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Data Analysis Sheet

Student: Tony Team Members: ILC and General Education Context Content Process Assessment + + Input Output + + +one-on-one Learned +one-on-one or +quick to +small group in Concepts very small apologize when ILC (no more -Place value: group (no more not doing what than 2) Knows place than 2 needs to be +quiet locations values exist. including him) doing. -Appears to Can +When asked a mostly occasionally question he understand ones handle 3 in a comprehends, & tens locations group good at in place value +visual cues answering setups. work best verbally. pictures, -occasionally numbers volunteers Learned written, facial information Concepts expressions verbally (when -Greater than and comprehends) lesser than values: understands single-digit greater than and lesser than. -large groups Error Pattern I -audio input -when asked a classroom -Does not does not always question he does -noisy consistently register. Needs not comprehend, Behavior Academic + +likes to please +works hard most of the time when has undivided adult (one-on-one) attention / direction. +works well with adults he is comfortable around -kinesthetic paired with visual with or without audio. -if drilled on specific behavior that is not acceptable, will selfcorrect. Social + -enjoys laughing with peers of similar ability (hit and miss sometimes friends are a bother) +sweet disposition (for the most part) -quick to apologize and change behavior Reinforcement + -mountain book does not like to fall off the mountain from behavior. Likes to please, so good daily reports are good. (starting to slip) -enjoys giving self tallys when answers correctly in Math. -does not like going to principal. -computer time -responds well to praise verbal. -auditory reprimand -personal space

-says I tired, I dont feel good, or its too hard when

-only interacts with other students with

environments -more than 2 in a group.

demonstrate understanding of place value. -Has not mastered ones and tens place value yet. -Has little to no concept of Hundreds place value. Error Pattern II -Does not consistently demonstrate understanding of greater than or less than when presented with 2digit numbers. -Does not understand greater or less than when presented with 3digit numbers.

visuals along with audio -easily confused with auditory. - when 3 in a group, easily distracted and lost.

will physically hide his eyes and sometimes stem, other times will just begin repeating the same answer, even though it may not be correct. -if does not have one-on-one attention from adult, no focus distracted and stemming or messing around.

does not want to do what is requested. -does not self-direct -does not work well independently -needs constant adult instruction and direction. -can be distracting to others in the small groups when stemming noises, banging hand on table, flapping, rapid movements. -if has something he has earned, easily distracted by object and cannot pay attention to others in the group. -does not participate with other group members unless cutting up

disabilities, and only with those he is most familiar and comfortable around.

invasion -counting down or up through auditory without visual (please do this in 3, 2, 1.)

Mathematics Improvement Plan


Student: Tony Objective: To learn place value ones, tens, and hundreds. Time 20 mins 20 mins Context Small group (1 other Small group (1 other student) (+) student) (+) Comparing cubes, longs, Using cubes and longs create 2and flats and seeing that digit numbers both with Content 10 cubes = 1 long and 10 manipulatives and with writing longs = 1 flat the numbers. Use of manipulatives to Number written on table and name and compare. (+) verbally expressed (+) Input Use of manipulatives to build numbers in a place-value chart Process (+) Exchanging 10 cubes for 1 long and 10 longs for 1 flat. Express verbally and with manipulatives. (+) Saying numbers (-) Making numbers out of manipulatives in chart (+) Writing numbers in correct placevalue columns (+) Write numbers in correct number form (+) Take time and talk through each step while writing (+) 20 mins Small group (1 other student) (+) Using cubes, longs, and flats create 3digit numbers both with manipulatives and with writing the numbers. Use of dry-erase markers to write numbers being created by use of cubes, longs, and flats. (+) When writing numbers, will write 2 ways one using place value columns and the other as a regular number. (+) Saying number of cubes, longs, and flats. (-) Writing numbers in correct placevalue columns (+) Write numbers in correct number form. (+) Saying number written. (-) Take time and talk through each step while writing (+) Turn-taking and interacting with peer & adult (-) Oral feedback (-) Visual feedback (+) Kinesthetic feedback (+)

Output

Take time and talk Academic through while writing. (+)

Turn-taking and Turn-taking and interacting with Behavior Social interacting with peer & peer & adult (-) adult (-) Oral feedback (-) Oral feedback (-) Visual feedback (+) Visual feedback (+) Reinforcement Kinesthetic feedback (+) Kinesthetic feedback (+) Note: The + symbols indicate strengths and the symbols indicate areas of concern

1Lesson Teacher Candidate: Carleene Bennett Title of Lesson: Place Value Lesson 1 Grade Level: 2nd Subject Area: Math 1. Lesson Topic (What is the big idea?):

Preparation

To learn the meaning of place values.

