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Diplomatic Correspondence

Example for Popular Education

No matter what age you are now, your dream about world peace is real.
Dream about free communication and cooperation of countries, nations and
people all over the world. But you need a way to tell them. You can write them
a letters, lot of them, but you must have at least some kind of general idea
how to do it.

You want them to take you seriously, don't you?

Besides, their eye has got used to certain form of printed materials.

About 30 years ago, international official letters were formatted something like
this: (well, not any more, this is only example, but nowadays the
Correspondence is not much different

Diplomatic Correspondence Guide

Provisional Edition

Foreign Service Institute
Manila, Philippines

Foreword

The practice of preparing proper forms of diplomatic communications dates
back to early periods of history when contacts among nations assumed great
importance. Since then, standardized forms have developed, which member
states of the family of nations generally now use.

Diplomatic correspondence is the art of communicating among states and
putting into written form important information, discussions or agreements
essential to the conduct of foreign relations, hence, the need for a proper and
accepted style of writing.

At the request of the Board of Foreign Service, Ministry of Foreign Affairs,
Manila, the Foreign Service Institute has prepared a Diplomatic
Correspondence Guide which would serve as a ready reference of the
personnel of the home office and the foreign serevice (please see
memorandum dated 24 April 1980).

We have included in this Guide the different types of diplomatic
correspondence and reports, and explained the processes involved in their
preparation, drafting and handling. Instructions are also given for each type of
correspondence. A section on ceremonial correspondence (protocol) is
included to familiarize those interested on the subject matter.

This Guide welcomes suggestions for further improvement. It presents current
practices, customs and procedures which may be changed in time. As new
regulations and Ministry orders on diplomatic correspondence are adopted,
we intend to come out with better, updated or revised editions.

Rodolfo A. Arizala
(Counselor)

Manila, 14 February 1981

Part I

Foreign Service Correspondence Forms

Conduct of Official Correspondence
All official communications within the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Foreign
Service are addressed to the minister of foreign affairs indicating below the
addressee, the office or person concerned.

When communicating with other agencies of the Philippine government,
correspondence is conducted on a minister-to-minister basis.

All communications with foreign governments are coursed through their
respective ministries of foreign affairs.

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Types of Foreign Service Correspondence

There are two general categories of official correspondence in the Foreign
Service, namely:
1) For External Communications
With foreign governments and/or their diplomatic and consular
representatives; and
2) for Internal Communications
within the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and/or with the other agencies of the
Philippine government.

Part II

Drafting of Correspondence
Considering the volume and magnitude of work which officers are faced with
everyday, it should be the primary consideration of the person/employee
drafting the correspondence to make the communication simple, direct and
clear.

ABC's in Drafting of Official Correspondence
Diplomatic correspondence should possess the following characteristics:
accuracy, brevity, clarity and suavity.

Accuracy
One of the primary functions of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs is to study,
recommend and implement Philippine foreign policies. It is therefore
important that these policies are well understood and explained. This can be
done if the following elements in communication are present: objectivity,
completeness of data, accuracy of facts and figures, correct spelling of names
and titles, a thorough command of the English language and appropriateness
in the choice of words.

One should avoid making general and exaggerated statements which could
be the object of inquiry and doubt. It is also important that data are checked to
ensure objectivity and consistency of information. Before sending the
communication, it is best to make sure that there are no missing words or
statements, typographical and clerical errors.

In writing long reports, it is advisable to make topical outlines to insure
continuity of ideas.

Brevity
Simple, brief and direct type of communication is the most effective, easily
understood, and therefore the best. Short sentences and paragraphs,
carefully chosen words and expressions are to be used. If possible,
communication should be limited to one subject only.

Clarity
The correspondence must be a complete document in itself, independent of
other documents. Since the official who will read the communication is a busy
man and has no time to engage in rhetorics, figures of speech, long
sentences and flowery literary style of writing are not advisable. A
communication must be grammatically correct, logical and must use well
chosen words. Charts, graphs and figures to clarify statements are to be used
if necessary. The last paragraph should contain the summary of the important
points of the communication.

