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New learning Becca & Lee-Ann

What is the big question? How was Australian society affected by other significant global events and changes in this period?

Teacher Ms B Crook Ms L Orton

Duration 4 weeks 12 double lessons

Unit The Modern World and Australia Depth study: Popular culture (1945 present)

Year Level 10

Rationale This unit is part of The Modern World and Australia, and focuses specifically the Globalising World and the nature of Australian Popular Culture after World War II. Students investigate how this time in history shaped Australian society in depth by investigating music, film, and fashion and also the introduction of television and other technological innovations. Using the Year 10 History knowledge and understanding as a guideline, this unit also incorporates Year 10 Science and students investigate how the values and needs of contemporary society can influence the focus of scientific research and how to formulate questions or hypotheses that can be investigated scientifically. It relies on inquiry approaches to explore how significant global events and changes have impacted on Australian society. Students begin to understand how their place in society has been influenced by important events in history as far as certain rights are concerned, especially freedom of expression and speech. Through inquiry they also begin to realise how change can happen when values and beliefs are shared and fought for. Students engage in activities that inspect the evolution of fashion and music and how these go beyond the aesthetic surface. They also learn about challenging the status quo and how being a teenager is a relatively new concept and this understanding is supported by an active exploration of what their lives are like today compared to how it would have been pre-1945, or just after WWII. Another significant focus of this unit is the representation of people - Australians as a whole, but also the myriad of cultures that make up our society. Questions that shape inquiry can include: o What is popular culture? o What shapes subcultures? o How can people bring change? o What is a protest song? o What did the media of the time look like? o Who were the Freedom Riders? o What is a teenager? o How did fashion change after the war? o How did the role of women change? o What is the role of technology in the changes that occurred after the war? o What impact has Australian film and music had on the rest of the world
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New learning Becca & Lee-Ann

Achievement Standards General capabilities & Cross-Curriculum priorities In English: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures All students will develop an awareness and appreciation of, and respect for the literature of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples including storytelling traditions (oral narrative) as well as contemporary literature. Students will be taught to develop respectful critical understandings of the social, historical and cultural contexts associated with different uses of language and textual features. In Science: Asia and Australias engagement with Asia In this learning area, students appreciate that the Asia region plays an important role in scientific research and development. These can include research and development in areas such as medicine, natural resource management, nanotechnologies, communication technologies and natural disaster prediction and management. In Mathematics: Sustainability In this learning area, students can observe, record and organise data collected from primary sources over time and analyse data
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Civics and Citizenship

Science

History

Students investigate the nature and history of the concept of human rights. They become aware of national and international legislation designed to protect those rights.

Students explain the concept of energy conservation and model energy transfer and transformation within systems. They analyse how biological systems function and respond to external changes with reference to interdependencies, energy transfers and flows of matter. They evaluate the evidence for scientific theories that explain the origin of the universe and the diversity of life on Earth. They explain the role of DNA and genes in cell division and genetic inheritance. They apply geological timescales to elaborate their explanations of both natural selection and evolution. They explain how similarities in the chemical behaviour of elements and their compounds and their atomic structures are represented in the way the periodic table has been constructed. They compare the properties of a range of elements representative of the major groups and periods in the periodic table. They use atomic symbols and balanced chemical equations to summarise chemical reactions, including neutralisation and combustion. They explain natural radioactivity in terms of atoms and energy change. They explain how different factors influence the rate of reactions. They explain global features

Students refer to key events, the actions of individuals and groups, and beliefs and values to explain patterns of change and continuity over time. They analyse the causes and effects of events and developments and explain their relative importance. They explain the context for peoples actions in the past. Students explain the significance of events and developments from a range of perspectives. Students sequence events and developments within a chronological framework, and identify relationships between events across different places and periods of time. When researching, students develop, evaluate and modify questions to frame an historical inquiry. They process, analyse and synthesise information from a range of primary and secondary sources and use it as evidence to answer inquiry questions. Students analyse sources to identify motivations, values and attitudes. When evaluating these sources, they analyse and draw conclusions about their usefulness, taking into account their origin, purpose, and context. They develop and justify their own interpretations about the past. Students develop texts, particularly explanations and discussions, incorporating historical argument. In developing these texts and organising and presenting their

