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Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action

Learning Management Plan for: Grade 4

Learning Management Plan Focus: Mathematics Term 1

LMQ1 What does my learner already know? (Prior knowledge about the topic/content/concept skills before the learning being planned) By the end of year three (Year three achievement standard): Learners recognise the connection between addition and subtraction and solve problems using efficient strategies for multiplication. Learners model and represent unit fractions. Learners interpret and compare data displays. Learners can count to and from 10,000. Learners can classify numbers as odd and even. Learners can recall addition and multiplication facts for single digits numbers. Learners use metric units for length, mass and capacity. Learners can tell time to the nearest minute. Learners conduct chance experiments and list possible outcomes. Learners carry out simple data investigations for categorical variables. LMQ2 Where does my learner/s need/want to be? Number and Algebra: Number and place value
Recognise, represent and order numbers to at least tens of thousands (ACMNA072) Apply place value to partition, rearrange and regroup numbers to at least tens of thousands to assist calculations and solve problems (ACMNA073) Recall multiplication facts up to 10 10 and related division facts (ACMNA075) Develop efficient mental and written strategies and use appropriate digital technologies for multiplication and for division where there is no remainder (ACMNA076)

Number and Algebra: Fractions and decimals


Investigate equivalent fractions used in contexts (ACMNA077) Count by quarters halves and thirds, including with mixed numerals. Locate and represent these fractions on a number line (ACMNA078)

Measurement and Geometry: Using units of measurement


Use scaled instruments to measure and compare lengths, masses, capacities and temperatures (ACMMG084) Convert between units of time (ACMMG085) Use am and pm notation and solve simple time problems (ACMMG086)

Statistics and Probability: Chance


Describe possible everyday events and order their chances of occurring (ACMSP092)

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Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action
Identify everyday events where one cannot happen if the other happens (ACMSP093)

Statistics and Probability: Data representation and interpretation


Select and trial methods for data collection, including survey questions and recording sheets (ACMSP095) Construct suitable data displays, with and without the use of digital technologies, from given or collected data. Include tables, column graphs and picture graphs where one picture can represent many data values (ACMSP096) Evaluate the effectiveness of different displays in illustrating data features including variability (ACMSP097)

Declarative Knowledge (The learner will know):


Number and Algebra Number and place value DK 1 - How to recognise, represent and order numbers to at least tens of thousands DK 2 - How to apply place value to partition, rearrange and regroup numbers to at least tens of thousands to assist calculations and solve problems DK 3 How to recall multiplication facts up to 10 x 10 and related division facts DK 4 How to develop efficient mental and written strategies and use appropriate digital technologies for multiplication and for division where there is no remainder Number and Algebra Fractions and decimals DK 5 How to investigate equivalent fractions used in contexts DK 6 How to count by quarters halves and thirds, including mixed numerals as well as locating and representing these fractions on a number line. Measurement and Geometry Using units of measurement DK 7 How to use scaled instruments to measure and compare lengths, masses, capacities and temperatures DK 8 How to convert between units of time DK 9 How to use am and pm notation and solve simple time problems Statistics and Probability Chance DK 10 How to describe possible everyday events and order their chances of occurring DK 11 How to identify everyday events where one cannot happen if the other happens Statistics and Probability Data representation and interpretation DK 12 - How to select and trial methods for data collection, including survey questions and recording sheets DK 13 - How to construct suitable data displays, with and without the use of digital technologies, from given or collected data. Include tables, column graphs

Procedural Knowledge (The learner will be able to):


Number and Algebra Number and place value PK 1 - Recognise, represent and order numbers to at least tens of thousands PK 2 Apply place value to partition, rearrange and regroup numbers to at least tens of thousands to assist calculations and solve problems PK 3 Recall multiplication facts up to 10 x 10 and related division facts PK 4 Develop efficient mental and written strategies and use appropriate digital technologies for multiplication and for division where there is no remainder Number and Algebra Fractions and decimals PK 5 Investigate equivalent fractions used in contexts PK 6 - Count by quarters halves and thirds, including mixed numerals as well as locating and representing these fractions on a number line. Measurement and Geometry Using units of measurement PK 7 Use scaled instruments to measure and compare lengths, masses, capacities and temperatures PK 8 Convert between units of time PK 9 Use am and pm notation and solve simple time problems Statistics and Probability Chance PK 10 Describe possible everyday events and order their chances of occurring PK 11 Identify everyday events where one cannot happen if the other happens Statistics and Probability Data representation and interpretation PK 12 - Select and trial methods for data collection, including survey questions and recording sheets PK 13 - Construct suitable data displays, with and without the use of digital technologies, from given or collected data. Include tables, column graphs and picture graphs where on picture can represent many data values

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Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action
and picture graphs where on picture can represent many data values

LMQ3 How does my learner best learn? (Learning styles, strengths, interests, needs) Kinaesthetic learners are catered for within the unit, as the final summative assessment is based on a practical activity, requiring student involvement to complete the task. Visual learners will benefit for the unit with digital resources utilised to explain concepts, flash cards to demonstrate values and number lines and teachers actions and gestures will indicate the elements of the task. Auditory learners are catered for by verbal instruction and digital resources to automatically direct students through the task. Visual impairments can be catered for with large, vibrant number lines and clear verbal instructions. Students with high learning needs may require extra teacher assistance when completing the tasks in the unit. The collaborative element of the assessment allows students to learn from one-another and model ideas effectively. Students of this age group will benefit and engage with collaborative task as they can communicate and express their ideas and data to their partner. LMQ4 What resources do I have at my disposal? (Interesting, motivating, relevant) iPad/Tablet/Laptop Number flash cards (rapid recall) Large adjustable clock Number line poster Place value poster MABs Number expanders Fraction bingo Work sheets from year three (diagnostic) Everyday materials for measurement Learning objective poster for whiteboard Role play activity for amazing race activity Mini whiteboard Counters Pg. 3

Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action Measurement instruments with graduated scales Calendars Word problem and investigation worksheets LMQ5 What will constitute the learning journey? Term Learning Experience Overview Dot points of strategies/management/key questions Week 1 Recognise, represent and order numbers to at least tens of thousands (ACMNA072) Reproduce five-digit numbers in words using their numerical representations, and vice versa Make connections between representations of numbers
Apply place value to partition, rearrange and regroup numbers to at least tens of thousands to assist calculations and solve problems (ACMNA073) Recognising and demonstrating that the place-value pattern is built on the operations of multiplication or division of tens Recall multiplication facts up to 10 10 and related division facts (ACMNA075) Using known multiplication facts to calculate division facts Recall multiplication facts Develop efficient mental and written strategies and use appropriate digital technologies for multiplication and for division where there is no remainder (ACMNA076) Using known facts and strategies, such doubling and halving for multiplication, and connecting division to multiplication when there is no remainder Recall multiplication facts up to 10 10 and related division facts (ACMNA075) Using known multiplication facts to calculate division facts Recall multiplication facts Can reverse multiplication operations to division operations in order to check answers Develop efficient mental and written strategies and use appropriate digital technologies for multiplication and for division where there is no remainder (ACMNA076) Using known facts and strategies, such doubling and halving for multiplication, and connecting division to multiplication when there is no remainder Can correctly format an operation with or without digital technologies Investigate equivalent fractions used in contexts (ACMNA077) Exploring the relationship between families of fractions by folding a series of paper strips to construct a

Assessment Diagnostic:
Year three workrevision of number and algebra and measurement.

Timeframe LMQ4 5 Hours

Formative:
Rapid recall of multiplication of year three level (x2, x3, x5, x10).

Week 2

Diagnostic:
Revision on multiplication, division facts and fractions. Formative: Rapid recall of multiplication, division facts and fractions. Visual assessment of

5 Hours

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Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action
fraction wall Exploring real life fractions using everyday objects Count by quarters halves and thirds, including with mixed numerals. Locate and represent these fractions on a number line (ACMNA078) Convert mixed numbers to improper fractions, and vice versa Match fraction representations to corresponding place on a number line Can recall number sequences rapidly and without prompts (visual and verbal) Develop efficient mental and written strategies and use appropriate digital technologies for multiplication and for division where there is no remainder (ACMNA076) Using known facts and strategies, such doubling and halving for multiplication, and connecting division to multiplication when there is no remainder Can correctly format an operation with or without digital technologies Can recall conversions of time Can use various strategies to convert time mentally and showing evidence of understanding Use scaled instruments to measure and compare lengths, masses, capacities and temperatures (ACMMG084) Reading and interpreting the graduated scales on a range of measuring instruments to the nearest graduation Has a developing understanding of comparing and converting measurements Convert between units of time (ACMMG085) Using correct operation for conversion Has a comprehensive understanding of the meta-language Use am and pm notation and solve simple time problems (ACMMG086) Calculate the time spent doing everyday activities Calculate the time from given time to a finishing time Recognise, represent and order numbers to at least tens of thousands (ACMNA072) Reproducing five-digit numbers in words using their numerical representations, and vice versa Make connections between representations of numbers Can recognise numbers when used in different contexts and forms Apply place value to partition, rearrange and regroup numbers to at least tens of thousands to assist calculations and solve problems (ACMNA073) Recognising and demonstrating that the place-value pattern is built on the operations of multiplication or division of tens Can elaborate and explore the place value columns Understand place value and how to alter the number outcomes knowledge shown through work samples.

Week 3

Diagnostic:
Rapid recall of multiplication and reading time.

5 Hours

Formative:
Solve word problems and simple equations involving time.

Week 4

Formative:
Revise content covered and assess students on evidence shown.

5 Hours

Summative:
Written test covering number facts, fractions and touching on

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Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action
Recall multiplication facts up to 10 10 and related division facts (ACMNA075) Using known multiplication facts to calculate division facts Recall multiplication facts Can reverse multiplication operations to division operations in order to check answers Can easily recall factors Investigate equivalent fractions used in contexts (ACMNA077) Exploring the relationship between families of fractions by folding a series of paper strips to construct a fraction wall Exploring real life fractions using everyday objects Understand numerators and denominators and how to adapt them in number problems Count by quarters halves and thirds, including with mixed numerals. Locate and represent these fractions on a number line (ACMNA078) Convert mixed numbers to improper fractions, and vice versa Match fraction representations to corresponding place on a number line Can recall number sequences rapidly and without prompts (visual and verbal) Use scaled instruments to measure and compare lengths, masses, capacities and temperatures (ACMMG084) Reading and interpreting the graduated scales on a range of measuring instruments to the nearest graduation Convert between units of time (ACMMG085) Using correct operation for conversion Has a developing understanding of comparing and converting measurements Recognise, represent and order numbers to at least tens of thousands (ACMNA072) Reproducing five-digit numbers in words using their numerical representations, and vice versa Make connections between representations of numbers Apply place value to partition, rearrange and regroup numbers to at least tens of thousands to assist calculations and solve problems (ACMNA073) Recognising and demonstrating that the place-value pattern is built on the operations of multiplication or division of tens Develop efficient mental and written strategies and use appropriate digital technologies for multiplication and for division where there is no remainder (ACMNA076) Using known facts and strategies, such doubling and halving for multiplication, and connecting division to multiplication when there is no remainder Investigate equivalent fractions used in contexts (ACMNA077) Exploring the relationship between families of fractions by folding a series of paper strips to construct a fraction wall time.

Week 5

Formative:
Rapid recall at beginning for first three lessons and observing/ annotating any major learning issues.