2. What standard(s) will it address?

Standard: 1. Number Sense, Properties, and Operations Concepts and skills students master: The whole number system describes place value relationships through 1,000 and forms the foundation for efficient algorithms. a. Use place value to read, write, count, compare, and represent numbers. 1. Represent the digits of a three-digit number as hundreds, tens, and ones. 3. What IEP goal(s) will it address?

a. Number Sense, Properties, and Operations: Will improve conceptual understanding and procedural fluency in math numbers and operations from 5-12 as measured by correct responses.

4. Main Objective of Instruction (What do you want the student(s) to learn?):

By the end of three lessons, the students will show their understanding of the connection between real numbers and place value by using manipulatives to show the correct number of flats, longs, and cubes in the correct place on a place value chart with five different two and three-digit numbers with 80% accuracy. By the end of three lessons, the students will show their understanding of the connection between real numbers and place value by writing the correct number of in the correct place on a place value chart with five different two and three-digit numbers with 80% accuracy. By the end of three lessons, the students will show their understanding of the connection between real numbers and place value by writing the real number represented by manipulatives in a place value chart with five different two and three-digit numbers with 80% accuracy. By the end of three lessons, the students will show their understanding of the connection between real numbers and place value by writing the real number represented by numbers written in a place value chart with five different two and three-digit numbers with 80% accuracy.

5. Supporting Objectives:

How many cubes are allowed in the ones place, how many longs are allowed in the tens place, and how many flats are allowed in the hundreds place. Understanding what numbers are represented by different place values. (i.e., A five in the tens place means 50, not five.) Making connections between numbers written and what place value each number represents.

6. Specific Strategies (conspicuous) to be taught/modeled:

Comparing cubes to longs and longs to flats to show that 10 cubes make one long and 10 longs make one flat.

7. Planning for individual differences (mediated scaffolding): What are the accommodations/modifications you need to prepare?

Most of the individual differences to plan for will be around behavior. Tony has a behavior chart that I will need to have on hand. Tony will need to sit on the blue wobble chair. Sarah will need to sit in her wooden chair so she is not leaning back on the back two legs of a regular chair.

Tony will need to have continuous visual and kinesthetic movement with all of the audio instructions.

8. What background knowledge do the students have? How will you assess students learning pre, during and post? (please paste your pre and post assessment here)

Both students have seen place value concept lessons before. However, neither of them have a solid grasp of place value. So, I will be starting from scratch to try to build the concepts from the ground up.

Overall unit assessments: Pre-assessment: I will make a teacher-made pre-assessment that is similar to some of the progress monitoring assessments Tony does monthly. I will have 3-digit numbers and ask the students to tell what number is in the ones

place value, tens place value, and hundreds place value. The pre-assessment will be multiple choice and random as to what place value is asked for. During: Students will be assessed during the lessons through teacher-made checklists of different activities and questions I will ask during the activities to monitor their learning. Post-assessment: I will give the same pre-assessment from the first day of the lessons.

Lesson one assessments: Pre: Informal checklist: Ask students how many cubes are in a long and how many longs are in a flat. Note their answers. During: Informal checklist: Note how students are doing when scaffolding from modeling to you do parts of the lesson and when asked to compare cubes, longs, and flats. Post: Informal checklist: Ask students how many cubes are in a long and how many longs are in a flat. Note their answers.

9. What management/grouping issues do you need to consider?

Both students in this group are very active and easily distracted. I will teach the lesson in a part of the ILC room that is quiet and has minimal interruption. I will also have each of them sit in the chairs that help with their activity levels. I will make the lessons as activity-based as possible so they are engaged constantly (visually, audibly, and kinesthetically) and do not have a chance to get bored.