New learning Becca & Lee-Ann


relating to issues of sustainability from secondary sources. They can apply spatial reasoning, measurement, estimation, calculation and comparison to gauge local ecosystem health and can cost proposed actions for sustainability. In History: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures Students learn about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples prior to colonisation by the British, the ensuing contact and its impacts. They will examine key policies and political movements over the last two centuries. Students will develop an awareness of the significant roles of Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander people in Australian society. and events in terms of geological processes and timescales, and describe and analyse interactions and cycles within and between Earths spheres. They give both qualitative and quantitative explanations of the relationships between distance, speed, acceleration, mass and force to predict and explain motion. Students analyse how the models and theories they use have developed over time and discuss the factors that prompted their review. They predict how future applications of science and technology may affect peoples lives. Students develop questions and hypotheses that can be investigated using a range of inquiry skills. They independently design and improve appropriate methods of investigation including the control and accurate measurement of variables and systematic collection of data. They explain how they have considered reliability, safety, fairness and ethics in their methods and identify where digital technologies can be used to enhance the quality of data. They analyse trends in data, explain relationships between variables and identify sources of uncertainty. When selecting evidence and developing and justifying conclusions, they account for inconsistencies in results and identify alternative explanations for findings. Students evaluate the validity and reliability of claims made in secondary sources with reference to currently held scientific views, the quality of the
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arguments, they use historical terms and concepts, evidence identified in sources, and they reference these sources.

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methodology and the evidence cited. They construct evidence-based arguments and use appropriate scientific language, representations and text types when communicating their findings and ideas for specific purposes

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Curriculum Aims and Standards General capabilities & Cross-Curriculum priorities Literacy Define and use terms and concepts relevant to the unit. Reading the text Numeracy Use statistics to investigate the teenager ICT capability Use a range of digital technologies (such as online search tools and databases) to assist with investigating concepts. Critical and creative thinking Modify a key question in an inquiry depending on the suitability of the sources available Ethical behaviour Investigate reasons for clashes of beliefs in issues of personal, social and global importance Use reasoning skills to prioritise the relative merits of points of view about complex ethical dilemmas ICT History Science

1. ICT for visualising thinking At Level 10, students use a range of ICT tools and data types to visualise their thinking strategies when solving problems and developing new understanding. Students are efficient and effective in their use of appropriate ICT tools and editing techniques for assisting in visualising thinking. When solving problems, students discriminate between such tools and strategies based on their suitability for problem solving in new situations. 2. ICT for creating At Level 10, students appraise different strategies for organising and managing resources involved in problem solving and creating information products. They use ICT to devise detailed plans that sequence tasks to be done, resources needed, and timelines for completion. They annotate their plans to explain changes made during the project. 3. ICT for communicating At Level 10, students exchange ideas and considered opinions with others through online forums and websites. Students apply techniques to locate more precise information from websites, including searching general and specialised directories, and applying proximity operators. They use accepted protocols to
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Personal and social capability Work together to participate in learning experiences. Intercultural understanding Critically analyse the complex and dynamic nature of knowledge, beliefs and practices after the second world

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Continuity and change in beliefs and values that have influenced the Australian way of life (ACDSEH149) Identifying, planning and investigating (individually and as part of a team) specific historical questions or issues (ACHHS184) Explaining the reasons for changes in government policy, for example the influence of White Australia ideology at the time of the introduction of the Immigration Restriction Act 1901; the Displaced Persons Scheme in the aftermath of World War II (ACDSEH145) Analysing the views of both men and women at different times regarding gender equality in Australia and explaining how these views might reflect changing values and attitudes (ACHHS190) Analysing post-World War II population growth and the development of Australias culturally diverse society using different types of graphs (ACDSEH147) The nature of popular culture in

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Scientific understanding, including models and theories, are contestable and are refined over time through a process of review by the scientific community (ACSHE191) People can use scientific knowledge to evaluate whether they should accept claims, explanations or predictions (ACSHE194) The values and needs of contemporary society can influence the focus of scientific research (ACSHE230) Formulate questions or hypotheses that can be investigated scientifically (ACSIS198) Plan, select and use appropriate investigation methods, including field work and laboratory experimentation, to collect reliable data; assess risk and address ethical issues associated with these methods (ACSIS199) Select and use appropriate equipment, including digital technologies, to systematically and accurately collect and record data (ACSIS200) Analyse patterns and trends in data, including describing relationships