Suavity
The manner of expression in diplomatic correspondence should be dignified.
Care should be exercised in using phrases of courtesy, designations, titles
and qualifications. The tone should be polite and in cases where
disagreements or protest are brought up, the communication should always
maintain sobriety and logic.

Part III

Preparation of Correspondence
The following rules and instructions are followed in preparing diplomatic
correspondence. (See also Foreign Service Correspondence Handbook, U.S.
FSI, pp. 19-20)

Materials
The paper to be used is shown in the sample forms.
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A black typewriter ribbon is used unless there is a special reason to
use other colors.

Spacing
Quotations comprising one or more paragraphs are to be indented five
spaces from the margin of the text in which they are contained, and when
possible, the lines are to be one space closer together than those of the text.

Margins
Margins are to be one and a half inches on the left and not less than one
inch on the right.

Paragraph indentions
Paragraph indentions are uniformly five spaces from the left-hand margin.

Line spacing
Despatches, memoranda and letters are, in general, to be single-
spaced; however, brief letters may be double-spaced to present a
better appearance.
Outgoing telegrams must be double-spaced.
Diplomatic notes are to be triple-spaced. Notes exceeding two pages
may be double-spaced.

Address
a. The address is written in Capital and small letters on the first page of
the communication.
b. In the first person diplomatic notes and letters, the address is placed
in the lower left-hand corner of the first page. Every following line is to be
indented five spaces beyond the preceding line.
c. The sequence or order of an address is as follows:
Name of addressee, preceded or followed by the appropriate title of
courtesy or respect, in one or more lines, according to the forms or
length.
Name of apartment or office and apartment (office) number, if known.
Street address or route and box number.
City, zone number and state or province.
d. When an addressee is in a unit of an organization, ministry or agency,
it is important that the unit be mentioned first.

For example:
Mr. Juan de la Cruz (name)

Bureau of Internal Revenue (unit)

Ministry of Finance (ministry)

Manila (place)
Key Word
In the lower right-hand corner of each page of a communication, the first three
words of the following page are written to serve key words to the continuity
of thought and to assure in proper pagination.

Pagination
The second and subsequent pages of all papers should be numbered one
inch from the top, in the middle of the page, three spaces above the first line
of the text. The number is immediately preceded and followed by a hyphen.

Enclosures
Enclosures in communications should be enumerated and described at the
end thereof. The word "Enclosure(s)" is flushed with the left-hand margin and
on a line by itself. If there is only one enclosure, it is not numbered.


Part IV

Ceremonial Correspondence

Congratulatory Messages
The President of the Philippines sends congratulatory messages to heads of
states celebrating occasions such as: Independence Day, anniversaries,
principal national holidays, and birthdays of monarchs, heads of state and
heads of government.

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These messages are prepared by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and are sent
either directly to the heads of state or through the Philippine diplomatic
representative in the celebrating state. The text of the message is likewise
quoted in a note sent by the Minister for Foreign Affairs to the representative
of the celebrating state in the Philippines.

Example:

(1)
Mesage transmitted by the President to the President of the United States on
the anniversary of its independence:

ON THE OCCASION OF THE 199TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE
DECLARATION

OF INDEPENDENCE OF THE UNITED STATES CMA THE FILIPINO
PEOPLE JOIN

ME AND MRS MARCOS IN CONVEYING SINCERE FELICITATIONS AND
BEST

WISHES STOP MAY I EXPRESS MY FERVENT HOPE THAT PHILIPPINE
AMERICAN

FRIENDSHIP SHALL CONTINUE TO GROW EVEN STRONGER FOR THE
MUTUAL

BENEFIT OF OUR TWO COUNTRIES AND PEOPLES.

(2)
Note sent by the Minister for Foreign Affairs to the American Ambassador in
Manila:

Manila, 4 July 1975

Excellency:

I have the honor to quote hereunder the text of the radiogram of His
Excellency, the President of the Philippines to His Excellency, the President
of the United States:

"ON THE OCCASION OF THE 199TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE
DECLARATION

OF INDEPENDENCE OF THE UNITED STATES CMA THE FILIPINO
PEOPLE JOIN

ME AND MRS MARCOS IN CONVEYING SINCERE FELICITATIONS AND
BEST

WISHES STOP MAY I EXPRESS MY FERVENT HOPE THAT PHILIPPINE
AMERICAN

FRIENDSHIP SHALL CONTINUE TO GROW EVEN STRONGER FOR THE
MUTUAL

BENEFIT OF OUR TWO COUNTRIES AND PEOPLES."