10. Materials and Resources: Base 10 blocks

Dry-erase markers Pre-assessment checklist Post-assessment checklist Pencils Erasers Place-value charts (hand-made)

11. How/where will students be able to integrate (generalize) this learning?

Students will show generalization when they move from base-ten blocks to actual items that they are grouping and counting using written numbers and place-value charts.

12. How will you evaluate student learning from this lesson and build review into ongoing instruction (judicious review)?

Students will show their learning through using base ten blocks to show the value of cubes to longs and longs to flats and by placing them in the correct place on the place-value charts. Following lessons will begin with showing and working with baseten blocks and place-value charts.

Lesson Title: Main Objective of this lesson: By the end of this lesson, the students will know the names of cubes, longs, and flats, verbally identify how much a cube, long, and flat are worth, and physically place manipulatives of cubes, longs, and flats in the correct place value setting on a place value chart with 100% accuracy. I. Opening: (SET How will you get the student(s) attention?) Relate lesson to prior learning. Communicate the objective of the lesson. Show students cubes, longs, and flats. Have you seen these before? If they say yes, have students tell where and when they have seen them and what they have used them for. II. Procedure: (Is this an informal presentation, direct instruction, or structured discovery?) Structured Discovery Strategies (I Do/ how will you guide students to construct meaning for themselves): Have labels on table showing names and place -values (cubes ones, longs tens, flats hundreds). Ask students, What are these are? Pre-assess using a checklist as to who says what and if they can name the items. After going over the names of each, ask, How many units each of these is worth? Note answers. What column do each of these belong in on the chart? Have students place the cubes, longs, and flats in the columns they think they belong in - note student answers. Differentiation: There are only two students in the group, so their needs are similar. Both are easily distracted, so the learning environment in which this lesson is taught needs to be quiet and free of as many distractions (people walking by) as possible. (PRODUCT): This lesson is an introductory lesson. The product will be the teachers check-list noting where both students are in their knowledge of cubes, longs, and flats and place-value.

Guided Practice (We Do/students present): How many cubes are in a long? Have students mess with longs and cubes. Through manipulating the tools, they will be able to discover the answer. How many longs are in a flat? Same as above. How many cubes are in a flat? Talk through this using longs and skip-counting by tens. Have a place-value map/chart out on the table. Explain that each cube represents one unit, or the number one. So, cubes belong in the ones column of the chart. If there are 10 cubes in a long, then the long is worth 10 units. That means that one long equals 10. So, longs belong in the tens column. If there are 100 cubes in a flat, then the flat is worth 100 units. That means that one flat equals 100. So, flats belong in the hundreds column.

III.

Closure: Student(s) summarize, demonstrate learning of lesson. Independent Practice (You Do). Remove all of the manipulatives from the chart and give each student his/her own chart and manipulatives. Ask the students to place the manipulatives in the correct place on their charts. Note each students answers by checking off of a checklist whether or not he/she understands the concept of what manipulative belongs in what column. Ask each student what each manipulative is worth. Note their answers using a checklist. Have labels on table showing names and place -values (cubes ones, longs tens, flats hundreds). Ask students, What is the name of each of these? Post-assess using a checklist as to who says what and if they can name the items. After going over the names of each, ask, How many units each of these is worth? Note answers. What column does each of these belong in on the chart? Have students place the cubes, longs, and flats in the columns they think they belong in - note student answers. Formally END the lesson. Tell students that the next time we meet, we are going to start relating numbers to the place-value chart and the manipulatives and learn about place value within numbers we use every day.

IV.

Reflect Lesson Reflection Student Progress


(linked to standards, goals and objectives)

Lesson Evaluation
Directly linked to procedures, strategies, timing and accommodations/ modifications (what went well, what would you change the next time you teach this concept):

Next Steps:
My next step will be to revisit the concepts within this lesson to see what stuck and what needs further attention before moving on to the next concept in lesson two. I will also take the lessons I learned about the visual schedule and limiting the risk of tools becoming toys into other lessons across curriculum, as these concepts are universal and can be helpful for all students, regardless of ability.

