108

bulletin board and in the USMs official website. Under E-Daftar, students can register any courses offered by USM, except co-curriculum courses. Registration of Co-curriculum courses is still placed under the administration of the Director of the Centre for Co-Curriculum Programme at the Main Campus or the Coordinator of the Co-Curriculum Programme at the Engineering Campus and the Coordinator of the Co-Curriculum Programme at the Health Campus. Co-Curriculum courses will be included in the students course registration account prior to the E-Daftar activity, if their preregistration application successful. ii) Access to E-Daftar System E-Daftar System can be accessed through Campus Online portal (campusonline.usm.my). b) Students need to register in this portal to be a member. Each member will be given an ID and password. c) Students need to use the ID and password to access to their profile page, which includes the E-Daftar menu. d) Students need to click at the E-Daftar menu to access and register for the relevant courses. e) Students are advised to print the course registration confirmation slip upon completion of the registration process or after updating the course registration list (add/drop) within the E-Daftar period. f) E-Daftar system can only be accessed for a certain period of time. g) Guidelines to register/access to E-Daftar portal are available at the Campus Online portals main page. iii) Online Course Registration (OCR) OCR activities are conducted in the Schools/Centres and are applicable to students who are academically active and under Probation (P1/P2) status. Students, who face difficulties to register their courses in the EDaftar can register their courses during the official period of OCR alternatively. Each school is responsible for scheduling this activity. Students must refer to the schedule at the notice board of their respective schools. Official period for OCR normally starts on the first day of the semester (without the penalty charge of RM50.00). After this official period, the registration will be considered late. (The penalty of RM50.00 will be imposed if no reasonable excuse is given.) During the non-penalty period, OCR will be conducted at each school. After Week Six, all registration, including adding and dropping courses will a)

109

be administered by the Examination & Graduation Section Office (Academic Management Division, Registry). 4.1.3 The Frequency of Course Registration in One Academic Session i) Normal Study Semester - 2 times per year (beginning of Semester 1 & Semester 2)

ii) Long semester break (about one month after the final examination of Semester 2) - Once per year - Applicable for relevant students only. 4.1.4 General Guidelines Before Students Register for Courses i) Matters / Information / Documents Required to be noted / considered / referred by students before course registration: - Refer to the respective schools website to get updated information for courses offered or course registration. - Decide courses to be registered according to the semester as stipulated in the Study Program Guide Book. - List courses to be registered and number of units (unit value) for each course. - Provide Cumulative Statement of Grades (Cangred). - Construct Teaching and Learning Timetable for the registered courses (to avoid overlapping in timetable). - Read and comprehend the reminders regarding policies/general requirements for the course registration. ii) The number of maximum and minimum units that can be registered in every semester are stated as below: Academic Status Active P1 P2 Minimum Unit 9 9 9 Maximum Unit 21 12 10

Determination for an academic status in a semester is based on the academic performance of the students in the previous semester (Grade Point Average, GPA):o GPA 2.00 & above = Active Academic Status o GPA 1.99 & below = Probation Academic Status (P1/P2) Students who meet the minimum period of residency (6 semesters for 3 years programme, 7 semesters for 3.5 years programme or 8 semesters for 4 years programme) are allowed to register courses with total units below 9. The semester in which the student is on leave is not considered for the residency period.

110

iii) Type of course codes during registration:T E M U = = = = Core courses Elective courses Minor courses University courses Grade and number of units obtain from these courses are considered for graduation

Two (2) other course codes are:Y = audit courses Z = prerequisite courses Grade and number of units obtain from these courses are not considered for graduation iv) Advice and approval of the Academic Advisor. - Approval from the Academic Advisor is required for the students under Probation status before being allowed to register during the OCR period. Probation students cannot assess E-Daftar for registration. - Approval from the Academic Advisor is not required for the students under Active Status to register courses through E-Daftar. v) Students are not allowed to register and to repeat any course that has achieved a grade 'C' and above. 4.1.5 Information/Document Given To All Students Through Campus Online Portal (www.campusonline.com.my) i) The information of Academic Advisor. ii) Academic information such as academic status, GPA value, CGPA value and year of study. iii) Cangred and Course Registration Form. iv) List of courses offered from all schools/centres. v) Teaching and Learning Timetable for all schools/centres/units from the three campuses. vi) List of pre-registered courses which have been added into the students course registration record (if any). vii) Reminders about the University course registration policies/general requisites. 4.1.6 Registration of Language and Co-Curriculum Courses a) Registration for Language courses through E-Daftar is allowed.

111

However, if any problem occurs, registration for language courses can still be carried out / updated during the official period of OCR at the office of the School of Language, Literacies & Translation. All approval / registration / dropping / adding of the language courses are under the responsibility and administration of the School of Language, Literacies & Translation. Any problems related to the registration of language courses can be made to the School of Language, Literacies & Translation. The contact details are as follow: General Office : 04-6534542 for Main Malay Language Programme Chairperson : 04-6533974 Campus English Language Programme Chairperson : 04-6533406 students Foreign Language Programme Chairperson : 04-6533396 Engineering Campus Programme Chairperson Health Campus Programme Chairperson b) : 04-5995407 : 09-7671252

Registration for Co-Curriculum courses through E-Daftar is not allowed.

Registration for Co-Curriculum courses is either done through pre-registration before the semester begins or during the first/second week of the semester. CoCurriculum courses will be included in the students course registration account prior to the E-Daftar activity, if their pre-registration application successful. All approval / registration / dropping / adding of the Co-Curriculum courses are under the responsibility and administration of the Director of the Centre for CoCurriculum Programme for Main Campus (04-6535243/45/48), Coordinator of the Co-Curriculum Programme for Engineering Campus (04-5995091), Coordinator of the Co-Curriculum Programme for Health Campus (097677547). c) Dropping of Language and Co-Curriculum courses, if necessary, must be made within the first week. After the first week, a fine of RM50.00 will be charged. Registration of Audit Course (Y code) Registration for the Audit course (Y code) is not allowed in the EDaftar. It can only be made during the official period of OCR in the School or Centre involved. Students who are interested must complete the course registration form which can be printed from the Campus Online Portal or obtained it directly from the School. Approval from the lecturers of the course to be audited and the Dean / Deputy Dean (Academic) [signed and stamped] in the course registration form are required.

4.1.7

112

Registration on Audit courses (Y code) is not included in the calculation of the total registered workload units. Grades obtained from Audit course are not considered in the calculation of CGPA and total units for graduation. 4.1.8 Registration of Prerequisite Course (Z code) Registration of the Prerequisite courses (Z code) is included in the total registered workload (unit). Grades obtained from the Prerequisite courses are not considered in the calculation of CGPA and units for graduation. 4.1.9 Late Course Registration / Late Course Addition Late course registration or addition is not allowed after the official period of the OCR ends without any reasonable excuses. General information on this matter is as follows: i) Late course registration and addition are only allowed in the first to the third week with the approval of the Dean. Students will be fined RM50.00 if the reasons given are not reasonable.

ii) Application to add a course after the third week will not be considered, except for the special cases approved by the University. 4.1.10 Dropping Courses Dropping the course is allowed until the end of the sixth week. For this purpose, students must meet the requirements set by the University as follows: i) Dropping Course Form must be completed by the student and signed by the lecturer of the course involved and the Dean / Deputy Dean of their respective schools and submit it to the general office of the School/Centre which is responsible of offering the courses involved. ii) Students who wish to drop a language course must obtain the signature and stamp of the Dean of the School of Language, Literacies and Translation, as well as the signature and stamp of the Dean of their respective schools. iii) Students who wish to drop the Co-Curriculum courses must obtain the approval of the Centre for Co-Curriculum Programme and the signature and stamp of the Dean of their respective schools. iv) The option for dropping courses cannot be misused. Lecturers have the right not to certify the course that the student wish to drop if the student is not serious, such as the record of attendance at lectures, tutorials and practical is unsatisfactory, as well as poor performance in course work. The student will be denied to sit for the examination and will be given grade 'X' and is not allowed to repeat the course during the period of Courses during the Long Vacation (KSCP).

