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Respond to form *Designing Instruction Task* for Task Form

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Due: 12/04/20 13

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Before beginning this task, read the complete directions provided in the CTC TPA Candidate Handbook. Step 1: Academic Content Selection and Learning about Students
Directions: An important step in planning instruction is to learn about your students. Select one class, one content area, and the state-adopted academic content standards or state-adopted framework (if your single subject content area does not have content standards) for this task. Respond to the questions below about this class, unit of study, and how you learn about the students.

A. Academic Content Selection


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Grade Level

Tenth and/or Eleventh Grade


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Content area

Chemistry
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Subject matter

Solutions and Solubility


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1. List the state-adopted academic content standards or state-adopted framework that you will cover for this unit of study.

Conservation of Matter and Stoichiometry 3. The conservation of atoms in chemical reactions leads to the principle of conservation of matter and the ability to calculate the mass of products and reactants. As a basis for understanding this concept: a. Students know how to describe chemical reactions by writing balanced equations. b. Students know the quantity one mole is set by defining one mole of carbon 12 atoms to have a mass of exactly 12 grams. c. Students know one mole equals 6.02 time 10 to the 23 power particles (atoms or molecules). d. Students know how to determine the molar mass of a molecule from its chemical formula and a table of atomic masses and how to convert the mass of a molecular substance to moles, number of particles, or volume of gas at standard temperature and pressure. e. Students know how to calculate the masses of reactants and products in a chemical reaction from the mass of one of the reactants or products and the relevant atomic masses. f. Students know how to calculate percent yield in a chemical reaction. g. Students know how to identify reactions that involve oxidation and reduction and how to balance oxidationreduction reactions. Acids and Bases 5. Acids, bases, and salts are three classes of compounds that form ions in water solutions. As a basis for understanding this concept: a. Students know the observable properties acid, bases, and salt solutions. b. Students know that acids are hydrogen-ion donating and bases are hydrogen ion accepting substances. c. Students know strong acids and bases fully dissociate and weak acids and bases partially dissociate. d. Students know how to use the pH scale to characterize acid and base solutions. e. Students know the Arrhenius, Bronsted-Lowry, and Lewis acidbase definitions. f. Students know how to calculate pH from the hydrogen-ion concentration. g. Students know buffers stabilize pH in acidbase reactions. Solutions 6.Solutions are homogeneous mixtures of two or more substances. As a basis for understanding this concept: a. Students know the definitions of solute and solvent. b. Students know how to describe the dissolving process at the molecular level by using the concept of random molecular motion. c. Students know temperature, pressure, and surface area affect the dissolving process. d. Students know how to calculate the concentration of a solute in terms of grams per liter, molarity, parts per million, and percent composition. e. Students know the relationship between the molality of a solute in a solution and the solutions depressed freezing point or elevated boiling point. f. Students know how molecules in a solution are separated or purified by the methods of chromatography and distillation. Students need to understand that scientific progress is made by asking meaningful questions and conducting careful investigations. As a basis for understanding this concept and addressing the content, students should develop their own questions and perform investigations. Students will select and use appropriate tools and technology (such as computer-linked probes, spreadsheets, and graphic calculators) to perform tests, collect data, analyze relationships, and display data. Students will identify and communicate sources of unavoidable experimental error, identify possible reasons for inconsistent results, such as sources of error or uncontrolled

understanding this concept: a. Students know the definitions of solute and solvent. b. Students know how to describe the dissolving process at the molecular level by using the concept of random molecular motion. c. Students know temperature, pressure, and surface area affect the dissolving process. d. Students know how to calculate the concentration of a solute in terms of grams per liter, molarity, parts per million, and percent composition. e. Students know the relationship between the molality of a solute in a solution and the solutions depressed freezing point or elevated boiling point. f. Students know how molecules in a solution are separated or purified by the methods of chromatography and distillation. Students need to understand that scientific progress is made by asking meaningful questions and conducting careful investigations. As a basis for understanding this concept and addressing the content, students should develop their own questions and perform investigations. Students will select and use appropriate tools and technology (such as computer-linked probes, spreadsheets, and graphic calculators) to perform tests, collect data, analyze relationships, and display data. Students will identify and communicate sources of unavoidable experimental error, identify possible reasons for inconsistent results, such as sources of error or uncontrolled conditions, and formulate explanations by using logic and evidence.
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2. Describe the unit of study that addresses those standards.

The objective is to teach students the necessary skills to become good problem solvers and critical thinkers. They will develop other skills including, organization, time management, study skills etc, through a variety of teaching strategies. This will be done using labs and molarity as the content for teaching the previously mentioned skills, so that the students will have a working knowledge of solution chemistry.
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3. What is (are) the academic learning goal(s) for this unit of study?

In this unit, students will be able to understand the properties of solutions, the concept of concentration, and the importance of water as a solvent prepare, analyze, and react solutions using qualitative and quantitative methods relate the scientific knowledge of solutions and solubility to a variety of technological, societal, and environmental examples, including water quality
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Class Information
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Age range of students

Fifteen and/or sixteen years of age.


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Number of male students

16
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Number of female students

17
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Total number of students

33
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B. Student Characteristics
Linguistic Background
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1. What information that may influence instruction do you want to learn about your students?

What language is spoken at home? What is their literacy level in their native language? What are their CELDT scores? Linguistic background is important because it helps me understand the students prior knowledge.
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2. How will you learn about your students? Describe the methods you will use and why you have chosen to use those particular methods.

I will use CELDT scores and personal surveys. I will use an in-class survey very early in the year to determine their linguistic background. I feel this method is the most appropriate as it allows me to obtain immediate results and resolve any questions the students may have regarding the survey.
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3. How will you use this information in planning academic instruction in your selected content area?

This pre-assessment language survey will allow me to quickly determine how I need to pace lessons and what modifications and accommodations are required for the class. It will also help me in terms of selecting texts, explaining assignments, planning activities and deciding what adaptations are necessary to ensure effective

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2. How will you learn about your students? Describe the methods you will use and why you have chosen to use those particular methods.

I will use CELDT scores and personal surveys. I will use an in-class survey very early in the year to determine their linguistic background. I feel this method is the most appropriate as it allows me to obtain immediate results and resolve any questions the students may have regarding the survey.
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3. How will you use this information in planning academic instruction in your selected content area?

This pre-assessment language survey will allow me to quickly determine how I need to pace lessons and what modifications and accommodations are required for the class. It will also help me in terms of selecting texts, explaining assignments, planning activities and deciding what adaptations are necessary to ensure effective lessons. This will help me with SDAIE techniques, verbal instruction, and graphic organizers.
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Academic Language Abilities, Content Knowledge, and Skills


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1. What information that may influence instruction do you want to learn about your students?

Id like to know their previous test scores in science and math (STAR if it is available during this transition to Smarter Balance), if they are having trouble with a particular subject, and what academic strengths/weaknesses they believe they have. I must understand what level of cognition the students are at in order to best set goals and plan lessons.
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2. How will you learn about your students? Describe the methods you will use and why you have chosen to use those particular methods.