Note: This lesson was designed for 2 students; however, one was out sick. So, this ended up being a one-on-one lesson. This lesson was a structured discovery lesson that allowed the students to work with manipulatives to learn the beginning concepts for place value. Even though the overall objective of this lesson was not reached, per the post assessment data, I still feel like the lesson was a success. The student was able to explore the manipulatives and say the names of them and their values multiple times during the lesson. She was pretty well spent by the time we performed the post-test; therefore, the data is somewhat misleading and does not show the full learning achievements during the lesson.

I intentionally set this lesson up at a round table out of the way of frequent traffic and interruptions, as the students this lesson was created for are both very easily distracted. I also set the student in a wooden chair that limits her ability to walk away from the table. This significantly decreased the loss of valuable instruction time. I felt like both of these decisions helped with the success of the lesson. I also liked the use of the manipulatives and having the student do some of the discovery of values on her own. I definitely will change a few things up in the future to maximize our time together. One of these things will be to have a visual schedule that shows the items we need to address during the lesson. With this schedule, I would have a place for a check-off so that the student(s) can check each item off as we accomplish it. One of the common questions during the lesson was are we done yet? Having a visual schedule will help with this during future lessons. I will also limit the amount of manipulatives I give to the students at one time. When I give them a pile of manipulatives, there is the risk of the tools becoming toys and a distraction from the lesson. Handing them one manipulative at a time and asking them to place it where it belongs would help eliminate some of this risk. Please see post observation conference info for further information regarding my reflection about what went well and what could have gone better.

Actual picture of work area prepared for student.

Math Lesson 1 Checklists and Student Tracking Information


Pre-Test: 5/15/13 Tony Absent for this lesson Name of cube ____________________________________ Name of long ____________________________________ Name of flat _____________________________________ Value of Cube ____________________________ Value of Long ____________________________ Value of Flat _____________________________ What column or place on the place value chart do cubes belong in? ________________ What column or place on the place value chart do longs belong in? _________________ What column or place on the place value chart do flats belong in? _________________ Sarah

Name of cube Block Name of long Blocks Name of flat Square Value of Cube 1 cent X Value of Long 10 she counted the cubes within the long Value of Flat 1 cent What column or place on the place value chart do cubes belong in? Hundreds X What column or place on the place value chart do longs belong in? Longs What column or place on the place value chart do flats belong in? Cubes Notes for during lesson: Tony: (absent) How many cubes are in a long? ____________________

How many longs are in a flat? _____________________ How many cubes are in a flat? _____________________ Sarah: X How many cubes are in a long? 10 hard to line up lining up at end instead of on the long. Worked together put on top then knocked off to count. X How many longs are in a flat? 10 - Lining up on top X How many cubes are in a flat? 100

Post-Test: 5/15/13 Tony (Absent) Name of cube ____________________________________ Name of long ____________________________________ Name of flat _____________________________________ Value of Cube ____________________________

Value of Long ____________________________ Value of Flat _____________________________ What column or place on the place value chart do cubes belong in? ________________ What column or place on the place value chart do longs belong in? _________________ What column or place on the place value chart do flats belong in? _________________ Sarah X Name of cube cube X Name of long long Name of flat 5 cents (student getting very tired and pretty much done. Demonstrated knowledge during lesson, but post test, she checked out.) Value of Cube 1 cent (Student done at this point. Demonstrated knowledge during lesson, but post test, she checked out.)

Value of Long 2 cents (Student done at this point. Demonstrated knowledge during lesson, but post test, she checked out.) Value of Flat out.) X What column or place on the place value chart do cubes belong in? X What column or place on the place value chart do longs belong in? X What column or place on the place value chart do flats belong in? 5 cents (student done checked out. Demonstrated knowledge during lesson, but post test, she checked

1Lesson Teacher Candidate: Carleene Bennett Title of Lesson: Place Value Lesson 2 Grade Level: 2nd Subject Area: Math 1. Lesson Topic (What is the big idea?):

Preparation

To learn the meaning of place values.

