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Visual Literacy Study on 'Luke's Way of Looking'.

Early Stage 1, Stage 1 | Creative Arts, English

Summary

Duration
Term 3 3 weeks Detail: 13hrs, 1 lesson per day

Unit overview
The main purpose of this unit is to stimulate students' imaginations through using a quality picture book. Activities include looking at narrative elements such as setting, characters and events. Students explore the ways these are portrayed through both language and visual images, with a particular emphasis on visual symbols and motifs. Major themes: difference, imagination, artistic expression Literary techniques: third person narrator, characterisation, dialogue visual symbolism Grammar focus: verbs, questions Reading level: independent reading 6 years and up; read aloud 5 years and up.

Enter your own title


Luke's Way of Looking

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Outcomes
English K-10

Assessment overview
Students will: Speak and listen in ways that assist communication with others.
Plan spoken descriptions, recounts and reports. Attend to responses of others and review or elaborate on what

ENe-1A communicates with peers and known adults in informal

and guided activities demonstrating emerging skills of group interaction


ENe-8B demonstrates emerging skills and knowledge of texts to

read and view, and shows developing awareness of purpose, audience and subject matter
ENe-10C thinks imaginatively and creatively about familiar

has been said.


Observe procedures for class activities (taking turns, asking

questions, interrupting speakers). Understand that texts are constructed by people and represent real and imaginary experiences.
Refer to the author and illustrator of a book, commenting on

topics, simple ideas and the basic features of texts when responding to and composing texts
ENe-11D responds to and composes simple texts about familiar

aspects of the world and their own experiences


EN1-1A communicates with a range of people in informal and

other books produced by them.


Consider how likely are the events, behaviour, settings and

guided activities demonstrating interaction skills and considers how own communication is adjusted in different situations
EN1-8B recognises that there are different kinds of texts when

outcomes found in texts.


Recognise that texts could have been written or produced

differently. Write brief imaginative and factual texts which include some related ideas about familiar topics.
Reflect briefly on an aspect of a personal experience including

reading and viewing and shows an awareness of purpose, audience and subject matter
EN1-10C thinks imaginatively and creatively about familiar

topics, ideas and texts when responding to and composing texts


EN1-11D responds to and composes a range of texts about

two or more relevant ideas.


Describe a few characteristics of a familiar person, place,

animal or object.
Write and illustrate an imaginary story.

familiar aspects of the world and their own experiences

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Program Builder contains NSW syllabus content prepared by the Board of Studies NSW for and on behalf of the State of New South Wales which is protected by Crown copyright.

Content
Early Stage 1 - Speaking and listening 1
Students:
understand how to communicate

Teaching, learning and assessment


Into the Book 1. Being Different Ask students to talk about how they react when they see something or someone that is unusual or different. Read books that are about unusual people (see resource list). Talk about ways in which these books present a character who is different and eccentric, but very lovable. Ask students if they know anyone like the characters in the books. Encourage them to describe the characteristics of this person. How do they feel when they are with the person? What makes this person lovable? (HOTs tool)

Resources
Bamboozled David Legge My Dad Anthony Browne HOT's tool - AFFINITY Diagram Comprehension - Making Connections

effectively in pairs and groups using agreed interpersonal conventions, active listening, appropriate language and taking turns adults about personal experience

communicate with peers and familiar

Stage 1 - Speaking and listening 1


use turn-taking, questioning and

other behaviours related to class discussions


describe in detail familiar places and

things

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Program Builder contains NSW syllabus content prepared by the Board of Studies NSW for and on behalf of the State of New South Wales which is protected by Crown copyright.