To gather this information I will look at their cumulative academic records, consult their previous teachers and ask the students directly in a short survey early in the year. If I can successfully meet with previous teachers, I can learn a lot about each particular student and can retrace what methods or strategies they might have employed. I will learn this information through CELDT scores, cumulative file, surveys, interview, class instruction and vocabulary journals.
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3. How will you use this information in planning academic instruction in your selected content area?

This information will allow me to determine certain areas in which a student may require more support. If I know that a portion of my classroom struggled in several units of their physical science class, I can plan ahead and pace out particular units accordingly. Likewise, if the class performed admirably in a unit of great use to my class, I can challenge them with advanced, but fun activities. In addition, this will help me with SDAIE techniques, verbal instruction, and graphic organizers.
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Physical, Social, and Emotional Development


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1. What information that may influence instruction do you want to learn about your students?

Id like to know if they have any social difficulties, are they outgoing, shy, overly aggressive, is there a history of abuse? Are there any physical or emotional issues? This is important to understand how my students will react to a situation.
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2. How will you learn about your students? Describe the methods you will use and why you have chosen to use those particular methods.

For this information I would primarily consult the school or district nurse and counselors. I would also like to speak with previous teachers and review students cumulative records. I would consult with the faculty and staff directly because I could get a much better understanding of the student from a conversation than by reading a report. TPE 8 Learning About Students says that candidates draw upon an understanding of patterns of child adolescent development to understand their students.
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3. How will you use this information in planning academic instruction in your selected content area?

One of the most important concepts in effective education is to ensure that your students feel safe and secure in an academic learning environment. The sooner I am made aware of possible physical, social and emotional development issues, the quicker I can respond accordingly and modify my classroom routines, policies, and general environment to fit my students needs. Once the classroom is comfortable for my students, they can focus more on academic learning. This information will be useful for planning Cooperative Learning strategies and differentiating groups.
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Cultural and Health Considerations


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1. What information that may influence instruction do you want to learn about your students?

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3. How will you use this information in planning academic instruction in your selected content area?

One of the most important concepts in effective education is to ensure that your students feel safe and secure in an academic learning environment. The sooner I am made aware of possible physical, social and emotional development issues, the quicker I can respond accordingly and modify my classroom routines, policies, and general environment to fit my students needs. Once the classroom is comfortable for my students, they can focus more on academic learning. This information will be useful for planning Cooperative Learning strategies and differentiating groups.
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Cultural and Health Considerations


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1. What information that may influence instruction do you want to learn about your students?

Id like to know if there are any serious health ailments or allergies that I need to be aware of. Id also like to know if there are any cultural or religious beliefs that may conflict with the curriculum of the course or school policy.
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2. How will you learn about your students? Describe the methods you will use and why you have chosen to use those particular methods.

I would gather this information with a parent survey sent home, a survey administered in class, and by consulting with the school nurse and counselors. Health issues such as a hearing loss should be given to the teacher in the form of an IEP or similar document from the office. These documents are the best way to find out about a students health concerns without violating the students privacy or bringing up a possible uncomfortable issue. I would consult the nurse and counselors as they are sure to be reliable sources of information, but for the topics of religious/cultural beliefs, Id like to get the parents involved for further verification. Also, showing the parents that my classroom is open and accepting of all religions and cultures will help to ensure a healthy parent-teacher relationship for the school year.
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3. How will you use this information in planning academic instruction in your selected content area?

This is very useful information as its nearly impossible to anticipate the wide range of responses I can get from parents regarding religious or cultural beliefs. The earlier I am made aware of potential conflicts or customs, the more time I have to prepare and adapt accordingly. For example, if I know a significant portion of my students are fasting on a certain day, it might be a good idea to reschedule an intensive, all-day field trip I had planned. Perhaps a significant portion of my students will be absent for a certain day on their religious calendar, it would be wise to reschedule the titration lab procedures so these students won't feel lost on lab day. At the beginning of the school year, it is so hard to understand just how deep a persons cultural practices go and just how severe a persons physical disability is. I believe the best way to go about this is to proceed with caution. A teacher is expected to be respectful to the students and give them a role model of how to respect other cultures or disabilities. Each student should be treated with the same respect as you treat any other student.
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Interests and Aspirations


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1. What information that may influence instruction do you want to learn about your students?

Id like to know hobbies, extracurricular activities, favorite or least favorite subjects, if they are looking forward to a particular unit of the course, do they have a career in mind, and if they plan to attend college. It is also important to understand what is "cool" for the students because if there is a way to incorporate this into your lesson than the students will be more interested in the topic.
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2. How will you learn about your students? Describe the methods you will use and why you have chosen to use those particular methods.

To obtain this information, Id devise an in-class icebreaker where students have to mingle and introduce a fellow student to the whole class. The information Id like to learn about the students will be written down and used to introduce their partner. This method fits perfectly as it throws a fun twist on obtaining useful information. This method also gives me immediate responses and students are able elaborate or clarify if necessary.
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3. How will you use this information in planning academic instruction in your selected content area?

This information is very useful as it provides me with a better understanding of areas of the course students may be the most excited about. Knowing the hobbies and activities of the classroom will help me design a curriculum that is both challenging and interesting. If I was at a crossroads deciding between two possible field trips, knowing the interests and aspirations of my classroom might make one field trip a clear winner.
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Step 2: Learning about Two Focus Students


Directions: Select two focus students from the class you identified in Step 1. Select one student who is an English learner and one student who presents a different instructional challenge. Use some of the methods you described in Step 1 to learn about these two students. Consider your selected content area and subject matter when describing what you learned about the two focus students. Complete the section below. In each box include: a description of what you learned about each of the students an explanation of how the information will influence your academic instructional planning. Note: Single subject candidates for a credential in Languages Other Than English who are delivering instruction in the target language may choose another student with a different instructional challenge rather than an English learner.

that is both challenging and interesting. If I was at a crossroads deciding between two possible field trips, knowing the interests and aspirations of my classroom might make one field trip a clear winner.
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Step 2: Learning about Two Focus Students


Directions: Select two focus students from the class you identified in Step 1. Select one student who is an English learner and one student who presents a different instructional challenge. Use some of the methods you described in Step 1 to learn about these two students. Consider your selected content area and subject matter when describing what you learned about the two focus students. Complete the section below. In each box include: a description of what you learned about each of the students an explanation of how the information will influence your academic instructional planning. Note: Single subject candidates for a credential in Languages Other Than English who are delivering instruction in the target language may choose another student with a different instructional challenge rather than an English learner.

Student 1: An English Learner


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Age

15
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1. Why did you select this student?

I chose this student because he is an English Learner. He looked a little lost at times and Im interested in learning more about his challenges in the classroom and possible ways to assist his learning. He is resourceful with language; once he tricked me into reading word problems for him. When I realized what was happening I knew he would be a great candidate for this assignment because he is working hard in school and really trying to learn the language.
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2. What did you learn about this student's linguistic background?