5 Hours

Summative:
End of week in class test covering word problems as multiple choice, visual representations or

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Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action
Count by quarters halves and thirds, including with mixed numerals. Locate and represent these fractions on a number line (ACMNA078) Convert mixed numbers to improper fractions, and vice versa Use scaled instruments to measure and compare lengths, masses, capacities and temperatures (ACMMG084) Reading and interpreting the graduated scales on a range of measuring instruments to the nearest graduation Convert between units of time (ACMMG085) Using correct operation for conversion Use am and pm notation and solve simple time problems (ACMMG086) Calculate the time spent doing everyday activities Calculate the time from given time to a finishing time Recall multiplication facts up to 10 10 and related division facts (ACMNA075) Using known multiplication facts to calculate division facts Recall multiplication facts Develop efficient mental and written strategies and use appropriate digital technologies for multiplication and for division where there is no remainder (ACMNA076) Solving problems using mental computation strategies Using known facts and strategies, such doubling and halving for multiplication, and connecting division to multiplication when there is no remainder Investigate equivalent fractions used in contexts (ACMNA077) Exploring the relationship between families of fractions Comparing and ordering fractions Count by quarters halves and thirds, including with mixed numerals. Locate and represent these fractions on a number line (ACMNA078) Comparing and ordering fractions Converting mixed numbers to improper fractions, and vice versa Develop efficient mental and written strategies and use appropriate digital technologies for multiplication and for division where there is no remainder (ACMNA076) Develop strategies for determining the chance of events Describe possible everyday events and order their chances of occurring (ACMSP092) Using lists of events familiar to students and ordering them from least likely to most likely to occur Understands the meta-language associated with chance and data Identify everyday events where one cannot happen if the other happens (ACMSP093) Using examples such as weather, which cannot be dry and wet at the same time
diagrams. Test will cover all areas taught in week.

Week 6

Diagnostic:
Rapid recall covering multiplication and division.

5 Hours

Formative:
Visual assessment on fractions, mixed numerals and representations of fractions on a number line.

Week 7

Diagnostic:
Revision covering time and likelihood.

5 Hours

Formative:
Written test comparing events on least and most

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Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action
likely and chance/data.

Week 8 Recall multiplication facts up to 10 10 and related division facts (ACMNA075)

Week 9

Using known multiplication facts to calculate division facts Recall multiplication facts Select and trial methods for data collection, including survey questions and recording sheets (ACMSP095) Choosing the most effective way to collect data for a given investigation Exploring methods of recording and representing collected data from peers Construct suitable data displays, with and without the use of digital technologies, from given or collected data. Include tables, column graphs and picture graphs where one picture can represent many data values (ACMSP096) Exploring ways of presenting data and showing the results of investigations Investigating data displays using many-to-one correspondence Recall multiplication facts up to 10 10 and related division facts (ACMNA075) Using known multiplication facts to calculate division facts Recall multiplication facts Alternative representations of multiplication operations (picture graphs, tally etc.) Describe possible everyday events and order their chances of occurring (ACMSP092) Using lists of events familiar to students and ordering them from least likely to most likely to occur Can effectively use the meta-language associated with chance and data Identify everyday events where one cannot happen if the other happens (ACMSP093) Using examples such as weather, which cannot be dry and wet at the same time Can transfer their understanding to an appropriate visual diagram/display Select and trial methods for data collection, including survey questions and recording sheets (ACMSP095) Comparing the effectiveness of different methods of collecting data Choosing the most effective way to collect data for a given investigation Can independently choose a suitable topic for data collection Construct suitable data displays, with and without the use of digital technologies, from given or collected data. Include tables, column graphs and picture graphs where one picture can represent many data values (ACMSP096) Exploring ways of presenting data and showing the results of investigations Investigating data displays using many-to-one correspondence Evaluate the effectiveness of different displays in illustrating data features including variability (ACMSP097) Interpreting data using simple questions

Diagnostic:
Establish students understanding of how to collect data and accuracy when representing.

5 Hours

Formative:
Written test covering multiplication, likelihood of events occurring, data collection and recording.

5 Hours

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Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action Week 10 Develop efficient mental and written strategies and use appropriate digital technologies for multiplication and
for division where there is no remainder (ACMNA076) Solving problems using mental computation strategies Investigate equivalent fractions used in contexts (ACMNA077) Exploring the relationship between families of fractions Comparing and ordering fractions Count by quarters halves and thirds, including with mixed numerals. Locate and represent these fractions on a number line (ACMNA078) Comparing and ordering fractions Converting mixed numbers to improper fractions, and vice versa Describe possible everyday events and order their chances of occurring (ACMSP092) Using lists of events familiar to students and ordering them from least likely to most likely to occur Identify everyday events where one cannot happen if the other happens (ACMSP093) Using examples such as weather, which cannot be dry and wet at the same time Select and trial methods for data collection, including survey questions and recording sheets (ACMSP095) Comparing the effectiveness of different methods of collecting data Choosing the most effective way to collect data for a given investigation Construct suitable data displays, with and without the use of digital technologies, from given or collected data. Include tables, column graphs and picture graphs where one picture can represent many data values (ACMSP096) Exploring ways of presenting data and showing the results of investigations Investigating data displays using many-to-one correspondence Evaluate the effectiveness of different displays in illustrating data features including variability (ACMSP097) Interpreting data using simple questions

Summative:
Practical assessmentCollecting and Presenting Data. In pairs students to conduct surveys, then will individually present their findings in appropriate format.

5 Hours

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Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action
Weekly Overview (Example) 4A

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

8.30 8.50 8.50 9.20 9.20 -9.50 9.50 10.20 10.20 10.50
LUNCH

Organise Homework
Reading Groups

Maths Mentals

Maths Mentals
Reading Groups

Maths Mentals/Correction

Homework correction

Parade
Timetables Practise

Maths
(Rotating Maths Groups)

Handwriting Practice

Weekly tests

Music

Maths
Duty Tuckshop/Hall
10:50 11:15

Maths

Maths

L.O.T.E

Maths
Duty Senior Eating, Oval. (infant
school) 10:50 11:40

10.50 11.40 11.40 12.10 12:10 12:40 12.40 1.10 1.10 1.30
Afternoon Tea 1.30 1.50

Pre Spelling test (Spelling City)

English

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

L.O.T.E

Library
English
Spelling/Grammar

English

English
Spelling/Grammar

English
Art (COMPUTERS) Sport/Art (Fun Friday)

English

Sensational Sentences

1.50 2.00 2.00 2.30 2.30 2.50

Silent Reading

Silent Reading

Science

SOSE

SOSE

Science

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Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action

Weekly Overviews

ILOs (Declarative DK/ Procedural PK) (LMQ2)

Learning Experience Dot points of strategies/management/key questions

Main DoL focus

Resources

Week 1 Overview Monday: (Diagnostic assessment for Unit 1 - Number and Algebra) DK: 1 6 PK: 1 - 6 Various Diagnostic Assessment Tools to be utilised to assess learners prior knowledge and abilities within the Number and Algebra strands of Number and Place Value and Fractions and Decimals: - Work from Year 3 in the strands as well as the use of worksheets from Year 3 - Mini quiz with number classification, ordering and representation - Fraction bingo activity - Place value revision with number expanders and MABs and using it to partition - Class games involving recalling multiplications of two, three, five and ten and their related division facts Various Diagnostic Assessment Tools to be utilised to asses learners prior knowledge and abilities within the Measurement and Geometry strand of Using Units of Measurement: - Revision, in small groups, on measuring various objects using familiar metric units of length, mass and capacity - Interactive whiteboard learning object on comparing and ordering various objects using familiar metric units of length mass and capacity - Whole class revision on telling the time to the minute using adjustable clock - Revision on units of time and the relationship between them using DoL 1 and 5 Year 3 worksheets Mini quiz Fraction bingo cards Bingo prizes Number expanders, MABs

Tuesday: (Diagnostic assessment for Unit 1 - Measurement and Geometry)

DK: 7 9 PK: 7 9

DoL 1 and 5

Various objects to measure length, mass and capacity with Interactive whiteboard with measurement learning objective Large adjustable Pg. 11

Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action peer questioning

clock

Wednesday: (Five digit numbers)

DK 1 PK 1

Thursday: (Partitioning, rearranging and regrouping numbers using Place Value Rotating Maths Groups)

DK 2 PK 2

Friday: (Multiplication and Division)

DK 3 & 4 PK 3 & 4

Amazing Race style game around school grounds - Various clues to be placed around different areas of the school - Each clue to have a number of 3 5 digits in different forms - Learners will need to be able to recognise, represent or order the number/s before moving onto the next clue Learning Manager to separate class into groups of 6 and assign them to an activity table with a supervising teacher aide or Learning Manager. Learners to complete activities at each table with assistance from teacher aide and Learning Manager within the time frame before rotating to the next table. Activity 1 Problem solving using MABs to assist in calculations Activity 2 Number Expanders to assist in working with five digit numbers Activity 3 Partitioning using individual whiteboards Activity 4 Rearranging and regrouping numbers - Rapid Recall warm up of x2, x3, x5 and x10 multiplication facts as revision - Using counters as well as individual whiteboards to begin working on x1, x4, x6, x7, x8 and x9 multiplication facts and their related division facts - Use Are you a math magician? learning object on interactive whiteboard to assess learners abilities to recall multiplication facts - Begin showing learners various mental and written strategies to assist them in multiplication and division problems where there is no remainder - Learners begin to develop their own through pratice of strategies suggested by learning manager

DoL 1, 2, 3 and 5

School grounds Clue cards Prize for winning team MABs Number expanders Mini whiteboards

DoL 1, 2 and 5

DoL 1, 2, 3 and 5

Counters Class set of mini whiteboards Interactive whiteboard Are you a math magician? learning object

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Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action Week 2 Overview Monday: (Multiplication and division) DK 3 & 4 PK 3 & 4 Rapid recall warm up of x2, x3, x5 and x10 multiplication facts as revision Revise and recap from Week 1 and in particular work covered on Friday In small groups using various amounts of lollies and 4, 6, 7, 8 and 9 facts learners will practice using sharing with the lollies amongst their group members Learning Manager to discuss with the learners their mental and written strategies theyve been investigating to assist them in working out multiplication and division where there is no remainder Learners to continue practicing and developing their own written and mental strategies through word problems and facts involving multiplication and division where there is no remainder Learning Manager to observe and take note of the learners strategies and assist those who may be having difficulties developing their own efficient ones Whole class game of Shoot Out using a mixture of multiplication facts of x1, x2, x3, x4, x5, x6, x7, x8, x9 and x10 as well as their related divisions. Learners may help each other if one of the facts is a newly learnt one from the previous lessons. Rapid recall warm up of what a fraction is, what a quarter is, what a half is, what a third is, what a fifth is as well as the use of some of pictorial representations of the fractions to see if the learners are able to recognise them and recall them Learners each create a fraction wall by folding a series of paper strips to explore the relationship between families of fractions Learning Manager to observe and take note of the learners as formative assessment DoL 1, 2 and 5 Lollies for division activity Word problems and facts involving multiplication and division where there is no remainder

Tuesday: (Equivalent fractions)

DK 5 PK 5

DoL 1, 2, 3 and 5

Pictorial representations of fractions Various strips of paper for fraction wall Whole class brainstorm to be Pg. 13

Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action - Whole class discussion and brainstorm on where we might see fractions in everyday life - Learners to take note of these and begin to explore what types of fractions they might see at some of the things discussed - Whole class to play Fraction Bingo involving equivalent fractions as well as pictorial representations of familiar fractions Wednesday: DK 5 & 6 - Rapid recall warm up of what a fraction is, what a quarter is, (Equivalent PK 5 & 6 what a half is, what a third is, what a fifth is as well as the use of factions and some of pictorial representations of the fractions to see if the counting by learners are able to recognise them and recall them halves, quarters - Learning Manager to explore counting by quarters, halves and and thirds) thirds through the use of number lines, shading in shapes and pictorial representations - Learning Manager to introduce mixed numerals with the fractions and have the learners practice counting in quarters, halves and thirds with them - Using individual laminated number lines, learners and Learning Manager work together to begin locating and representing the above fractions - Learners look at various representations of the fractions and correspond them with their place on their number lines in order to see how else fraction can be represented - Learning Manager to discuss the terms mixed numbers and improper fractions with the learners Thursday: DK 5 & 6 Learning Manager to separate class into groups of 6 and assign them to (Fractions PK 5 & 6 an activity table with a supervising teacher aide or Learning Manager. Rotating Maths Learners to complete activities at each table with assistance from Groups) teacher aide and Learning Manager within the time frame before rotating to the next table. Activity 1 Exploring what mixed numbers and improper fractions are and where they can be seen

DoL 1, 2, 3 and 5

recorded on big piece of paper and displayed in the classroom Whole class bingo cards Bingo prizes Pictorial representations of fractions Class set of laminated number lines

DoL 1, 2, 3 and 5

Pictorial representations of fractions for hands on activities Mini whiteboards Laminated Pg. 14

Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action Activity 2 Converting mixed numbers and improper fractions Activity 3 Counting by quarters, halves and thirds, including with mixed numerals and locating and representing these on a number line Activity 4 Mr. Anker Tests Fractions Set 4 learning object on laptops. Learners to work through equivalent fractions activities using learning object. Friday: (Multiplication and division treasure hunt) DK 3 & 4 PK 3 & 4 Using multiplication facts of x1 to x10 and their related divisions facts learners (in small groups) are required to answer the facts for each clue before moving onto the new one and eventually making their way to the buried treasure in the school grounds Learning Manager and teacher aides assist the learners in solving the clues if required Week 3 Overview Rapid recall warm up of x4, x6, x7, x8 and x9 multiplication facts as revision Learning Manager to individually to talk to the learners about their development of efficient written and mental strategies. Learners to continue practicing strategies using various facts and word problems. Learners to also use appropriate digital technologies for the problems and facts. Learning Manager to take note of learners who are having difficulties with the strategies and who are having difficulties solving word problems using their strategies. Learners to discuss their strategies with their peers Whole class game of Shoot Out using a mixture of multiplication facts of x1, x2, x3, x4, x5, x6, x7, x8, x9 and x10 as well as their related divisions. Learners may help each other if one of the facts is a newly learnt on from the previous lessons. DoL 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5

number lines Class laptops Mr. Anker Tests Fractions Set 4 learning object

School grounds Clues to find buried treasure Buried treasure prize for winning group

Monday: (Developing efficient strategies for multiplication or division when there is no remainder)

DK 3 & 4 PK 3 & 4

DoL 1, 2, 3 and 5

Word problems for the learners to solve using their strategies and appropriate digital technologies Class set of mini whiteboards

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Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal RonaldNumeracy in Action Tuesday: DK 7 (Measuring and PK 7 comparing lengths, masses, capacities and temperatures)

Assessment Task 1 DoL 1, 2, 3 and 5 Measuring instruments with graduated scales Various objects to measure and compare in length, mass, capacity and temperature Investigations worksheet

Wednesday: (Converting between units of time)

DK 8 PK 8

Thursday: (Developing efficient strategies for multiplication

DK 3, 4, 7 & 8 PK 3, 4, 7 & 8

Learning Manager to revise units of measurement with learners in length, mass, capacity and temperature Learning Manager to discuss and practice with the learners reading and interpreting the graduated scales on a range of measuring instruments to the nearest graduation. Learners to complete investigation worksheet (in pairs) in which they will measure and compare various objects located in the classroom using scaled instruments. Learners will measure and compare lengths, masses, capacities and temperatures of the objects to answer their investigations. - Learning Manager to observe learners and assist them in their investigations to ensure they are measuring correctly - Whole class to compare investigation worksheets and the answers they found through their measuring and comparing - Rapid recall warm up of reading different times using flash cards with digital time and adjustable clock for analogue time - Learning Manager to revise units of time with learners including the meta-language involved - Learners to add meta-language to their Maths glossary for future reference - Learning Manager to discuss and practice with the learners what operations should be used to convert units of time - Using calendars on class iPads as well as prior knowledge, learners to solve a number of word problems and show their working in their maths books. Learners to show working in order for the Learning Manager to see if they have chosen the correct operation for the conversion. Learning Manager to separate class into groups of 6 and assign them to an activity table with a supervising teacher aide or Learning Manager. Learners to complete activities at each table with assistance from teacher aide and Learning Manager within the time frame before rotating to the next table.

DoL 1, 2, 3 and 5

Digital time flash cards Adjustable clock Class iPads Word problems

DoL 1, 2, 3 and 5

Multiplication and division problems Investigation for comparing the Pg. 16

Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action or division Activity 1 Learners practice using appropriate digital technologies and when there is efficient written and mental strategies to solve multiplication and no remainder. division problems Measuring and Activity 2 Learners to complete investigation as a group to compare comparing the length and mass of various household items lengths, Activity 3 Learners use the school calendar year to convert units of masses, time, ensuring they use the correct operation for the conversions capacities and Activity 4 Learners revise telling the time to the minute using mini temperatures. adjustable clocks Converting between units of time. Rotating Maths Groups) Friday: (Using DK 9 - Rapid recall warm up of reading different times using flash DoL 1, 2, 3, 4 am and pm PK 9 cards with digital time and adjustable clock for analogue time and 5 notation) - Learning Manager to revise the meaning of am and pm notation with the learners - Learners to work through time word problems worksheet. Problems to include calculating the time spent doing everyday activities and calculating the time from a given time to a finishing time - Learners to work in pairs to construct a time plan of a usual school day for them. Learners to calculate the time spent doing different activities in their day as well as the time from when school starts to when it finishes - Whole class to compare the different time plans created in the pairs

length and mass of various household items School calendar year Mini adjustable clocks

Digital time flash cards Adjustable clock Time word problems worksheet Time plan template for learners to fill in (in pairs)

Pg. 17

Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action LMQ6 Who will do what? Learning Manager will facilitate learning and carry out assessment Teacher Aide will assist in distributing materials and assist learners who require refined or extended activities. Learners will participate to the best of their abilities in all tasks. Parents and caregivers will assist in warm up or introduction part of lesson and homework completion. LMQ7 How will I check that the learner has achieved the learning outcomes? The diagnostic testing within the units will inform the learning manager of the student progress to ensure adjustments are made where needed. The formative assessment ensures the learning manager is provided with substantial student progress, and is able to consolidate any further requirements before the summative task The summative task provides the learning manager with student progress of application and collation of understanding of content covered within the unit. LMQ8 How will I inform others about the learners progress? The criteria sheet will provide evidence of learning that can be supplied as a work sample document. Supplying efficient feedback to students on their progress and level understanding will ensure learners know their achievement level and where they can improve. The feedback will also be of importance to the family or caregiver of student, as it will ensure further study and homework is completed at home with homework tasks and revision. LMQ9 Why has the learner achieved/not achieved the learning outcomes? Were the intended learning outcomes met? What areas need further consolidation and attention? What activities did or didnt work well? What would be changed for next time?

Pg. 18

Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action Week 1 - Learning Experience Plan 4 (LEP) Year level(s) Year 4 Duration 1 hour Focus Partitioning, rearranging and regrouping numbers using Place Value Rotating Maths Groups Implementation date(s) N/A Curriculum area(s) Mathematics

Prior knowledge:

LMQ1 - What does the learners already know?

Learners are aware of the place values involved in numbers to at least tens of thousands Some learners have difficulties with place value Learners have used partitioning in Year 3 Learners have used place value to assist them in calculations and solving problems Learners enjoy hands on activities and working in groups By the end of Year 3, learners count to and from 10 000

Learning outcomes/standards: LMQ2 - Where does the learner need/want to be? Recognise, represent and order numbers to at least tens of thousands (ACMNA072) Knowledge & understanding: The learner will know: DK 2 - How to apply place value to partition, rearrange and regroup numbers to at least tens of thousands to assist calculations and solve problems Skills: The learner will be able to: PK 2 Apply place value to partition, rearrange and regroup numbers to at least tens of thousands to assist calculations and solve problems

Pg. 19

Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action Learning processes: LMQ3 - How does the learner best learn? DoL1 Focus - What Attitudes and Perceptions will be the focus of this LEP and how will I DoL5 Focus - What Habits of Mind will be the focus of this LEP support individual learners? and how will I support their development? Classroom climate: Recognise and provide for students individual differences. Critical Thinking: Maintain an open mind. In the year 2 class there is a broad range of levels at which the learners are at in As the content in the unit this learning experience plan is quite Mathematics. The learning preferences and also difficulties are also a crucial part of the new to the learners it is essential that both the learners and learning that takes part in the classroom. Therefore, in this learning experience and also Learning Manager maintain an open mind when approaching any other learning experience, the Learning Manager needs to ensure they cater for these the new knowledge and skills in order to gain a greater individual levels, preferences and difficulties to the best of their ability. Assisting all understanding. learners and ensuring the content of the lessons is easy for all of them to understand, can Creative Thinking: Persevere be seen to further provide for the differences within the class. As this content is quite new for the learners, it is important for Classroom Tasks: Use a variety of ways to engage students in classroom tasks. the Learning Manager to encourage the learners to persevere. It is important for the Learning Manager to use a variety of ways to engage the learners in Through revising prior knowledge and assisting the learners the activities and content within not only this learning experience, but others which are throughout, the learning experience can be implemented facilitated. When learners are highly engaged in tasks, they learn more and thus allowing successfully. for the knowledge and skills at hand in the learning experience to be understood. Self regulated Thinking: Identify and use necessary resources. It is crucial for the Learning Manager to select and use appropriate resources within this learning experience and also others that they implement. Using the correct resources and ones that are appropriate for the content at hand, allows for the learning to be enhanced for the learners as they engage in the learning experiences further.

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Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action

Time

Learning procedures LMQ5 - What will constitute the learning journey? LMQ6 - Who will do what?

Dimensions of Learning (DoL) focus.

Resources LMQ4 -What resources do I have at my disposal?