Content
Early Stage 1 - Thinking imaginatively and creatively
understand that imaginative texts

Teaching, learning and assessment


Into the book cont... 2. Using your imagination Recall students' drawings/paintings. Talk about what they have drawn/paintedthemselves, other people, places or fantasy images. Describe colours, shapes in their works. Are they realistic? Did they use fantasy elements? Read, Changes, talk about ways in which the realistic, everyday objects in this book are changed by the artists' imagination. Show students a shiny apple and have them describe the shape and colours they see. Give students paper and crayons in many colours. Fold the paper in half. On one half they are to draw the apple as realistically as possible, replicating the shapes and colours that they see. On the other half, they are to use their own imaginations to change the apple. Talk about the differences in the two halves of the apple. Into the book cont... 3. The Artist's Work Visual Arts The teacher shows the children three pictures of famous paintings depicting three different artistic styles. For example, Vincent Van Gogh, Jackson Pollock and Pablo Picasso. Each time the teacher shows an individual painting the children

Resources
Students previous art works Changes Anthony Browne Paper Crayons Apple Comprehension - Visualising

can be composed for a range of audiences and purposes, using a range of media
discuss creative language features

in imaginative texts that can enhance enjoyment, eg illustrations, repetition

Stage 1 - Thinking imaginatively and creatively


recognise and begin to understand

how composers use creative features to engage their audience in imaginative texts that enhance enjoyment, eg illustrations, repetition

identify creative language features

Artworks by Vincent Van Gogh, Jackson Pollock & Pablo Picasso. Flowers are Red by Harry Chapin (Let's All Sing,1981,ABC,pages 58 - 59).

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Content

Teaching, learning and assessment


tell, write or draw what they see. The teacher writes the name of each painting on the board then lists what the children have seen under each title. Are their responses different and why? Listening / Singing Listen to the song Flowers are Red by Harry Chapin This song tells of a young boy who went to school ready to paint flowers all the colours of the rainbow, but his teacher said that ' Flowers are red, young man and green leaves are green. There's no need to see flowers any other way than the way they always have been seen.'

Resources

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Program Builder contains NSW syllabus content prepared by the Board of Studies NSW for and on behalf of the State of New South Wales which is protected by Crown copyright.

Content
Early Stage 1 - Speaking and listening 1
express a point of view about texts

Teaching, learning and assessment


Reading the Book - Session 1 Questions
What does the cover tell us about the

Resources
Luke's Way of Looking Nadia Wheatley & Matt Ottley HOT's tool - BONE Diagram Comprehension - Predicting

read and/or viewed

Stage 1 - Speaking and listening 1


use some persuasive language to

book?
What does the title tell us the story will

express a point of view

be about?
What do the two author names tell us

Early Stage 1 - Reading and viewing 2


understand that readers/viewers may

have varied and individual responses to a text


recognise parts of print and digital

about the way the book has been created?


Show students the back cover. How do

you interpret the image of the eye?

texts, eg front and back covers, title and author, layout and navigation in shared book activities on familiar and imaginary books

engage with shared stories and join

Talk about the illustration on the cover. Tell students to look very closely at the images and identify the symbols that are illustrated there. Point out: * a painting on an easel and that the image of Luke is in the painting, looking out, * birds (contemporary and prehistoric), * the buildings, * the door, * the tower, * and the swirling clouds You may need to explain what a Phoenix is. Ask students to predict what part these various elements might have in the story. Read the title again. Talk about various ways of looking at things i.e. from a distance or close up.

Stage 1 - Reading and viewing 2


understand that texts can draw on

readers' or viewers' knowledge of texts to make meaning and enhance enjoyment, eg comparing fairytales discuss purpose and audience

respond to a range of literature and

Explain that Nadia Wheatley is a writer Board of Studies NSW Program Builder pb.bos.nsw.edu.au
Program Builder contains NSW syllabus content prepared by the Board of Studies NSW for and on behalf of the State of New South Wales which is protected by Crown copyright.

Content
Early Stage 1 - Expressing themselves
engage with a variety of simple texts

Teaching, learning and assessment


Reading the Book - Session 2 Questions
What kinds of birds appear in the story? What feelings are associated with the

Resources
Luke's Way of Looking Nadia Wheatley & Matt Ottley Session 2 images external hard-copy. HOT's tool - CLUSTER Diagram Comprehension - Monitoring

and begin to understand that readers draw on their own knowledge to make meaning and enhance enjoyment
compare and connect own

birds?

experiences to those depicted in stories

Stage 1 - Expressing themselves


identify aspects of different types

of literary texts that entertain, and give reasons for personal preferences
(ACELT1590)

Recall the story Luke's Way of Looking. Recall the images of the birds in the book. Tell them you are going to look at each of these pictures and discuss the ideas they represent. Show each page in order and encourage discussion about the bird images and the feelings that they evoke in the reader (separate page attached) (HOTs tool). Encourage students to talk about feelings associated with the birds and the angels. Point out that the birds have the freedom to fly and to rise out of the ashes. This gives inspiration to Luke's imagination.

compose simple print, visual

and digital texts that depict aspects of their own experience

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Program Builder contains NSW syllabus content prepared by the Board of Studies NSW for and on behalf of the State of New South Wales which is protected by Crown copyright.