2. What standard(s) will it address?

Standard: 1. Number Sense, Properties, and Operations

Concepts and skills students master:

The whole number system describes place value relationships through 1,000 and forms the foundation for efficient algorithms. b. Use place value to read, write, count, compare, and represent numbers. a.Represent the digits of a three-digit number as hundreds, tens, and ones. 3. What IEP goal(s) will it address?

a. Number Sense, Properties, and Operations: Will improve conceptual understanding and procedural fluency in math numbers and operations from 5-12 as measured by correct responses.

4. Main Objective of Instruction (What do you want the student(s) to learn?):

By the end of three lessons, the students will show their understanding of the connection between real numbers and place value by using manipulatives to show the correct number of flats, longs, and cubes in the correct place on a place value chart with five different two and three-digit numbers with 80% accuracy. By the end of three lessons, the students will show their understanding of the connection between real numbers and place value by writing the correct number of in the correct place on a place value chart with five different two and three-digit numbers with 80% accuracy. By the end of three lessons, the students will show their understanding of the connection between real numbers and place value by writing the real number represented by manipulatives in a place value chart with five different two and three-digit numbers with 80% accuracy. By the end of three lessons, the students will show their understanding of the connection between real numbers and place value by writing the real number represented by numbers written in a place value chart with five different two and threedigit numbers with 80% accuracy.

5. Supporting Objectives:

How many cubes can be in the ones place, how many longs can be in the tens place, and how many flats can be in the hundreds place. Understanding what numbers are represented by different place values. (i.e., A five in the tens place means 50, not five.)

Making connections between numbers written and what place value each number represents.

6. Specific Strategies (conspicuous) to be taught/modeled:

Activities on page 198 of Van De Walles book, Elementary and Middle School Mathematics Teaching Developmentally (8th edition), for making groups of ten and estimating groups of tens and ones.

7. Planning for individual differences (mediated scaffolding): What are the accommodations/modifications you need to prepare?

Most of the individual differences to plan for will be around behavior. Tony has a behavior chart that I will need to have on hand. Tony will need to sit on the blue wobble chair. Sarah will need to sit in her wooden chair so she is not leaning back on the back two legs of a regular chair.

Tony will need to have continuous visual and kinesthetic movement with all of the audio instructions.

8. What background knowledge do the students have? How will you assess students learning pre, during and post? (please paste your pre and post assessment here)

Both students have seen place value concept lessons before. However, neither of them have a solid grasp of place value. So, I will be starting from scratch to try to build the concepts from the ground up.

Overall unit assessments:

Pre-assessment: I will make a teacher-made pre-assessment that is similar to some of the progress monitoring assessments Tony does monthly. I will have 3-digit numbers and ask the students to tell what number is in the ones place value, tens place value, and hundreds place value. The pre-assessment will be multiple choice and random as to what place value is asked for. During: Students will be assessed during the lessons through teacher-made checklists of different activities and questions I will ask during the activities to monitor their learning. Post-assessment: I will give the same pre-assessment from the first day of the lessons.

Lesson two assessments: Pre: Informal: Give students their own place-value charts and cubes and longs. Give them a worksheet with five different 1-digit numbers and five different 2-digit numbers. Ask students to use the cubes and longs to show you the numbers within their place-value charts. After they have shown you, have them draw their answers on their worksheet. (Keep this as a pre-assessment.) During: Informal student work: Keep the activity worksheets students fill out during the we do portion of the lesson. Post: Informal: Give students their own place-value charts and cubes and longs. Give them a worksheet with five different 1-digit numbers and five different 2-digit numbers. Ask students to use the cubes and longs to show you the numbers within their place-value charts. After they have shown you, have them draw their answers on their worksheet. (Keep this as a post-assessment.)

9. What management/grouping issues do you need to consider?

Both students in this group are very active and easily distracted. I will teach the lesson in a part of the ILC room that is quiet and has minimal interruption. I will also have each of them sit in the chairs that help with their activity levels. I will make the lessons as activity-based as possible so they are engaged constantly (visually, audibly, and kinesthetically) and do not have a chance to get bored.