113

4.1.11

Course Registration Confirmation Slip Course registration confirmation slip that has been printed / obtained after registering the course should be checked carefully to ensure no errors, especially the code type of the registered course codes. Any data errors for course registration must be corrected immediately whether during the period of E-Daftar (for student with active status only) or during the period of OCR at the Schools.

4.1.12

Revising and Updating Data / Information / Students Personal and Academic Records Personal and academic information for each student can be checked through the Campus Online portal (campusonline.usm.my). Students are advised to always check all the information displayed on this website. Any application / notification for correction / updating of personal data such as the spelling of names (names must be spelled as shown on the Identification Card), Identification Card number and address (permanent address and correspondence address) must be notified to the office of the Student Data & Records Section. Any application / notification for correction of academic data such as information on Major, Minor, MUET result and the course code should be reported to the office of the Student Data & Records Section. Application / notification for correction of the examination/results data should be reported to the office of the Examination and Graduation Section.

4.1.13

Academic Advisor Each School will appoint an Academic Advisor for each student. Academic Advisors are comprised of academic staff (lecturers). Normally, confirmation from Academic Advisors will be made known to every student during the first semester in the first year of their studies. Academic Advisors will advice the students under their responsibility on the academic-related matters. Among the important advice for the student is the registration planning for certain courses in each semester during the study period. Before registering the course, students are advised to consult and discuss with their Academic Advisor to determine the courses to be registered in a semester.

114

Final year students are advised to consult their respective academic advisors before registering via E-Daftar to ensure they fulfil the graduation requirements. Students under the Probation status (P1/P2) should obtain the approval from the Academic Advisor before they register for courses in a semester through OCR at the School and they are not allowed to register through E-Daftar. 4.2 Interpretation of Unit/Credit a) Unit

Each course is given a value, which is called a UNIT. The unit is determined by the scope of its syllabus and the workload for the students. In general, a unit is defined as follows: Type of Course Theory Practical/Laboratory Language Proficiency Industrial Training/ Teaching Practice b) Contact Contact is defined as formal face-to-face meeting between an academic staff and his/her students and it may take the form of lectures, tutorials, seminar, laboratory and field work. c) Accumulated Credit Unit Units registered and passed are known as credits. To graduate, students must accumulate the total number of credits stipulated for the program concerned. 4.3 Examination System Examination would be held at the end of every semester. Students have to sit for the examination of the courses they have registered. Students are required to settle all due fees and fulfil the standing requirements for lectures/tutorials/practical and other requirements before being allowed to sit for the examination of courses they registered. Course evaluation will be based on the two components of coursework and final examinations. Coursework evaluation includes tests, essays, projects, assignments and participation in tutorials. Definition of Unit 1 unit is equivalent to 1 contact hour per week for 13 - 14 weeks in one semester. 1 unit is equivalent to 1.5 contact hours per week for 13 - 14 hours in one semester 1 unit is equivalent to 1.5 contact hours per week for 13 - 14 weeks in one semester. 1 unit is equivalent to 2 weeks of training.

115

Duration of Examination Evaluated Courses 2 units 2 units 3 units or more 3 units or more Examination Duration 1 hour for coursework of more than 40% 2 hours for coursework of 40% and below 2 hours for coursework of more than 40% 3 hours for coursework of 40% and below

Barring from Examination Students will be barred from sitting the final examination if they do not satisfy the course requirements, such as absence from lectures and tutorials for at least 70%, and have not completed/fulfilled the required components of coursework. Students will also be barred from sitting the final examination if they have not settled the academic fees. A grade 'X' would be awarded for a course in which a student is barred. Students will not be allowed repeating the course during Course during the Long Vacation (KSCP). Grade Point Average System Student academic achievement for registered courses will be graded as follows:
Alphabetic Grade Grade Points

A-

B+

B-

C+

C-

D+

D-

4.00

3.67

3.33

3.00

2.67

2.33

2.00

1.67

1.33

1.00

0.67

Students awarded with grade 'C-' and below for a particular course would be given a chance to improve their grades by repeating the course during the KSCP (See below) or normal semester. Students awarded with grade 'C' and above for a particular course will not be allowed to repeat the course whether during KSCP or normal semester. The achievements of students in any semester are based on Grade Point Average (GPA) achieved from all the registered courses in a particular semester. GPA is the indicator to determine the academic performance of students in any semester. CGPA is the Cumulative Grade Point Average accumulated by a student from one semester to another during the years of study. The formula to compute GPA and CGPA is as follows:

116

n Ui M i Grade Point Average = i=1 __________ n Ui i=1 where n = Number of courses taken Ui = Course units for course i Mi = Grade point for course i Example of calculation for GPA and CGPA: Course Semester I ABC XX1 ABC XX2 BCDXX3 CDEXX4 EFGXX5 EFGXX6 Unit 4 4 3 4 3 2 20 GPA = 43.66 = 2.18 20 Course Semester II ABCXX7 ABBXX8 BBCXX9 BCBX10 XYZXX1 Unit 3 4 4 4 3 18 GPA = 40.99 = 2.28 18 CGPA = Total Accumulated GP 43.66 + 40.99 84.65 Total Accumulated Unit = 20 + 18 = 38 Grade Point (GP) 1.00 2.33 2.00 2.67 3.33 Grade (G ) D C+ C BB+ Total GP 3.00 9.32 8.00 10.68 9.99 40.99 Grade Point (GP) 3.00 2.33 1.67 2.00 1.33 2.67 Grade (G ) B C+ CC D+ BTotal GP 12.00 9.32 5.01 8.00 3.99 5.34 43.66

= 2.23

117

From the above examples, the CGPA is calculated as the total grade point accumulated for all the registered courses and divided by the total number of the registered units. Courses During the Long Vacation (Kursus Semasa Cuti Panjang) (KSCP) KSCP is offered to students who have taken a course earlier and obtained a grade of 'C-', 'D+', 'D', 'D-', 'F' and 'DK' only. Students who have obtained 'X' or 'F*' grade are not allowed to take the course during KSCP. The purpose of KSCP is to: i) Give an opportunity to students who are facing time constraints for graduation. ii) Assist students who need to accumulate a few more credits for graduation. iii) Assist "probationary" students to enhance their academic status. iv) Assist students who need to repeat a prerequisite course, which is not offered in the following semester. However, this opportunity is only given to students who are taking courses that they have attempted before and achieved a grade as stipulated above, provided that the course is being offered. Priority is given to the final year students. Usually, formal lectures are not held, and teaching is via tutorials. The duration of KSCP is 3 weeks, i.e. 2 weeks of tutorial and 1 week of examination, all held during the long vacation. The KSCP schedule is available in the University's Academic Calendar. The Implementation KSCP a) Students are allowed to register a maximum of 3 courses and the total number of units registered must not exceed 10.

b) Marks/grades for coursework are taken from the highest marks/the best grades obtained in a particular course in the normal semester before KSCP. The final overall grade is determined as follows: Final Grade = The best coursework marks or grade + Marks or grade for KSCP examination c) GPA calculation involves the LATEST grades (obtained in KSCP) and also involves courses taken in the second semester and those repeated in KSCP. If the GPA during KSCP as calculated above is 2.00 or better, the academic status will be active, even though the academic status for the second semester was on probation status. However, if the GPA for KSCP

