Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 3

Lander University Teacher Education Lesson Plan Template

Rev. 2013

Teacher Candidate: Teddi Steadman Subject/Grade: Mathematics/4th Grade Learning Objective:

Lesson # 2 Date and Time of Lesson: September 25, 2013 at 10:45

Students will generalize a place value understanding for multi-digit whole numbers.

Alignment with Standards: Identify the source and list standards (local, state, and/or national) that align with the learning objective. EEDA Standard(s): Students will work cooperatively together in small groups. SSCA Element(s): Students will agree/disagree with other students explanations and understandings in a respectful manner. CCSS: 4.NBT.A.3 Number and Operations in Base Ten Generalize place value understanding for multi-digit whole numbers. Developmental Appropriateness or Cross-curricular connections: Teaching the students to generalize a place value understanding for multi-digit whole numbers is appropriate because the students are in fourth grade and this is the standard the students are on in mathematics. In this lesson we will be focusing on using place value understandings to round multi-digit whole numbers to any place. Students will be reminded that we using rounding in many different life situations. We can connect rounding to in a money sense, we round the items we need when we are grocery shopping. I will provide a lot of instances in real life situations, when we can use our knowledge on rounding. Assessment(s) of the Objectives:
What assessment(s) will you use to determine student learning (pre, during, post)? Each objective should be aligned with an assessment. Lesson Objective(s) Assessment(s) of the Objective(s) I will assess students during the lesson by focusing on two problems on independent work (questions 4 and 10). I will have a checklist to check off whether students are getting these two questions correct. At the end of the lesson, I will provide each student with a note card. I will ask students to write down one question they have about todays lesson. The students who do not have questions, will be provided with one problem on the board to solve. Assessment for Objective 2 Use of Formative Assessment By walking around during independent work, I will know where students stand on the concept of rounding. I will stop students, if I see major errors, and review on the whiteboard for all students to see. By collecting the note cards at the end of the lesson, I will have a better understanding of each students progress. If students are excelling, we will move on to the next concept. If they are having difficulties we will do further exploration in this area.

Students will generalize a place value understanding for multi-digit whole numbers.

Objective 2 (if applicable)

Lander University Teacher Education Lesson Plan Template

Rev. 2013

Accommodations: I will accommodate my ADHD students by making sure I check in with them often during independent work, to make sure they are on topic. For fast-finishers, I will allow them to move forward to the next page during independent work. There are two students who will be pulled to the back for extra math support during independent math work for any additional questions they may have. Materials: McGraw- Hill My Math textbook, whiteboard, note cards, and scrap paper Procedures:
1. I will ask students to clear their desks completely. I will tell students that we are going to learn a song that will help us with rounding our numbers. I will teach students the beat, and then we will add the words. I will put a copy of the words at the front of the room on the smart board for all students to see. The beat of the song is to, We will rock you. I will ask students clap the beat out, we will clap the beat out as a class, and then I will sing the words by myself. After I have sang through the song one time, students will be asked to join. This will take 57 minutes. LYRICS: We will, we will, round you! Yeah! Round you, yeah! We will, we will round you, yeah! Round you, yeah! Find your place, look next door, five or greater, add one more, all digits in front, stay the same, all digits behind, zeros your name. We will, we will, round you, yeah! Round you, yeah! We will, we will, round you, yeah! Round you. Yeah! 2. I will ask my students to turn to chapter 2 in their textbooks and discuss the examples with their partner. The students have learned how to round in previous grade levels, so during this time they will be encouraged to express their current understanding of rounding. Students will write down things they remember about rounding on scratch paper, and we will discuss these things as a class before beginning our lesson. 3. I will write the equation three times two hundred and sixty seven on the board. I will put an arrow above the two hundred and sixty seven. I will asks students to think about what the purpose of this arrow could be? I will tell students that this example is also place in their textbook. 4. After allowing students to explain what they think the purpose of the arrow is, I will review with students that rounding up results in an estimate greater than the actual product, while rounding down results in an estimate less than the actual product. Going back to example 1, I will ask students to explain whether 267 rounds up or down. An example answer of this would be, Up; When rounding 267 to the nearest hundred you round to 300 which is greater than 267. (NCTM 2) 5. I will ask students to turn to a partner and discuss the following question, is there more than one way to estimate products? Why or why not? I will ask each student to record his or her answer on the front side of a note card.(NCTM3) I will explain to students that it is very important for them to understand that when rounding, there may be several correct answers, depending which on which place value position they round to. It is always very important to explain your reasoning when you are rounding.(NCTM2) I will tell them that it is always a good idea to continually ask themselves if what they are doing makes sense within the context of the problem they are solving. After explaining this, I will introduce to students the focus of todays lesson, rounding to the greatest place value position. 6. I will now read aloud example 1 (three times two hundred and sixty seven) and I will also write the equation on the board for students to see. 7. I will ask students: What is the greatest place-value position in 267? (Hundreds) Which digit is in the hundreds place? (2) What is 267 rounded to the nearest hundred? (300) Why is 267 rounded up to 300? The tens digit is larger that 4, so you round up. 8. Since 267 is rounded up, is the estimate greater than or less than the actual distance? Explain. The estimate is greater than the actual distance because 300 is more than 267. 9. Now I will move on to example two, and I will read this example aloud. What is 2,496 rounded to the nearest thousand? Explain. 2000; the hundreds digit is less than 5, so you round down to the nearest thousand. So, 8 times 2,496 9s about 16,000. 10. We will work together through example 3. I will write the problem the on the board, (4 times 8,562) and read the problem aloud. I will point out that the word tuition refers to the amount of money paid to study at a university or college. I will explain to students that I currently attend Lander University, and I can explain to students that going to college is a very big expense! I will tell them that I am very lucky, and have my parents pay for school,