10. Materials and Resources: Base 10 blocks Dry-erase markers Pre-assessment test Post-assessment test Pencils Erasers Beans or other items that can be counted and grouped Place-value charts (hand-made) Charts for activities

11. How/where will students be able to integrate (generalize) this learning?

Students will show generalization when they move from base-ten blocks to actual items that they are grouping and counting using written numbers and place-value charts.

12. How will you evaluate student learning from this lesson and build review into ongoing instruction (judicious review)?

Give students their own place-value charts and cubes and longs. Give them a worksheet with five different 1-digit numbers and five different 2-digit numbers. Ask students to use the cubes and longs to show you the numbers within their place-value charts. After they have shown you, have them draw their answers on their worksheet. (Keep this as a post-assessment.) The next lesson will begin with a review of the numbers and their place-value placement using numerals and base-10 blocks.

Lesson Title: Main Objective of this lesson: At the end of this lesson, students will show their understanding of place value through the correct representation of two-digit numbers using manipulatives and numbers with 80% accuracy. I. Opening: (SET How will you get the student(s) attention?) Relate lesson to prior learning. Communicate the objective of the lesson. Show students cubes, longs, and flats. Do you remember these from our last lesson? Can you tell me what each is called? Have a place-value chart. Place these where they belong on this chart, please. Tell me how many units each is worth. Great! Today we are going to start putting numbers with the base-10 blocks. II. Procedure: (Is this an informal presentation, direct instruction, or structured discovery?) Structured Discovery Pre-assessment: Give students their own place-value charts and cubes and longs. Give them a worksheet with five different 1digit numbers and five different 2-digit numbers. Ask students to use the cubes and longs to show you the numbers within their place-value charts. After they have shown you, have them draw their answers on their worksheet. (Keep this as a preassessment.) Strategies (I Do/ how will you guide students to construct meaning for themselves): Have a sheet of numbers that are different from the pre-assessment. (Include single-digit numbers and double-digit numbers.) Show the students how to use the manipulatives to represent the numbers shown. Use self-talk so they can understand the concepts being worked through. Build the two-digit numbers out of cubes and then group them into tens. Talk through and show the students how to exchange the groups of 10 for longs. Once this has been done, use the longs and cubes to fill out the activity sheets from page 198 of Van De Walles book.

Differentiation: There are only two students in the group, so their needs are similar. Both are easily distracted, so the learning environment in which this lesson is taught needs to be quiet and free of as many distractions (people walking by) as possible. (PRODUCT): This lesson is an introductory lesson. The product will be the teachers check-list noting where both students are in their knowledge of cubes, longs, and flats and place-value.

Guided Practice (We Do/students present):

Have sheet of numbers that is different from the pre-assessment and slightly different from the modeling section of the lesson. Have a few of the numbers be the same as the modeling numbers. (Include single-digit numbers and double-digit numbers.) Work with the students using the manipulatives to represent the numbers shown. Let the students experiment with using the manipulatives to figure out the numbers. Make sure they are using self-talk so I can assess their understanding of the concepts being worked through. Takes notes as needed. Once this has been done, use the longs and cubes to fill out the activity sheets from page 198 of Van De Walles book. Each student should fill out their own packet drawing representations of the manipulatives and writing the numbers appropriately. Keep these papers to show student work and progress and to plan for the next lesson. III. Closure: Student(s) summarize, demonstrate learning of lesson. Independent Practice (You Do). As students are filling out the activity sheets, start backing out when they seem to be getting the concept and let them do the last few (at the least) on their own. Pos-assessment: Give students their own place-value charts and cubes and longs. Give them a worksheet with five different 1digit numbers and five different 2-digit numbers. Ask students to use the cubes and longs to show you the numbers within their place-value charts. After they have shown you, have them draw their answers on their worksheet. (Keep this as a postassessment.)

Formally END the lesson. Tell students that the next time we meet, we are going to add flats to our mix and work on the hundreds place-value, along with tens and ones.

1Lesson Teacher Candidate: Carleene Bennett Title of Lesson: Place Value Lesson 3 Grade Level: 2nd Subject Area: Math 1. Lesson Topic (What is the big idea?):

Preparation

To learn the meaning of place values.