The officials of the Ministry join me in extending to you and to the
members of your staff my best wishes on this happy occasion.

Accept, Excellency, the renewed assurances of my highest
consideration.

CARLOS P. ROMULO
Minister for Foreign Affairs

His Excellency
Ambassador of the United States
Manila

Felicittions are also sent on days of great rejoicing or celebration.

Birth Anniversary
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Birthday - RP-UK

JFF - 132

The Ambassador of the Philippines presents His compliments to His
Excellency Her Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for Foreign and
Commonwealth Affairs and has the honour to transmit through His Excellency
to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II the following message from His Excellency
the President of the Philippines:

HER MAJESTY
QUEEN ELIZABETH

"MRS. MARCOS JOINS ME AND THE FILIPINO PEOPLE IN
CONVEYING
TO YOUR MAJESTY OUR SINCERE BEST WISHES AND FELICITATION
ON YOUR
BIRTHDAY."

"MAY YOUR MAJESTY CONTINUE TO ENJOY GOOD HEALTH AND
HAPPINESS
IN THE YEARS TO COME."

"FERDINAND E. MARCOS
PRESIDENT OF THE PHILIPPINES"

The Ambassador of the Philippines avails himself of this opportunity to
renew to His Excellency Her Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for Foreign
and Commonwealth Affairs the assurances of his highest consideration.

3 May 1973

Birth of a Royal Heir


NV-89-68 29th
May 1968

Excellency:

I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your Excellency's Note of
the 27th May 1968 conveying to me the good news of the birth of a Prince to
Her Royal Highness Princess Margrethe.

I share the feeling of the Danish people over the happy event and extend
my heartfelt congratulations to their Royal Highnesses.

Please accept, Excellency, the assurances of most distinguished
consideration.

[Pen Signature]

His Excellency
Poul Hartling
Minister for Foreign Affairs
Copenhagen

Correspondence between Heads of States
Heads of states send each other congratulatory messages on the occasion of
national holidays or birthdays of a sovereign, and messages of condolence on
the death of a close member of the sovereign's family. They also send letters
to each other on any topic, but usually covering areas of common interest to
their countries.

On the Occasion of Accession to the Throne because of Death or
Abdication

Name and Title of Sovereign

To (Name and Title of Head of State)
(Address)

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Great and Good Friend:

Called by the death (abdication) of my Father and by the order of
succession to the throne of (name of country), I fulfill the duty of announcing
to you my accession. I trust that my reign will always find support in your
sentiments and I wish to assure you that on my part it will be pleasure to
maintain and to cultivate the friendly relations and good will which happily
exist between our two countries.

I express the hope that you will lend me your valuable cooperation with a
view to attaining these results, which is for the greater good of the people
whose destinies have been confided in us. It is with this sentiment that I avail
myself of this opportunity to convey to you my sincere wishes for the
prosperity of (name of state of addressee) as well as for your personal
happiness.

Your Good Friend,

[Signature of Sovereign]

Signature of Foreign Secretary (Minister)
Place and date of signing of letter

On the Occasion of Election to the Presidency

Name and Title of Head of State

To (Name and Title of Head of State)
(Address)

Great and Good Friend:

I have the honor to inform you that I have taken on this day my oath of
office as President of (name of state), to serve as such for a period of (four)
years.

In conveying this information, I wish to assure you that it shall be on my
constant endeavor to maintain and strengthen the friendly relations that
happily exist between our two countries at the present time. I trust that, in the
attainment of this objective, you will lend me your valuable cooperation.

I avail myself of this opportunity to express to you (Excellency, Majesty)
my sincere wishes for the prosperity of (name of state), as well as for your
personal happiness.

