Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 20

[ Assignment View ]

Class PHYSICS110SPRING2007
Chapter 14

Assignment is due at 11:00am on Monday, May 28, 2007

Credit for problems submitted late will decrease to 0% after the deadline has passed.
There is no penalty for wrong answers to free response questions. Multiple choice questions are
penalized as described in the online help.
The unopened hint bonus is 2% per part.
You are allowed 4 attempts per answer.

  

Good Vibes: Introduction to Oscillations
Learning Goal: To learn the basic terminology and relationships among the main characteristics of 
simple harmonic motion.

Motion that repeats itself over and over is called periodic motion. There are many examples of periodic 
motion: the earth revolving around the sun, an elastic ball bouncing up and down, or a block attached to a 
spring oscillating back and forth.

The last example differs from the first two, in that it represents a special kind of periodic motion called 
simple harmonic motion. The conditions that lead to simple harmonic motion are as follows: 

• There must be a position of stable equilibrium. 
• There must be a restoring force acting on the oscillating object. The direction of this force must 
always point toward the equilibrium, and its magnitude must be directly proportional to the 
magnitude of the object's displacement from its equilibrium position. Mathematically, the 

restoring force  is given by  , where  is the displacement from equilibrium and  is 


a constant that depends on the properties of the oscillating system. 
• The resistive forces in the system must be reasonably small. 

In this problem, we will introduce some of the basic quantities that describe oscillations and the 
relationships among them.

Consider a block of mass  attached to a spring with force constant  , as shown in the figure


. The spring can be either stretched or 
compressed. The block slides on a frictionless horizontal surface, as shown. When the spring is relaxed, 
the block is located at  . If the block is pulled to the right a distance  and then released,  will be 
the amplitude of the resulting oscillations.

Assume that the mechanical energy of the block­spring system remains unchanged in the subsequent 
motion of the block.

Part A

After the block is released from  , it will

remain at rest.
ANSWER:
move to the left until it reaches equilibrium and stop there.
move to the left until it reaches  and stop there.
move to the left until it reaches  and then begin to move to the right.

As the block begins its motion to the left, it accelerates. Although the restoring force decreases as the 
block approaches equilibrium, it still pulls the block to the left, so by the time the equilibrium position 
is reached, the block has gained some speed. It will, therefore, pass the equilibrium position and keep 
moving, compressing the spring. The spring will now be pushing the block to the right, and the block 
will slow down, temporarily coming to rest at  .

After  is reached, the block will begin its motion to the right, pushed by the spring. The block 
will pass the equilibrium position and continue until it reaches  , completing one cycle of 
motion. The motion will then repeat; if, as we've assumed, there is no friction, the motion will repeat 
indefinitely.

The time it takes the block to complete one cycle is called the period. Usually, the period is denoted 
and is measured in seconds.

The frequency, denoted  , is the number of cycles that are completed per unit of time:  . In SI 


units,  is measured in inverse seconds, or hertz ( ).

Part B

If the period is doubled, the frequency is
unchanged.
ANSWER:
doubled.
halved.

Part C

An oscillating object takes 0.10  to complete one cycle; that is, its period is 0.10  . What is its 


frequency  ?
Express your answer in hertz.

ANSWER:       10  
  
=

Part D

If the frequency is 40  , what is the period  ?
Express your answer in seconds.

ANSWER:       0.025    
=  
The following questions refer to the figure 
that graphically depicts the oscillations of the block on the spring.

Note that the vertical axis represents the x coordinate of the oscillating object, and the horizontal axis 
represents time.

Part E

Which points on the x axis are located a distance  from the equilibrium position?
R only
ANSWER:
Q only
both R and Q

Part F

Suppose that the period is  . Which of the following points on the t axis are separated by the time 
interval  ?
K and L
ANSWER:
K and M
K and P
L and N
M and P

Now assume that the x coordinate of point R is 0.12  and the t coordinate of point K is 0.0050  .
Part G

What is the period  ?
Hint G.1 How to approach the problem

Hint not displayed
Express your answer in seconds.

ANSWER:       0.02    
=  

Part H

How much time  does the block take to travel from the point of maximum displacement to the 
opposite point of maximum displacement?
Express your answer in seconds.

ANSWER:     
 0.01    
=

Part I

What distance  does the object cover during one period of oscillation?
Express your answer in meters.

ANSWER:       0.48    
=  

Part J

What distance  does the object cover between the moments labeled K and N on the graph?
Express your answer in meters.