Content
Early Stage 1 - Reading and viewing 2
recognise that words and pictures

Teaching, learning and assessment


Reading the Book - Session 3 Questions
Why does Luke feel at home in the

Resources
Luke's Way of Looking Nadia Wheatley & Matt Ottley Session 3 images external hard-copy. BLM1 - Luke at the Art Gallery HOT's tool - FIVE Whys Comprehension - Questioning

have meaning and that words can be read aloud


interpret pictures with labels,

gallery?
What kinds of artworks are in the

environmental print logos and other visual images

gallery?
How has Luke's visit to the gallery

Stage 1 - Reading and viewing 2


discuss possible author intent and

changed him? In this book Luke makes an important discovery. His bus ride takes him along Homer Street to the art gallery. Show the page examples (separate page attached), allowing plenty of time for close examination and discussion. Luke thinks the gallery is a palace and when he gets inside he feels at home. Examine each of the paintings and sculptures that Luke sees in the gallery and encourage students to discuss why Luke would feel happy in this building (HOTs tool). How would you describe them? What do you see? For example, the painting entitled 'Clarra Bough' (the illustrator's humour is evident here), the 'bird' standing on the 'egg', the piano sculpture, the bird and the hands and the large abstract painting. Are any paintings 'realistically' presented? The children suggest titles for the various paintings and sculptures. Discuss what Luke has learned from the paintings. Use BLM1 to jointly construct an account of what Luke saw and did at

intended audience of a range of texts


understand how text structure

contributes to the meaning of texts

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Program Builder contains NSW syllabus content prepared by the Board of Studies NSW for and on behalf of the State of New South Wales which is protected by Crown copyright.

Content
Early Stage 1 - Thinking imaginatively and creatively
engage with and appreciate

Teaching, learning and assessment


Reading the Book - Session 4 This double-page spread of the bus ride back to Homer Street needs to be read like a cartoon strip. Read the words to students and show them how to read the picture across the top frame and then across the bottom frame. Ask students what they think Luke is drawing. Use BLM2 to help students visualise what Luke was drawing on the bus on the way home. Allow time for students to share their drawings.

Resources
Luke's Way of Looking Nadia Wheatley & Matt Ottley BLM2 - What does Luke draw on the bus? Comprehension - Monitoring

the imaginative use of language through storytelling


use imagination to represent aspects

of an experience using written text, drawings and other visual media

Stage 1 - Thinking imaginatively and creatively


identify and compare the imaginative

language used by composers


recreate texts imaginatively using

drawing, writing, performance and digital forms of communication


(ACELT1586)

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Program Builder contains NSW syllabus content prepared by the Board of Studies NSW for and on behalf of the State of New South Wales which is protected by Crown copyright.

Content
Early Stage 1 - Thinking imaginatively and creatively
share feelings and thoughts about

Teaching, learning and assessment


Reading the Book - Session 5 Questions
How are the shadows used in the

Resources
Luke's Way of Looking Nadia Wheatley & Matt Ottley Session 5 images external hard-copy. HOT's tool - FORCE FIELD Analysis Comprehension - Making Connections

the events and characters in texts


(ACELT1783)

illustrations?
What part do the shadows play in the

Early Stage 1 - Expressing themselves


share responses to aspects of a text

story? One of the key images in this book comes from the shadows that the artist uses to communicate important ideas. Tell students you are going to look at the book again to examine how shadows are used in the book (separate page attached). Ask students to describe the kinds of feelings that the various shadows give (HOTs tool). Talk about the ideas that are suggested by these shadows. Student suggestions could include: * Mr Barraclough as a formidable and powerful teacher who casts his shadow over students and their work, * Luke as vulnerable, * birdlike creature who is following his inspiration Demonstrate the significance of their shadows being joined as Mr Barraclough comes to accept Luke's way of looking.

that relate to their own life

Stage 1 - Thinking imaginatively and creatively


express a range of feelings in

response to a text

Stage 1 - Expressing themselves


recognise and begin to understand

that their own experience helps shape their responses to and enjoyment of texts

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Program Builder contains NSW syllabus content prepared by the Board of Studies NSW for and on behalf of the State of New South Wales which is protected by Crown copyright.