Your Good Friend,

[Signature of Head of State]

Signature of Minister for Foreign Affairs
Place and date of signing of letter

The reply may be as follows:

Name and Title of Head of State

To (Name and Title of Head of State)
(Address)

Great and Good Friend:

I have the honor to acknowledge your letter of (date), announcing your
(accession, election) to the (Throne, Presidency). It is my hope that under
your benign (wise) rule (leadership), the bonds of friendship that bind our two
countries will be maintained and further strengthened. Please be assured
that, on my part, I shall endeavor to work for the realization of this end.

I avail myself of this opportunity to convey to Your (Majesty, Excellency)
my sincere wishes for the prosperity of (name of state of addressee), as well
as for your well-being and happiness.

Your Good Friend,

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[Signature of Head of State]

Signature of Minister for Foreign Affairs
Place and date of signing of letter

Death of a Head of State
A formal notification on the death of a head of state is made to all chief of
mission accredited to the country of the deceased.

The diplomatic representatives of the mourning country notify the Foreign
Office of the country to which they are accredited, of the death of their head of
state. Stationery with a black stripe on the upper right side is used.

Example:

Excellency:

It is with deep regret that I fulfill the sad task of informing you of the
death of the Honorable ___________________, President of the Philippines,
on ___________________________.

A visitor's book is provided at the Chancery of the Embassy, for those
who may wish to pay calls of condolence, and will be open daily from eight to
twelve o'clock in the morning and from two to four o'clock in the afternoon,
until the day of the funeral.

Accept, Excellency, the renewed assurances of our highest
consideration.

Signature of Chief of Mission

(Name and Address of Foreign Minister)

A week after closing the visitor's book, a card of thanks is sent by the chief of
mission to all those who have expressed their condolences.

A.
Sample Card of Thanks

The Ambassador of the Philippines
gratefully acknowledges
your expression of
sympathy on the occasion
of the death of
The Honorable ______________
President of the Philippines

B.
Sample of Message of Condolence

The Ambassador of the Philippines presents his compliments to His
Excellency the French Ambassador and has the honour to convey his
sincerest condolences on the death of His Excellency General Charles de
Gaulle, the great leader and former President of France whose place in
history is secure among the greatest statesmen and as one of the towering
personalities of our time.

The Philippine Ambassador shares the sentiments of loss and sorrow
felt all over the world at the passing away of such an eminent patriot whose
entire career was single-mindedly devoted to the service of his country and
his people but at the same time advanced the broader causes of peace and
freedom for all mankind.

The Ambassador of the Philippines avails himself of this opportunity to
extend to His Excellency the French Ambassador the renewed assurances of
his highest consideration.

11 November 1970

Documents Issued to/for Consular Officers

Consular Commission (Letters Patent)


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The President of the Philippines

To all who shall see these Presents, Greetings:

Know ye, that, reposing special trust and confidence in the Integrity,
Fidelity and Ability of (name of consular officer), I do assign him as (rank) of
the Republic of the Philippines at (post) and such other parts as shall be
nearer thereto than to the residence of any other Consul or Vice Consul of the
Republic of the Philippines within the same allegiance; and do authorize and
empower him to have and to hold the said Office, and to exercise and enjoy
all the rights, privileges and immunities thereto appertaining, during the
pleasure of the President of the Philippines; and I do hereby enjoin all
Captains, Masters and Commanders of ships and other vessels, armed or
unarmed, sailing under the flag of the Republic of the Philippines, as well as
other citizens, to acknowledge and consider him, the said (name of consular
officer) accordingly; and I hereby pray and request (the Government of the
receiving state) and all its authorities, judges, civil and military officials to
recognize (name of consular officer) in his capacity of (rank) and to permit
him fully and peaceably to enjoy and exercise the said office without giving or
suffering to be given unto him, any molestation or trouble, but on the contrary
to afford him all proper countenance and assistance. I offer to do the same for
all those who shall, in like manner, be recommended to me by (said
Government).

In testimony whereof, I have caused these letters to be made Patent and
the Seal of the Republic of the Philippines to be here unto affixed.

Done in the city of Manila, this ______ day of _______________ in the
year of our Lord, one thousend nine hundred and ____________, and of the
independence of the Philippines, the ___________________.