This student speaks Spanish at home. My master teacher found out that his cousins and other relatives have been in the states for a longer period of time and have helped him learn English. His CELDT score placed him at the intermediate level. I received this information from his school loop file.
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3. What did you learn about this student's academic language abilities in relation to this academic content area?

He speaks BICS well, but needs to work on academic communication and writing skills. He has trouble with spelling, memorizing vocabulary, and sounding out unfamiliar words. This student has significant difficulty learning scientific terminology. He does not enjoy reading assignments and will rarely participate in group discussions. He has a tough time when asked to read passages aloud in class.
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4. What did you learn about this student's content knowledge and skills in this subject matter?

He does well with group work and performance assessments, such as a lab, but struggles with written assignments. The student appears to enjoy the unit but struggles overall due to his low literacy levels. The print out I received from my master teacher shows that his grade is made up of a 73% on class work, 100% on notes, 98% on homework assignments, 52% on tests, and 62% on quizzes. By looking at these overall scores we can assume that he is trying, but something is not working when it comes to tests and quizzes. It could be the language barrier slowing down his ability to understand the content or the way the tests are written. It may be a lack in content knowledge and having little to do with English literacy, however I cannot determine that from the print out.
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5. What did you learn about this student's physical, social and emotional development relevant to this academic content area?

He is quiet, and I have the opinion that he wants to get by unnoticed. He may have trouble relating to native English speakers. However, he does perform well in small groups and is well liked by his classmates. He has a good sense of humor and is happy to participate when engaged. I have been told by my master teacher that he has a positive family with emotional support at home.
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6. What did you learn about this student's cultural background, including family and home relevant to this academic content area?

The student is from Mexico and moved here almost 4 years ago. His mother works full-time and his father works two jobs to support him and his three little sisters. His family would be categorized as working class. The student is considering working a part-time job after school to help support the family. A conservative Catholic, family and religion are very important to the student.
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7. What did you learn about this student's special considerations, including health issues relevant to this academic content area?

The student has no serious health concerns or learning disabilities on file. He said he usually eats chips and a drink for lunch. This is actually quite normal as most students seem to have a poor diet, either eating junk food or not eating all school day.

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6. What did you learn about this student's cultural background, including family and home relevant to this academic content area?

The student is from Mexico and moved here almost 4 years ago. His mother works full-time and his father works two jobs to support him and his three little sisters. His family would be categorized as working class. The student is considering working a part-time job after school to help support the family. A conservative Catholic, family and religion are very important to the student.
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7. What did you learn about this student's special considerations, including health issues relevant to this academic content area?

The student has no serious health concerns or learning disabilities on file. He said he usually eats chips and a drink for lunch. This is actually quite normal as most students seem to have a poor diet, either eating junk food or not eating all school day.
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8. What did you learn about this student's interests and aspirations relevant to this academic content area?

The student enjoys math and lists engineering as a possible career choice. He wants to make his parents proud by graduating high school and attending college. If I were his teacher, I would meet with him (and other EL) to learn about what may be holding him back, if anything, from becoming more inspired by this content. He may share that he likes chemistry, but the vocabulary slows him down and makes him frustrated with the content; I would show him how to identify new vocabulary in the book so that he becomes an active learner.
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9. Describe other information relevant to this academic content area that you learned about the student (e.g., attendance, extracurricular activities).

The student has great attendance and has been absent only once this year. To me this shows that his family is involved in his success. The student tries hard to finish his work in class to avoid homework.
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Student 2: A Student Who Presents a Different Instructional Challenge


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Gender Male Femal e

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Age

15
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1. Why did you select this student?

I chose a hearing impaired student because I want to learn more about her challenges and learning needs. She is an amazing student and performs at a high level.
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2. How is the instructional challenge that he or she presents different from that of the other student?

This student calls for a unique balancing act on the part of the teacher. The teacher needs to make certain that she understands the curriculum and direction of the course and that her learning needs are met, but doing so without calling too much attention to the fact that she is hearing impaired. The student needs to feel equally included, not more or less.
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3. What did you learn about this student's linguistic background?

The student is a native English speaker and English is spoken at home. She experiences a little trouble with spoken English, but overall she can communicate orally very well. She is a very good lip-reader and can catch most things the teacher is saying immediately. She also has a background with sign language; it is my opinion that her parents thought she was completely deaf as an infant and toddler and communicated with her in sign language.
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4. What did you learn about this student's academic language abilities in relation to this academic content area?

She reads and writes at a very high level. She experienced little trouble understanding the content and even felt comfortable asking questions in class. She comprehends reading and vocabulary assignments at a high level; she is also comfortable with lab procedures.
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5. What did you learn about this student's content knowledge and skills in this subject matter?

I learned that once she understood what was being said in a lecture or presentation, she would grasp the concept almost immediately. She is very sharp and is a strong student; she is comfortable with Molarity calculations.

language.
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4. What did you learn about this student's academic language abilities in relation to this academic content area?

She reads and writes at a very high level. She experienced little trouble understanding the content and even felt comfortable asking questions in class. She comprehends reading and vocabulary assignments at a high level; she is also comfortable with lab procedures.
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5. What did you learn about this student's content knowledge and skills in this subject matter?

I learned that once she understood what was being said in a lecture or presentation, she would grasp the concept almost immediately. She is very sharp and is a strong student; she is comfortable with Molarity calculations.
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6. What did you learn about this student's physical, social and emotional development relevant to this academic content area?

While she may experience some teasing or social ostracism outside of the classroom, she is very much an integral part of her chemistry classroom. She is social, works well with others, and is often not afraid of speaking in front of the classroom. This student is resilient and works very hard to overcome all barriers. Emotionally she seems to be at peer level, I have not observed anything out of the ordinary about her emotions. When she is participating in group activities she relates well with her peers and seems to be socially accepted.
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7. What did you learn about this student's cultural background, including family and home relevant to this academic content area?

She comes from a middle-class Caucasian home close to school. She has a younger sister who attends the same school. They grew up attending the community Christian church. Her family encourages her to succeed in school.
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8. What did you learn about this student's special considerations, including health issues relevant to this academic content area?

The special consideration for this student is that she is hearing impaired and sometimes requires extra support in understanding content and directions. She should be seated in the front of class so that she can better see the teacher's face. There are no other health issues or special considerations for this student.
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9. What did you learn about this student's interests and aspirations relevant to this academic content area?

Though she enjoys her science class, she said that her favorite subject is history. She likes the immersion that her teacher creates and takes pleasure in experiencing cultures and events from different perspectives. This open attitude serves her well in the academic environment. She plans to attend college and enroll in another chemistry course that will further her understanding of the content.
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10. Describe other information relevant to the academic content area that you learned about the student (e.g., attendance, extracurricular activities).