Assessment & feedback LMQ7 - How will I check to see the learner has achieved the learning outcomes? LMQ8 How will I inform others? Learning manager to observe learners in the learning experience as form of diagnostic and formative assessment Learning manager to take note on the learners discussion and answers to questions as a form of diagnostic and formative assessment Learning manager and teacher aides to observe learners collaboration with their group members and how well the groups work in the activities. This will provide information for the Learning manager on Pg. 21

10mins

45mins

Phase 1 1. Learners to be sitting on the carpet. 2. Learning Manager to revise and recap previous lesson with the learners. 3. Learning Manager to explain to the learners that every Thursday will be rotating maths groups throughout the year. 4. Learning Manager to explain the learners that they have been assigned to 4 different animal groups and that each group will begin working at one activity station for 10 15 minutes before rotating to the next activity. Learning Manager to also explain that their will be a teacher aide or learning manager at each activity to assist the learners if required. Phase 2 1. Learning Manager to separate learners into their designated groups and activity table. 2. Activity Tables are: Activity 1 Simple word problem solving using MABS to assist in calculations Activity 2 Using number expanders to assist in working with five digit numbers Activity 3 Practicing partitioning using individual whiteboards Activity 4 Rearranging and regrouping numbers into the tens of thousands

DoL 1 - Use a variety of ways to engage learners in classroom tasks DoL 1 - Provide learners with the clarity about the knowledge that the task addresses DoL 1 Structure opportunities for students to work with peers. DoL 2 Help students understand the importance of constructing 4 x activity tables with 6 chairs at each MABs Number expanders 6 x mini whiteboards Learners

Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action 3. Each group to complete the activities to the best of their ability with the time frame before rotating to the next table. 4. Learning Manager and teacher aides to assist the learners and ensure the rotation flows smoothly. 5. By the end of the time frames each group should have been to each activity table. 5mins Phase 3 1. Learners to sit on the carpet and Learning Manager to discuss with the learners how they feel they went in their groups and what they thought about the activities. 2. Learning Manager and learners to discuss what activities they would like to do in the next coming Thursdays.

models for procedural knowledge.

maths books

DoL 2 Help students to construct meaning for vocabulary terms. DoL 5 Maintain an open mind, persevere, identify and use necessary resources

whether things like the mixed abilities in the groups need to be changed.

Reflection: outcomes (standards)? Were the learning goals for the LEP achieved? Which activities worked well? Which activities didnt? What needs further consolidation? What needs to be changed if LEP was to be facilitated again?

LMQ9 Why has the learner (achieved/)not achieved the learning

Pg. 22

Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action Week 2 - Learning Experience Plan 1 (LEP) Year level(s) Year 4 Duration 1 hour Focus Multiplication and division Implementation date(s) N/A LMQ1 - What does the learners already know? Curriculum area(s) Mathematics

Prior knowledge:

Learners have worked with x1, x4, x6, x7, x8 and x9 facts in previous lesson Learners enjoy hands on activities and working in groups Some have difficulties recalling multiplication facts Some learners have difficulties with division facts By the end of Year 3, learners can recall x2, x3, x5 and x10 multiplication facts By the end of Year 3, learners can solve problems using efficient strategies for multiplication

Learning outcomes/standards: LMQ2 - Where does the learner need/want to be? Recall multiplication facts up to 10 10 and related division facts (ACMNA075) Knowledge & understanding: The learner will know: DK 3 How to recall multiplication facts up to 10 x 10 and related division facts DK 4 How to develop efficient mental and written strategies and use appropriate digital technologies for multiplication and for division where there is no remainder Skills: The learner will be able to: PK 3 Recall multiplication facts up to 10 x 10 and related division facts PK 4 Develop efficient mental and written strategies and use appropriate digital technologies for multiplication and for division where there is no remainder

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Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action

Learning processes: LMQ3 - How does the learner best learn? DoL1 Focus - What Attitudes and Perceptions will be the focus of this LEP and how will I DoL5 Focus - What Habits of Mind will be the focus of this LEP support individual learners? and how will I support their development? Classroom climate: Recognise and provide for students individual differences. Critical Thinking: Maintain an open mind. In the year 2 class there is a broad range of levels at which the learners are at in As the content in the unit this learning experience plan is quite Mathematics. The learning preferences and also difficulties are also a crucial part of the new to the learners it is essential that both the learners and learning that takes part in the classroom. Therefore, in this learning experience and also Learning Manager maintain an open mind when approaching any other learning experience, the Learning Manager needs to ensure they cater for these the new knowledge and skills in order to gain a greater individual levels, preferences and difficulties to the best of their ability. Assisting all understanding. learners and ensuring the content of the lessons is easy for all of them to understand, can Creative Thinking: Persevere be seen to further provide for the differences within the class. As this content is quite new for the learners, it is important for Classroom Tasks: Use a variety of ways to engage students in classroom tasks. the Learning Manager to encourage the learners to persevere. It is important for the Learning Manager to use a variety of ways to engage the learners in Through revising prior knowledge and assisting the learners the activities and content within not only this learning experience, but others which are throughout, the learning experience can be implemented facilitated. When learners are highly engaged in tasks, they learn more and thus allowing successfully. for the knowledge and skills at hand in the learning experience to be understood. Self regulated Thinking: Identify and use necessary resources. It is crucial for the Learning Manager to select and use appropriate resources within this learning experience and also others that they implement. Using the correct resources and ones that are appropriate for the content at hand, allows for the learning to be enhanced for the learners as they engage in the learning experiences further.

Pg. 24

Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action Time Learning procedures LMQ5 - What will constitute the learning journey? LMQ6 - Who will do what? Dimensions of Learning (DoL) focus. Resources LMQ4 -What resources do I have at my disposal? Assessment & feedback LMQ7 - How will I check to see the learner has achieved the learning outcomes? LMQ8 How will I inform others? Learning Manager to observe learners during rapid recall and further consolidate learning with those who appear to be struggling Learning manager to observe learners in the learning experience as form of diagnostic and formative assessment Learning Manager to observe group collaboration and the different learners abilities to share the lollies amongst their peers to solve the division fact on their card Learning Manager to observe and take note of Pg. 25

10mins

Phase 1 1. Learning Manager to do rapid recall warm up from last lesson in previous week. Learners recall x2, x3, x5 and x10 multiplication facts as revision using flash cards of the facts. 2. Learners to sit on the carpet. Learning Manager to recap and revise on Week 1 of unit and in particular the work covered on Friday. 3. Learning Manager to advise the learners that today they will be looking at the division facts of the multiplication facts they worked on in last weeks lesson. Phase 2 1. Learning Manager to have the learners to get into groups of 9. Learning Manager may need to rearrange groups if learners arent able to choose suitable peers to work with. 2. Learning Manager to explain to the learners that they will be using lollies to share amongst their group and help them learn the division facts for 4, 6, 7, 8 and 9 facts. 3. Learning Manager to hand each group a series of cards with a mixture of the division facts above. 4. Each group to work through the cards using the lollies to help them find the answers by sharing them amongst the required amount of group members. 5. Learning Manager to discuss with the learners their own mental and written strategies theyve been investigating to

DoL 1 - Use a variety of ways to engage learners in classroom tasks DoL 1 - Provide learners with the clarity about the knowledge that the task addresses

x2, x3, x5 and x10 multiplication fact flash cards

40mins

DoL 1 Respond positively to students incorrect responses or lack of response. DoL 1 Structure opportunities for students to work

Lollies for group sharing

Word problems and facts

Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action assist the learners in working out multiplication and division where there is no remainder. 6. Learners to continue practicing and developing their own written and mental strategies. 7. Learning Manager to write a number of word problems and facts involving multiplication and division where there is no remainder for the learners to practice using their strategies. 10mins Phase 3 1. Learning Manager and learners to discuss how the learners felt they went with the lolly sharing activity and how they are going with their strategies. 2. Whole class to play game of Shoot Out using a mixture of multiplication facts of x1 to x10 as well as their related division facts. 3. Shoot Out involves the two learners standing up the front of the classroom back to back. The Learning Manager calls out a fact and the learner who has the answer jumps around to face their opponent and yells out the answer. The learner who is able to answer the fact correctly stays in the game whilst the other learner swaps for a new opponent. 4. Learners may help each other if one of the facts is a newly learnt one from the previous learner. Reflection: (standards)? Were the learning goals for the LEP achieved? Which activities worked well? Which activities didnt? What needs further consolidation? What needs to be changed if LEP was to be facilitated again?

with peers.

DoL 2 Help students understand the importance of constructing models for procedural knowledge. DoL 5 Maintain an open mind, persevere, identify and use necessary resources

the learners strategies and assist those who may be having difficulties developing their own efficient ones for further consolidation

LMQ9 Why has the learner (achieved/)not achieved the learning outcomes

Pg. 26

Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action Week 3 - Learning Experience Plan 5 (LEP) Year level(s) Year 4 Duration 1 hour Focus Using am and pm notation Implementation date(s) N/A LMQ1 - What does the learners already know? Curriculum area(s) Mathematics

Prior knowledge: Learners have worked with pm and am notation in previous years Learners enjoy hands on activities and working in groups Learners are able to recall the time in digital and analogue Some learners have difficulties telling the time in one or both formats By the end of Year 3, learners can tell the time to the nearest minute

Learning outcomes/standards: Use am and pm notation and solve simple time problems (ACMMG086) Knowledge & understanding: The learner will know: DK 9 How to use am and pm notation and solve simple time problems

LMQ2 - Where does the learner need/want to be? Skills: The learner will be able to: PK 9 Use am and pm notation and solve simple time problems

Learning processes:

LMQ3 - How does the learner best learn?

Pg. 27

Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action DoL1 Focus - What Attitudes and Perceptions will be the focus of this LEP and how will I support individual learners? Classroom climate: Recognise and provide for students individual differences. In the year 2 class there is a broad range of levels at which the learners are at in Mathematics. The learning preferences and also difficulties are also a crucial part of the learning that takes part in the classroom. Therefore, in this learning experience and also any other learning experience, the Learning Manager needs to ensure they cater for these individual levels, preferences and difficulties to the best of their ability. Assisting all learners and ensuring the content of the lessons is easy for all of them to understand, can be seen to further provide for the differences within the class. Classroom Tasks: Use a variety of ways to engage students in classroom tasks. It is important for the Learning Manager to use a variety of ways to engage the learners in the activities and content within not only this learning experience, but others which are facilitated. When learners are highly engaged in tasks, they learn more and thus allowing for the knowledge and skills at hand in the learning experience to be understood.

DoL5 Focus - What Habits of Mind will be the focus of this LEP and how will I support their development? Critical Thinking: Maintain an open mind. As the content in the unit this learning experience plan is quite new to the learners it is essential that both the learners and Learning Manager maintain an open mind when approaching the new knowledge and skills in order to gain a greater understanding. Creative Thinking: Persevere As this content is quite new for the learners, it is important for the Learning Manager to encourage the learners to persevere. Through revising prior knowledge and assisting the learners throughout, the learning experience can be implemented successfully. Self regulated Thinking: Identify and use necessary resources. It is crucial for the Learning Manager to select and use appropriate resources within this learning experience and also others that they implement. Using the correct resources and ones that are appropriate for the content at hand, allows for the learning to be enhanced for the learners as they engage in the learning experiences further.

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Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action

Time

Learning procedures LMQ5 - What will constitute the learning journey? LMQ6 - Who will do what?

Dimensions of Learning (DoL) focus.

Resources LMQ4 -What resources do I have at my disposal?

5mins

Phase 1 1. Learning Manager to do rapid recall with the learners from previous lessons. Learners read different times using flash cards with digital time and an adjustable clock for the analogue time. 2. Learners to sit on the carpet. Phase 2 1. Learning Manager to revise and discuss the meaning of am and pm notation with the learners. 2. Learners to work through time word problems worksheet. Problems on the worksheet includes calculating the time spent doing everyday activities and calculating the time from a given time to a finishing time. 3. Learning Manager and learners to discuss the worksheet after

DoL 1 - Use a variety of ways to engage learners in classroom tasks DoL 1 - Provide learners with the clarity about the knowledge that the task addresses DoL 1 Respond

Digital time flash cards Adjustable clock

50mins

Time word problems worksheet

Assessment & feedback LMQ7 - How will I check to see the learner has achieved the learning outcomes? LMQ8 How will I inform others? - Learning Manager to observe learners during rapid recall and further consolidate learning with those who appear to be struggling - Learning manager to take note on the learners discussion and answers to questions as a form of diagnostic and formative assessment - Learning manager to Pg. 29

Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action the majority of the class has finished it. 4. Learners to work in pairs to construct a time plan of a usual school day for them. 5. Using a time plan template for them to fill in the pairs will calculate the time spent doing different activities in their day as well as the time from when school starts to when it 5mins finishes. Phase 3 1. Learners to sit on the carpet in their pairs and the whole class to compare the different time plans created in their pairs. 2. Learning Manager to note the differences and similarities on the whiteboard for the learners to see.

positively to students incorrect responses or lack of response.