(Seal of the Republic of the Philippines)

Signature of the President

By the President:

Signature of the Minister for Foreign Affairs

Sample Request for Provisional Recognition

Excellency:

I have the honor to inform you that (name of consular officer), whose
curriculum vitae is enclosed herewith, has been appointed Consul of (name of
sending state) in (name of receiving state), with residence in (name of city
where consular office will be located).

I would appreciate it if, pending the receipt of this commission and the
issuance of an exequatur thereon, (name of consular officer) may be granted
provisional recognition.

Accept, Excelency, the renewed assurances of my highest
consideration.

Signature of Chief of Mission

His Excellency
The Minister for Foreign Affairs
Manila

Exequatur

(Name of President)

President of the Philippines

To all whom it may concern:

Satisfactory evidence having been exhibited to me that (name of
consular officer) has been appointed (rank of consular officer), I do recognize
him as such, and declare him free to exercise and enjoy such functions,
powers, and privileges as are allowed to consular officers by the Law of
Nations or by the Laws of the Republic of the Philippines.
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In testimony hereof, I have caused these letters to be made Patent, and
the Seal of the Republic of the Philippines to be hereunto affixed.

Done in the City of Manila this (date), and of the Independence of the
Philippines, the ___________________________.

Signature of the President

By the President:
Minister for Foreign Affairs

(SAMPLE: FULL POWERS)

MALACAANG PALACE

MANILA

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE PHILIPPINES

TO ALL WHOM THOSE PRESENTS SHALL COME, GREETINGS:

KNOW YE, that reposing special trust and confidence in the integrity,
prudence and ability of:

Honorable Manuel Collantes, Deputy Minister
for Foreign Affairs - Chairman
Ambassador Hortencio J. Brillantes - Member
Ambassador Pacifico A. Castro - Member
Ambassador Nicasio Valderrama - Member
Counsellor Jaime J. Yamhao - Member
I, FERDINAND E. MARCOS, President of the Philippines, have
designated the Honorable Manuel Collantes Deputy Minister for Foreign
Affairs, as Leader and the rest as Members of the Philippine Observer
Delegation to the Sixth Summit Conference of Non-Aligned Countries to be
held in Havana, Cuba on 25 August to 9 September 1979, and have invested
in them with full and all manner of power and authority, for and in the name of
the Republic of the Philippines, to meet and confer with any person or
persons duly represented in the said Meeting being invested with like power
and authority.

IN THE TESTIMONY WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and
caused the seal of the Republic of the Philippines to be affixed.

DONE in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 14th day of July in the year
of our Lord nineteen hundred and seventy nine.

BY THE PRESIDENT:

Minister for Foreign Affairs

(SAMPLE: LETTER-CREDENTIALS)

13 February 1981

S i r :

In connection with the forthcoming Asian-African Legal Consultative
Committee Inter-sessional Meeting on the Law of the Sea which will be held
from 16 to 18 February 1981 and Inter-sessional Expert Group Meeting on
the Exclusive Economic Zone, from 19 to 21 February 1981, both in New
Delhi, I wish to inform you that the following shall be participants in said
Meetings:

1. Counsellor RODOLFO A. ARIZALA
Acting Director-General
United Nations and International
Organizations, Ministry of
Foreign Affairs, Manila - Representative
2. Mr. FRANKLIN M. EBDALIN
Second Secretary
Philippine Embassy, New Delhi - Alternate
Representative
Accept, Sir, the assurances of my highest consideration.
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(SGD) CARLOS P. ROMULO
Minister for Foreign Affairs

The Honorable
B. Sen
Secretary General
Asian-African Legal Consultative Committee
New Delhi

UNIO:RAA:prf:act

Letters of Credence

(SAMPLE: LETTER OF CREDENCE - PILIPINO)

PANGULO NG PILIPINAS

(RP SEAL)

Dakila at Butihing Kaibigan:

Hinirang ko si

isang magiting na mamamayan ng Pilipinas, upang manirahang

malapit sa Pamahalaan ng lnyong bilang

ng Republika ng Pilipinas. May lubos siyang kabatiran hinggil

sa mga kapakanan ng dalawang bansa at hinggil sa matapat na

hangarin ng Pamahalaang ito na lubusang linangin ang pagkaka-

ibigang matagal nang nagbubuklod sa kanila. Ang aking nalalaman

tungkol sa kanyang ulirang katauhan at kakayahan ay nagdulot sa

akin ng lubos n pagtitiwala na tuwina'y sisikapin niyang mapa-

unlad ang mga kapakanan at kasaganaan ng dalawang Pamaha-

laan at sa gayo'y maging kanais-nais siya sa Inyong.