118

(as calculated above) is 1.99 or below, the academic status will remain as probation status for the second semester. d) Graduating students (those who have fulfilled the graduation requirements) in the second semester are not allowed to register for KSCP. Academic Status Active Status: Any student who achieves a GPA of 2.00 and above for any examination in a semester will be recognised as ACTIVE and be allowed to pursue his/her studies for the following semester. Probation Status: A probation status is given to any student who achieves a GPA of 1.99 and below. A student who is under probation status for three consecutive semesters (P1, P2, FO) will not be allowed to pursue his/her studies at the university. On the other hand, if the CGPA is 2.00 and above, the student concerned will be allowed to pursue his/her studies and will be maintained at P2 status. Without any prejudice to the above regulations, the University Examination Council has the absolute right to terminate any student's studies if his/her academic achievement do not satisfy and fulfil the accumulated minimum credit in line with the number of semesters completed by the student as given in the table below. Total Accumulated Minimum Credit Units Pure End of 2 semester End of 4 semester End of 6 semester End of 8 semester
th th th nd

Number of Semesters

Applied 15 35 55 75

Professional 16 38 60 80

15 35 55 75

The University Examination Council has the right to terminate any student's studies due to certain reasons (a student who has not registered for the courses, has not attended examination without valid reasons), as well as medical reasons can be disqualified from pursuing his/her studies. Examination Result A provisional result (pass/fail) through the Tele-academic line: (600-83-7899), Campus Online Portal and short message service (SMS) will usually be released and announced after the School Examination Council meeting and presumably one month after final examination.

119

Full result (grade) can be enquired through the Tele-academic line: (600-837899), Campus Online Portal and short message service (SMS) will be released and announced after the University Examination Council meeting and is usually two weeks after the provisional results are released. The official semester results (SEMGRED) will be issued to students during the second week of the following semester. 4.4 Unit Exemption/Credit Transfer Definition of Unit Exemption Unit exemption is defined as the total number of units given to students who are pursuing their studies in USM that are exempted from the graduation requirements. Students only need to accumulate the remaining units for graduating purpose. Only passes or course grades accumulated or acquired in USM will be included in the calculation of the Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) for graduation purpose. Regulations and Implementation of Unit Exemption a) Diploma holders from recognised Public and Private Institutions of Higher Learning: i) Unit exemption can only be given to courses taken at diploma level.

ii) Courses for unit exemption may be combined (in two or more combinations) in order to obtain exemption of one course at degree level. However if the School would like to approve only one course at the diploma level for unit exemption of one course at degree level, the course at diploma level must be equivalent to the degree course and has the same or more units. iii) Courses taken during employment (in service) for diploma holders cannot be considered for unit exemption. iv) The minimum achievement at diploma level that can be considered for unit exemption is at least 'C' grade or 2.0 or equivalent. v) The total number of semesters exempted should not exceed two semesters. vi) In order to obtain unit exemption for industrial training, a student must have work experience continuously for at least two years in the area. If the student has undergone industrial training during the diploma level

120

study, a student must have work experience for at least one year. The students are also required to produce the report on the level and type of work performed. Industrial training unit exemption cannot be considered for semester exemption as the industrial training is carried out during the long vacation in USM. vii) Unit exemption for university and option courses can only be given for courses such as Bahasa Malaysia (LKM400), English Language, Islamic and Asian Civilisations and as well as co-curriculum. b) IPTS (Private Institution of Higher Learning) USM Supervised/External Diploma Graduates i) Students who are IPTS USM supervised/external diploma graduates are given unit exemption as stipulated by the specific programme of study. Normally, unit exemption in this category is given as a block according to the agreement between USM (through School that offers the programme) with the IPTS.

c)

Students from recognised local or foreign IPTA (Public Institution of Higher Learning)/IPTS who are studying at the Bachelor Degree level may apply to study in this university and if successful, can be considered for unit exemptions subject to the following conditions: i) Courses taken in the previous IPT are equivalent (at least 50% of the course must be the same) with courses offered in USM.

ii) Students taking courses at advanced diploma level in IPT that is recognised to be equivalent to the Bachelor Degree course at USM may be considered for unit exemption as in c) i). iii) The total maximum unit exemption allowed should not exceed one third of the total unit requirement for graduation. Total Number of Exempted Semesters Semester exemption is based on the total unit exempted as below:Total Unit Exempted <9 9-32 >32 Total Semester Exempted 1 2

Application Procedure for Unit Exemption Any student who would like to apply for exemption unit is required to complete 121

the Unit Exemption Form which can be obtained at the counter of Admission and Enrolments Unit or the respective schools. The form must to be approved by the Dean/Deputy Dean of the School prior to the submission to the Admission and Enrolments Unit for consideration. Definition of Credit Transfer Credit transfer is defined as the recognition of a total number of credits obtained by USM students taking courses in other IPTA (Public Institution of Higher Learning) within the period of study at USM, and is combined with credits obtained at USM to fulfil units requirement for his/her programme of study. The transferred examination result or grades obtained in courses taken at other IPTA will be combined in the Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) calculation. Category of Students Who Can Be Considered for Credit Transfer USM full-time Bachelor Degree level students who would like to attend specific Bachelor Degree level courses at other IPTA. USM full-time diploma level students who would like to attend specific diploma level courses at other IPTA. Conditions a) Basic and Core Courses i) Credit transfer can only be considered for credits obtained from other courses in other IPTA that are equivalent (at least 50% of the content are the same) with the courses offered by the programme.

ii) Courses that can be transferred are only courses that have the same number of units or more. For equivalent courses but with less number of units, credit transfers can be approved by combining a few courses. Credits transferred are the same as the course units as offered in USM. Average grade of the combined course will be taken into account in CGPA calculation. b) Elective or Option Courses i) Students may attend any appropriate courses in other IPTA subject to permission from the School as well as the approval of other IPTA. ii) The transferred credits are credits obtained from courses at other IPTA. No course equivalence condition is required.

122

c)

Minor Courses i) For credit transfer of minor courses, the School should adhere to either conditions (a) or (b), and take into account of the programme requirement.

d) The total maximum units transferred should not exceed one third of the total number of units for the programme. e) Credit exemption from other IPTA can be considered only once for each IPTA. The examination results obtained by a student taken at other IPTA will be taken into account for graduation purpose. Grade obtained for each course will be combined with the grades obtained at USM for CGPA calculation.

f)

g) Students who have applied and approved for credit transfer are not allowed to cancel the approval after the examination result is obtained. h) Students are required to register courses at other IPTA with not less than the total minimum units as well as not exceeding the maximum units as stipulated in their programme of study. However, for specific cases (e.g. students on extended semester and only require a few units for graduation), the Dean may approve such students to register less than the minimum and the semester will not be counted in the residential requirement. In this case, the CGPA calculation will be carried out as in KSCP. i) USM students attending courses at other IPTA and if failed in any courses are allowed to resit the examination if there is such provision in that IPTA. If the method of calculation of examination marks in the other IPTA is not the same as in USM, a grade conversion method will be carried out according to the existing scales.

j)

k) USM students who have registered courses at other IPTA and decided to return to study in USM, must adhere to the existing course registration conditions in USM. Application Procedure for Attending Courses/Credit Transfer USM students who would like to attend courses/credit transfer at other IPTAs should apply using Unit Exemption Form. The application form should be submitted for the Dean's approval for the programme of study within three months before the application is submitted to other IPTA for consideration.