Time plan template

DoL 1 Structure opportunities for students to work with peers. DoL 2 Help students understand the importance of constructing models for procedural knowledge. DoL 2 Help students to construct meaning for vocabulary terms. DoL 5 Maintain an open mind, persevere,

assist the learners having difficulites with the word problems or the pairs activity and take note for further consolidation on the topic Learning manager to collect time plans as a form of formative assessment

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Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action identify and use necessary resources

Reflection: (standards)? Were the learning goals for the LEP achieved? Which activities worked well? Which activities didnt? What needs further consolidation? What needs to be changed if LEP was to be facilitated again?

LMQ9 Why has the learner (achieved/)not achieved the learning outcomes

Pg. 31

Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action Medium Term Planning Template Assessment Task 1 School Name: N/A Unit Title: Exploring Chance and Data KLA: Mathematics Identify Curriculum Identify the outcomes to be targeted from the relevant curriculum. Number and Algebra: Number and place value
Develop efficient mental and written strategies and use appropriate digital technologies for multiplication and for division where there is no remainder (ACMNA076)

Year Level(s): 4

Duration of Unit: 5 Weeks

Number and Algebra: Fractions and decimals


Investigate equivalent fractions used in contexts (ACMNA077) Count by quarters halves and thirds, including with mixed numerals. Locate and represent these fractions on a number line (ACMNA078)

Statistics and Probability: Chance


Describe possible everyday events and order their chances of occurring (ACMSP092) Identify everyday events where one cannot happen if the other happens (ACMSP093)

Statistics and Probability: Data representation and interpretation


Select and trial methods for data collection, including survey questions and recording sheets (ACMSP095) Construct suitable data displays, with and without the use of digital technologies, from given or collected data. Include tables, column graphs and picture graphs where one picture can represent many data values (ACMSP096) Evaluate the effectiveness of different displays in illustrating data features including variability (ACMSP097)

Declarative Knowledge The learner will know and understand that:


DK 1 How to develop efficient mental and written strategies and use appropriate digital technologies for multiplication and for division where there is no remainder Number and Algebra Fractions and decimals DK 2 How to investigate equivalent fractions used in contexts DK 3 How to count by quarters, halves and thirds, including mixed numerals as well as locating and representing these fractions on a number line. Statistics and Probability Data representation and interpretation DK 4 - How to select and trial methods for data collection, including survey

Procedural Knowledge The learner will be able to:


PK 1 Develop efficient mental and written strategies and use appropriate digital technologies for multiplication and for division where there is no remainder Number and Algebra Fractions and decimals PK 2 Investigate equivalent fractions used in contexts PK 3 - Count by quarters halves and thirds, including mixed numerals as well as locating and representing these fractions on a number line. Statistics and Probability Data representation and interpretation PK 4 - Select and trial methods for data collection, including survey questions and recording sheets

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Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action
questions and recording sheets DK 5 - How to construct suitable data displays, with and without the use of digital technologies, from given or collected data. Include tables, column graphs and picture graphs where on picture can represent many data values PK 5 - Construct suitable data displays, with and without the use of digital technologies, from given or collected data. Include tables, column graphs and picture graphs where on picture can represent many data values

Context for Learning


The cohort of year four students will be able to explore the steps required for data collections and representing the findings. The unit is designed for a year four cohort consisting of an array of learning styles and needs. All elements of data collections are covered within the unit including fractions and multiplication facts; chance, data representation, interpretation and measuring the effectiveness of representations. The unit allows students to begin understanding real-life concepts and explore ways of recording information for various surveys and concepts.

Vocabulary
The learner will understand and use terminology such as: Variations Categorising Classification Likely, most likely, least likely, never, improbable Frequencies Graphing elements (axis, scales) Survey questions (open ended or multiple choice) Tally

Develop Assessment Type of Assessment and Outline


Assignment: Collaborative and Individual task elements In pairs students select one of the following topics and conduct a survey on hair colour, eye colour or favourite sport Students must decide the best method for collecting the data prior to commencing the survey. Students will individually present their data in an appropriate format. Students will answer ready-made questions in order to individually communicate their findings Students will justify why their methods were effective and accurate in collection.

Make Judgments What will be Assessed Purpose of Assessment Assessable Elements


Collection of data Representation of data Accuracy Methods of collecting data Collaborative learning Communication skills

- How to investigate equivalent fractions used in contexts. (DK 2) - How to select and trial methods for data collection, including survey questions and recording sheets (DK 4) - How to construct suitable data displays, with and without the use of digital technologies, from given or collected data. Include tables, column graphs and picture graphs where on picture can represent many data values (DK 5) - Investigate equivalent fractions used in contexts (PK 2) - Select and trial methods for data collection, including survey questions and recording sheets (PK 4)

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Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action
- Construct suitable data displays, with and without the use of digital technologies, from given or collected data. Include tables, column graphs and picture graphs where on picture can represent many data values (PK 5)

Use Feedback Ways to monitor learning and assessment


Working samples: Week 2- (formative task: Students understanding of multiplication, division, fractions and formatting operations). Week 4- (summative task: Students written test consisting of multiplication, place value, fractions and time.) Week 5- (summative task: Students visual representations and diagrams of information and data found.) Week 7- (formative task: Students written test of comparisons of likelihood and chances of events occurring.) Week 8- (Diagnostic: Students own mathematic book work in understanding of accuracy with data collection.)

Visual assessment and teacher annotation: Observable learning issues with students understanding and involvement with number lines, place value, fractions, mixed numbers and measurement in week five. Diagnostic: Rapid recall and revision activities are used within the unit to familiarize students with simple facts to create quick responses to help solve future problems and operations. Formative: The written tests are used as a tool throughout the unit to collate and analyse student achievement and understanding of concepts covered. The tests consist of a range of areas covered in the unit to inform the learning manager of possible issues and areas requiring improvement or extension. The formats of the written tests cover a range of methods in responses including multiple choice, graphing, short response and problem solving with operations. Summative: The detailed and challenging written tests for the summative assessment will demonstrate the student understandings and application of concepts explored in the unit. The final summative task allows students to work with a peer in collecting data by selecting a theme from those offered and developing a survey to conduct on their cohort. The task requires students to consider the questioning needed to acquire appropriate information with multiple choice options for the survey. Collecting and representing data findings requires students to demonstrate and present their understanding of data and graphing. The task allows students to

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Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action
apply and utilize their multiplication and division skills to calculate their findings and represent the data in the appropriate format. The final task offers students a clear explanation of the expectations of the assessment with a classroom-ready task sheet that steps learners through the assessment elements to complete the task. The criteria sheet that follows gives the learning manager a clear rubric to use for each individual students evidence of learning and understanding in the task, covering the five main areas and learning standards for each.

Pg. 35

Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action Criteria Sheet- Summative Assessment Task: Collecting and Presenting Data.

Criteria
Collaboration and group work

A
Demonstrates fair and effective work habits of collaboratively working with peer to develop and conduct survey. Constructs a well organised and efficient process of collecting data through open ended, multiple choice style questions in survey. Consistently applies and utilises a range of mathematical concepts in calculating and organising the findings to come to the most accurate final outcome. Presents data in a sophisticated and clear format to display the findings from the survey, with little errors. Consistently demonstrates accuracy in operations, representations and clear communication of findings.

B
Demonstrates fair work habits to collaboratively work with peer to develop and conduct survey. Constructs an organised and efficient process of collecting data through open ended, multiple choice style questions in survey. Usually applies and utilises mathematical concepts in calculating and organising the findings to come to an accurate final outcome.

C
Demonstrates some work habits to work with peer to develop and conduct survey.

D
Demonstrates work habits to help develop and conduct survey.

E
Demonstrates little work habits to help develop and conduct survey.

Collection of Data

Constructs a process of collecting data with some open ended and multiple choice style questions. Generally applies mathematical concepts in calculating and organising the findings to come to an accurate outcome.

Collects data with some thought into the style of questions needed for the survey. At times applies some mathematical concepts in calculating the findings to come to a final outcome.

Collects data with little thought into the style of questions for the survey.

Application of Mathematical concepts

Applies little mathematical concepts in calculating findings to come to a final outcome.

Presentation of Data

Presents data in a sophisticated and mostly clear format to display findings from the survey, with minor errors. Mostly demonstrates accuracy in operations, representations and communication of findings.

Presents data in a clear format to display findings from the survey, with some errors.

Presents data in a clear format to display findings, with several errors.

Presents data in a legible format to display findings with various errors.

Accuracy and communication

Usually demonstrates accuracy in operations, representations and communication of findings.

At times demonstrates accuracy in operations and communication of findings.

Rarely demonstrates accuracy in operations and communication of findings.

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Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action Name__________________.

Year Four Task Sheet- Collecting and Presenting Data In pairs you will select a topic and conduct a survey on your class. You must consider how you will record your findings before beginning the survey.
In pairs you will select one of the following topics to conduct a survey on your class: Hair colour Eye colour Favourite sport Select the methods of collecting your data: Survey forms Tally Ask peers individually Ask class as a whole Picture representations

Individually you will represent your findings in the most accurate and clear format as possible. Using your new knowledge and understanding of data collection and representation, you will present your findings using a graph and answer the questions below to explain how it worked well.

How did you present your data findings? Why did you use this method? What did the data findings tell you? How do we know that from the findings? What would you have done differently for next time?

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Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action

Summary of Potential Learning Outcomes


During the term outlined, there are fourteen content descriptors being addressed over the three content strands; Number and Algebra, Measurement and Geometry, and Statistics and Probability. As this is a term one outline, it will need to be taken into consideration that students have not yet been exposed to these content descriptors and although their proficiency should develop throughout the term, they will re-cover these elements throughout the year, allowing students extra time to work through potential learning difficulties.

Many students struggle with Number and Algebra: Number and place value as students can struggle to gain a conceptual understanding of numbers. Students in grade four have previously had exposure to one-digit, two-digit, three-digit and four-digit numbers and should have confident number recognition. Despite much exposure to them, when students have to, Recognise, represent and order numbers to at least tens of thousands, and, Apply place value to partition, rearrange and regroup numbers, (ACARA, Mathematics, Year 4, 2013), some dwindle with their knowledge. Common issues faced is that students are unaware of the place value column names and do not comprehend the capacity of each number. By being unable to comprehend the value of each number in their column, students face the difficulty of representing numbers accurately and ordering them correctly; into their columns or in a combination making the smallest or largest number possible. While some students may comprehend larger numbers more readily, a common throw-off students have is when a zero is present in the number as they struggle to accurately identify place value. A great way to assist students in making the connection between the number as a written form and as a spoken form is to conduct examples and ask students, How would you read this number? How would you write it? (Booker, Bond, Sparrow, Swam, 2010, p. 119). This will demonstrate not only their comprehension of how numbers are in connection with each other, but also if they are struggling, it will assist in identifying which elements they need assistance with. Marzano and Pickering (1997, p. 18), suggest to, Plan varied classroom activities so that all students have opportunities to learn in their preferred style.

