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Unit Plan Overview

Unit: Questions Geographers Ask: Absolute and Relative Location; Physical and Human Characteristics of Michigan Stage 1- Desired Results Connections to Context: Transfer Last year students discussed what it meant Students will be able to independently use their learning to to think Like a Historian. In this fourth Determine places absolute and relative locations grade unit students ask what it means to Evaluate whether the alterations that people have made on a landscape are positive, negative, or a mix of the two think Like a Geographer. Mrs. Andresen Describe why Michigan is a unique place to live both in its human and natural characteristics will teach three questions before I teach my (What kinds of long-term independent accomplishments are desired?) two questions, Where is it? and What is it Meaning like there? UNDERSTANDINGS ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS Ridge Park particularly focuses on student Students will understand that Students will keep considering responsibility. Students must learn to be Places have both absolute and relative locations. Should I think of others when I make a decision? accountable for their actions (Ridge Park Geographers came up with latitude and longitude in What does it look like to be a good citizen of both Charter Academy, 2013). Part of these order to understand and navigate the world better. Michigan and the world? lessons purpose is to instill in children a Humans can understand where they live in reference How can we use and protect Michigans resources? responsibility to take care of the world that to surrounding places or by absolute location. If I am an immigrant, can I belong to two countries at they live in. I hope to instill in students a Humans can positively or negatively alter the once and impact both for the better? love of the world and, therefore, a desire to landscape of Michigan and the world. take care of it. Part of being a good citizen of the world means asking, Many of these students have not travelled Will my action hurt or help the world and its much of the USA or even much of MI. They inhabitants? will develop a greater love for MI once they (What specically do you want students to understand? (What thought-provoking questions will foster inquiry, meaningsee its many beautiful and unique features. making and transfer?) What inferences should they make?) Since I cannot take them physically around MI, it is important that I show them many Acquisition of Knowledge, Skill and Values/Commitments/Dispositions pictures of MI so that they can experience Cognitive Objectives Physical Development Objectives Socio-emotional Objectives its beauty secondhand. Define latitude and longitude (R), To use latitude and longitude lines Students should wonder what Students could also benefit by seeing how know how they help people (R), to find a places absolute location responsibility they have to take immigrants have shaped Michigan since the and how to use them to find care of the world around them. To use a compass many of them are immigrants. This will absolute location (Ap). Students should consider whom show them that, though they were not they impact when they make Contrast relative and absolute originally born here, they can shape location (An), understand decisions. Michigan for better or for worse. Michigans relative location in the Great Lake region (U). List the unique natural and human (How does this fit with students experiences, characteristics of Michigan (R) the school goals, and the larger societal issues?) Understand that humans have both positively and negatively affected Established Goals the natural landscape of Michigan (U). Michigan State Standards for Social Studies
Based on Wiggins and McTighe (2011) The Understanding by Design Guide to Creating High-Quality Units and Van Brummelen (2002) Steppingstones to Curriculum

4 G1.0.1 Identify questions geographers ask in examining the United States (e.g., Where it is? What is it like there? How is it connected to other places?). 4 G1.0.2 Use cardinal and intermediate directions to describe the relative location of significant places in the United States. 4 G1.0.3 Identify and describe the characteristics and purposes (e.g., measure distance, determine relative location, classify a region) of a variety of geographic tools and technologies (e.g., globe, map, satellite image). 4 G2.0.2 Compare human and physical characteristics of a region to which Michigan belongs (e.g., Great Lakes, Midwest) with those of another region in the United States 4 G2.0.2 Compare human and physical characteristics of a region to which Michigan belongs (e.g., Great Lakes, Midwest) with those of another region in the United States. 4 G5.0.1 Assess the positive and negative effects of human activities on the physical environment of the United States. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly. o CCSS.ELALiteracy.W.4.2a Introduce a topic clearly and group related information in
Based on Wiggins and McTighe (2011) The Understanding by Design Guide to Creating High-Quality Units and Van Brummelen (2002) Steppingstones to Curriculum

paragraphs and sections; include formatting (e.g., headings), illustrations, and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. o CCSS.ELALiteracy.W.4.2b Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic. o CCSS.ELALiteracy.W.4.2c Link ideas within categories of information using words and phrases (e.g., another, for example, also, because). o CCSS.ELALiteracy.W.4.2d Use precise language and domainspecific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic. o CCSS.ELALiteracy.W.4.2e Provide a concluding statement or section related to the information or explanation presented
Based on Wiggins and McTighe (2011) The Understanding by Design Guide to Creating High-Quality Units and Van Brummelen (2002) Steppingstones to Curriculum

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.7 Conduct short research projects that build knowledge through investigation of different aspects of a topic. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.8 Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant information from print and digital sources; take notes and categorize information, and provide a list of sources. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.4.4 Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience in an organized manner, using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.4.5 Add audio recordings and visual displays to presentations when appropriate to enhance the development of main ideas or themes. Stage 2- Evidence Students will show their learning by PERFORMANCE TASK(S): Students will demonstrate their understanding of relative location by the navigation game. They will find objects using relative location and write descriptions of an objects relative location. Students will use latitude and longitude to find famous places in the United States. Students will write an exit ticket and describe Michigans relative and absolute location Students will list and describe Michigans physical characteristics in a letter format. Students will work in groups and present on a human characteristic of Michigan. Students will follow a checklist to make sure they are including all important information about a topic. One of the checkpoints should ask, Why should we care about this human characteristic? or Is this a good contribution to the Michigan landscape?
(How will students demonstrate their understanding- meaning-making and transfer- through complex performance?)