123

4.5 Academic Integrity "Integrity without knowledge is weak and useless. Knowledge without integrity is dangerous and weak" Samuel Johnson Being a student of the University Sains Malaysia requires a firm adherence to the basic values, integrity, purpose and meaning of a university education. The most essential values in academia are rooted on the principles of truth seeking in knowledge and honesty with regards to the intellectual property of oneself and of others. Thus, students must bear the responsibility of maintaining these principles in all work done in their academic endeavour. Academic dishonesty violates the fundamental purpose of preserving and maintaining the integrity of university education and will not be tolerated. The following, although not exhaustive, are examples of practices or actions that are considered dishonest acts in academic pursuit. (a) Cheating Cheating is the unauthorised use of information or other aids in any academic exercise. There are numerous "infamous" ways and methods of cheating including: Copying from others during a test or an exam. Using unauthorised materials or devices (calculator, PDA, mobile phone, pager, etc.) during a test or an exam. Asking or allowing another student to take a test or an exam for you and vice-versa. Sharing answers or programmes for an assignment or project. Tampering with marked/graded work after it has been returned, then resubmitting it for remarking/regrading. Allowing others to do the research, writing, programming, or other types of assignment. Submitting identical or similar work in more than one course without consulting or prior permission from the lecturers involved.

Below is an excerpt from the University and University College Act 1971, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Discipline of Students, Rule 1999 regarding conduct during examination (Part II, Provision 8):

124

Conduct during examination 8. No student can(a) take any form of books, worksheets, documents, pictures or any other materials, other than those authorised by the examiner, into or out of any examination room, or receive any form of books, worksheets, documents, pictures or any other materials from outsiders when in examination room. Students can receive any form of books, worksheets, documents, pictures or any other materials recommended by the examiner or the Board of Examiners, and authorized by the Vice-Chancellor (b) write, or have somebody else to write, any information or to draw diagrams which can be related to the examination taken by the student, on any parts of the body, or on the clothings worn by the student. (c) contact with other students during an examination through any form of communication, or (d) cheat or try to cheat or act in any way that can be interpreted as cheating. (a) Plagiarism Plagiarism is "academic theft". It violates the intellectual property rights of the author. Simply put, it is the use, in part or whole, of other's words or ideas and claiming it as yours without proper attribution to the original author. It includes: Copying and pasting information, graphics or media from the Internet into your work without citing the source. Paraphrasing or summarising other's written or spoken words that are not common knowledge, without referencing the source. Not putting quote marks around parts of the source that you copy exactly. Using someone else's work or acquiring papers, assignment, project or research you did not do and turning it in as if you had done the work yourself. Giving incorrect information about the source of reference. Not acknowledging collaborators in an assignment, paper, project or research. Plagiarism is, however, often misunderstood. There are numerous sources in the Internet that describe plagiarism and explain acceptable ways for using borrowed words. Students should explore the relevant materials.

125

Below is an excerpt from the University and University College Act 1971, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Discipline of Students, Rule 1999 regarding prohibition against plagiarism (Part II, Provision 6):

Prohibitions against plagiarism 6. (1) A student shall not plagiarise any idea, writing, data or invention belonging to another person. (2) For the purpose of this rule, plagiarism includes: (a) the act of taking an idea, writing, data or invention of another person and claiming that the idea, writing, data or invention is the result of one's own findings or creation; or (b) an attempt to make out or the act of making out, in such a way, that one is the original source or the creator of an idea, writing, data or invention which has actually been taken from some other source. (3) Without prejudice to the generality of sub rule (2), a student plagiarises when he/she: (a) publishes, with himself/herself as the author, an abstract, article, scientific or academic paper, or book which is wholly or partly written by some other person; (b) incorporates himself/herself or allows himself/herself to be incorporated as a co-author of an abstract, article, scientific or academic paper, or book, when he/she has not at all made any written contribution to the abstract, article, scientific or academic paper, or book; (c) forces another person to include his/her name in the list of coresearchers for a particular research project or in the list of coauthors for a publication when he/she has not made any contribution which may qualify him/her as a co-researcher or co-author; (d) extract academic data which are the result of research undertaken by some other person, such as laboratory findings or field work findings or data obtained through library research, whether published or unpublished, and incorporate those data as part of his/her academic research without giving due acknowledgement to the actual source;

126

uses research data obtained through collaborative work with some other person, whether or not that other person is a staff member or a student of the University, as part of another distinct personal academic research of his/her, or for a publication In his/her own name as sole author, without obtaining the consent of his/her co-researchers prior to embarking on his/her personal research or prior to publishing the data; (f) transcribes the ideas or creations of others kept in whatever form, whether written, printed or available in electronic form, or in slide form, or in whatever form of teaching or research apparatus, or in any other form, and claims whether directly or indirectly that he/she is the creator of that idea or creation; (g) translates the writing or creation of another person from one language to another whether or not wholly or partly, and subsequently presents the translation in whatever form or manner as his/her own writing or creation; or (h) extracts ideas from another person's writing or creation and makes certain modifications without due reference to the original source and rearranges them in such a way that it appears as if he/she is the creator of those ideas.

(e)

(a)

Fabrication Unauthorised invention, alteration, falsification or misleading use of data, information or citation in any academic work constitutes fabrication. Fabricated information neither represent the student's own effort nor the truth concerning a particular investigation or study thus violates the principle of truth seeking in knowledge. Some examples are: Making up or changing of data or result, or using someone else's result, in an experiment, assignment or research. Citing sources that are not actually used or referred to. Intentional listing of incorrect or fictitious references. Falsifying of academic records or documents to gain academic advantage. Forging signatures of authorisation in any academic record or other university document. (b) Collusion The School does not differentiate between those who commit an act of academic dishonesty with those who knowingly allow or help others in performing those acts. Some examples of collusion include: Paying, bribing or allowing someone to do an assignment, test/exam, project or research for you.

127

Doing or assisting others in an assignment, test/exam, project or research for something in return. Permitting your work to be submitted as the work of others. Providing material, information, or sources to others knowing that such aids could be used in any dishonest act.

(b) Unfair Advantage A student may obtain an unfair advantage over another, which is also a breach of academic integrity, in several ways including: Gaining access to, stealing, reproducing or circulating of test or exam material prior to its authorised time. Depriving others of the use of library material by stealing, defacing, destroying or hiding it. Intentionally interfering with other's effort to do their academic work. Altering or destroying work or computer files/programmes that belong to others or those that are meant for the whole class.

(c) Consequences of Violating Academic Integrity Both students and academic staff must assume the responsibility of protecting and upholding the academic integrity of the university. In the event that a student encounters any incident that denotes academic dishonesty, the student is expected to report it to the relevant lecturer. The lecturer is then responsible to substantiate the violation and is encouraged to confront the perpetrator(s) to discuss the facts surrounding the allegation, and report the matter to the Deputy Deans or the Dean of the School. If the lecturer found that the student is guilty, an appropriate punitive grading may be applied, depending on the extent of the violation. Examples of punitive grading are giving lower grade or "F" on the assignment, test, project, or lower grade or "F" for the whole course. If the violation is deemed serious by the lecturer, the matter will be brought to the attention of the University Disciplinary Authority where appropriate action will be taken. If a student is caught in an examination, the University Examination Board will pursue the matter according to the university's procedure. The consequence then may range from a warning, fine not exceeding RM200, exclusion from any specific part or parts of the University for a specified period, suspension from being a student of the University for a specified period, or expulsion from the University (University and University College Act 1971, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Discipline of Students, Rule 1999).