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Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action Booker, (2010, p.110), suggests strategies that cater for all learners and allows them to learn aurally, visually or kinaesthetically. He suggests MAB blocks, paddle pop sticks or a ten frame to assist in students recognition of what a number is and its capacity. As their knowledge progresses, it is important that they can understand place value in order to order numbers, partition, rearrange and regroup them. This can be done by explicitly writing numbers into place value columns and using number expanders to say numbers in long and short formats. Once students have a comprehensive understanding of place value and the capacity of numbers, students will be able to manipulate the numbers accurately.

Throughout the term, students will also look at Number and Algebra: Fractions and decimals, particularly focusing on being able to, Investigate equivalent fractions used on contexts, and Count by quarters, halves and thirds including with mixed numerals, (ACARA, Mathematics, Year 4, 2013). As a part of investigating fractions, students will have to locate and represent various fractions on a number line. In order to comprehend fractions, students first have to understand parts in a whole and how to manipulate the numbers or divisions in parts. Students who do not understand the concept of fractions will be unable to demonstrate by colouring or drawing various parts in a whole which equate to a quarter, half or third. They will also be unable to see a fraction in written form and represent it using tangible materials or its location on a number line. These difficulties often occur, because there is little understanding that equal parts are needed or be cause the process of naming parts to provide the fraction name is not internalised, ( Booker, et.al., 2010, p.144). Firstly, to begin working on fractions with students, it is essential that there is a, sound basis of numeration for the development of computation for whole numbers and their application in problem solving, (Booker, et.al., 2010, p. 139). If students do not have a solid comprehension of whole numbers, the division of numbers is overwhelming and confusing as they cannot make the connection between the two mathematical concepts. Whole number numeration is established through the use of materials that are grouped to show the place value ideas, (Booker, et.al., 2010, p. 139). Activities linked with advancing students understanding should be visually appealing and concise so that students can see how parts are linked with a whole number. Activities may include, forming and shading parts on a region model, to develop students, intuitive understanding of a fraction as a part of something, (Booker, et.al., 2010, p. 139). Teachers also need to Pg. 39

Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action underpin the importance of equally dividing parts as students may divide a diagram into the number of parts required but not comprehend that the fraction is wrong if it is not equal. Shapes and line bricks are fantastic for allowing students to see the equal parts in a whole in comparison to other diagrams such as cars, houses, and fish. Although all can be used to show a part out of a whole, using shapes and line bricks allow students to mentally calculate how large each equal part has to be in comparison to dividing the diagrams equally. The variation of activities can be decided by the understanding of the learner. To assist the learners understanding, it is also an idea to use real-life scenarios such as pizza or sharing lollies so students can understand how fractions are used in reality.

Students will look at Measurement and geometry, also linked in with the Number and Algebra stand. Learning how to tell the time and solve simple am and pm problems can be quite difficult is students have difficulty understanding analogue clocks and the differences between am and pm. Firstly, students should be able to read digital time and have a good understanding of when the times occur throughout the day, including when am and pm is. Booker (2010, p. 490), outlines a teaching sequence which can be adhered to which will ensure the progression of students understanding, it includes, Perceiving and identifying the attribute, Comparing and ordering, Measuring using non-standard units, Measuring using standard units, and Applications. Students begin by using every day events and sequence them in correct time. Odonnell, Bartlett, Bryer, Reeve, Smith (2012, p. 328), suggests to use their sematic memory as it, is believed to be organised like a network. By using a method that links their known everyday activities to an unknown element, will assist in helping them to make a connection and understand the new information.

This basic step will demonstrate the quality of their understanding in regard to time. Once students can sequence time throughout the day, they can begin comparing and ordering time in their duration and set up a schedule for their daily events. Apart from telling time using am and pm, students should also be aware of time in other contexts, such as, clapping patterns and hopping patterns. They should also be aware of time in other formats like minutes, days, months and decades. This development will allow for students to apply their in other manners and, Use scaled instruments to measure and compare lengths, masses, capacities and temperatures, (ACARA, Mathematics, Year 4, 2013).While it is not adversely Pg. 40

Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action linked with time, it requires students to have a knowledge of how to accurately and sequentially measure and interpret. When dealing with time, students have to precise in order to get the correct answer, which is likewise when measuring other means. Being able to use a range of instruments is adhered to by students being able to recognise numeration and focus on what each measurement means.

While the Number and Algebra strand is linked with multiple strands, students also advance their understandings in other strands such as Statistics and Probability: Chance. In year four, students will work toward being able to, Describe possible everyday events and order their chancing of occurring, and, Identify everyday events where one cannot happen if the other happens, (ACARA, Mathematics, Year 4, 2013). Although students are exposed to chance from a young age while partaking in games, their reasoning is often illogical and speaks more of their hoped outcome in comparison to a logical outcome. Evidence shown by students who do not comprehend the aspect of chance will be unable to consider other elements when making a prediction and the likelihood of their occurrence. Students need assistance in thinking of all possible outcomes in order to determine the likelihood of something happening. Students struggle to see beyond what is directly evident, leading to misconceptions of the events. When teaching chance, students first need to, Perceive and identify the attribute, (Booker, et.al., 2010, p. 502). This means that students are

immersed in the metalanguage and discussing the chance of alternate things and their occurrences. Using everyday events, such as weather is great in allowing students to see the real life connection with chance. Using spinners, dice, coins and cards is also a great visual for students to see how the likelihood of occurrences is dependent on the other factors. Secondly, students will, Compare and order the likelihood of outcomes, (Booker, et.al., 2010, p. 502). This activity will make students increasingly aware of contributing factors when evaluating and sequencing them in a logical order based on the likelihood of their occurrence. This will engage them with a range of outcomes, therefore a range of metalanguage. Using this step-by-step strategy will allow the teacher to see where the students are struggling to comprehend the concept and can focus on explicit teaching in that area before it is progressed to more in-depth work.

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Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action Another one of the topics covered is Statistics and Probability: Data representation and interpretation. In this concept, students will, Select and trial methods for data collection, and Construct suitable data displays, (ACARA, Mathematics, Year 4, 2013). When students are able to collect and display data, they will then begin to, Evaluate the effectiveness of different displays in illustrating data features, (ACARA, Mathematics, Year 4, 2013). Accuracy is the key to every element in data representation in order to effectively interpret what is presented. It will be evident if students are lacking knowledge in how to effectively collect and represent data as there will be correspondence issues and the information will not align. Students will need explicit teaching on how to accurately collect data, which includes how to neatly format suitable tables making the transferring on information easier. For this to occur, students need to have a comprehensive understanding of numeration and confident understanding of the collection table format. If students are not confident in the table, they will struggle to transfer the information into a data representation. Marzano and Pickering (1997, p.58), suggest to, Use instructional techniques that provide students with strategies to use before, during, and after they receive information. By adapting this recommendation, it will ensure students feel confident to ease through the process in a form that they are familiar with. There are many graphs that can be used such as a pie graph, bar graph, line graph or picture graph. It is easiest for students to begin representation data on graphs they are confident with before progressing onto learning new representations. This will also help in them deepening their understanding as they can follow a conventional set of techniques. Once learners can accurately collect and represent data in a variety of ways, they should feel capable to evaluate a range of displays. A key element to consider in teaching these concepts is that it is taught to suit their learning style. Through catering to how the learner learns best, it will allow the learner to gain a comprehensive understanding more readily.

While each content strand and descriptor will be addressed in other terms, this is the basis of strategies for understanding how to achieve the standard. When students have understood how to achieve the standard, the activities will be altered to advance the knowledge so they are as proficiently possible and ready for the advancement when they are working towards the year five curriculum.

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Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action

Individual Justification- Lacey Fry


Mathematics is witnessed everywhere you look and used by everyone, every day. The exposure of maths begins at infancy and extends past schooling years, however during their schooling period is when students build upon their knowledge and understanding rapidly and in a range of mathematical strands. Effective learning begins with effective teaching which begins with effective planning.

The process we undertook to firstly construct the term planner was to look through the mathematics curriculum of grade three and four. We validated what students should know before delegating the content descriptors into four terms. We chose the term one content descriptors by assessing which would be a necessity for students to know, in order to achieve the other descriptors throughout the year. We knew that in order for students to have a sophisticated conceptual understanding, the teaching must be formatted in repetitive fashion for optimal outcomes. The capacity of the term plan was outlined of the content descriptors and how they would be altered and addressed throughout the term, as the students knowledge progressed. By revisiting the content descriptors throughout the units, it will help in making their mathematical thinking and communication skills more concrete, with a higher chance of retaining the information.

The weekly plans focus more heavily on the format of each lesson in comparison to each week. The outlines are more specified and target key elements aligned with the descriptors as well as the diagnostic and formative assessments to benchmark the students knowledge. This template is effective for ensuring students are able to learn in their preferred learning style and that throughout the week, there are assessable outcomes to evaluate the students learning. The planner incorporates strategies, management plans and key questions which helps to ensure that the lessons are formatted in a way that will assist in helping their mathematical thinking and understanding. The lesson plans also follow the same style of formatting but with a more thorough and explicit component. By effectively using a lesson plan and having it incorporate every detail of the lesson such as the teacher

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Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action talk and activities, it validates the lessons are at their paramount. The three levels of planning work in sync for the benefit of the students optimal learning .

The last planning document contained in this design is the assessment package. It includes links to the assessable curriculum, which comes from a range of content strands. This will provide evidence that learning has occurred across the board and students can make links between mathematical concepts, applying them in various situations. The assessment piece includes familiar and unfamiliar elements however by having thoroughly investigated each content descriptor, it will, enable students to respon d to familiar and unfamiliar

situations by employing mathematical strategies to make informed decisions and solve problems efficiently, (ACARA, Mathematics, Rationale, 2013). We have chosen to structure the task with collaborative and individual work. Not only does this correspond with conventional lesson plans presented throughout the unit, but it will also help to assist students by utilising scaffolding their learning through peer teaching. Scaffolding student learning is the primary task of teachers of mathematics, but this cannot be achieved without accurate information about what each student knows already and what might be within their grasp with some support from their teachers and/or peers, (Siemon, 2011, p. 19). The structure of the assessment piece also has a classroom-ready task sheet and rubric which, provides students and teachers with established criteria for success, and clarifies and shares the intentions of the given task, (Siemon, 2011, p. 134). While there are summative assessment tasks, as addressed above, the term plan also outlines the diagnostic and formative assessments undertaken throughout the term. This is to benefit the students learning and to teach according to their level of understanding. Assessment of learning is when teachers or school systems gather evidence about student learning to make judgements against goals and standards. Assessment for learning is when teachers and students gather evidence about student understanding to inform future learning, (Siemon, 2011, p. 124). Although the term plan is completed, the diagnostic and formative assessments mentioned in planning will be used to cater for students and will be used as assessment for learning.

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Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action Every element of teaching has been structured around ensuring that it is done in a sophisticated manner which supports the students learning and provides them with a range of approaches to suit their learning styles. The use of concrete materials in the classroom is often associated with the learning theories of Piaget. Piaget suggests that children in the operational stage (7-11 years) are not ready for abstract thinking because they are cognitively immature, (Siemon, 2011, p. 106). In teaching mathematics, it is easiest for students to learn by manipulating objects and by witnessing how it works. As the year four students fall into the operational stage as suggested in Piagets theory, it is vital that students have concrete materials to visualise the maths and form an understanding. This can be completed for all learning styles as the materials can act as assistance to their primary form of information intake. In contrast to the preoperational child, the concrete operational child can attend to successive stages in the transformation of an object from on state to another and mentally reverse the operations that produce an outcome, (McInerney, McInerney, 2006, p. 44). As the students are exposed to the content descriptors in a repetitive fashion, this will assist them in alliance with Piagets theory as they will be able to not only complete simple operations, but thoroughly understand each mathematic component.