New learning Becca & Lee-Ann


war Assessing the use of stereotypes in the portrayal of cultural minorities communicate regularly online with peers, experts, and others, expressing their messages in language appropriate to the selected form of communication, and demonstrating respect for cultural differences. Australia at the end of World War II, including music, film and sport(ACDSEH027) What were the consequences of World War II? How did these consequences shape the modern world? Identify and analyse the perspectives of people from the past (ACHHS190) Identifies important features of the period (the impact of popular culture in shaping and reflecting the post World War II world). Select and use a range of communication forms (oral, graphic, written) and digital technologies (ACHHS193) Placing in sequence the main events of the Freedom Rides campaigns in the United States and Australia and explaining the links between the two campaigns (ACHHS182) Investigating the changing contribution of the Australian rock n roll, film and television industries to Australian culture and identity through the development and export of music, film and television,(ACDSEH123) Comparing and contrasting views on the values and beliefs of rock n roll, film and television across time, age and gender (for example issues of conservatism between variables and identifying inconsistencies (ACSIS203) Use knowledge of scientific concepts to draw conclusions that are consistent with evidence (ACSIS204) Communicate scientific ideas and information for a particular purpose, including constructing evidence-based arguments and using appropriate scientific language, conventions and representations (ACSIS208)

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Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures How was an Aboriginal teenagers life different in the 50s to a White teenager? How is Aboriginal culture packaged to sold by popular culture? Is it an accurate representation of the culture? Asia and Australias engagement with Asia How did Asia effect pop culture in Australia?

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The Arts, Music 1. In response to learning and performing songs that reflect the human spirit students, individually or collaboratively, compose and using conventional or unconventional notation, write down, then present their musical response to an issue holding personal interest for them. Interpersonal development 1. Building social relationships At Level 10, students demonstrate awareness of complex social conventions, behaving appropriately when interacting with others. They describe how local and global values and beliefs determine their own and others social relationships. They evaluate their own behaviour in relationships, identify potential conflict and employ strategies to avoid and/or resolve it. 2. Working in teams At Level 10, students work collaboratively, negotiate roles and delegate tasks to complete complex tasks in teams. Working with the strengths of a team they achieve agreed goals within set timeframes. Students describe how they respect and build on the ideas and opinions of team members and clearly
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articulate or record their reflections on the effectiveness of learning in a team. They develop and implement strategies for improving their contributions to achieving the team goals. Maths 1. Evaluate statistical reports in the media and other places by linking claims to displays, statistics and representative data (ACMSP253) and rebellion, the challenge to established ideas and national identity) (ACDSEH121) 14. Developments in popular culture in post-war Australia and their impact on society 15. Students sequence events and developments within a chronological framework, and identify relationships between events across different places and periods of time.

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Summative Assessment tasks Curriculum tested See Rubric for assessment criteria. Science The values and needs of contemporary society can influence the focus of scientific research Students plan, select and use appropriate investigation methods, including fieldwork and laboratory experimentation, to collect reliable data; assess risk and address ethical issues associated with these methods. Students communicate scientific ideas and information for a particular purpose, including constructing evidencebased arguments and using appropriate scientific language, conventions and representations History: Identifies important features of the period (the impact of popular culture in shaping and reflecting the post World War II world) Developments in popular culture in post-war Australia and their impact on society See Rubric for assessment criteria. History: Developments in popular culture in post-war Australia and their impact on society Students sequence events and developments within a chronological framework, and identify relationships between events across different places and periods of time. Using Capzles.com, students conduct research and construct a timeline highlighting the key events; groups and individuals; and technological inventions that have shaped Popular Culture from the 1945 to the present. To In order to effectively meet the outlined achievement standards, students have to demonstrate the ability to identify the importance of the elements they choose to include on their timelines and provide justification for their selections. Task 2 Constructing a digital timeline of Popular Culture from 1945 to the present, listing major events, people and innovations of the era. What is it? Students take the findings from the laboratory practical on fabrics and report in an alternative way. This can be by but not limited to Advertisement Womens weekly article Radio report News report Science article Song These must all include What was tested and how What the findings were How this makes it an ideal fabric for a dress What it means for the new working woman Task 1 Writing an article based on findings from the group practical