128

Below is an excerpt from the University and University College Act 1971, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Discipline of Students, Rule 1999 regarding Disciplinary Punishment (Part II, Provision 48):

Disciplinary punishment 48. A student who commits a disciplinary offense under these Rules and found guilty of the offense can be punished according to any one or any two or more of the following appropriate actions; (a) warning; (b) fine not more than two hundred ringgit; (c) banned from entering any or certain premises of the University for a specified period; (d) suspended from being a student of the University for a specified period; (e) dismissed from the University

4.6 USM Mentor Programme Mentor Programme acts as a support-aid that involves the staff undergoing special training as a consultant and guide to USM community who would like to share their feelings and any psychosocial aspects that could harm their social functions. This programme manages psychosocial issues in a more effective manner and finally could improve the well-being of individuals in order to achieve life of better quality. Objectives (a) As a co-operation and mutual assistance mechanism for dealing with stress, psychosocial problems and many more in order to reinforce the well-being of the USM community. (b) To inculcate the spirit of unity and the concept of helping one another by appointing a well-trained mentor as a social agent who promotes caring society for USM (c) To produce more volunteers to assist those who need help (d) To prevent damages in any psychosocial aspects before they reach a critical stage. For more information, please visit www.usm.my/mentor

129

4.7

Student Exchange Programme (a) Study Abroad Scheme The student exchange programme is an opportunity for USM students to study one or two semesters abroad at any USM partners institutions. Ideally, students are encouraged to participate in the exchange programme within their third to fifth semester (3 years degree programme) and within third to seventh semester (4 years degree programme). Studies abroad are planned beforehand with the Dean or Deputy Dean of the respective School, and with the International Office. Credits earned at an associate university are transferable as a part of credit accumulation for graduation. (b) Student Exchange Programme between Local Higher Education Institutions (RPPIPT) This is a programme that allows students of public higher learning institutions to do an exchange programme for a semester between the public higher institutions itself. Students can choose any relevant courses and apply for credit transfers. For more information, please visit http://www.usm.my/io or contact the Academic Collaboration Unit, International Office at +604 653 2775/2778.

130

5.

UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENTS

5.1 Summary of University Requirements Students are required to take 15 - 22 units of the following University/Option courses for University requirements: University Requirements 1 2 3 Bahasa Malaysia English Language Local Students Islamic and Asian Civilisations (TITAS) (2 Units) Ethnic Relations (2 Units) Core Entrepreneurship* (2 Units) International Students Malaysian Studies (4 Units) Option/Bahasa Malaysia/English Language (2 Units) 4 Third Language/Co-Curriculum /Skill Course/Options Students have to choose one of the followings: Third Language Package Co-Curriculum** (1-6 units) Skill Course/Options Total 3 10 Unit 2 4 6

15 22

* Students from Schools which have a similar course as this are exempted from following this course. The units should be replaced by an option course. ** Students from the School of Education are required to choose a uniformed body cocurriculum package. Students from the School of Medical Sciences and School of Dentistry are required to register two (2) units of Co-Curriculum course in year Two. Students from the School of Health Sciences are required to register one (1) unit of Co-Curriculum course. Details of the University requirements are given in the following sections. 5.2 Bahasa Malaysia (a) Local Students

The requirements are as follows: LKM400/2 - Bahasa Malaysia IV All Malaysian students must take LKM400 and pass with the minimum of grade

131

C in order to graduate. Entry requirements for Bahasa Malaysia are as follows:


No 1. Qualification (a) SPM/MCE/SC (or equivalent qualification) (b) STPM/HSC (or equivalent qualification) Grade 1-6 P/S Level of Entry LKM400 Type U Units 2 Status Graduation requirement

Note:

To obtain credit units for Bahasa Malaysia courses, a minimum grade of C is required. Students may obtain advice from the School of Languages, Literacies and Translation if they have different Bahasa Malaysia qualification from the above. International Students International students pursuing Bachelors degrees in Science, Accounting, Arts (ELLS), Education (TESL) and Housing, Building and Planning.

(b)

All international students in this category are required to take the following courses: Code LKM100 Type U Units 2

International students (non-Indonesian) pursuing Bachelors degrees in Arts. International students in this category are required to take and pass three Intensive Malay Language courses before they commence their Bachelors degree programmes. Code LKM101 LKM102 LKM201 Course Bahasa Malaysia Persediaan I Bahasa Malaysia Persediaan II Bahasa Malaysia Pertengahan Duration 4 months 4 months 4 months

132

The Bahasa Malaysia graduation requirement for this category of students is as follows: Code LKM300 Type U Units 2

International students (Indonesian) pursuing Bachelors degrees in Arts. The Bahasa Malaysia graduation requirement for this category of students is as follows: Code LKM200 LKM300 Note: Type U U Units 2 2

Students must pass with a minimum grade of C for type U courses.

5.3 English Language All Bachelors degree students must take 4 units of English Language courses in fulfillment of the University requirement for graduation. (a) No 1. Entry Requirements for English Language Courses English Language Qualification *MUET LSP401/402/403/404 Discretion of Dean *MUET LSP300 Discretion of Dean *MUET LMT100 Discretion of Dean *MUET Discretion of Dean Grade Band 6 A-C Level of Entry LHP 451/452/453/ 454/455/456/ 457/458/459 LSP 401/402/403/ 404 LSP300 Status Compulsory/ Option/Type U (2 Units) Compulsory/ Type U (2 Units) Compulsory/ Type U (2 Units) Pre-requisite/ Type Z (2 Units)

2.

Band 5 A-C Band 4 A-C Band 3/2/1 (Score 0 - 179)

3.

4.

LMT100/ Re-sit MUET

* MUET: Malaysia University English Test. Students may obtain advice from the School of Languages, Literacies and Translation if they have different English Language qualification from the above.

133

Note: Students are required to accumulate four (4) units of English for graduation. In order to obtain units in English Language courses, students have to pass with a minimum grade of C. Students with a Score 260 - 300 (Band 6) in MUET must accumulate the 4 units of English from the courses in the post-advanced level (LHP451/452/453/454/455/456/457/ 458/459*). They can also take foreign language courses to replace their English language units but they must first obtain a written consent from the Dean of the School of Languages, Literacies and Translation. (Please use the form that can be obtained from the School of Languages, Literacies and Translation.) [*The number of units for LHP457 is 4 and for LHP451, 452, 453, 454, 455, 456, 458 and 459 is 2.] Students with a score of 179 and below in MUET are required to resit MUET to improve their score to Band 4 or take LMT100 and pass with a minimum grade of C.

(b) English Language Courses (Compulsory English Language Units) The English Language courses offered as University courses are as follows:
No Code/Unit Course Title School (If Applicable)

1. 2. 3.

LMT100/2 LSP300/2 LSP401/2

Preparatory English Academic English General English

Students from all Schools Students from all Schools Students from: School of Education Studies (Arts) School of Fine Arts School of Humanities School of Social Sciences

4.

LSP402/2

Scientific and Medical English

Students from: School of Biological Sciences School of Physics School of Chemical Sciences School of Mathematical Sciences School of Industrial Technology School of Education Studies (Science) School of Medical Sciences School of Health & Dental Sciences School of Pharmaceutical Sciences Students from: School of Management School of Communication

5.

LSP403/2

Business and Communication English

134

6.

LSP404/2

Technical and Engineering English

Students from: School of Computer Sciences School of Housing, Building and Planning Schools of Engineering Students from School of Health Sciences Students from School of Health Sciences

7. 8.