Samakatwid, hinihiling ko sa Inyong

na siya'y mabutihin ninyong tanggapin at lubos ninyong panaligan

ang anumang sasabihin niya sa panig ng Republika ng Pilipinas at

sa mga iniatas kong paratingin niya sa inyo na mga pahayag ng

lalong mabubuting hangarin ng Pamahalaang ito para sa kasaganaan

ng

Ingalan nawa ng Maykapal ang Inyong sa

kanyang matalinong Pangangalaga.

Ang Inyong Butihing Kaibigan,

Nilagdaan ng Pangulo:

Minister ng mga Ugnayang Panlabas

Maynila, Ika

(SAMPLE: LETTER OF CREDENCE - ENGLISH)

PRESIDENT OF THE PHILIPPINES

Great and Good Friend:

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I have made choice of

a distinguished citizen of the Philippines, to reside near the Government

of Your in the quality of

of the Republic of the Philippines. He is well informed of the relative

interests of the two countries and of the sincere desire of this Govern-

ment to cultivate to the fullest extent the friendship which has so long

subsisted between them. My knowledge of his high character and ability

gives me entire confidence that he will constantly endeavor to advance

the interests and prosperity of both Governments and so render himself

acceptable to Your

I therefore request Your to receive him favorably

and to give full credence to what he shall say on the part of the Republic

of the Philippines and to the assurances which I have charged him to con-

vey to you of the best wishes of this Government for the prosperity of



May God have Your in wise keeping.

Your Good Friend,

By the President:

Minister of Foreign Affairs

Manila

Letter of Credence Accrediting Ambassador to the Pope

Name and Title of Head of State

To (Title and Name of Pope)

Most Holy Father or Your Holiness:

Desirous of Yostering the relations of friendship and good
understanding that exists between the Philippines and the Holy See,
I have decided to accredit to Your Holiness (name of ambassador),
a distinguished citizen of the Philippines, in the character of
Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the Republic of the
Philippines. He is well informed of the relative interests of our
two states and of the sincere desire of this Government to cultivate
to the fullest extent of the friendly relations which have long
subsisted between us. My knowledge of his high character and ability
gives me entire confidence that, in the discharge of his duties, he
will constantly endeavor to advance the interest and prosperity of
both Governments and so render himself acceptable to Your Holiness.

I therefore request Your Holiness to receive him favorably,
and to give full confidence to what he shall say on behalf of the
Republic of the Philippines, more especially to the assurances which
I have charged him to convey to Your Holiness of the best wishes of
this Government for the prosperity and well-being of the Holy See.

May God have Your Holiness in His safe and wise keeping.

Signature of Head of State

By the President:

Signature of Minister for Foreign Affairs
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Date and place of issue

Letter of Credence Accrediting a Minister to a King

(Name and Title of Head of Sending State)

To (Title and Name of Sovereign)

Great and Good Friend:

I have chosen (name of Minister), a distinguished citizen of
the Philippines, to accredit to Your Majesty in the character of
Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of the Republic of
the Philippines. He is well informed of the relative interests of
our two countries, and of the sincere desire of this Government to
cultivate to the fullest extent the relations of friendship and good
understanding which have so long subsisted between us. My knowledge
of his high character and ability gives me entire confidence that,
in the discharge of his duties, he will constantly endeavor to advance
the interests and prosperity of both Governments and so render himself
acceptable to Your Majesty.

I therefore request Your Majesty to receive him favorably and
to give full credence to what he shall say on behalf of the
Republic of the Philippines, and more especially to the assurances
which I have charged him to convey to Your Majesty of the best
wishes of this Government for the prosperity of (name of receiving
state).

May God have Your Majesty in His wise keeping.