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Introduction: The power of people Introduction to Pop Culture and idea of change that can be brought about by the coming together of people with shared value s and beliefs Students start referring to key events, the actions of individuals and groups, and beliefs and values to explain patterns of change at moments in time Introduction using example of Sound Relief 2009 concert: People uniting to raise funds for vict ims of the floods and bushfires - promoting awareness through social media. Defining terms that shape culture: beliefs; attitudes; lifestyle - and how these are reflected through: actions; products they choose; media. Group work: Students break into groups to research and identify cultural groups they are familiar with and list the attributes that define them: fashion; music etc. Their findings are listed on the board and discussed. Start looking at influential young people.

Lesson 1 Learning intent SC/Essential Question Content of the Lesson

Sound Relief performance by Kings of Leon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tkWoFpFU96U

Resources needed

Informal students can discuss the nature of popular culture and give specific examples General capabilities & Cross-Curriculum priorities Other curriculum History Science

Assessment Curriculum

ICT - 2. Interpersonal development -2.

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New learning Becca & Lee-Ann


Introduction: Post-war Australia Background to popular culture, 1950s - 1970s What was life like post WWII? Brainstorm: what questions you could ask to gather information on what Australia would have been like at the end of World War II? Organise those questions as the first level of a mind map based on 'Australia in 1945'. Have students fill in the next level building from these questions. What are possible sources of information for life in 1945? Ask students to locate their own family in 1945. Has their family kept anything from that period? Can students bring in any primary sources that will assist in describing life in 1945? How do any primary sources compare with the information contained in secondary sources? Research task: technology in Australia immediately after World War II have groups research aspects such as: radio, film, transport, household appliances, sport and communication. Then report back to the class on the nature of their area in Australia after 1945. Key Ideas: Its still a mans world - where is the womans place now? Start looking at equal rights. Discuss expanding suburbia; rise of youth culture; the baby boom; increasing leisure time and disposable income; and changing technologies. Students explore the History Pin application to discover what certain areas of the city and Footscray looked like during the 1950s Oxford Big Ideas. History 10: Australian Curriculum Carrodus et al, Oxford University Press, Melbourne, 2012 pp181-83 Photographs of Melbourne during this time - www.historypin.com/map Summative: The results from this are fed into their timelines General capabilities & Cross-Curriculum priorities ICT Research on netbooks and History Pin app History Science Resources needed Lesson 2 Learning intent SC/Essential Question Content of the Lesson

Assessment Curriculum

Students apply techniques to locate more precise information from websites, including searching general and specialised directories

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New learning Becca & Lee-Ann


Teenagers then and now Discuss modern day tech, social media, reality TV and how this compares to the historical teenager. How did popular culture change the teenager? Teenagers are a new phenomena and the teenage brain is different to the childs and adults. Comparison of averages for teenagers (then and now) Longer time in education, increased leisure time. Became a force in the 50s/60s. As a class draw up what they think a typical 2013 teenager looks like Jigsaw activity 50s White teenager 50s Aboriginal teenager 60s teenager 90s teenager 2010s teenager Looking at the statistics for each. What they were doing, when they left school etc. Note the aboriginal teenager not in the census till the 60s Lesson 3 Learning intent SC/Essential Question Content of the Lesson

http://aifs.org.au/institute/pubs/diversity/DiversityAndChange.pdf http://trove.nla.gov.au/

Resources needed

Summative: The results from this are fed into their timelines General capabilities & Cross-Curriculum priorities Other

Informal - Mind maps of the information they found vs. the teenager of today History Science

Assessment Curriculum

Maths - 1. ICT -2,3

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New learning Becca & Lee-Ann


Role play day Historical changes in fashion and music trends contribute to social/ cultural change How did various cultural movements challenge the status quo through fashion and music? Building on previous research (that was listed on the board). Students form groups and select clothing and props from the drama wardrobe closet to portray groups of their choosing. Specifically supply 50s, 60s, 70s gear as well. Students dress up, protest, play music, act out movements and attempt to convince other students to join them. Lesson 4 Learning intent SC/Essential Question Content of the Lesson