LDN 101/2 LDN 201/2

English For Nursing I English For Nursing II

5.4 Local Students - Islamic and Asian Civilisations/Ethnic Relations/Core Entrepreneurship (a) Islamic and Asian Civilisations (The course is conducted in Bahasa Malaysia)

The following course is compulsory to pass (with a minimum grade of C): HTU 223 Islamic and Asian Civilisation (TITAS) (2 units) This course aims to increase students knowledge on history, principles, values, main aspect of Malay civilization, Islamic civilization and its culture. With the academic exposure to cultural issues and civilization in Malaysia, it is hoped that students will be more aware of issues that can contribute to the cultivation of the culture of respect and harmony among the plural society of Malaysia. Among the topics in this course are Interaction among Various Civilization, Islamic Civilization, Malay Civilization, Contemporary Challenges faced by the Islamic and Asian Civilization and Islamic Hadhari Principles. (b) Ethnic Relations (The course is conducted in Bahasa Malaysia)

The following course is compulsory to pass (with a minimum grade of C): SHE 101 Ethnic Relations (2 units) This course is an introduction to ethnic relations in Malaysia. This course is designed with 3 main objectives: (1) to introduce students to the basic concept and the practices of social accord in Malaysia, (2) to reinforce basic understanding of challenges and problems in a multi-ethnic society, and (3) to provide an understanding and awareness in managing the complexity of ethnic relations in Malaysia. At the end of this course, it is hoped that students will be able to identify and apply the skills to issues associated with ethnic relations in Malaysia.

135

(c) Core Entrepreneurship (The course is conducted in Bahasa Malaysia) The following course is compulsory to pass (with a minimum grade of C): WUS 101 Core Entrepreneurship (2 units) This course aims to provide basic exposure to students in the field of entrepreneurship and business, with emphasis on the implementation of the learning aspects while experiencing the process of executing business projects in campus. The mode of teaching is through interactive lectures, practical, business plan proposal, execution of entrepreneurial projects and report presentations. Practical experiences through hands-on participation of students in business projects management will generate interest and provide a clearer picture of entrepreneurship world. The main learning outcome is the assimilation of culture and entrepreneurship work ethics in their everyday life. This initiative is made to open the minds and arouse the spirit of entrepreneurship among target groups that possess the potentials to become successful entrepreneurs. By exposing entrepreneurial knowledge to all students, it is hoped that it will accelerate the effort to increase the number of middle class entrepreneurs in the country. For more information, please refer to the Co-curriculum Program Reference Book. 5.5 International Students - Malaysian Studies/Option (a) Malaysian Studies

The following course is compulsory to pass (with a minimum grade of C) for all international students: SEA205E - Malaysian Studies (4 Units) This course investigates the structure of the Malaysian system of government and the major trends in contemporary Malaysia. Emphasis will be given both to current issues in Malaysian politics and the historical and economic developments and trends of the country. The discussion begins with a review of the independence process. An analysis of the formation and workings of the major institutions of government parliament, judiciary, bureaucracy, and the electoral and party systems will follow this. The scope and extent of Malaysian democracy will be considered, especially in light of current changes and developments in Malaysian politics. The second part of the course focuses on specific issues: ethnic relations, national unity and the national ideology; development and political change; federal-state relations; the role of religion in Malaysian politics; politics and business; Malaysia in the modern world system; civil society; law, justice and order; and directions for the future.

136

(b)

Option/Bahasa Malaysia/English Language (2 Units)

International students need to fulfill a further 2 units of option course or additional Bahasa Malaysia/English Language course. 5.6 Third Language/Co-Curriculum/Skill Courses/Options Students have to choose one of the followings (A/B/C): (A) Third Language Package (6 Units) Third Language Courses are offered as University courses. They are offered as a package of three (3) levels, 2 units per level. The total number of units per package is 6. Students are requested to complete all levels (3 semesters). The packages offered are as follows: Commn. Arabic LTA100/2 LTA200/2 LTA300/2 Commn. French LTP100/2 LTP200/2 LTP300/2 (B) Commn. Chinese LTC100/2 LTC200/2 LTC300/2 Commn. Spanish LTE100/2 LTE200/2 LTE300/2 Commn. Japanese LTJ100/2 LTJ200/2 LTJ300/2 Commn. Tamil LTT100/2 LTT200/2 LTT300/2 Commn. German LTG100/2 LTG200/2 LTG300/2 Commn. Thai LTS100/2 LTS200/2 LTS300/2 Commn. Korean LTK100/2 LTK200/2 LTK300/2

Uniformed/Seni Silat Cekak Co-Curriculum Package (4 - 6 Units) Students who choose to take packaged co-curriculum courses are required to complete all levels of the package. It is compulsory for students from the School of Education to choose a uniformed body co-curriculum package from the list below (excluding Seni Silat Cekak). The cocurriculum packages offered are as follows:

137

Armed Uniformed/Seni Silat Cekak Co-Curriculum Package (6 Units) (3 years)


PALAPES Tentera Darat (Army)
WTD102/2 WTD202/2 WTD302/2

PALAPES Tentera Laut (Navy)


WTL102/2 WTL202/2 WTL302/2

PALAPES Tentera Udara (Air Force)


WTU102/2 WTU202/2 WTU302/2

SUKSIS (Student Police Volunteer)


WPD101/2 WPD201/2 WPD301/2

Seni Silat Cekak

WCC123/2 WCC223/2 WCC323/2

Unarmed Uniformed Co-Curriculum Package (4 Units) (2 Years) Kelana Siswa (Rover Training) WLK101/2 WLK201/2 Bulan Sabit Merah (Red Crescent) WBM101/2 WBM201/2 Ambulans St. John (St. John Ambulance) WJA101/2 WJA201/2

Unarmed Uniformed Co-Curriculum Package (2 Units) (1 Year) SISPA (Siswa Siswi Pertahanan Awam) (Public Defense) (offered in Health Campus only) WLK101/2 WLK201/2 (C) Co-Curriculum/Skill Course/Options (1 6 Units) All students are encouraged to follow the co-curriculum courses and are given a maximum total of 6 units for Community Service, Culture, Sports, Innovation & Initiatives and Leadership (Students from the School of Medical Sciences and School of Dentistry are required to register for two (2) units of Co-Curriculum course in Year Two). (Students from the School of Health Sciences must take at least one of the co-curriculum courses while those from the School of Education must take the uniformed co-curriculum package [excluding Seni Silat Cekak]). Students who do not enroll for any co-curriculum courses or who enroll for only a portion of the 3 units need to replace these units with skill/option courses. The co-curriculum, skill and option courses offered are as follows: (i) Community Service, Culture, Sports, Innovation & Initiatives and Leadership Co-Curriculum Courses

138

Packaged (Students are required to complete all levels) Khidmat Masyarakat (Community Service) (2 Years) WKM101/1 WKM201/1 Jazz Band (3 Years) WCC108/1 WCC208/1 WCC308/1 Culture WCC103/1 - Catan (Painting) WCC105/1 - Gamelan WCC107/1 - Guitar WCC109/1 - Koir (Choir) WCC110/1 - Kraftangan (Handcrafting) WCC115/1 - Tarian Moden (Modern Dance) WCC116/1 - Tarian Tradisional (Traditional Dance) WCC117/1 - Teater Moden (Modern Theatre) WCC118/1 - Wayang Kulit Melayu (Malay Shadow Play) WCC119/1 - Senaman Qigong Asas (Basic Qigong Exercise) WCC219 Senaman Qigong Pertengahan (Intermediate Qigong Exercise) WCC124/1 Kompang Berlagu WCC122/1 - Seni Memasak (Culinary Art) WCC127/1 Kesenian Muzik Nasyid (Nasyid Musical Art) Innovation & Initiative WCC120/1 - Canting Batik (Batik Painting) WCC121/1 - Seni Khat (Calligraphic Art) WCC125/1 Seni Wau Tradisional (Traditional Kite Art) WCC128 Seni Sulaman & Manik Labuci (Embroidery & Beads Sequins Art) WCC 130 Seni Fotografi SLR Digital (Digital SLR Photography Art) Karate (3 Semesters) WSC108/1 WSC208/1 WSC308/1 Sports WSC105/1 - Bola Tampar (Volley Ball) WSC106/1 - Golf WSC110/1 - Memanah (Archery) WSC111/1 - Ping Pong (Table Tennis) WSC112/1 - Renang (Swimming) WSC113/1 - Aerobik (Aerobic) WSC114/1 - Skuasy (Squash) WSC116/1 - Tenis (Tennis) WSC119/1 - Badminton WSC122/1 - Selaman SCUBA (SCUBA Diving) WSC123/1 - Kriket (Cricket) WCC124/1 Sepak Takraw WSC 125/1 Futsal WSC 126/1 Bola Jaring (Netball) Leadership (Kepimpinan) WSC 127/1 Pengurusan Acara 1 (Event Management 1) WSC 227/1 Pengurusan Acara 2 (Event Management 2) Taekwondo (3 Semesters) WSC115/1 WSC215/1 WSC315/1