She is active in a deaf support group at the local community center. She made a presentation there and was excited to share the details with me. The student is part of the general curriculum and attends class regularly. The student has no extracurricular activities on file.
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Step 3: Planning for Academic Instruction for the Whole Class


Directions: Consider your academic content selection in Step 1 and what you want the students to learn. As you begin to think about a lesson that falls within the selected unit of study, respond to the questions below about your plan for academic instruction for the whole class.

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1. At what point in the sequence of the unit is this lesson? Put an X next to one: At the beginning of the unit of study Between the beginning and the end of the unit of study At the end of the unit of study

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2. List the state-adopted academic content standard(s) or state-adopted framework you will address in the lesson.

Acids and Bases: 5. Acids, bases, and salts are three classes of compounds that ionize in water solutions. As a basis for understanding this concept: a. Students know the observable properties of acids, bases, and salt solutions Solutions: d. Students know how to calculate the concentration of a solute in terms of grams per liter, molarity, parts per million, and percent composition.
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3. What is (are) your academic learning goal(s)? What specifically do you expect students to know or be able to do as a result of the lesson?

Students will be able to do the following with a focus on acids and bases: Demonstrate how the concentration of acid in a solution can be determined by titration with a base of known concentration.

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2. List the state-adopted academic content standard(s) or state-adopted framework you will address in the lesson.

Acids and Bases: 5. Acids, bases, and salts are three classes of compounds that ionize in water solutions. As a basis for understanding this concept: a. Students know the observable properties of acids, bases, and salt solutions Solutions: d. Students know how to calculate the concentration of a solute in terms of grams per liter, molarity, parts per million, and percent composition.
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3. What is (are) your academic learning goal(s)? What specifically do you expect students to know or be able to do as a result of the lesson?

Students will be able to do the following with a focus on acids and bases: Demonstrate how the concentration of acid in a solution can be determined by titration with a base of known concentration.
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4. How is (are) your academic learning goal(s) related to the state-adopted academic content standards or state-adopted framework?

The learning goals are strongly connected to the state standards and by satisfying the learning goals of the lesson, the students will be more than capable of fulfilling the requirements of the state-adopted academic content standards. The assignments and activities build towards satisfying the learning goals of the lesson. With a strong understanding of the concepts iterated in the learning goals, the students will be able to satisfy the standards with little difficulty.
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5. How will the content of the lesson build on what the students already know and are able to do?

At this point in the year, the students will have had practice with dimensional analysis and stoichiometry. They will already know how to convert grams to moles, identify and use a mole ratio, and convert moles back to grams. They will have had practice converting moles of a diatomic gas into liters and vice versa. So they will be comfortable calculating molarity even though it is a new concept. The students will have worked on lab and safety procedures so the titration lab will be somewhat routine. Group reading will be a routine by this time, so the students will feel comfortable during their reading on titration.
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6. How will the content of the lesson connect to the content of preceding and subsequent lessons?

The preceding and subsequent lessons have covered these standards: a. Students know how to describe chemical reactions by writing balanced equations. b. Students know that acids are hydrogen-ion donating and bases are hydrogen ion accepting substances. c. Students know strong acids and bases fully dissociate and weak acids and bases partially dissociate. d. Students know how to use the pH scale to characterize acid and base solutions. e. Students know the Arrhenius, Bronsted-Lowry, and Lewis acidbase definitions. e. Students know how to calculate the concentration of a solute in terms of molarity, moles per liter of solution. The preceding lesson includes definitions of acids and bases, the concept of pH, the auto ionization of water, and practice calculating various molarity problems. Students can identify, compare, and contrast an Arrhenius acid/ base and a Bronsted Lowry acid/base. They have received a list of strong acids and bases. The concept of pH will be introduced and used to describe how distilled water is neutral, how strong acids have a high H+ concentration, and how strong bases have a high OH- concentration. The students will receive a handout that requires them to calculate various molarity problems. This content will connect the students to the titration lab.
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7. What difficulties do you anticipate students could have with the lesson content and why do you think these difficulties will arise?

I anticipate that students will have difficulties writing a clean lab report that labels objectives, materials, and procedures. I anticipate that they may forget to draw a clean data table that includes their measurements. I think these difficulties will arise, not because expectations are not clearly communicated, but because students do not have enough practice completing professional lab reports. They will improve over time. I anticipate students will read the buret measurements backwards because it is an upside down scale. Students may forget to fill the tip of the buret with the titrant and clean off the outside with distilled water before titrating. Students might add NaOH too quickly and record an end point that is far from the equivalence point. All of these will contribute to errors in their calculations. I imagine students will not use domain specific words and phrases in their conclusions because they lack the confidence to express their understanding with academic language. Their calculations may be off because they have difficulty with stoichiometry and using the method of dimensional analysis. EL could have difficulties with the reading because of the language barrier unless they receive a translation. The hearing impaired student may have difficulty with the demonstration and explanation unless they receive differentiated instruction like a handout that clearly labels and color codes the apparatus.
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8. What evidence will you collect during the lesson or at the end of the lesson that will show the extent to which the students have learned what you intended?

Students will complete a titration lab. Students will complete a lab report that includes the objective, materials, procedures, a data table, balanced chemical equation, calculations using dimensional analysis, and a conclusive paragraph of this lab experience using domain specific words and phrases such as titration, equivalence, acid, base, neutralize, milliliters, liters, grams, moles. This lab report contains many conversion factors (grams-molesmoles-grams, milliliters-liters), and a data table that holds their observations and measurements (each group will be slightly different).
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9. Think about how you will sequence your instruction of the academic content to be covered in this lesson.

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8. What evidence will you collect during the lesson or at the end of the lesson that will show the extent to which the students have learned what you intended?

Students will complete a titration lab. Students will complete a lab report that includes the objective, materials, procedures, a data table, balanced chemical equation, calculations using dimensional analysis, and a conclusive paragraph of this lab experience using domain specific words and phrases such as titration, equivalence, acid, base, neutralize, milliliters, liters, grams, moles. This lab report contains many conversion factors (grams-molesmoles-grams, milliliters-liters), and a data table that holds their observations and measurements (each group will be slightly different).
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9. Think about how you will sequence your instruction of the academic content to be covered in this lesson. Describe your plan for instruction in the order in which it will be implemented.
Address each of the following prompts and provide a rationale for each of your decisions.

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Communicating the academic learning goal(s) to the students Instruction Plan

Rationale

I will write the days agenda on the board along with the objective for the day. I will assure them that they already posses the tools to calculate concentration, but they will need to use their skills in a new way.

Its important that students are able to see how the day will progress and get a feel for what is expected of them. This will help in classroom management as well as students know what is coming next and can settle in for the lesson and not be surprised by the introduction of a particular activity or assignment. By both hearing and being able to read the objective, all students can get a clear idea of what to expect. I want everyone to be positive about the learning goal. So that is why I assure them that they possess the skills of calculating, using stoichiometry, and dimensional analysis.