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Content
Early Stage 1 - Speaking and listening 1
communicate appropriately and

Teaching, learning and assessment


Reading the Book - Session 6 Questions
What kinds of hands did the artist

Resources
Luke's Way of Looking Nadia Wheatley & Matt Ottley Session 6 images external hard-copy. BLM3 - Hands Comprehension - Summarising

effectively within the classroom using agreed conventions, eg staying on topic, asking for and offering assistance
use interaction skills

present in the various parts of the story?


What do the different hands suggest

about the characters? A recurring motif in this book is the hand. Have students talk about what we use our hands for. We use them for holding and carrying things, but also for signalling meaning. Hands are an important part of the way in which we communicate with one another. Lead students through the book (separate page attached), looking at the ways in which hands appear, and talk about the feelings they are communicating. Have students talk about the ways in which hands are used in the story. Have the students mimic the various positions of the hands seen. Complete BLM3.

including listening while others speak, using appropriate voice levels, articulation and body language, gestures and eye contact (ACELY1784)

Stage 1 - Speaking and listening 1


understand that language is used in

combination with other means of communication, for example facial expressions and gestures to interact with others (ACELA1444)
communicate with increasing

confidence in a range of contexts

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Content
Early Stage 1 - Reading and viewing 2
identify some features of texts

Teaching, learning and assessment


Reading the Book - Session 7 Questions
What kind of teacher is Mr Barraclough? What does he learn from Luke?

Resources
Luke's Way of Looking Nadia Wheatley & Matt Ottley BLM4 - Mr Barraclough's Thoughts Comprehension - Predicting

including events and characters and retell events from a text (ACELT1578)

Stage 1 - Reading and viewing 2


discuss possible author intent and

intended audience of a range of texts

Ask students to talk about the kind of teacher Mr Barraclough is. Show the pages that feature Mr Barraclough. Point out that he is usually depicted in dull colours with cross hatching rather than solid colour. (Crosshatching is shading with parallel lines). Highlight that only in the last image does Mr Barraclough have solid colour. Encourage them to talk about why the artist might have done this and how it makes the reader see the teacher. Give each student a copy of BLM4. Tell students that in the beginning of the story Mr Barraclough shouts at Luke, but when Mr Barraclough looks at Luke's painting of the watermelon he does not say anything. Encourage students to speculate as to what he might be thinking.

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Content
Early Stage 1 - Reading and viewing 2
explore the different contribution of

Teaching, learning and assessment


Reading the Book - Session 8 Questions
What is an anagram? What anagram does the artist use in the

Resources
Luke's Way of Looking Nadia Wheatley & Matt Ottley HOT's tool - VENN Diagram BLM5 - Anagrams

words and images to meaning in stories and informative texts


(ACELA1786)

Stage 1 - Reading and viewing 2


understand concepts about print and

story?

Why do you think he does this?

screen, including how different types of texts are organised using page numbering, tables of content, headings and titles, navigation buttons, bars and links (ACELA1450)

Matt Ottley plays on Mr Barraclough's name in the story. He uses an anagram for one of the artists displayed in the gallery Clarra - Bough. Display page 7 where Mr Barraclough shouts at Luke and page 12 which has the painting by Clarra Bough of a man. Ask students to compare these two images (HOTs tool). Use BLM5 to point out the same letters in both names. Explain what an anagram is (An anagram is a word made by using letters of another word in a different order). Encourage students to talk about why the artist and the writer might have used an anagram here. Encourage discussion about how it makes students feel about Mr Barraclough.