2. What standard(s) will it address?

Standard: 1. Number Sense, Properties, and Operations

Concepts and skills students master:

The whole number system describes place value relationships through 1,000 and forms the foundation for efficient algorithms. c. Use place value to read, write, count, compare, and represent numbers. 2. Represent the digits of a three-digit number as hundreds, tens, and ones. 3. What IEP goal(s) will it address?

a. Number Sense, Properties, and Operations: Will improve conceptual understanding and procedural fluency in math numbers and operations from 5-12 as measured by correct responses.

4. Main Objective of Instruction (What do you want the student(s) to learn?):

By the end of three lessons, the students will show their understanding of the connection between real numbers and place value by using manipulatives to show the correct number of flats, longs, and cubes in the correct place on a place value chart with five different two and three-digit numbers with 80% accuracy. By the end of three lessons, the students will show their understanding of the connection between real numbers and place value by writing the correct number of in the correct place on a place value chart with five different two and three-digit numbers with 80% accuracy. By the end of three lessons, the students will show their understanding of the connection between real numbers and place value by writing the real number represented by manipulatives in a place value chart with five different two and three-digit numbers with 80% accuracy. By the end of three lessons, the students will show their understanding of the connection between real numbers and place value by writing the real number represented by numbers written in a place value chart with five different two and three-digit numbers with 80% accuracy.

5. Supporting Objectives:

How many cubes can be in the ones place, how many longs can be in the tens place, and how many flats can be in the hundreds place. Understanding what numbers are represented by different place values. (i.e., A five in the tens place means 50, not five.)

Making connections between numbers written and what place value each number represents.

6. Specific Strategies (conspicuous) to be taught/modeled:

Activity on page 202 of Van De Walles book, Elementary and Middle School Mathematics Teaching Developmentally (8th edition),using place-value mats (figure 11.11.)

7. Planning for individual differences (mediated scaffolding): What are the accommodations/modifications you need to prepare?

Most of the individual differences to plan for will be around behavior. Tony has a behavior chart that I will need to have on hand. Tony will need to sit on the blue wobble chair. Sarah will need to sit in her wooden chair so she is not leaning back on the back two legs of a regular chair.

Tony will need to have continuous visual and kinesthetic movement with all of the audio instructions.

8. What background knowledge do the students have? How will you assess students learning pre, during and post? (please paste your pre and post assessment here)

Both students have seen place value concept lessons before. However, neither of them have a solid grasp of place value. So, I will be starting from scratch to try to build the concepts from the ground up.

Overall unit assessments:

Pre-assessment: I will make a teacher-made pre-assessment that is similar to some of the progress monitoring assessments Tony does monthly. I will have 3-digit numbers and ask the students to tell what number is in the ones place value, tens place value, and hundreds place value. The pre-assessment will be multiple choice and random as to what place value is asked for. During: Students will be assessed during the lessons through teacher-made checklists of different activities and questions I will ask during the activities to monitor their learning. Post-assessment: I will give the same pre-assessment from the first day of the lessons.

Lesson three assessments: Pre: Informal: Give students their own place-value charts and cubes, longs, and flats. Give them a worksheet with five different 1-digit numbers, five different 2-digit numbers, and five 3-digit numbers. Ask students to use the cubes, longs, and flats to show you the numbers within their place-value charts. After they have shown you, have them draw their answers on their worksheet. (Keep this as a pre-assessment.) During: Informal student work: Keep the activity worksheets students fill out during the we do portion of the lesson. Post: Informal: Give students their own place-value charts and cubes, longs, and flats. Give them a worksheet with five different 1-digit numbers, five different 2-digit numbers, and five 3-digit numbers. Ask students to use the cubes, longs, and flats to show you the numbers within their place-value charts. After they have shown you, have them draw their answers on their worksheet. (Keep this as a post-assessment.)

9. What management/grouping issues do you need to consider?

Both students in this group are very active and easily distracted. I will teach the lesson in a part of the ILC room that is quiet and has minimal interruption. I will also have each of them sit in the chairs that help with their activity levels. I will make the

lessons as activity-based as possible so they are engaged constantly (visually, audibly, and kinesthetically) and do not have a chance to get bored.