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Instructional strategies Instruction Plan

Rationale

Overview: This is a two session lesson plan. Session #1 reveals the concept of titration and then lab procedures. Session #2 is a hands on titration lab. Session#1 1) Anticipatory Set: Engage student interest with an acid video. This one minute video is of a sponge, that has been artistically crafted into the character SpongeBob Square Pants, being dissolved in sulfuric acid. Please copy and paste this into your URL if you would like to watch the video. http://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=PQ6IsCbNZAQ 2) Communicate objectives and agenda, which will be written on the white board for clarity. 3) Demonstration: Use litmus acid/base indicators in HCl and NaOH and explain that red litmus paper turns blue in base and blue litmus paper turns red in acid. Begin evaporating the water from a solution of HCL and NaOH to show that the NaCl bonded into an observable salt. 4) Group four students per lab station, differentiating groups to adapt for limitations of ELs and Special Needs. Give students five minutes to experiment with litmus paper. Walk around and give each group a close look at the evaporating dish that contains the observable salt, NaCl. 5) Assign ten minutes of group reading on titration with the differentiated groups at their lab station. Each member is assigned a responsibility to the the group reading: reader, summarizer, note taker, and question maker. 6) Review the reading with an interactive lecture. The students and I will have time to address any questions and misconceptions. The reading and interactive lecture content are about titration. Specifically, a titration is a process used to determine the quantity of one substance by adding a measured amount of a second substance. The learning goals for the learning experience explain that students will demonstrate how the concentration of acid in a solution can be determined by titration with a base of known concentration. Molarity is a concentration that is measured in moles per liter. The phenolphthalein indicator in solution will change color when the solution is basic, which is called the end point. Stop adding NaOH so the end point is as close to the equivalence point as possible. The point at which the stoichiometrically equivalent amounts of the two reactants are present is called the equivalence point. At the equivalence point, stoichiometry can be used to calculate the amount of HCl in the sample from the

I chose this video for the sole purpose that it is fun, grabs your attention, and makes you wonder about acid properties. This differentiated group reading strategy is effective for accommodating EL, Special Needs, and interpersonal learning profiles. Including a note taker and question maker responsibility is a good strategy to receive feedback from the students while simultaneously teaching group work and new content. Demonstrations and the titration lab provide real world applications and they are hands on discovery learning experiences that appeal to the visual, logical, and kinesthetic intelligence. Using the thumbs up, thumbs down response at the closure of session one allows the teacher to assess if these strategies were engaging. The introduction to session two serves as a review of concepts, procedures, misconceptions, and pitfalls. Using feedback during the lab and the designated writing time is perfect for meeting the students at their level of cognition and getting into the details of their acquisition. This type of formative assessment is valuable for creating rapport and a safe learning environment.

and misconceptions. The reading and interactive lecture content are about titration. Specifically, a titration is a process used to determine the quantity of one substance by adding a measured amount of a second substance. The learning goals for the learning experience explain that students will demonstrate how the concentration of acid in a solution can be determined by titration with a base of known concentration. Molarity is a concentration that is measured in moles per liter. The phenolphthalein indicator in solution will change color when the solution is basic, which is called the end point. Stop adding NaOH so the end point is as close to the equivalence point as possible. The point at which the stoichiometrically equivalent amounts of the two reactants are present is called the equivalence point. At the equivalence point, stoichiometry can be used to calculate the amount of HCl in the sample from the measured amount and known concentration of NaOH. This is the learning goal for the learning experience. 7) Go over lab procedure for the next session using problem based strategy and prompting questions: What lab equipment should we use to complete the most precise titration? What is the best container for stirring? Why can't we just pour it all together? Why should we measure and record? Should we add the acid to base? Or base to the acid? Why? What are some ways that our measurements could be thwarted? What can we do to prevent these pitfalls? What do we do with our measurements? These questions are meant to lead the students to autonomously set up a titration lab. The lab set up starts with a buret on a buret stand, and an Erlenmeyer flask underneath the tip of the burette. A volumetric pipette is used for measuring acid and adding it into the Erlenmeyer the flask. Add deionized water so there is a decent volume in the flask to titrate against (the volume of water added is irrelevant). A dropper pipette is used for adding phenolphthalein indicator to the HCl. Begin titrating by releasing NaOH into the Erlenmeyer flask, stirring to ensure the reaction between acid and base is equally distributed throughout the entire flask. 8) Closure: Thumbs up, thumbs down response to assess understanding of titration and lab procedures. Session#2 1) Introduction: Quick demonstration of the lab: safely pour NaOH into a prepared solution of phenolphthalein and HCl until it changes color. Go over questions and pitfalls of the actual lab. For example, filling up the buret correctly since it is an upside down scale, or expelling all the air from the tip of the buret before beginning the titration. This strategy will serve as a review of the reading and lab procedures from session one. 2) Review Laboratory Safety: wear goggles, gloves and aprons. Handle glass equipment responsibly. 3) Use feedback to assist the students as they complete their lab. 4) Clean up 5) Use feedback to assist the students as they write a paragraph describing their lab experience using domain specific words and phrases such as titration, acid, base, neutralize, milliliters, liters, grams, moles.

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Student activities Instruction Plan

Rationale

Sesssion #1 1) Understanding the objectives and agenda, take mental note that it is written on the white board. Include the objectives as a start to their lab report. 2) Observing the litmus paper demonstration. 3) Break into assigned groups of four. Test litmus paper in acid and/or base, and observe. 4) Complete a group reading on titration: Each member is assigned a responsibility to the group reading: reader, summarizer, note taker, and question maker. The reader reads to the group aloud, the summarizer has time to summarize verbally what was just read, the note taker records in writing the main points of the reading and shares with the group, question maker records questions or problems that the group may still have. These activities should appeal to the visual, kinesthetic, and interpersonal

Noting the objectives and the agenda on the white board creates a spatial memory of what is expected of the students. They can refer to the white board in their schema, and this will help to manage the classroom and increase academic learning time. They quickly move into their differentiated groups because they are excited to test the litmus paper. Next, each individual has a responsibility for the group reading, which will increase the social well being of the classroom. They are first introduced to the concept of titration through the reading and then the content is synthesized and expressed twice, first through the summarizer and second by the note taker. Then the question maker must evaluate the groups understanding and record questions or problems that the group may still have. This is a good strategy for tapping into the higher order of cognition on Bloom's taxonomy. The interactive lecture serves to repeat the concept again and address any misconceptions or questions. Students are encouraged to express their