Evaluative Criteria In Lesson 1: The written down descriptions of various objects relative location. See if descriptions demonstrate a clear understanding of North, South, East, and West and how to find an objects relative location. In Lesson 2: Students will appropriately use latitude and longitude to find locations of famous places in the US. Use their map to determine students understanding of latitude and location. They will also turn in an exit ticket by which you can assess if students

Based on Wiggins and McTighe (2011) The Understanding by Design Guide to Creating High-Quality Units and Van Brummelen (2002) Steppingstones to Curriculum

understand the difference between relative and absolute location. In Lesson 3: Students will write a letter. Use rubric to evaluate understanding. In Lesson 4: Students present in groups on a physical feature of Michigan (Jigsaw method.) Use checklist to make sure that they have presented on all the information needed about a topic. One of these checks should be Why should we care about ______?
(What criteria will be used in each assessment to evaluate attainment of the desired results?) (Regardless of the format of the assessment, what qualities are most important?)

OTHER EVIDENCE:
(What other evidence will you collect to determine whether Stage 1 goals were achieved?

Based on Wiggins and McTighe (2011) The Understanding by Design Guide to Creating High-Quality Units and Van Brummelen (2002) Steppingstones to Curriculum

Stage 3- Learning Plan I made a hand-out pre-assessment for the students to take on Friday, October 18. The pre-assessment was a little ticket that asked them to draw a compass, to describe the location of Michigan, to describe what a GPS does, to list some of Michigan's biggest cities, to describe what latitude and longitude are, to write what they wish they knew about Michigan According to the 3rd grade standards, students should already know North, South, East, and West. If they have indeed learned this they should be able to draw a compass. Latitude and Longitude, GPS operations, and some major cities will be covered in the unit, so I asked them for information about these topics to see if any of the students already knew about latitude and longitude. By the information, on where Michigan is located I hope to gain an understanding of where students fall on the spectrum of understanding relative location. Pre-assessment- due Oct 31 (Toward Learning Events Progress Monitoring which goal Student success at transfer, meaning, and acquisition depends upon their participation in these learning Each day I have an activity which does each events will assess students on how well learning Define relative location, cardinal directions, and intermediate directions, political boundaries, continent (A) they are acquiring information event Describe the relative location of an object using North, South, East and West (M) and developing skills. On each build?) Draw a compass (A) day there is an activity which Work with partners to navigate the classroom using relative location (T) they are doing with their group Acquisition Define latitude and longitude, prime meridian, and equator, northern hemisphere (A) or with a partner during which I Use latitude and longitude lines on a map to find locations (M) Meaning can walk around and observe Know what GPS stands for and what a GPS does (A) how students are doing and ask Work with a partner comparing answers to Lat. and Long. Locations (M) Transfer them individual questions. There Identify the major natural characteristics of Michigan (A) are also questions built into the Define what a natural characteristic is. (A) lessons to ask as we are going Write an informational letter about the natural characteristics of Michigan to someone who doesnt know along to see how students are anything about Michigan (T) understanding the material and Know the major human characteristics (A) to see that students are engaging Define what a human characteristic is (A) with the material. Many of the Work together in groups well following roles (M) lessons also start with what the Evaluate whether a human feature uses or abuses natural features. (T) Work together in group to recall and apply concepts that they have learned all week (T) students also knowfrom Use compasses to navigate the classroom (T) previous lessons or from learning that theyve done with Mrs. Andresen or on their own. Also, the final day there is a final activity and assessment which require students to bring all that theyve learned together. The activities at the end of the lessons allow students to monitor their own progress. Also, there are built in places for them to talk to partners and assess themselves. The lesson on the final day will first have them

Based on Wiggins and McTighe (2011) The Understanding by Design Guide to Creating High-Quality Units and Van Brummelen (2002) Steppingstones to Curriculum

practice their understanding in groups and then individually on a test. This unit covers so much material that it could potentially be very easy for students to be left behind. Also, there is more group work than students normally do in this classroom. Students will need to work together. If their group fails to get along, those students could be at a disadvantage. When I walk around and assist students with their group work, it is something that Ill really need to watch for. Students will get their papers back with comments. They will also get my direct feedback when I walk around.

Based on Wiggins and McTighe (2011) The Understanding by Design Guide to Creating High-Quality Units and Van Brummelen (2002) Steppingstones to Curriculum