10. Materials and Resources: Base 10 blocks Dry-erase markers Pre-assessment test Post-assessment test Pencils Erasers Beans or other items that can be counted and grouped Place-value charts (hand-made) Charts for activity 11.11

11. How/where will students be able to integrate (generalize) this learning?

Students will show generalization when they move from base-ten blocks to actual items that they are grouping and counting using written numbers and place-value charts. Also, the final celebration activity will be looking at random numbers and pointing out which number is in which place value. (We are moving from table-activities to general numbers placed in different areas.)

12. How will you evaluate student learning from this lesson and build review into ongoing instruction (judicious review)?

Students will show their learning through using base ten blocks to show the value of cubes to longs and longs to flats and by placing them in the correct place on the place-value charts. Following lessons will begin with showing and working with baseten blocks and place-value charts.

Lesson Title: Main Objective of this lesson: At the end of this lesson, students will show their understanding of place value through the correct representation of three-digit numbers using manipulatives and numbers with 80% accuracy. (CONTENT-PROCESS) I. Opening: (SET How will you get the student(s) attention?) Relate lesson to prior learning. Communicate the objective of the lesson. Show students cubes, longs, and flats. Have you seen these before? If they say yes, have students tell where and when they have seen them and what they have used them for. II. Procedure: (Is this an informal presentation, direct instruction, or structured discovery?) Structured Discovery Pre-assessment: Give students their own place-value charts and cubes, longs, and flats. Give them a worksheet with five different 1-digit numbers, five different 2-digit numbers, and five 3-digit numbers. Ask students to use the cubes, longs, and flats to show you the numbers within their place-value charts. After they have shown you, have them draw their answers on their worksheet. (Keep this as a pre-assessment.) Strategies (I Do/ how will you guide students to construct meaning for themselves): Have a sheet of numbers that are different from the pre-assessment. (Include single-digit numbers, double-digit numbers, and triple-digit numbers.) Show the students how to use the manipulatives to represent the numbers shown. Use self-talk so they can understand the concepts being worked through. Build the two-digit numbers out of cubes and then group them into tens. Talk through and show the students how to exchange the groups of 10 for longs and groups of 10 longs for flats. Once this has been done, use the flats, longs and cubes to fill out the activity sheets from activity 11.11 of Van De Walles book.

Differentiation: There are only two students in the group, so their needs are similar. Both are easily distracted, so the learning environment in which this lesson is taught needs to be quiet and free of as many distractions (people walking by) as possible. (PRODUCT): This lesson is an introductory lesson. The product will be the teachers check-list noting where both students are in their knowledge of cubes, longs, and flats and place-value.

Guided Practice (We Do/students present): Have sheet of numbers that is different from the pre-assessment and slightly different from the modeling section of the lesson. Have a few of the numbers be the same as the modeling numbers. (Include single-digit numbers, double-digit numbers, and triple-digit numbers.) Work with the students using the manipulatives to represent the numbers shown. Let the students experiment with using the manipulatives to figure out the numbers. Make sure they are using self-talk so I can assess their understanding of the concepts being worked through. Takes notes as needed. Once this has been done, use the flats, longs, and cubes to fill out the activity sheets from activity 11.11 of Van De Walles book. Each student should fill out their own packet drawing representations of the manipulatives and writing the numbers appropriately. Keep these papers to show student work and progress and to plan for the next lesson.

III.

Closure: Student(s) summarize, demonstrate learning of lesson. Independent Practice (You Do). As students are filling out the activity sheets, start backing out when they seem to be getting the concept and let them do the last few (at the least) on their own. Pos-assessment: Give students their own place-value charts and cubes, longs, and flats. Give them a worksheet with five different 1-digit numbers, five different 2-digit numbers, and five different 3-digit numbers. Ask students to use the cubes, longs, and flats to show you the numbers within their place-value charts. After they have shown you, have them draw their answers on their worksheet. (Keep this as a post-assessment.)

Formally END the lesson. Thank the students for their time and celebrate how hard they have worked through a game of looking at numbers around the room and having them identify numbers and place values. Include sticker rewards.