mental note that it is written on the white board. Include the objectives as a start to their lab report. 2) Observing the litmus paper demonstration. 3) Break into assigned groups of four. Test litmus paper in acid and/or base, and observe. 4) Complete a group reading on titration: Each member is assigned a responsibility to the group reading: reader, summarizer, note taker, and question maker. The reader reads to the group aloud, the summarizer has time to summarize verbally what was just read, the note taker records in writing the main points of the reading and shares with the group, question maker records questions or problems that the group may still have. These activities should appeal to the visual, kinesthetic, and interpersonal intelligence. The note taker and question maker record their parts on one paper that will be turned in before the end of the session. 5) Interact with content by participating in the interactive lecture. The content is described in the Instructional Strategies, session one number six. 6) Take notes by writing and drawing pictures, labeling and describing the titration set up. Think critically about how to perform a titration. Use pictures in their lab report. The content is described in the Instructional Strategies, session one number seven. 7) Thumbs up for understanding, thumbs down for not understanding. Session #2 1) Pay close attention to the lab demonstration, pitfalls, and safety review. This activity should serve as a quick review of the reading, lab procedure, and questions that were written by the question maker during the group reading in session one. 2) Laboratory: Completing two titrations, attempting a more precise titration on the second. The lab set up starts with a buret on a buret stand, and an Erlenmeyer flask underneath the tip of the burette. A volumetric pipette is used for measuring acid and adding it into the Erlenmeyer the flask. Add deionized water so there is a decent volume in the flask to titrate against (the volume of water added is irrelevant). A dropper pipette is used for adding phenolphthalein indicator to the HCl. Begin titrating by releasing NaOH into the Erlenmeyer flask, stirring to ensure the reaction between acid and base is equally distributed throughout the entire flask. 3) Clean-up 4) Start writing a paragraph describing their lab experience using domain specific words and phrases such as titration, acid, base, neutralize, milliliters, liters, grams, moles.

the students. They can refer to the white board in their schema, and this will help to manage the classroom and increase academic learning time. They quickly move into their differentiated groups because they are excited to test the litmus paper. Next, each individual has a responsibility for the group reading, which will increase the social well being of the classroom. They are first introduced to the concept of titration through the reading and then the content is synthesized and expressed twice, first through the summarizer and second by the note taker. Then the question maker must evaluate the groups understanding and record questions or problems that the group may still have. This is a good strategy for tapping into the higher order of cognition on Bloom's taxonomy. The interactive lecture serves to repeat the concept again and address any misconceptions or questions. Students are encouraged to express their knowledge in a drawing, labeling and describing the titration set up. This drawing will be required for EL and the hearing impaired student. The drawing is yet another method for expressing the new concept. Thumbs up, thumbs down checks for understanding and engagement. There are a variety of reasons why a lab is an effective student activity, but the one that is most valuable to me is that a lab is a hands on discovery learning experience, which means that students will apply, reflect and become autonomous users of knowledge. Scientific progress is made by asking meaningful questions and conducting careful investigations. Students should develop their own questions and perform investigations. Students will identify and communicate sources of unavoidable experimental error, identify possible reasons for inconsistent results, such as sources of error or uncontrolled conditions and formulate explanations by using logic and evidence. Finally, writing a paragraph of their lab experience using domain specific words and phrases

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Student grouping Instruction Plan

Rationale

Students meet in differentiated groups to experiment with litmus paper to observe the properties of acids and bases. The groups will also complete a group reading that holds each individual responsible for the success of the group. The titration lab is set up so that groups implement the procedures, observe, measure, and record their data together.

When each individual is respected and valued, the environment is more productive for learning. Value and respect are natural products of shared responsibility. Students listen all day to teachers out of necessity but they listen to their peers all day out of free will. So if you can get a peer to explain to them the same thing you would explain to them, then this works in your favor and you become a facilitator of learning instead of an enforcer.

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Materials, technology, and/or resources, including the use of instructional aides, parents, or other adults in the room Instruction Plan Rationale

Goggles, gloves, aprons, Erlenmeyer flasks, burets, volumetric pipettes, acid/base indicators (litmus paper & phenolphthalein), 0.10 M NaOH, 0.50 M HCl (aq), pipet bulbs, class set of calculators, buret stands, beakers, water (or access to), NaHCO3 (s), all appropriate safety equipment, texbook, instructional aides, whiteboard, markers, pencil, paper.

The textbook will be used to complete a group reading. The instructional aides will set up the lab stations prior to session two; other aides will double check the stations in between each period and prepare the stations for the next period. The white board will be used for the objectives, agenda, drawings, and calculations. All of the other equipment is used to complete a titration lab.

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Materials, technology, and/or resources, including the use of instructional aides, parents, or other adults in the room Instruction Plan Rationale

Goggles, gloves, aprons, Erlenmeyer flasks, burets, volumetric pipettes, acid/base indicators (litmus paper & phenolphthalein), 0.10 M NaOH, 0.50 M HCl (aq), pipet bulbs, class set of calculators, buret stands, beakers, water (or access to), NaHCO3 (s), all appropriate safety equipment, texbook, instructional aides, whiteboard, markers, pencil, paper.

The textbook will be used to complete a group reading. The instructional aides will set up the lab stations prior to session two; other aides will double check the stations in between each period and prepare the stations for the next period. The white board will be used for the objectives, agenda, drawings, and calculations. All of the other equipment is used to complete a titration lab.

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Progress monitoring of student learning Instruction Plan

Rationale

I will use interactive lecture and discussions, written responses to questions, lab report, and chapter test to determine level of learning. Students will receive written and oral feedback from the teacher and oral feedback from their elbow partners, reading groups, and lab groups. I will use the feedback that the note taker and question maker recorded from the group reading to influence instructional strategies.

The use of these progress monitoring strategies are informal and formal for a reason, so that students feel safe and take academic risk, and so that students have an opportunity to present their understanding in a professional lab report. This lesson provides for ample amounts of formative assessment and guided practice. During the interactive lecture and discussion part of the lesson, I will frequently poll the class and ask essential questions to determine how well the students are grasping the material. I will make sure the class clearly understands the content before moving forward. During lab and group reading, I will circulate the room checking for progress and offer assistance.

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10. Given the difficulties you anticipate students could have with the content, what additional steps would you take to foster access and comprehension for all students?

This lesson does not include videos on titration or a powerpoint on titrations. Some students are more comfortable watching videos and writing their own notes for conceptual and linear understanding. I would include differentiated instruction for EL by providing translations. I would require the use of Circle Thinking Maps to describe and/or draw definitions. I would be available during lunch and after school for individual instruction.
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11. How would you share the results of student academic learning with students and families?

Students love to see their work displayed so I would display as much as I could in the classroom. I would also post work, grades and comments on schoolloop or the schools equivalent academic browser. On assignments or projects that are given back to students, I will cover the pages with comments and helpful critiques. For outstanding work or tremendous academic improvement, I would make a call home or send a flattering e-mail to praise their work. Its important for both students and parents/guardians to know that I am invested in their education and will make every effort to support and encourage their success.
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Step 4: Lesson Adaptations for the Two Focus Students


Directions: Consider what you have learned about the two focus students in Step 2, along with the implications for instruction that you identified for each of them. For the two students, determine what adaptations you will make to this lesson you have planned for the whole class. Describe those adaptations for each of the two focus students. If you determine that no adaptations are needed for a part of the plan for instruction, indicate and explain that decision. In each box below, include: Your decisions about lesson adaptations A rationale for these decisions

Student 1: An English Learner


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1. Academic learning goal(s) or your expectations of what the student should know or be able to do as a result of this lesson.

