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UbD

Writing Unit Plan Template


Teachers Name:
Topic/genre: Animal Facts/ Expository Writing
Mrs. Whitt & Miss Whiteside
Unit Title:
Grade Level
Animal Facts Expository Writing
3rd
Approximate Time Frame: Four 40 minute lessons, once a day for one week

Prerequisite skills:
Researching, writing complete sentences, reading

Essential Vocabulary:
Fact, fable, rapidly, temperature, label, attack, expects, bother, supporting detail, main idea, conclusion, introduction, paragraph

Mentor texts: Animal Fact/Animal Fable by Seymour Simon, Can Animals Talk?, Dont Believe It!, The Man Who Discovered Pluto All
by Mark Dubowski

Materials: SmartBoard, encyclopedia, paper, pencil, internet (for home use), Mentor Texts,


Brief Summary of the Unit: In a few sentences, describe the topics/genre and key activities students
will be working on during the unit
This unit focuses on the story of the week for reading, Animal Fact, Animal Fable. The story describes fables about animals that
many people believe to be true, but then debunk these fables with facts about the animals. After reading this story, we explored
the topic of expository writing, which was the basis of the story as well as the mentor texts to go along with it. Students will then
be assigned an animal to study and write an informative (expository) report on. Students will go through the writing process
including brainstorming/prewriting, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing. The final drafts and pictures drawn by students
will be put together to form a class book to be displayed in the library.


Stage 1 Desired Results
Standards:
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.3.2
Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.3.2.A
Introduce a topic and group related information together; include illustrations when useful to aiding comprehension.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.3.2.B
Develop the topic with facts, definitions, and details.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.3.2.D
Provide a concluding statement or section.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.3.7
Conduct short research projects that build knowledge about a topic.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.3.8
Recall information from experiences or gather information from print and digital sources; take brief notes on sources and
sort evidence into provided categories.

Competency/Objectives
The students will be able to
Write a full paragraph with an opening sentence, two detail sentences, and a concluding sentence
Complete research using a multitude of sources to find answers to questions
Effectively execute the writing process including brainstorming/prewriting, drafting, editing, revising, publishing
Draw a representative illustration of their assigned animal to accompany their reports in order to aid in comprehension

Established Goals:
Enduring
Completing research using a multitude of sources and organizing information within a paragraph with
Understandings
an introduction, details, and a conclusion efficiently delivers information to an audience.



Essential Question(s):

Why is it important to brainstorm and create ideas?


Why is it important to organize our thoughts into an outline?
How does having a peer check our writing help us to make it better?
Why is it important that we publish our work?
How does the writing process help our writing?
Why is a paragraph constructed the way it is?

Students will know
That a paragraph is made of an introductory sentence, detail sentences, and a concluding

sentence.
Research can be completed through books, like an encyclopedia, and online through the internet
How to use an encyclopedia
The steps of the writing process

Students will be able to
Write a full paragraph with an opening sentence, two detail sentences, and a concluding
sentence
Complete research using a multitude of sources to find answers to questions
Effectively execute the writing process including brainstorming/prewriting, drafting, editing,
revising, publishing
Draw a representative illustration of their assigned animal to accompany their reports in order
to aid in comprehension


Stage 2 Assessment Evidence
Performance Task:
Students will create a three-paragraph essay reporting on facts for an assigned animal (dog, goat,
ostrich, cricket, or turtle). Each paragraph will answer a main idea/question and use an opening
sentence, at least two details, and a closing sentence. Students will also draw a picture to aid in
understanding of the animal and how it lives, eats, etc.

Performance Task Statement



Students will understand
How the writing process works
How to correctly use the steps in the writing process
How a book is created
How illustrations aid in the comprehension


Preassessment
Students will be asked what they know about the writing process. Since it hasnt been formally introduced
to them yet, this should be a whole new experience for them. Asking them what their favorite books are
and then explaining that every one of those books has been through the writing process will be a great
introduction.

Formative assessment
Conferences with students along with and asking questions and seeing over brainstorming lists, outlines,
and rough drafts are good indicators of how students are doing along the way.

Summative assessment
Students will create a three-paragraph essay reporting on facts for an assigned animal (dog, goat, ostrich,
cricket, or turtle). Each paragraph will answer a main idea/question and use an opening sentence, at least
two details, and a closing sentence. Students will also draw a picture to aid in understanding of the animal
and how it lives, eats, etc. These will be graded based on a rubric given below.

Learning Plan: Describe the sequence of activities over the course of instruction
The students will focus on a different piece of the writing process every day in the order of:
brainstorming, drafting, editing, revising, and publishing. On the first day, the students will
brainstorm questions they want answered about their animal, then, they will create an outline so that
they may research their top three questions starting in class using encyclopedias, or other media
when they get home. The next day, they will return with their outlines completed and spend time
drafting in class. They should be putting the details in their outlines into full sentences and complete
thoughts that support one another and flow. The following day, they will be peer editing each others
paragraphs



Differentiation for ELLs, scaffolding, comprehensible input etc.

There are no ELLs in the classroom. However, there are students who struggle with reading, writing,
spelling, phonics, and grammar. For these children, I will constantly be reading directions out loud
while they follow along in print on their own. Words that are hard to spell will also be posted at the
front of the room so students spend more time focusing on the writing of the essay and conveying
information rather than how a word is spelled.