The planning documents support the statement from the Mathematics Rationale in the Australian Curriculum and Reporting Authority (2013), which states that , The curriculum focuses on developing increasingly sophisticated and refined mathematical understanding, fluency, logical reasoning, analytical thought and problem-solving skills. We have completed the basis of the planning around the statement from ACARA and believe that the planning is structured to be of optimal benefit for students.

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Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action

Individual Justification- Alex Jesshope


Mathematics skills are progressive and develop over time through hands on experiences. For mathematics planning for a year four level of learners, students explore a range of areas of mathematics and more importantly make real-life connections. These connections help students make sense of the information and understand the importance of maths in everyday work. As Piagets theory of cognitive development suggests, students between the ages of 7-11 are categorised as concrete operational and benefit from the use of concrete materials to assist learning and development (Siemon, Beswick, Brady, Clark, Faragher & Warren, 2011).

To begin the term plan, we took a backward mapping approach by analysing the curriculum for year three and four, to collate the elements that have been and what needed to be covered. To understand the prior knowledge of the learners, the content covered in year three was compared to what was covered in year four and planning began on how it was to be taught and applied. The term plan as a whole was divided into weekly segments to plan each weeks content and assessment components. By distributing the content descriptors over the term plan, it allowed us to consider the patterns and structure we wanted to develop within the unit of work. As Siemon, (2011), describes term planning consists of main objectives which at times may overarch, divided into finer detail to then be effectively taught. The content that is overarched helps develop the sequential pattern within the term. The sequential learning pattern within the term would allow learners of varying levels to effectively gain knowledge. Cognitive development which refers to the, mental processes involved in gaining knowledge, thinking, creating, reasoning, problem solving, conceptualising, classifying, relating and symbolising, (Snowman, Dobozy, Bryer, Bartlett,
Scevack, & Biehler,2009, p.26), allows learners to build on prior knowledge to gain a full

understanding of the concept.

The weekly plans were developed through detailed planning of the learning requirements to cover selected content descriptors. To understand in a more detailed manner what is covered in each week, the weekly plans allowed us to see the how the content descriptors

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Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action will be covered. The weekly plan gave us a clear indication of the timing of diagnostic, formative and summative assessment. The repetitive sequence of some of the content descriptors ensured that thorough understanding would occur. Particularly for multiplication and division facts which are useful for real-life application, efficient strategies that students can apply for problem solving and mental computation, ensures they can apply their knowledge at any given time, (Siemon, et al., 2011). Developing a degree of automaticity is the result of repeated experience with rapid recall and fast facts. The lessons were designed to cater for a range of learners with varying strengths and needs. Designing a flexible learning journey ensures all learners have the opportunity to participate to the best of their ability. Planning for a range of intellectual levels from recall of knowledge through to higher-order thinking such as analysis and evaluation, (Siemon, et al., 2011, p.54).

The assessment pieces were designed for students to explore and apply their new knowledge in a practical summative task. Planning needs to consider how the information is gained from the assessment will be used to provide evidence of learning (Siemon, et al., 2011). The diagnostic testing throughout the unit mostly consisted of revision, rapid recall enabling us to refer back to previous work samples completed. This helped us develop the introduction of teacher observations and annotations to inform the progress for the formative assessment. The formative assessment was an important factor during the planning stage, as this helped to further students application of the content through written testing. The summative assessment required understanding of the content covered throughout the unit, and engaging ways for students to apply it. The collaborative element of the task requires students to work in pairs to collect the data in a survey situation from a selected topic. By offering students the opportunity to investigate a topic or theme that is of interest to them, creates motivation and determination for the task, (Marzano & Pickering, 1997). Independently students are required to represent their data in the appropriate format. As students can apply their knowledge in a practical setting, kinaesthetic, aural and visual learners are catered for. Discussions about what representations can show and the benefits of various methods of representations expose learners to sophisticated data representations, (Siemon, et al., 2011). The structure of the class-room ready task sheet is relevant for learners as it clearly sets the assessment expectations and requirements for the Pg. 47

Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action summative task. The criteria sheet for marking purposes aligns the achievement standards and expectations for student outcomes. The task enables students to personally reflect on the effectiveness of their data collection and representation of findings through scaffolded questions. The questions involve the use of justification and elaboration on why the particular method of collecting the data and how the findings are presented.

To help learners understand that attitudes and perceptions associated with classroom climate can influence learning, a shared responsibility must be met between the students and the teacher to ensure positivity remains within the environment, (Marzano & Pickering, 1997). Catering for learning styles is an important issue, particularly for students who have difficulties with mathematics. During the planning process of both the learning journey and the assessment, careful detail was considered for designing stage to ensure all learners are appropriately challenged. In the past, students mathematical errors were seen merely as the students inability to learn. Errors such as these now provide teachers with more focused information on the nature of a students difficulties with learning, (Hyde, Carpenter & Conway, 2010). For varying learning strengths and needs within a classroom setting, the importance of student grouping ensures students of the same level are effectively challenged and remain on task. For differentiation in the classroom, simplifying or extending the task question, making the problem more concrete, finding a different way of doing it and applying the solution to other real situations are some suggestions which were considered when developing the unit.

The carefully constructed unit provides a variety of learners and abilities to apply and explore with their new knowledge. The planning process was found to be of high importance in ensuring all learners meet their optimal level of achievement. As the planning was developed around the assessment, this allowed us to elaborate how and why the content was taught the way it was. Aiming to develop automaticity, the unit plan is constantly referring back to prior knowledge of students with revision and rapid recall activities to enable them to make connections between what they have learnt and how it will help them learn more.

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Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action

Individual Justification- Daneal Ronald


Mathematics is seen all around the world; its an important part of our every day lives. It is therefore crucial that the mathematics facilitated in todays classrooms, from the early years of schooling through to the secondary school years, is thoroughly planned with great consideration given to the learners in the classroom, the curriculum and the types of assessment. The above Mathematics unit was designed for implementation in a year four class in the first term. Through the use of backward mapping, profiling, careful consideration of the curriculum and various theorists pedagogies the unit was developed through a collaborative effort.

The term planner can be seen in the above planning within a Learning Management Plan or an LMP. Nine questions form the basis of this type of planning; these questions are known as the Nine Learning Management Questions (LMQs) and were developed by Knight, Lynch and Smith. The questions are a set of sequential design based questions that engage a Learning Manager in a process of designing learning experiences that produce intended learning outcomes. (Knight, Lynch & Smith, 2007, p. 78) Within these questions the profiling of the learners at the centre of the learning to be facilitated is evident as well as the relevant curriculum, necessary resources, assessment to be carried out and a section for the Learning Manager to reflect on the implementation of the unit. Within the LMP utilised in this assessment piece, there is a ten-week term plan consisting of two units. The units involve the Mathematic strands of Number and Algebra, Measurement and Geometry as well as Statistics and Probability. Various descriptors within these strands are seen across the term planner a number of times to allow for consolidation of the content at hand, as some of the learning is new to the cohort of learners. This also allows for the learners to be able to understand the content further before completing their summative assessment tasks at the end of each unit. For example, the descriptor for the Number and Algebra strand which involves the learners developing their own strategies to solve multiplication and division problems is seen across a few weeks within the first unit. As this descriptor involves the learners practicing the strategies as well as the Learning Manager assisting the learners in developing these strategies, it was essential for the concept to be extended. In

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Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action order to ensure the planning was effective and meaningful for the learners when implemented, the process of backward mapping was used before the term planner was developed. This process, also called backward design, involves beginning with the curriculum and assessment before planning the learning to be facilitated. Backward design begins with the end in mind and maps back from the desired result to the present to determine the best way to reach the goal. (McTighe & Wiggins, 2001, p. 146) This ideology was also employed in the planning of this Mathematics unit as a means of assisting the learners acquire and integrate new knowledge through looking at a goal, before looking at how to get there.

Through the scaffolding stated above our group was able to construct a term planner, which allows for the learners to be aware of the goals for their learning as well as the development of effective implementation of the unit of work. Three weekly plans and lesson plans were also developed collaboratively through the scaffolding methods stated above. These planning documents were adapted from the term planner and explicitly plan how the Mathematics unit will be facilitated. Through these planning documents the diversity of learners within the cohort is catered for as our group took into consideration the learners needs as we planned each element of the unit. The weekly plans break down each week of the term planner into what the days will consist of and how the curriculum will be implemented. The weekly plans also included what declarative and procedural knowledge the learners will be using within each day as well as the appropriate resources. Our group chose to break down the term planner into the weekly plans by briefly stating how the learning will be facilitated through the types of activities to be involved in each lesson. From these weekly plans, lesson plans or Learning Experience Plans were constructed. These plans also use the Nine Learning Management questions to scaffold the learning, however for the this unit our group also used the handy planning questions within Siemon, Beswich, Brady, Clark Faragher and Warren (2011, p. 52) which investigate aspects like how the learners have been engaged, what diversity has been catered for and what types of questions can be asked within each lesson. Although these questions arent explicitly answered like the Nine LMQs, collaboratively we went through each lesson plan and answered the questions suggested by Siemon, et. al, to ensure we were planning our lessons effectively. Within these lesson plans the activities stated in the weekly plans are Pg. 50

Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action explicitly included into how the Mathematics lesson will ideally be facilitated. These plans allowed for our group to further plan the unit of work into one hour lessons. Collaboratively we structured lessons that contain appropriate resources, effective pedagogies and provide opportunities for the learners to be engaged in the learning in a variety of ways. The overarching goal of these planning documents is the chosen methods of assessment across the term.

Diagnostic, formative and summative assessment can be seen throughout the unit of work. As the term contains to different units we chose to have a summative assessment task at the end of each. The first being a written test and the other being an investigation assignment. The second assessment piece was broken down into an assessment planner, a classroom ready task sheet and a criteria sheet for the purpose of this assignment. Collaboratively we created an assessment task, which we believe would allow for the learners to use their knew knowledge, from the previous weeks of work, in a meaningful context whilst also structuring opportunities for them to work with their peers. As stated by Marzano and Pickering (1997, p. 20) opportunities to work in groups towards a common goal, when structured appropriately, can help students feel accepted by their peers. Through providing the learners opportunities to work with their peers they gain social skills which are effective in working collaboratively and they are also provided with peer learning that occurs between learners in the group who may be at a higher level in Mathematics and those who have some difficulties with Mathematic concepts. Within this investigation task we chose to have the learners collect data through their chosen method in pairs. Through this the pairs then individually create their own data displays. The idea of both collaborative and individual work within the task was selected to allow for the Learning Manager to assess how the learners work in groups as well as their individual understanding of the concepts previously taught. With the great consideration given to the learners needs before planning the assessment task, it was essential that the task was also able to adapted if required and allows for the learners who may have difficulties in Mathematics to still be fairly assessed on the content.