The particular EL student I chose is currently proficient at an intermediate ELD level. With certain adaptations in my communication of the goals, strategies and activities for the lesson, he would be able to perform as well as his classmates. These adaptations will be explained below. I will not modify the academic learning goals for this student. I have high expectations for all of my students. That being said, I completely understand that I will need to make adaptations to help him reach the same goals.
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2. Evidence of student learning you will collect during the lesson and/or at the end of the lesson.

For this particular student, I will have him hand in his lab report to me at the end of class. While the other students may just copy definitions, I will require that he draw a visual representation for each term as well. These adaptations, though slight, will aid his retention and comprehension of the terms. If he struggles to draw a representation, he and I can quickly see that he may not completely understand a term. These adaptations will act as an additional way for me to monitor his progress and combat misunderstandings as soon as possible.
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student. I have high expectations for all of my students. That being said, I completely understand that I will need to make adaptations to help him reach the same goals.
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2. Evidence of student learning you will collect during the lesson and/or at the end of the lesson.

For this particular student, I will have him hand in his lab report to me at the end of class. While the other students may just copy definitions, I will require that he draw a visual representation for each term as well. These adaptations, though slight, will aid his retention and comprehension of the terms. If he struggles to draw a representation, he and I can quickly see that he may not completely understand a term. These adaptations will act as an additional way for me to monitor his progress and combat misunderstandings as soon as possible.
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3. Communicating the academic learning goal(s) and/or expectations to the student.

To ensure that the EL student completely understands the learning goals and expectations, I would employ visuals, one-on-one discussions, and shorter, easier to understand sentences. I would make repeated reference to the goals and expectations so he knows what point we are on and how they relate to the lesson. By repeating, and making the goals and expectations easier to understand, he will be more likely to understand and meet the goals and expectations presented.
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4. Instructional strategies

To further aid in the students understanding of the lesson, I will offer additional learning time before school, after school and during lunch to pre-teach the terminology. I will provide him with a printout of the objectives and procedures ahead of class. I will also provide him with a text outline for the unit that includes the main points for the section. Where possible, Id try and throw in a sports analogy. These particular adaptations will help with his language acquisition and improve his ability to understand the concept of titration. The outline specifically will help him focus on the major concepts of the unit. If I can relate a concept or idea to an activity he enjoys, such as sports, it might make a positive impact on his level of classroom involvement. When the students have time to talk to one another during the reading I will make sure that the EL is participating, even if he turns to another EL. If he is active in the class he will have a better chance of grasping the material.
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5. Student activities

When the student break into groups for reading, I will have the EL situated by a bilingual student. This should allow them to ask questions to the bilingual student which will give them another resource to rely on besides the teacher. While other students are merely conversing and taking notes, this student will draw a visual representation of each term. Early in the year, I will demonstrate with him an effective way of taking notes and will regularly check that he is following this model. He will also have an outline of the unit to aid with his understanding as the class reviews the vocabulary. These adaptations give him the best chance of reaching the lesson goals without having to spend a significant amount of additional time or re-teaching. These adaptations will increase his comprehension and retention levels at a low cost to the teacher.
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6. Student grouping

I will use differentiated grouping and pair this EL student with another Spanish speaker, but one who holds a higher level of English proficiency. I will encourage them to speak both Spanish and English. I will also take advantage of any peer tutor or teaching assistant available and make sure they help the student with the writing portions of the lesson. Being able to speak Spanish with another student will allow the EL student to break down text and more rapidly understand the content material. The bilingual partner student is able to explain terminology and concepts in more effective ways than an English only speaker could. This pairing will increase the EL students academic language, content comprehension, and social growth.
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7. Materials, technology, and/or resources, including the use of instructional aides, parents, or other adults in the room

Adapted resources will be utilized and made available for the EL student. I will use additional graphic organizers, outlines, and handouts to facilitate his comprehension of the material. I would request the assistance of an instructional aide to specifically work with this EL student. The adapted resources are specifically designed for EL students and will be able to more effectively convey ideas and concepts to the student. The instructional aide would be able to provide him with individualized assistance while I am currently occupied with other students.
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8. Progress monitoring of student learning

Progress monitoring of this student will be done at the same time as the rest of the students. However, as a teacher you must give attention to an EL because the lesson in English is extra challenging for EL compared to a student who is a native English speaker. So it is important to monitor them, and check for understanding and give then the necessary extra time to process all the information.
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9. Sharing results of the student learning with the student and/or the family

As family is very important to the student, I will implement a large number of parent-teacher-student conferences. During these meetings we can review strengths, weaknesses, evaluate the current adaptations, and establish individualized short-term and long-term goals. I will make a stronger effort to reach out to the family with phone calls, letters and emails. This of course would be in addition to all the feedback and results sharing I do normally. Its very important that a strong and healthy home-school relationship is established. It is imperative the family knows the effort that the student, teacher and school are making to help their son. With family being so important to this student, its vital that he knows his family supports him and is involved in his success.

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8. Progress monitoring of student learning

Progress monitoring of this student will be done at the same time as the rest of the students. However, as a teacher you must give attention to an EL because the lesson in English is extra challenging for EL compared to a student who is a native English speaker. So it is important to monitor them, and check for understanding and give then the necessary extra time to process all the information.
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9. Sharing results of the student learning with the student and/or the family

As family is very important to the student, I will implement a large number of parent-teacher-student conferences. During these meetings we can review strengths, weaknesses, evaluate the current adaptations, and establish individualized short-term and long-term goals. I will make a stronger effort to reach out to the family with phone calls, letters and emails. This of course would be in addition to all the feedback and results sharing I do normally. Its very important that a strong and healthy home-school relationship is established. It is imperative the family knows the effort that the student, teacher and school are making to help their son. With family being so important to this student, its vital that he knows his family supports him and is involved in his success.
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Student 2: A Student Who Presents a Different Instructional Challenge


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1. Academic learning goal(s) or your expectations of what the student should know or be able to do as a result of this lesson.

Despite being hearing impaired, I would still expect her to master the content like her peers. She is a very astute student and with certain adaptations in my communication of the goals, strategies and activities for the lesson, she would be able to perform as well as her classmates. These adaptations will be explained below. I will not modify the academic learning goals for this student. I have high expectations for all of my students. That being said, I completely understand that I will need to make adaptations to help her reach the same goals.
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2. Evidence of student learning you will collect during the lesson and/or at the end of the lesson.

I will make an extra effort to write terms and major concepts on the board or overhead and be certain to use a variety of colors and identifiers, such as circling and underlining words, so as to convey their importance visually. Using different colors and identifiers is a simple way for me to ensure she's right there with the rest of the class.
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3. Communicating the academic learning goal(s) and/or expectations to the student.