Wardrobe Netbooks

Resources needed

Adjustment Summative: The results from this are fed into their timelines General capabilities & Cross-Curriculum priorities Other History Science Assessment Curriculum

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Science in action! How STEM subject lead to changes in pop culture. How and why did technology influence the pop culture movement? Introduction using 50 videos that show what they predicted the future might look like (on schoology) Discussion on how this compares to what the future (now) really looks like. What was right? What was wrong? Using some of the changes that they found on the videos and through discussion what changes do they think have occurred in Science and Technology? In pairs investigate the various branches of tech etc that they have show they can see differences in. If not very forthcoming can prompt with

Lesson 5 Learning intent SC/Essential Question Content of the Lesson

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Transport ICT Phones Medicine, Entertainment Chemistry Nuclear/energy Space race As well as a general overview to be published on the timeline can they find one key Australian event/person/invention. More in depth entry on the timeline using this event.

Youtube videos http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VowfYuhx1-o http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OpfxwRDRGY4 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RQZcXCDr4Wc Capzules Summative: The results from this are fed into their timelines Informal students can discuss the of Science in popular culture and give specific examples Informal - Australian key person/event on timeline. Does the student show an understanding of the importance of this event/person? History Science

Resources needed

Assessment

General capabilities & Cross-Curriculum priorities

General

Curriculum

ICT

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Exploration Fashion: Introduction/ rising hemlines movements mods,rockers etc How did pop culture affect the clothing after the war? How was this lead by teenagers? What did the clothing look like during and the after the war? Why did it look like this? Linking back to the teenager thing. Can they see any links between the rise of the teenager and the change in clothing? For each subculture what was the fashion? How did this link in to the values of the subculture? Where did the subculture come from and how did it play out in Australia? Virtual investigation of the changes. Lesson 6 Learning intent SC/Essential Question Content of the Activity

Youtube video Links http://www.vam.ac.uk/content/articles/h/history-of-fashion-1900-1970/ Introduction to Schoology

Resources needed

Summative: The results from this are fed into their timelines Other ICT

informal - Class discussion at the end about the key differences and where they came from. History Science

Assessment Curriculum

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Investigation Designing the investigation to be carried out by the class later What would a working woman want in a dress? Students work together to design the practical to be performed next week. What properties of fabric make it useful? Questions to shape the lesson What makes a good dress fabric for the dress of the 60s? What type of job would the typical woman of the 60s be doing? What kind of things do you look for in clothing today? As well as working as a class to divide up the task start to look at the assessment. What did the media targeting women at this time look like? Trove http://trove.nla.gov.au/ Resources needed Lesson 7 Learning intent SC/Essential Question Content of the Lesson

Summative feeds into the writing task

Informal - Did the class all contribute to figuring out the questions they wanted to answer and how to best do it. Other History Science

Assessment

General

Curriculum

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Protest songs Investigating the changing face and power of music What is music with a message?
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Lesson 8 Learning intent SC/Essential Question

New learning Becca & Lee-Ann


Introduce the rise of rock n roll; Elvis - watch first performance broadcast on TV and discuss the impact this had at the time; Beatlemania; folk music and the hippies. 'What was Australia's first rock 'n' roll record?' will allow students to become historians as they work through a range of resources to investigate this question and come to a conclusion based on evidence. 'How did Australians react to the arrival of rock 'n' roll?' gives students the opportunity to explore competing perspectives on this question. 'Australian music's hidden history exploring Indigenous music case studies' gives students the Opportunity to explore the almost completely ignored contribution of indigenous Australians to our Musical popular culture. 'The Beatles arrive' will allow students to create an exhibition to commemorate the 50th anniversary of The Beatles tour of Australia. Look at freedom of expression through art, music, and literature. Explore the idea of protesting Introduce task of the protest music video by watching Bob Dylans Subterranean Homesick Blues Students break into groups (according to month they were born) and decide on an issue they feel strongly about and start working on protest posters for music video Content of the Lesson

Variety of videos: Elvis performance; Beatles arrival in Melbourne footage; Woodstock footage; Bob Dylan music video Sheets of A3 paper and black markers

Resources needed

Assessment English Literature and Context Cross-Curriculum History Science Curriculum

Literature and Context: Compare and evaluate a range of representations of individuals and groups in different historical, social and cultural contexts (ACELT1639) Literacy Critical and creative thinking.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures Asia and Australias engagement with Asia