Non-Packaged (1 Semester)

139

(i)

HTV201/2 - Teknik Berfikir (Thinking Techniques) (ii) Other option/skill courses as recommended or required by the respective school (if any) (iii) English Language Courses The following courses may be taken as university courses to fulfill the compulsory English Language requirements (for Band 5 and Band 6 in MUET) or as skill/option courses:
No 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Code/Unit LHP451/2 LHP452/2 LHP453/2 LHP454/2 LHP455/2 LHP456/2 LHP457/4 LHP458/2 LHP459/2 Course Title Effective Reading Business Writing Creative Writing Academic Writing English Pronunciation Skills Spoken English Speech Writing and Public Speaking English for Translation (Offered only in Semester II) English for Interpretation (Offered only in Semester I)

(i)

Foreign Language Courses The foreign language courses offered by the School of Languages, Literacies and Translation can be taken by students as option or compulsory courses to fulfill the number of units required for graduation. Students are not allowed to register for more than one foreign language course per semester. They must complete at least two levels of a foreign language course before they are allowed to register for another foreign language course. However, students are not required to complete all four levels of one particular foreign language course. The foreign language courses offered are as follows:
Arabic LAA100/2 LAA200/2 LAA300/2 LAA400/2 Chinese LAC100/2 LAC200/2 LAC300/2 LAC400/2 Japanese LAJ100/2 LAJ200/2 LAJ300/2 LAJ400/2 German LAG100/2 LAG200/2 LAG300/2 LAG400/2 Spanish LAE100/2 LAE200/2 LAE300/2 LAE400/2

140

French LAP100/2 LAP200/2 LAP300/2 LAP400/2

Thai LAS100/2 LAS200/2 LAS300/2 LAS400/2

Tamil LAT100/2 LAT200/2 LAT300/2

Korean LAK100/2 LAK200/2 LAK300/2

141

6.0 6.1

GENERAL INFORMATION OF PROGRAMMES/SCHOOL Career Prospects

Graduates from the School are well accepted by the construction industry. Many have become senior managers and executives in professional firms, financial institutions, construction organisations, property development companies and government agencies. The broad-based approach combined with specialism gives our graduates the edge in dealing with the construction and development processes in a more holistic manner. 6.2 Alumni

The Alumni Association of the School of Housing, Building and Planning was officially established in August 1999. The aim of the Alumni is to inculcate cohesive interaction and relationship encompassing professional, scientific, social and cultural levels that can provide and develop networking of inter-disciplinary communication as well as to provide a sounding board between the ex-students of the School of HBP. Membership of this association is opened to all ex-students and staff of HBP and its representatives comprise of 8 committee members that is headed by the President. Its registered address is at School of Housing, Building and Planning, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang. 6.3 Conferments and Awards

Conferments and Awards are divided into three levels, i.e. at School level, University level and Professional Bodies level. 6.3.1 School Level

The Deans List Award will be conferred to students who have obtained a CGPA of 3.5 in their academic endeavor for every semester. 6.3.2 University Level

At the university level, awards will be given to final year students who are excellence in their overall fields of study such as the Chancellors Gold Medal, Royal Student Award and University Gold Medal by the University Women Association. 6.3.3 Professional Bodies Level

Excellence students also have the opportunity to be conferred with awards from profesional bodies.

142

6.4

School Association

HBP students are allowed to conduct various academic or non-academic activities with the establishment of the School of HBPs Association. All students of HBP are members and this association is a moderating medium between the management and the student levels. The students activities include conducting orientation week, study tours, organizing the school dinner and arranging students activities with other universities and institutions locally or internationally. 6.5 Graduate Studies

The School offers graduate studies degree programmes such as Masters and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D) programmes. Masters programmes are conducted by coursework and research modes while the Ph.D programme is by research only. The fields of studies are as follow: 6.6 Project Management Planning Building Technology Housing Architecture Landscape Architecture Quantity Surveying Overseas Learning Scheme

USM also offers an overseas learning scheme to first and second year students who are interested in continuing their first semester at an international university. These schemes are aimed at exposing students with new experiences at international level as well as to allow transfer of their academic credits. For further information and enquiries, contact: International Relations, Students Affairs and Academic Department, USM. 6.7 School Website

Information about the School of Housing, Building and Planning can be obtained from the school website at: http://www.hbp.usm.my

143

6.8 6.8.1

Facilities Physical Facilities

Facilities include provisions of studio space for the students. 6.8.2 Resourse Centre/Branch Library

The School of HBP has its own Resource Centre to cater for the needs of the students. Materials found in the Resource Centre includes the following: i. ii. iii. iv. v. vi. 6.8.3 Academic books Seminar papers Magazines Research Projects Dissertation Samples of building materials, etc. Laboratories

The School also has several laboratories for the purpose of conducting practical classes. All the instruments found in the laboratories are related to the construction industry in the country. The laboratories are: i. ii. iii. iv. v. vi. 6.8.4 General Workshop Structure Laboratory Soils Laboratory Concrete and Cement Technology Laboratory Environmental Physics Laboratory Information Technology Laboratory Photography & Audio Visual Laboratory General Workshop

Services offered: i. ii. 6.8.5 Arc Welding Gas Welding Structure Laboratory

Torsee Universal Testing Machine 50T Torsee Universal Wood Testing Machine 10T Educational Facilities: i. ii. Friction on Incline Plane Apparatus Torsion Bar Apparatus

144

iii. iv. v. vi. vii. viii. 6.8.6 i. ii. iii. iv. v. vi. vii. viii. ix. x. 6.8.7

Continuous Beam Apparatus Roof Truss Apparatus Portal Frame Apparatus Shear Force and Bending Moment Apparatus Reaction of Beam Apparatus Etc. Soil, Concrete and Cement Technology Laboratory Fan Ventilated Oven Sand Replacement Apparatus CBR Testing Machine (Laboratory and In-Situ) Mechanical Compactor Linear Shrinkage Apparatus Field Vane Apparatus Penetrometer Vibrating Hammer Electronic Balance Casagrande Liquid Limit Apparatus Environmental Physics Laboratory

Environmental Physics Laboratory conducts various tests related to the environmental science. 6.8.8 Anemometer, digital Anemometer, hot-wire Thermometer Infrared Electronic Thermo-hygrograph Sunshine Recorder Data Logger Information Technology Laboratory (IT Lab)

The IT Lab is equiped with 100 computers for use in various computer courses such as Auto Cad, GIS, ATS/Front Page. Among the facilities provided include: FTP drop boxes for submission of assignments. Provision for Web site design, 3-D Modelling and Animation Internet access E-Learning Platform E-mail access Other common computer use.

145

6.8.9

Photography and Audio Visual Laboratory

This laboratory provides the following services: Single Lens Reflex (SLR) Audio Focus Cameras Epidiascope Overhead Projectors Slide Projectors LCD Computer Projector

146

6.9 i.