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Content
Early Stage 1 - Thinking imaginatively and creatively
retell familiar literary texts through

Teaching, learning and assessment


Reading the Book - Session 9 Question
Who is the narrator in the story? Does the narrator like Mr Barraclough? Does the narrator like Luke? How do you know? How would the story change if a different

Resources
Luke's Way of Looking Nadia Wheatley & Matt Ottley HOT's tool - JIGSAW Comprehension - Predicting

performance, use of illustrations and images (ACELT1580)

Stage 1 - Thinking imaginatively and creatively


jointly adapt a well-known text for a

different audience and purpose

narrator (Luke) told it? Talk about how a story can be told using both words and pictures. The person telling the story is the narrator. Sometimes the narrator is a character in the story and sometimes it is an invisible person who can see what is going on. Explain that the narrator helps us to know which characters to like (HOTs tool). Have students take turns at assuming the character of Luke and telling the story of his trip to the art gallery. Reading the Book - Session 10 Questions
What is a verb? Which character yells a lot? Which character looks a lot?

Luke's Way of Looking Nadia Wheatley & Matt Ottley HOT's tool - DOUBLE BUBBLE BLM6 - Verbs

Remind the students that this is a story about seeing and talking. Point out that when we tell about actions we need to use verbs. Reread the story and find the verbs that indicate seeing (saw, look,

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Content

Teaching, learning and assessment


sightseeing, imagined, staring). Talk about the different meaning of these words. Reread the story and find the words that have to do with talking (told, yelled, said, screamed, shouted, groaned).(HOTs tool) Have students draw a portrait of the character associated with these words. Highlight that Luke doesn't speak, except to promise that he will tell the other boys where he has been. Remind students, however, that Luke does use his imagination, wonders, goes sightseeing and hears the bell ringing. Give students a copy of BLM6 and collaboratively work through matching verbs to characters in the story. Beyond the Book 1. Luke's Explanation Remind students that Luke promised to tell later where he had been. Encourage students to think of the questions that they would ask Luke about what he saw and what he did on that Friday morning. Put students into groups of 6-8 to enact this moment. One person will need to be Luke and the others should look closely at the illustration on pages 25/26 and decide who they will play. Have each character select an appropriate name and then set up the improvisation. Decide where the incident is taking place e.g. in the classroom, in the playground or on the bus. Have other students watch the enactment and discuss the reactions

Resources

HOT's tool - HOT SEAT Comprehension - Summarising

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Content

Teaching, learning and assessment


afterwards (HOTs tool). Beyond the Book cont... 2.Visual Arts Experimenting with line Procedure The children can experiment with a variety of black pens and pencils. Luke's Way of Looking is used as the example for each technique. Draw in square number : 1. Vertical lines - Luke looking out of the window, page 5-6; 2. Horizontal lines - on Luke's shirt, page 3, the steps of the art gallery; 3. Crossing and intersecting lines (cross hatching) - shadows, Mr Barraclough's suit, page 7; 4. Horizontal, wavy lines - the roof of the school; 5. Short, curved lines - Mr Barraclough's hand, the top of the balcony wall, page 1. 6. ??? The children go outside and draw a simple building, tree or playground scene. The more adventurous could try a person. Using the line techniques which have already been practiced, and Luke's Way of

Resources

Luke's Way of Looking Nadia Wheatley & Matt Ottley Black, felt tipped pens - such as fineliner, 'ordinary' felt tips for children; Black nylon tips, ball points, ink pens; Different grades of lead pencil - such as H, HB, B and 4B; White paper folded into six squares and numbered.

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Content

Teaching, learning and assessment


Looking as a guide, the children 'fill in ' their pictures using black pens and pencils to create line, pattern, texture, tone and shading. Dance Use the squares as cue cards. As each one is held up,have children move in repsonse to the lines represented. Create a dance sequence by using the movements acssociated with each cue card. Order these and decide how many repeats should be made for each movement. Practice the dance sequence to music with a strong beat

Resources

Enter your own title

Evaluation

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17

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18

AFFINITY DIAGRAM

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WHAT WHEN HOW

The Affinity Diagram is an interactive data collection method, which enables the identification and sorting of large quantities of ideas within a short time frame. Affinity means likeness or close relationship.