ANSWER:       0.36    
=  

  

Position, Velocity, and Acceleration of an Oscillator
Learning Goal: To learn to find kinematic variables from a graph of position vs. time.
The graph of the position of an oscillating object as a function of time is shown. 
Some of the questions ask you to determine ranges on the graph over which a statement is true. When 
answering these questions, choose the most complete answer. For example, if the answer "B to D" were 
correct, then "B to C" would technically also be correct­­but you will only recieve credit for choosing the 
most complete answer.

Part A

Where on the graph is  ?
A to B
ANSWER:
A to C
C to D
C to E
B to D
A to B and D to E

Part B

Where on the graph is  ?
A to B
ANSWER:
A to C
C to D
C to E
B to D
A to B and D to E
Part C

Where on the graph is  ?
A only
ANSWER:
C only
E only
A and C
A and C and E
B and D

Part D

Where on the graph is the velocity  ?
Hint D.1 Finding instantaneous velocity

Hint not displayed

A to B
ANSWER:
A to C
C to D
C to E
B to D
A to B and D to E
Part E

Where on the graph is the velocity  ?
A to B
ANSWER:
A to C
C to D
C to E
B to D
A to B and D to E

Part F

Where on the graph is the velocity  ?
Hint F.1 How to tell if 

Hint not displayed

A only
ANSWER:
B only
C only
D only
E only
A and C
A and C and E
B and D
Part G

Where on the graph is the acceleration  ?
Hint G.1 Finding acceleration

Hint not displayed

A to B
ANSWER:
A to C
C to D
C to E
B to D
A to B and D to E

Part H

Where on the graph is the acceleration  ?
A to B
ANSWER:
A to C
C to D
C to E
B to D
A to B and D to E

Part I

Where on the graph is the acceleration  ?
Hint I.1 How to tell if 

Hint not displayed

A only
ANSWER:
B only
C only
D only
E only
A and C
A and C and E
B and D

  

Mass Hitting a Spring
A block sliding with velocity  along a frictionless floor hits a spring at time  (configuration 1). 
The spring compresses until the block comes to a momentary stop (configuration 2).

Finally, the spring expands, pushing the block back in the direction from which it came. 

In this problem you will be shown a series of plots related to the motion of the block and spring, and you 
will be asked to identify what the plots represent. In each plot, the point labeled "1" refers to 
configuration 1 (when the block first comes in contact with the spring). The point labeled "2" refers to 
configuration 2 (when the block comes to rest with the spring compressed).

In the questions that follow, "force" refers to the x component of the force that the spring exerts on the 
block and "position" and "velocity" refer to the x components of the position and velocity of the block. 

For all graphs, treat the origin as  ; that is, the x axis represents  and the y axis represents 


.
Part A

Consider graph A. 

What might this graph represent?

Part A.1 Specify the initial condition

Part not displayed

Hint A.2 Determine what the slope means

Hint not displayed

position vs. time
ANSWER:
velocity vs. time
force vs. time
force vs. position

Part B

Consider graph B. 
  

Cosine Wave

The graph shows the position  of an oscillating object as a function of time  . 

The equation of the graph is 

where  is the amplitude,  is the angular frequency, and  is a phase constant. The quantities  ,  , 


and  are measurements to be used in your answers. 
Part A

What is  in the equation?
Hint A.1
Maximum of 

Hint not displayed

ANSWER:

Part B

What is  in the equation?
Hint B.1 Period

Hint not displayed

ANSWER:
Part C

What is  in the equation?
Hint C.1 Using the graph and trigonometry

Hint not displayed

Hint C.2 Using the graph and Part B

Hint not displayed

ANSWER:

  

Vertical Mass­and­Spring Oscillator
A block of mass  is attached to the end of an ideal spring. Due to the weight of the block, the block 
remains at rest when the spring is stretched a distance  from its equilibrium length. 

The spring has an unknown spring constant 

Part A

What is the spring constant  ?
Part A.1 Sum of forces acting on the block

Part not displayed
Express the spring constant in terms of given quantities and  , the magnitude of the acceleration 
due to gravity.

ANSWER:         
=  

Part B

Suppose that the block gets bumped and undergoes a small vertical displacement. Find the resulting 
angular frequency  of the block's oscillation about its equilibrium position.
Hint B.1 Formula for angular frequency

Hint not displayed
Express the frequency in terms of given quantities and  , the magnitude of the acceleration due 
to gravity.