I will write the lesson objective clearly on the board in an area that is apparent to all students. I will read it aloud and make repeated reference to it both visually and orally throughout the lesson. With the objective displayed for the entire lesson and with visual clues constantly referring to the objective, she will have no problem understanding the objective, learning goals and expectations.
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4. Instructional strategies

A small, but important adaptation that I will make is to always face towards the classroom when I am speaking and to try and point towards the student that is currently speaking. I will also do my very best to provide clear visual representations for each term and concept. I will encourage her to visit me at lunch or after school if she needs additional help. As she receives the lecture by reading lips, its important that I always face towards the class and be certain to not cover my mouth or be chewing or eating anything when speaking. By pointing at the student who is speaking, she can then turn to face that student to hear/see what they are saying. Its important that I do as much as I can to display visual representations as these can quickly and effectively convey concepts.
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5. Student activities

The student will be asked to complete every aspect of the lesson plan, but will only be expected to participate in the discussions or group sharing as much as she feels comfortable. She will be asked to draw visual representations of the terms addressed in class. As she does not have any cognitive issues, I will expect the student to complete the same level of work as her peers. The difference is that I want her to feel comfortable doing so and will not force her production. She is a very productive student and will contribute when she is ready to.
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6. Student grouping

For the grouping aspects of the lesson, I will use differentiated grouping techniques and be sure to place her with patient peers who group well with others and can understand her spoken communication with ease. Its important to allow her to experience low-stress environments and be able to work together with others. She is a very astute student and with a patient and adaptable partner, can produce amazing work.
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7. Materials, technology, and/or resources, including the use of instructional aides, parents, or other adults in the room

I will take full advantage of all visual materials and technology available to me, including powerpoint presentations, videos, realia, etc. I would request the service of an instructional aide who could give her additional help and progress monitoring while I am occupied with other students. As she is hearing impaired, visual representations must play a bigger part in her academic learning. By utilizing all the visual resources possible, I will supplement

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6. Student grouping

For the grouping aspects of the lesson, I will use differentiated grouping techniques and be sure to place her with patient peers who group well with others and can understand her spoken communication with ease. Its important to allow her to experience low-stress environments and be able to work together with others. She is a very astute student and with a patient and adaptable partner, can produce amazing work.
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7. Materials, technology, and/or resources, including the use of instructional aides, parents, or other adults in the room

I will take full advantage of all visual materials and technology available to me, including powerpoint presentations, videos, realia, etc. I would request the service of an instructional aide who could give her additional help and progress monitoring while I am occupied with other students. As she is hearing impaired, visual representations must play a bigger part in her academic learning. By utilizing all the visual resources possible, I will supplement my instruction and ensure that she is able to learn the content and material at the same pace as her peers.
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8. Progress monitoring of student learning

I will pay close attention to her notes and visual representations drawn there. When appropriate, I will speak with her one-on-one to make certain she understands the concepts. I will also make sure to visit her and her partner during the group work segments. As there are no cognitive issues, it is simply a matter of determining whether she grasped the material the first pass through. By reviewing her notes and speaking with her lab group, I am given the right feedback and can adapt accordingly.
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9. Sharing results of the student learning with the student and/or the family

In addition to the normal feedback and results sharing, I will implement a number of parent-teacher-aide-student conferences. During these meetings we can review strengths, weaknesses, evaluate the current adaptations, and establish individualized short-term and long-term goals. Its important the methods and adaptations that are used are constantly being refined and polished to provide the best support possible. By setting and achieving regular sets of goals, she can make significant strides towards her goal of attending college. Its very important that a strong and healthy home-school relationship is established. It is imperative the family knows the effort that the student, teacher and school are making to help their son. With family being so important to this student, its vital that he knows his family supports him and is involved in his success.
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Step 5: Reflection on Connecting Instructional Planning to Student Characteristics


Directions: Read your responses to the questions in Steps 1-4. Think about what you have learned by completing this task, including the characteristics of the two focus students, your instructional planning for the whole class, and your adaptations for the focus students. Respond to the questions below

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1. What information that you collected for the whole class and/or for the two focus students most influenced your planning for this lesson? In your response, describe how and why the information was influential and why you found it to be so.

What I collected for the whole class that most influenced my planning for this lesson was information about their physical, social, and emotional development. This information really played a large part in determining which activities to include or focus on for my lesson plan. As teachers it is our responsibility to provide equal access to content for all students, whether they are EL, special needs, or anything else. Learning about the physical, social, and emotional development of the classroom enabled me to realize the importance of grouping techniques and its role on adolescents in an educational environment. Strategic grouping enables students to experience a comfortable, low-stress environment where they can take academic risk, facilitate their conceptual understanding, share ideas, and develop socially. I feel I have taken this idea to heart and developed a lesson plan designed to take advantage of the power of group work. In regards to my two focus students, I found that differentiated grouping to ensure a good pairing of students works very well in my lesson design. I found that a safe, confident, and happy student performs very well, no matter what the task or the challenges facing them. The information from the EL was the most challenging to deal with, and had the most influence on my lesson. The EL has not been in the country for a long period of time so there is very little data on his past achievement. So when planning the task I had to plan my nonverbal approach as well as my verbal approach prior to instruction.
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2. How will you use what you have learned regarding connecting instructional planning to student characteristics in the future?

I will use this TPA in the future in many ways, I know that when I start teaching I will have students who are EL and it will be important to instruct them in such a way that allows them to understand the information. This assignment has taught me several things, the most important is a reinforcement of a concept I already acquired, that teachers best connect with and motivate students when they take the time to learn about their class on an individual basis. To properly plan instruction for individual students, a teacher needs to understand that individual student as much as they can. They need to learn the students family life, home situation, extracurricular activities, interests, aspirations, challenges, linguistic abilities, health concerns, cultural considerations, physical, social, and emotional development, and academic content knowledge (all information that this assignment has required). Teachers must be vigilant and obtain all the information they can about students from all the resources at our disposal. Once a teacher understands a particular student, they can successfully adapt academic lessons and truly make content universally acceptable. This assignment showed me just how different all the students are and how important it is for teachers to understand these differences.
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and it will be important to instruct them in such a way that allows them to understand the information. This assignment has taught me several things, the most important is a reinforcement of a concept I already acquired, that teachers best connect with and motivate students when they take the time to learn about their class on an individual basis. To properly plan instruction for individual students, a teacher needs to understand that individual student as much as they can. They need to learn the students family life, home situation, extracurricular activities, interests, aspirations, challenges, linguistic abilities, health concerns, cultural considerations, physical, social, and emotional development, and academic content knowledge (all information that this assignment has required). Teachers must be vigilant and obtain all the information they can about students from all the resources at our disposal. Once a teacher understands a particular student, they can successfully adapt academic lessons and truly make content universally acceptable. This assignment showed me just how different all the students are and how important it is for teachers to understand these differences.
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