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Practical Creating music with a message

Lesson 9 Learning intent

Do protest songs work? Complete posters for music videos. Go out into school grounds to film videos. Return to class and edit videos Filming and editing protest songs and Presenting Class discussion

SC/Essential Question Content of the Lesson

Video cameras from library Netbooks Movie editing program Formal: Strength and clarity of cause and message. Accurate choice of imagery and music. General Other History Science

Resources needed

Assessment

Curriculum

Literature and Context: Compare and evaluate a range of representations of individuals and groups in different historical, social and cultural contexts (ACELT1639) Literacy Critical and creative thinking.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures Asia and Australias engagement with Asia

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New learning Becca & Lee-Ann

What makes a good dress fabric? Performing the practical on different fabrics, using the tests devised by the class

Lesson 10 Learning intent

What fabric makes the best dress? PracticalGuided inquiry. For each of the different fabrics identified each pair tests one of -Washability -Crease resistance -colorfastness -Flammability -Wear (pumice test) -Drape These results are then shared on schoology enabling all students to come to a conclusion. Then using this they write a media message for the assessment. Practical resources as identified by students -Range of fabrics -Detergent -Iron -Bleach -Bunsen burner - Pumice Netbooks and links to schoology to Summative Mark themselves against the group work component of the rubric, then discuss with the teacher. General Other History
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SC/Essential Question Content of the Lesson

Resources needed

Assessment

Science

Curriculum

New learning Becca & Lee-Ann

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Exploration Power of the media and how it was used to convey certain messages

Lesson 11 Learning intent

Did the developments in technology change the way messages were conveyed? Contestability should Australia have local content rules? The Menzies government decided not to require a quota of local content that had to be broadcast when television was introduced. Use the TV guides shown at TELEVISION.AU http://televisionau.com/classic-tv-guides to examine what was actually shown on Australian TV in the late 1950s and early 1960s. How can this information be used to argue for or against the argument that Australia should have local content rules to ensure Television is used to support and develop Australian culture? Mapping and groupings of people Relevance to aboriginal rights Discuss the following key dates and events that occurred: 1962: Receive right to vote 1965: Freedom Ride NSW students draw public attention 1966: PM Holt takes over from PM Menzies Reflective activity where students think about and list rights they currently have; rights they think could be taken away; wh at theyll do when it happens
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SC/Essential Question Content of the Lesson

New learning Becca & Lee-Ann


Class grouped into opposition parties where they have to campaign and fight for their rights.

Resources needed

Assessment Cross-Curricular Civics and Citizenship History Science Curriculum

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures Asia and Australias engagement with Asia Sustainability (cultural).

They explain how the Australian Constitution affects their lives, and human rights issues, both national and international. They explain how citizens influence government policy through participation in political parties, elections and membership of interest groups. They explain the development of a multicultural society and the values necessary to sustain it.

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Australias contribution to international popular culture Australias contribution to international popular culture (music, film, television, sport).

Lesson 12 Learning intent

What does it mean to be Australian? Case study: Jedda. Why is Jedda a significant film in Australian film history? Consider the information at Australian Screen and 'Chauvel's Jedda led the way' Key questions: What view of Australia is portrayed? Was it relevant to Australia in the 1970s? Is it relevant to Australia today?
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SC/Essential Question Content of the Lesson

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What picture of Australia would it give overseas viewers? Do the characters seem realistic to you? How did this film contribute to the development of an Australian identity?

http://aso.gov.au/titles/features/jed da/ http://www.theage.com.au/news/Fil m/Chauvels-Jedda-led-theway/2004/12/14/1102787061956.ht ml

Resources needed

Summative: The results from this are fed into their timelines General Cross-Curricular

Informal: Research notes on Jedda History Science

Assessment Curriculum

Information and communication technology capability Ethical behaviour

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures Sustainability (cultural).

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Timeline assessment To demonstrate the knowledge learnt through unit through timelines Sequencing significant global events and changes in contemporary Australian history. Groups present their timeline during class Netbooks and student capzles.com timelines Formal, see-attached rubric. General Other History Science Lesson 13 Learning intent SC/Essential Question Content of the Lesson Resources needed Assessment Curriculum

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