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Design for Learning

Instructor: Melia Vines Lesson Title: Bigger or Smaller? Curriculum Area: Math Grade Level/Cooperating Teacher: K/ McAdams Date: Nov. 13, 2012 Estimated Time: 45 minutes

Standards Connection: CCRS Standard K (6): Identify whether the number of objects in one group is greater than, less than, or equal to the number of objects in another group, e.g., by using matching and counting strategies. (include groups with up to ten objects.) Learning Objective(s): Students will use counting and matching strategies to explain whether two sets of objects are greater than, less than, or equal two each other with 100% accuracy. Learning Objective(s) stated in kid-friendly language: Today we are going to learn how to know when something is greater than, less than, or equal to another object. Evaluation of Learning Objective(s): Each student will be given two sets of counters. The student will then use strategies taught in class to determine whether the number of counters on the table is greater than, less than, or equal to each other. Students will use the set of counters to their left as a beginning place (to determine if the set is greater or less than.) The teacher will then walk around the classroom and allow each student to show his or her set and explain how they know that the set is greater than, less than, or equal to each other. If the student can explain it correctly, they have mastered the content. If a student cannot, the teacher will make a note of it and will give the student small hints to help him or her find the correct answer. The teacher will then return to that student after giving him or her enough time to find the answer. Should the student still not understand, the teacher will put differentiation strategies in place. Engagement: Boys and girls, I have a problem and I need your help! Teacher holds up 3 different sized bowls. I have to stack these bowls up and I cant seem to figure out how they should be stacked. They dont fit right for me. When my mom stacks them, they always go together perfectly. She stacks them from biggest to smallest. Can you help me stack them biggest to smallest? Students reply with yes. Okay, which one do you think goes on the bottom? It would be the biggest bowl. Teacher calls on a student. Student will reply and the teacher will put whatever he or she says on the bottom. Do we think (s)he is right? Why? Give students the opportunity to reply. Teacher corrects or affirms students decision on the biggest bowl. If the student is wrong teacher calls on another student to find the biggest bowl. If that student is wrong give another student the opportunity to find the biggest bowl. Once the biggest bowl is on bottom, move on to the medium sized bowl and the smallest bowl. Thank you so much for helping me stack the bowls. How did we know which bowl was which? Students should reply by looking at them. Very good! Did you know numbers can work in the same way? Some are bigger while others are smaller. Sometimes we are able to look at them and decide that one is bigger than the other and other times we have to count to decide if one is bigger than the other. Today we are going to learn how to know when something is greater than, less than, or equal to another object.

Learning Design:

I. Teaching: Ok everybody, we are going to read a book about an alligator named Alfie who likes to eat numbers. Teacher reads Alfie the Alligator. Boys and girls, why did Alfie only eat big numbers? Which number is bigger here? What number do you think he will eat here? What do you think is about to happen? Ok everyone, now look at the board. Teacher puts out two cups and a bag of gummy bears and draws four dots on the left side of the board and six dots on the right side of the board. Now, everybody look at the dots I just drew. How many are on this side? Teacher points

to the left side and calls on a student. Very good there are four dots! Would you please put four gummy bears in this cup? Teacher writes four underneath the dots. How many are on this side? Teacher points to the right side and calls on a student. Very good there are six dots on this side! Please place six gummy bears in this cup. Teacher writes six underneath the dots. Looking at these cups, which one would you like to have? Students should reply the one with six gummy bears in it. Why would you want the one with six? Students should reply that one has more in it. So, is four a larger number than six, or is four a smaller number than six? Students should reply saying four is smaller than six. Great job!!! Four is smaller than six. We could see that because there are more dots on this side than on the other side, and there are more gummy bears in the cup with six. If we wanted we could also count the number of dots on either side! Lets try another. Teacher erases the four dots and replaces it with six dots. Now who can tell me which side has more? Students should reply saying that neither side has more. Oh, so both sides are equal. Student, please place six gummy bears in each cup. So, they are the same on either side. How did you realize that? Students should reply that they either counted or were able to tell by looking at the numbers and gummy bears. Great job! I love how much you are thinking about this! Now lets try one more before we move on. Teacher draws ten dots on the left side of the board and 2 dots on the right side of the board. Which side has more? Students should reply saying that the side with ten has more. Are you sure? Lets put our gummy bears in the cup and see what you think then. Teacher places gummy bears in the cups and gives students time to analyze them. Do you still think ten is a larger number? Students should reply saying yes. Great job boys and girls! You are all working very hard! II. Opportunity for Practice: Okay, I am about to pass out counters. Could you all remind me what we do with our counters when we get them? Do we throw them across the room? Do we put them in our mouths? Do we feed them to our class goldfish? No! Student, please tell me what we do with our counters when we get them. Teacher passes out counters to each student. Teacher places counters on the document camera. Everyone look at the document camera and make your counters look like mine. Who can tell me which side has more? Put your thumb on your tummy when you know. Teacher calls on a student to answer. Does everyone see how Student came to that answer? Teacher rearranges counters. Now, change yours to look like mine. Who would like to tell me which side has less? Put your thumb on your tummy when you know. Teacher calls on a student to answer. The class does this activity several times until each student has had the opportunity to answer and all misconceptions are corrected. Does anyone have any questions or anything they were confused about? Teacher pauses and gives students time to respond. III. Assessment: Okay boys and girls, now it is your turn to teach me. Teacher arranges counters in to various groupings on the students desks. I would like you all to decide which side is greater. I will come around and listen to your answers when you have finished. Put your thumb on your chest when you finish so I can know who needs to be listened to. Teacher walks around listening to students answers. Thank you all for being so good today! I am now going to walk to each table with a bucket and I would like each of you to put your counters in the bucket. Teacher collects counters. IV. Closure: Boy and girls you have all done such a great job today! I am very proud of all of you. Who would like to tell me what weve learned today? Calls on a student who will explain what was learned. Yes! We learned the difference between greater and lesser numbers, didnt we? Now we are going to line up, its time to go to the playground.

Materials and Resources: 3 bowls Counters Document camera Dry Erase board Alphie the Alligator: A Teaching Rhyme about Comparing Numbers by Sandy Turley Gummy Bears 2 Clear plastic cups

Differentiation Strategies (including plans for individual learners): H Students may create their own set of counters combinations to determine if they are greater than, less than, or equal to each other. L Students will use a number line and counters to determine greater than and less than.

Data Analysis:

Reflection:

Samford University Design for Learning