Lander University Teacher Education Lesson Plan Template

Rev. 2013

11. 12. 13.

14.

and I couldnt imagine paying all of that money by myself! I would also tell them not to worry about the cost just yet because they have a little ways to go, but there are ways to get help with paying for school, like student loans. (NCTM4) After connecting my problem to a real word problem, I will write 4 times ______=_______. I will ask a student to raise their hand and tell me what 8,562 rounds to. I will remind students that we are rounding to the greatest place value. The answer will be 9,000. I will circle the five and explain to students that since the hundreds is greater, we round up to 9. I will then help students find the product. I will ask students to raise there hand and tell me what 9*4 , and then I will ask another student how many zeros to place behind the 36 .I will now ask students to help fill in the word for the next question on example 3. Since 8,562 was rounded (up), the estimated product is (greater) than the actual product. So we can conclude the problem by saying, tuition will cost about $36,000. I would then reiterate to students that I told them college was expensive! (NCTM 4) I will ask students to silently work on the guided practice problems located in their textbooks. I will give them 3-4 minutes to complete these two questions. We will review the guided questions together, and then I will answer any remaining questions the students may have. I will assign students to independently work on the remaining questions. I will walk around and make sure students showing their work properly. (NCTM5) I will have a checklist with the students names. I will dial in on questions 4 and 10. I will check students names on the list if they get these two questions correct. This will not go in the grade book; this will just allow me to know where students stand at this point. Once students are completed with independent practice, I will place students in groups. Each group will be given a real world problem-solving question that correlates with our rounding lesson. Students will be given a piece of chart paper and asked to solve the problem. Each group will have a chance to share their chart paper with the class. I will assign two students per group. Each question will be different, so that when presenting students can see a variety of situations where rounding is used in the real world. (NCTM 1, 3, and 5)

Activity Analysis:
Identify at least two activities you plan to use in this lesson and explain why you are planning these specific activities. In your explanation include the following prompts: I assessed students during the lesson and after the lesson for a better understanding of how the students were grasping the concept of rounding to the highest place value. I allowed for class discussion after each of the example because students tend to be more engaged when they are allowed to speak out loud. I allowed for students to actively learn how to round by learning the song, we will round you. For technology, we used the smart board.

References:
McGraw Hill textbook Youtube (we will round you)