Industry Advisory Panel (IAP) Architecture Ar. Hamdan Abdul Jamal Pertubuhan Arkitek Malaysia 4 & 6 Jalan Tangsi 50480 Kuala Lumpur Building Technology Y.Bhg. Dato Abd Ghani Yusof Metronic Engineering Sdn. Bhd. Executive Vice Chairman No. 2, Jalan Astaka U8/83 Seksyen U8, Bukit Jelutong 40150 Shah Alam, Selangor Darul Ehsan Interior Design Mr. Dickie Ong Chye Huat Axial Interior Design A-2-2 Kestana Apartment Jalan 2/62D Bandar Manjalara 52200 Kuala Lumpur Construction Management Dato Hj. Mohamed Fadzil Hassan Managing Director Fadzil Construction Sdn. Bhd. no. 69D-2, Persiaran Bayan Indah, Sg. Nibong, Bayan Lepas, 11900 Pulau Pinang Quantity Surveying Y. Bhg. Dato Seri Sr Hj. Md. Isahak Md. Yusof Pakatan International No. G22A, Jalan Pandan Prima 2 Dataran Pandan Prima 55100 Kuala Lumpur Urban and Regional Planning Puan Norliza Hashim Presiden (Mantan) Pertubuhan Perancang Malaysia B-1-02, Jalan SS 7/13B, Aman Seri, Kelana Jaya, 47301 Petaling Jaya, Selangor, Darul Ehsan

ii.

iii.

iv.

v.

vi.

147

6.10

Administrative /Technical/Laboratories Staff


: Md Kamal Shari Pinansa : Subramaniam Govindan : Khalid Ahmad : Zaheran Aziz : Hamidah Hamid : Abdul Kahar Kalid Noraini Rafie : Fauziah Hanim Mohd Ismail Noraini Abu Hassan Normah Ismail Shahrena Aminoordin Siti Aishah Bedin Ainul Azrul Abd. Latif Ashahril Idrus Malissa Nadia Mohd Rodzi : Abdul Jalil Ishak : Rozyta Lokman : Zainal Abidin Md. Saad : Ooi Cheow Lam Mohd Adnan Omar : Feyrus Samat Mohd. Faisal Md. Nasir Mohamad Fikrillah Mohd Ridwan Nurandlia Mohd Kholdaie : Aishah Abu Bakar Faridahton Mohamad Salleh Md. Noh Sohaimi Zulyadain Hassan : Diana Isme Ishak Mohd Suhaimi Samsudin Firdaus Mohd Ibrahim : Rizwadi Md Noor : Azliza Ahmad : Zulfadli Zainal : Mohd. Poudzi Mohd. Noor Zamri Awang : Mohamed Yusoff Mohd Khairi Khairuddin Idris Shaari

Senior Assistant Registrar Assistant Registrar Research Officer Senior Secretary (Stenographer to Dean) Senior Secretary (Stenographer to Deputy Dean) Senior Administrative Assistant Administrative Assistants (Clerical)

Senior Assistant Engineer Senior Asst. Architecture Officer Senior Lab Assistants Lab Assistants

Senior Technician

Technicians

Computer Technician Senior Draught Person Administrative Assistant (Clerical) (Resource Centre) Senior General Assistant General Assistants

148

APPENDIX A CURRICULUM, BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (HOUSING, BUILDING AND PLANNING) YEAR 1 Unit requirement for School of HBP Code T E Core Courses Elective Total : 108 unit : 36 unit 1st Semester RUS 104/7 RAG 121/3 RAG 132/3 RMK 153/3 RAG 161/3 RUS RPG REG RMK : 72 unit
Majoring in Planning and Interior Design

2012

2nd Semester 105/7 RUS 131/3 RPG 162/3 REG 252/3 RMK 106/7 131/3 162/3 252/3

Majoring in Quantity Surveying, Building Technology, Construction Management and Building Surveying

RUS 106/7 REG 162/3 RMK 252/3


Architecture only

University/Option Bahasa Malaysia English language/Other language Islamic Civilization Ethnic Relations (for local) Malaysian Studies (for international Core-Entrepreneurship (for local ) Co-Curriculum/Option/Skill Courses/ Third language Total Unit : : : : : :

2 4 2 2 4 2

unit unit unit unit unit unit : 7 unit : 127

Notes: Maximum Units Allowed for Registration per Semester is 21 ( including Universiti/Option courses) 2ND YEAR

CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT

BUILDING TECHNOLOGY

QUANTITY SURVEYING

URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING

INTERIOR DESIGN

ARCHITECTURE

BUILDING SURVEYING

RMS RMK REG RMK RMK

1st Semester
RQS REG RQG RMK RQK RPS RPK REG REG 201/7 231/3 232/3 265/3 RPS RPK RPK RPG RPK 202/7 222/3 233/3 235/3 323/3 RDS RAK RAG RDG RDG 201/7 232/3 234/3 262/3 313/3 201/7 232/3 236/3 254/3 259/5 RQS RQG RQK REG RAG 202/7 237/3 255/3 261/3 265/3

201/7 231/3 232/3 254/3 363/3

2nd Semester Semester 1


RDS RDB REG RDG

RMS RMK REG RAG RMK

202/7 232/3 261/3 265/3 357/3

1st Semester

RES REG RMK REG REG RMK

201/7 232/3 231/3 262/3 265/3 362/3

RES RMK REG RMK RMK

2nd Semester

202/7 232/3 261/3 354/3 364/3

1st Semester

2nd Semester

2nd Semester

1st Semester

2nd Semester
202/7 217/3 261/3 323/3

RAS RAK RAG RAG REG

1st Semester
203/7 232/3 232/3 234/3 262/3

2nd Semester
RAS REG RAG RAK 204/7 261/3 265/3 344/3

1st Semester
RBS RBK REG RQG REG 203/7 231/3 232/3 236/3 265/3

2nd Semester
RBS RPK RQG REG RAG 204/7 222/3 237/3 261/3 322/3

RUL 274/6 3RD YEAR

RUL 274/6

RUL 274/6

RUL 274/6

RUL 274/6

RUL 274/6

RUL 274/6

CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT

BUILDING TECHNOLOGY

QUANTITY SURVEYING

URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING

INTERIOR DESIGN

ARCHITECTURE

BUILDING SURVEYING

1st Semester
RQS REG RMK REG 303/7 265/3 353/3 361/3 RQS RMK RQG REG RQL 304/7 354/3 359/3 362/3 370/3

RMS 303/7 RMK 350/3 RMK 353/3 REG 360/3 REG 361/3 RMK 362/3

2nd Semester2

RMS RMK RMK RMK

304/7 336/3 354/3 364/3

1st Semester

RES 303/7 REG 360/3 REG 361/3 RMK 363/3 REG 363/3 REG 368/3

2nd Semester

RES REG REG REG REL

304/7 367/3 369/3 370/3 370/3

1st Semester

2nd Semester

1st Semester
RPS RPK RPK RPK 303/7 321/3 334/3 351/3

2nd Semester
RPS RPK RPK RMK 304/7 332/3 343/3 357/3

1st Semester

RDS 301/7 RDG 235/3 RAG 333/3 RDG 334/

RDS 302/7 RDB 314/3 RDG 336/3 RAK 345/3 RDG 366/3

2nd Semester

1st Semester
RAS 305/7 RAG 333/3 RAK 346/3 REG 360/3 RAL 371/3

2nd Semester
RMS RAG RAK RMK 306/7 322/3 345/3 354/3

1st Semester
RBS RBG REG REG 305/7 351/3 361/3 363/3

2nd Semester
RBS RMK RBK RMK REG RBL 306/5 336/3 351/3 354/3 370/3 371/3

31/05/20/12 MRI/fhmi