The Affinity is used when a non-judgemental process is required for gathering and categorizing ideas

1. Clearly define and write the topic for the session at the top of the flip chart. WHAT MAKES SYDNEY A GREAT CITY? 2. All team members individually brainstorm ideas relating to the stated question or topic. As brainstorming takes place, individuals silently write each idea on a sticky note or note card and place it in front of them. Place only one idea on each slip of paper/card. 3. Team members randomly place ideas on the topic flip chart or stick them on a smooth surface such as a mirror or a white board

Sydney Harbour parks restaurants tall buildings trains

noisy Opera House different people buses walking

movies

shopping

4. Team members, as a group, through negotiation, place ideas in like categories.

buses trains

parks restaurants

The Opera House Sydney Harbour tall buildings

shopping movies walking

noisy different people

5. Finally label each category by writing it on the flip chart or placing a header.

Transport buses trains

Places to Go Landmarks parks restaurants The Opera House Sydney Harbour tall buildings

Things to Do Descriptions shopping movies walking

noisy different people

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SAMPLES

Types of Questions which could be supported by the use of an Affinity Diagram What makes a quality classroom? What are the causes of our poor performance? What do I already know about frogs?

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BONE DIAGRAM
George Noyes from the Defence Systems Management College Fort Belvoir Virginia designed the Bone Diagram. A Bone Diagram allows us to reflect on our current situation as well as plan or visualise a future or desired situation. The Bone Diagram is a helpful tool in developing a big picture or future concept whilst providing a mechanism to assist teams or groups in moving from where they are currently situated towards achieving that big picture or desired situation.

WHAT

WHY HOW

The tool encourages inclusively and creativity, provides a great opportunity for reflection and allows for clarity in planning

DRIVING FORCES

How does it work? 1. Draw a large bone or shapes representing a bone onto a whiteboard or paper 2. Brainstorm ideas which represent the current situation in the lower section of the bone 3. Have the group brainstorm ideas that they identify as a desired situation or the picture they would like to see happening in the upper section of the bone 4. Identify the positive forces that will help the growth of the bigger picture and place on the upper left side of the bone 5. In the lower right section identify and list the forces, which will inhibit growth of the future or big picture. 6. Prioritise the negative forces using a ranking or voting system. 7. Select those issues which will need to be worked on if the desired state is to be achieved

* Use to have students determine the optimum behaviour for a classroom

SAMPLES

* Use for the development of a school vision statement * Use as a tool for students to determine their goals

TOPIC/TITLE

RESTRAINING FORCES

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CLUSTER DIAGRAMS
Cluster diagrams (also called cloud diagrams) are a type of non-linear graphic organiser that can help to systematize the generation of ideas based upon a central topic.

WHAT WHEN HOW

Using this type of diagram, the student can more easily brainstorm a theme, associate about an idea, or explore a new subject.

The cluster diagram can be generated electronically or manually, sorting research and organising topics and sub-topics.

SAMPLES

TOPIC

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FIVE WHYS

WHAT WHEN PROCESS

Five Whys

At any time to promote deep thinking through questioning

To employ a "Five Whys a question, problem or issue is asked. This is answered by asking "why ?". The answer then becomes the question and 'why' is then asked again The process is repeated five times with the final answer providing a deeper example of student thinking. Example: Q. Why am I returning to Year 11? A. Because I would like to attain my Higher School Certificate. Q Why do I want to receive my Higher School Certificate? A. Because I would like to study Art at the University? Q. Why would I like to study Art at the University? A. Because it it will allow me to gain employment in an area I am particularly interested in. Q. Why is important to gain employment in an area I am interested in? A. This will enable me to have job and personal satisfaction Q. Why is important for me to have job and personal satisfaction? A. So that my life will be more fulfilling

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FORCE FIELD ANALYSIS


Force field analysis is an influential development in the field of social science. It provides a framework for looking at the factors (forces) that influence a situation, originally social situations. It looks at forces that are either driving movement toward a goal (helping forces) or blocking movement toward a goal (hindering forces).

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VENN DIAGRAM

WHAT WHEN PROCESS

Venn Diagram

To visually compare and contrast similarities and differences.

Draw two overlapping circles. Each Circle will represent one subject.

2. Students write the unique characteristics of that subject into the identified circle 3. Common characteristics are placed in the overlapping sections of the circles Variation Venn Diagrams can be made more complex by drawing three or more overlapping circles The number of circles drawn will depend on the number of subjects or ideas to be contrasted.