ANSWER:     
   
=
 
It may seem that this result for the frequency does not depend on either the mass of the block or the 
spring constant, which might make little sense. However, these parameters are what would determine 

the extension  of the spring when the block is hanging:  . 

One way of thinking about this problem is to consider both  and  as unknowns. By measuring  and 


(both fairly simple measurements), and knowing the mass, you can determine the value of the spring 
constant and the acceleration due to gravity experimentally.

  

Analyzing Simple Harmonic Motion
This applet shows two masses on springs, each accompanied by a graph of its position versus time. 
Part A

What is an expression for  , the position of mass I as a function of time? Assume that position is 
measured in meters and time is measured in seconds.
Part A.1 How to approach the problem

Part not displayed

Part A.2 Find the amplitude

Part not displayed

Part A.3 Find the angular frequency

Part not displayed

Express your answer as a function of  . Express numerical constants to three significant figures.

ANSWER:         
=  

Part B

What is  , the position of mass II as a function of time? Assume that position is measured in 
meters and time is measured in seconds.
Part B.1 How to approach the problem

Part not displayed

Part B.2 Find the amplitude

Part not displayed

Part B.3 Find the angular frequency

Part not displayed

Express your answer as a function of  . Express numerical constants to three significant figures.

ANSWER:         
=  

  

Problem 14.14

The position of a 50 g oscillating mass is given by  , where  is in s. If 


necessary, round your answers to three significant figures. Determine: 
Part A

The amplitude.

 2.00 
ANSWER:  cm
 

Part B

The period.

 0.628 
ANSWER:  s
 

Part C

The spring constant.

 5.00 
ANSWER:  N/m
 

Part D

The phase constant.

 ­0.785 
ANSWER:  rad
 

Part E

The initial coordinate of the mass.

ANSWER:  1.41   cm

Part F

The initial velocity.
 cm/
ANSWER:  14.1  
s
Part G

The maximum speed.

 20.0   cm/
ANSWER:
  s

Part H

The total energy.

 1.0 
ANSWER:  mJ
 

Part I

The velocity at  .

 1.46   cm/
ANSWER:
  s

  

Problem 14.22
A mass on a string of unknown length oscillates as a pendulum with a period of 4.0 s. Parts a to d are 
independent questions, each referring to the initial situation. What is the period if 
Part A

The mass is doubled?

 4.00 
ANSWER:  s
 

Part B

The string length is doubled?

 5.66 
ANSWER:  s
 
Part C

The string length is halved?

 2.83 
ANSWER:  s
 

Part D

The amplitude is doubled?

 4.00 
ANSWER:  s
 

  

Problem 14.58
Astronauts on the first trip to Mars take along a pendulum that has a period on earth of 1.50 s. The period 
on Mars turns out to be 2.45 s. 
Part A

What is the Martian acceleration due to gravity?

 3.67 
ANSWER:
   

  

Problem 14.19

A spring with spring constant 13.1   hangs from the ceiling. A ball is attached to the spring and 
allowed to come to rest. It is then pulled down 7.50   and released. The ball makes 20.0  oscillations in 
19.0  seconds. 
Part A

What is its the mass of the ball?

 299   
ANSWER:
  g

Part B

What is its maximum speed?

 49.6   cm/
ANSWER:
  s

  

Problem 14.40
Part A

When the displacement of a mass on a spring is  the half of the amplitude, what fraction of the 
energy is kinetic energy?

ANSWER:  75.0   %

Part B

At what displacement, as a fraction of  , is the energy half kinetic and half potential?

 0.707 
ANSWER:
 

  

Problem 14.63

A 0.880   block is attached to a horizontal spring with spring constant 1800  . The block is at rest 


on a frictionless surface. A 11.7   bullet is fired into the block, in the face opposite the spring, and sticks. 
Part A

What was the bullet's speed if the subsequent oscillations have an amplitude of 7.90  ?

 271   
ANSWER:
  m/s

  

Problem 14.34

The figure is the velocity­versus­time graph 
of a particle in simple harmonic motion. 
Part A

What is the amplitude of the oscillation?

ANSWER:  115   cm

Part B

What is the phase constant?

 2.62 
ANSWER:  rad
 

Part C

What is the position at 

 ­99.3 
ANSWER:  cm
 

Summary 13 of 13 problems complete (101.26% avg. score)


96.33 of 95 points

 [ Print ]