In todays classrooms there is a variety of learning styles and needs. In order for any type of learning to be effective within a classroom it is crucial that the Learning Manager plans and Pg. 51

Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action facilitates learning experiences that best cater to the learners within their classroom. Therefore, before looking at the curriculum documents when planning the Learning Manager needs to ensure they profile their learners. Profiling was carried out in the above lesson plans within the Nine LMQs, although the planning documents were developed for a hypothetical class the profiling conducted involved what the learners had covered in year three as well as how they best learn. Within these lesson plans the catering for various learning styles is evident through the variety of resources our group chose to use to implement the content with. As Siemon, et. al (2011, p. 106) states, The use of concrete materials in the classroom is often associated with the learning theories of Piaget. Piaget suggests that children in the concrete operational stage (7-11 years) are not ready for abstract thinking because they are cognitively immature. Therefore as the cohort of learners at the centre of this unit are in the concrete operational stage of Piagets cognitive development theory, it is crucial that the Mathematics work implemented with them involves concrete materials to aid in their learning of the content. Throughout the unit of work the use of visual, auditory and concrete resources are evident with more reference to concrete materials across the planning documents in order to meet the cohorts cognitive levels within Mathematics. If the above planning document were to be implemented with an actual year four class, necessary adaptations would be made for learners with learning difficulties and any other important considerations would be catered for as well. However, as this unit was constructed on a hypothetical basis the types of differentiation to be catered for was looked at in a broader approach in order to allow for appropriate changes to be made to the unit if it was to be implemented.

The Australia Curriculum Assessment and Reporting Authority (2014) states within their Mathematics curriculum rationale that, the curriculum focuses on developing increasingly sophisticated and refined mathematical understanding, fluency, logical reasoning, analytical thought and problem-solving skills. The collaborative effort to construct the above planning and assessment documents aimed to meet the curriculum focuses by utilising a number of pedagogies, planning scaffolding methods and backward mapping. It was through the ideologies of the Mathematics curriculum rationale that our group developed a unit of work that we believe could effectively be implemented in to a classroom today, with necessary adaptations being made in order to suit that cohort of learners at hand. Pg. 52

Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action

Group Collaboration- Minutes recorded.


Group Meeting: 05/03/14 All group members present Gained a thorough understanding of course profile Created a checklist for the assignment and time frames in which we wish to complete each task Established year level Delegated the strands of ACARA over a year plan then divided it into term sections Elaborated each content descriptor and basic ideas of planning Group Meeting: 14/03/14 All group members present Established where the content descriptors would be addressed in the units Began planning and brainstorming assessment Used backward mapping to plan final summative assessment Scaffolded a template for planning documents Created weebly Decided where diagnostic, formative and summative assessment would go within the term/units Discussed summative assessment task and briefly planned what it may consist of Group Meeting: 18/03/14 All group members present Divided content descriptors over the term Established how each content descriptor would be addressed and spread over the unit Completed the term planner Began establishing exactly what the diagnostic, formative and summative assessments would be over the units Designated small areas of the LMP template to complete individually for the next group meeting Group Meeting: 25/03/14 All group members present Combined the areas of the LMP template that each group member completed

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Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action
Collaboratively went through the LMP to format the areas individually completed and ensure that they all flow seamlessly Decided as a group how the rest of the assignment was going to divided up amongst the three of us Although the rest of the assignment was divided up amongst the group together we began drafting each parts of the assignment Collaboratively drafted the assessment planner, criteria sheet and classroom ready task sheet Each group member to take away their designated areas of the assignment and begin scaffolding ideas, etc to show the other group members in the next meeting

Group Meeting: 1/04/14 All group members present Each group member showed their individual work to the rest of the group as they discussed each area of the assignment and provided feedback to each other Collaboratively drafted the weekly plans using the ideas from the group member who had been working on them as well as other planning documents already completed for the assessment task Continued collaboratively working on the assessment planner, criteria sheet and classroom ready task sheet using the ideas from the group member who had been working on them Each group member to take away their designated areas of the assignment and begin constructing them using the drafting completed as a group. Group members to have this ready for next meeting. Group Meeting: 4/04/14 All group members present Each group member showed their individual work to the rest of the group as they discussed their area of the assignment and the work they have started on it. Other group members provided feedback on the work. Collaboratively drafted the LEPs using the ideas from the group member who had been working on them as well as other planning documents already completed for the assessment task Collaboratively completed and formatted the weekly plans and assessment planner, criteria sheet and classroom ready task sheet. These were added into our final assessment document. Each group member to continue working on their designated areas of the assignment and have them completed for the next meeting so that the group is able to collaboratively format the work and make an necessary changes before adding the work to the final assessment document Group Meeting: 8/04/14 All group members present Each group member showed their completed individual area of the assignment to rest of the group. Collaboratively the group formatted this work and made any necessary changes to the work completed individual before adding it to the final assessment document Collaboratively the group researched and wrote the summary of potential learning issues

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Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action
Each group member to continue working on their individual justifications to be added to the final assessment document

Group Meeting 10/04/14 All group members present Group members proof read each others justifications before they were added to final document Collaboratively constructed reference list Collaboratively went through final document for formatting and proof reading to ensure everything flows seamlessly Added necessary documents to the Weebly Ensured final document was ready for submission

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Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action

EDCU11022 - Assessment Task 1 Individual contribution and teamwork Lacey Fry


Criteria High Distinction Distinction Credit Pass Fail

Contribution and teamwork (*Rated by group) Lacey Fry

Full participation and valuable contribution to every aspect of the research and preparation of the task response.

Full participation and insightful contribution to the research and preparation of the task response.

Keen participation and helpful contribution to the research and preparation of the task response.

Participation and contribution to most aspects of the research and preparation of the task response.

Little participation and/or contribution to the research and preparation of the task response.

Contribution and teamwork (*Rated by group) Alex Jesshope

Full participation and valuable contribution to every aspect of the research and preparation of the task response.

Full participation and insightful contribution to the research and preparation of the task response.

Keen participation and helpful contribution to the research and preparation of the task response.

Participation and contribution to most aspects of the research and preparation of the task response.

Little participation and/or contribution to the research and preparation of the task response.

Contribution and teamwork (*Rated by group) Daneal Ronald

Full participation and valuable contribution to every aspect of the research and preparation of the task response.

Full participation and insightful contribution to the research and preparation of the task response.

Keen participation and helpful contribution to the research and preparation of the task response.

Participation and contribution to most aspects of the research and preparation of the task response.

Little participation and/or contribution to the research and preparation of the task response.

Comment: All group members participated collaboratively and with enthusiasm. I felt as though each group member contributed equally and I am happy with the overall result of the assessment.

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Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action

EDCU11022 - Assessment Task 1 Individual contribution and teamwork Alex Jesshope


Criteria High Distinction Distinction Credit Pass Fail

Contribution and teamwork (*Rated by group) YOUR NAME: Alex Jesshope

Full participation and valuable contribution to every aspect of the research and preparation of the task response.

Full participation and insightful contribution to the research and preparation of the task response.

Keen participation and helpful contribution to the research and preparation of the task response.

Participation and contribution to most aspects of the research and preparation of the task response.

Little participation and/or contribution to the research and preparation of the task response.

Contribution and teamwork (*Rated by group) GROUP MEMBER NAME: Lacey Fry

Full participation and valuable contribution to every aspect of the research and preparation of the task response.

Full participation and insightful contribution to the research and preparation of the task response.

Keen participation and helpful contribution to the research and preparation of the task response.

Participation and contribution to most aspects of the research and preparation of the task response.

Little participation and/or contribution to the research and preparation of the task response.

Contribution and teamwork (*Rated by group) GROUP MEMBER NAME: Daneal Ronald

Full participation and valuable contribution to every aspect of the research and preparation of the task response.

Full participation and insightful contribution to the research and preparation of the task response.

Keen participation and helpful contribution to the research and preparation of the task response.

Participation and contribution to most aspects of the research and preparation of the task response.

Little participation and/or contribution to the research and preparation of the task response.

Comment: Full group participation and collaboration ensured an effective unit was developed. All group members contributed their expected work promptly and were constructive with suggestions in developing the unit.

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Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action

EDCU11022 - Assessment Task 1 Individual contribution and teamwork Daneal Ronald


Criteria High Distinction Distinction Credit Pass Fail

Contribution and teamwork (*Rated by group) YOUR NAME: Daneal Ronald Contribution and teamwork (*Rated by group) GROUP MEMBER NAME: Lacey Fry Contribution and teamwork (*Rated by group) GROUP MEMBER NAME: Alex Jesshope

Full participation and valuable contribution to every aspect of the research and preparation of the task response.

Full participation and insightful contribution to the research and preparation of the task response.

Keen participation and helpful contribution to the research and preparation of the task response.

Participation and contribution to most aspects of the research and preparation of the task response.

Little participation and/or contribution to the research and preparation of the task response.

Full participation and valuable contribution to every aspect of the research and preparation of the task response.

Full participation and insightful contribution to the research and preparation of the task response.

Keen participation and helpful contribution to the research and preparation of the task response.

Participation and contribution to most aspects of the research and preparation of the task response.

Little participation and/or contribution to the research and preparation of the task response.

Full participation and valuable contribution to every aspect of the research and preparation of the task response.

Full participation and insightful contribution to the research and preparation of the task response.

Keen participation and helpful contribution to the research and preparation of the task response.

Participation and contribution to most aspects of the research and preparation of the task response.

Little participation and/or contribution to the research and preparation of the task response.

Comment: I believe our group worked well within this assessment task. We were all able to meet at the arranged times and collaboratively constructed the final assignment. Each group member always had their allocated work ready to show the group in the time frame we chose to have it ready and each group member provided constructive feedback on the work completed individually. I would definitely work with both Lacey and Alex in future assessment tasks.

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Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action

References
Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority. The Australian Curriculum: Mathematics curriculum: Year Four. (2013). Retrieved from http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/mathematics/Curriculum/F-10#level4

Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority. The Australian Curriculum: Mathematics curriculum: Rationale. (2013). Retrieved from http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/mathematics/Rationale

Booker, G., Bond, D., Sparrow, L., Swam, P. (2010). Teaching Primary Mathematics. Frenchs Forest: Pearson Australia. Hyde, M., Carpenter, L., Conway, R. (2010). Diversity, Inclusion & Engagement. (2nd ed.). Melbourne: Oxford University Press Lynch, D., Smith, R. & Doe, T. (2007). The learning management plan. In R. Smith, D. Lynch & B.A. Knight (Eds) Learning management: Transitioning teachers for national and international change. (pp.75-105). Frenchs Forest: Pearson Education Australia Marzano, R. J., & Pickering, D. J. (1997). Dimensions of learning: teacher's manual (2nd ed.). Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. McInerney, D., McInerney, V. (2006). Educational Psychology: Constructing Learning. (4th ed.). Frenchs Forest: Pearson Education Australia. Mc Tighe, J. & Wiggins, G. (2001) Understanding by design. Ohio, USA: Prentice-Hall Inc.

O'donnell, A., Dobozy, E., Bartlett, B., Bryer, F., Reeve, J., & Smith, J. (2012). Educational Psychology. Australia: John Wiley & Sons.

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Lacey Fry, Alex Jesshope & Daneal Ronald- Assessment Task 1 Numeracy in Action Siemon, D., Beswick, K., Brady, K., Clark, J., Faragher, R., Warren, E., (2011). Teaching Mathematics: Foundation to Middle Years. Melbourne: Oxford University Press.

Snowman, J., Dobozy, E., Bryer, F., Bartlett, B., Scevack, J., & Biehler, R. (2009). Education Applied to Teaching. Milton, QLD: John Wiley & Sons.

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