SAMPLE USES

Venn Diagrams can be used to compare and contrast almost anything, eg to examine or analyse events, religions, politics, characters, environments and stories.

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JIGSAW
The Jigsaw strategy encourages the development of specific skills within individual team members.

WHAT WHY

Originally developed by Eliot Aronson, it is perhaps one of the most effective cooperative strategies for promoting responsibility within each of the students in the team.

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Basic Jigsaw:

HOW

1. Break into teams of four, and number the members from 1 to 4. 2. Present a mini-project to each team, such as a study of the local community. 3. Assign specific tasks to each member, such as: No.1: Collect all available brochures from the local council. No.2: Research any information available in the school library. No.3: Construct a large map of the local area. No.4: Compile a list of goods and services available in the local area. 4. Each of the members then is required to complete their specific task. 5. The team reforms, and the students share their information with each other. This information then can be collated, and the project can be completed. The most difficult aspect of this strategy will involve the formulation of the specific tasks. It sometimes can also be worthwhile to assign tasks to the students according to the level of difficulty, and the interests of the different students. Extra students could be asked to share a role with someone else in a team. This means that there could be two No.1s in the team, who could work together on the particular task. VARIATIONS One of the most effective variations is known as Expert Jigsaw and it employs the use of Home Teams and Expert Teams. To implement this structure: 1. Form students into Home Teams of four members, and number them from 1 to 4. 2. Introduce the project or activity to the Home Teams eg Design a future home. 3. The specific functions of the Expert Teams are then outlined in the following fashion: Expert Team 1: Basic design layout of the future home. Expert Team 2: The furniture. Expert Team 3: The entertainment facilities. Expert Team 4: The food preparation process. 4. The Home Teams are then reformed into Expert Teams, which means that all of the Home Team No.1s move to Expert Team No.1, Home TeamNo.2s into Expert Team No.2, and so on. 5. The Expert Teams then research their specialized area, and develop a range of ideas. 6. Expert Teams then split up, and all members return to their original Home Team. At this stage, there then will be an expert on each of the areas, such as furniture, within each of the Home Teams.

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Program Builder contains NSW syllabus content prepared by the Board of Studies NSW for and on behalf of the State of New South Wales which is protected by Crown copyright. 10

Board of Studies NSW Program Builder pb.bos.nsw.edu.au


Program Builder contains NSW syllabus content prepared by the Board of Studies NSW for and on behalf of the State of New South Wales which is protected by Crown copyright. 11

BUBBLE/ DOUBLE BUBBLE


The Double Bubble Map is a visual organising tool. It is similar in concept to a Venn Diagram

WHAT WHEN HOW

The Double Bubble is used to compare and contrast, situations, places, an issues or items and objects.

1. Two bubbles or circles are drawn in the centre of a page. 2. The two concepts to be compared and contrasted are each placed in one of the bubbles 3. Smaller bubbles are drawn outside of the two larger bubbles. These bubbles show the qualities they share with only one of the larger bubbles. (These are the contrasting aspects or qualities) 4. The bubbles between the two items being compared will hold the items which are similar. Simple examples could include Comparing and contrasting Mum and Dad Day and Night

SAMPLES

Two of the latest movies Vietnam War and the War on Terror Baby Boomers and Generation X

Board of Studies NSW Program Builder pb.bos.nsw.edu.au


Program Builder contains NSW syllabus content prepared by the Board of Studies NSW for and on behalf of the State of New South Wales which is protected by Crown copyright. 12

Board of Studies NSW Program Builder pb.bos.nsw.edu.au


Program Builder contains NSW syllabus content prepared by the Board of Studies NSW for and on behalf of the State of New South Wales which is protected by Crown copyright. 13

Comprehension See - http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/literacy/assets/pdf/packages/combook.pdf for six comprehension strategies ideas plus the text: Revisit, reflect and retell.

Board of Studies NSW Program Builder pb.bos.nsw.edu.au


Program Builder contains NSW syllabus content prepared by the Board of Studies NSW for and on behalf of the State of New South Wales which is protected by Crown copyright. 14