Your Good Friend,

Signature of Head of Sending State

By the President:

Signature of Minister for Foreign Affairs
Date and place of issue

Letter Accrediting a Charge d'Affaires

Excellency:

I have the honor to inform you that I have appointed (name of
officer) as Charge d'Affaires ad interim of the Philippines in
(name of receiving state). Mr. (name of officer) will serve in that
capacity pending the arrival of an Envoy Extraordinary and Minister
Plenipotentiary of the Philippines.

In communicating the foregoing information, I have the honor to
request that Mr. (name of officer) be recognized in the character
above mentioned, and that he be received favorably, giving full
credence to what he shall say in my behalf, and causing to be
extended to him such immunities, privileges and courtesies as are
usually accorded to a diplomatic representative of his rank and
position.

I avail myself of this occasion to convey to Your Excellency
the assurances of my most distinguished consideration.

Minister for Foreign Affairs

His Excellency
(Name and Address of Minister for
Foreign Affairs of Receiving State)

Letters of Recall

(SAMPLE: LETTER OF RECALL - PILIPINO)

PANGULO NG PILIPINAS

(RP SEAL)
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Dakila at Butihing Kaibigan:

Sa dahilang si na may

ilang panahon nanirahang malapit sa Pamahalaang ng Inyong

bilang

ng Republika ng Pilipinas

ay pinabalik na, at sa dahilang bindi niya maiaabot nang tuwiran

ang kanyang liham ng pagpapabalik, ipinagkatiwala ko sa kanyang

kahalili ang tungkuling paglalagay niyon sa mga kamay ng Inyong

Ikinalulugod kong paniwalaan na si

sa panahon ng kanyang misyo, ay nag-ukol ng buo niyang maka-

kaya upang mapatibay ang mabuting pagkakaunawaan at magiliw

na pagsasamahan ng dalawang Pamahalaan ng Republika ng Pilipi-

nas at ng

Ako'y umaasa na sa kasiya-siyang panunuparan ng tungkuling inl-

atang sa kanya'y natamo niya ang pagtingin at mabuting kalooban

ng Inyong

Ang Inyong Butihing Kaibigan,

Nilagdaan ng Pangulo:

Minister ng mga Ugnayang Panlabas

Maynila, Ika

(SAMPLE: LETTER OF RECALL - ENGLISH)

PRESIDENT OF THE PHILIPPINES

Great and Good Friend:

who has for some time resided

near the Government of Your in the character of

of the Republic of the Philippines, having

and being unable to present his letter of recall in person, I have entrusted

to his successor the duty of placing it in the hands of Your

I am pleased to believe that during his mission,

devoted all his efforts to strengthening the good understanding and the

friendly relations existing between the Government of the Republic of the

Philippines and I entertain the

hope that, while fulfilling satisfactorily the trust imposed upon him he

succeded in gaining Your esteem and good will.

Your Good Friend,

By the President:

Minister for Foreign Affairs
14 | P a g e

Manila

Calling Cards

Forms for Diplomatic Officers:

1.
Juan de la Cruz
Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary
of the Philippines

Paris, France

2.
Juan de la Cruz
Ambassador of the Philippines

Paris, France

3.
Ramon Garcia
Second Secretary of Embassy of the Philippines

Rome, Italy

Cards are used for various occasions: to express gratitude, felicitations, to
make and return calls, condolences, etc.

The following are generally accepted abbreviations, written in pencil on the
lower left-hand corner of cards:

p.p. - pour presenter (to introduce)
p.r. - pour remercier (to express appreciation or thanks)
p.c. - pour consoler (to extend condolences)
p.f. - pour feliciter (to extend felicitations)
p.p.c. - pour pendre conge (to say goodbye)

Card forms for Consular Officers:

1.
Jose Reyes
Consul General of the Philippines

2.
Jose Reyes
Consul of the Republic of the Philippines

3.
Jose Reyes
Vice Consul of the Philippines

Diplomatic and consular officers when assigned in the Home Office should
refrain from using their diplomatic titles or ranks. They should indicate below
their names, the position they hold in the Home Office.

Part V

Handling of Correspondence

General Instructions
All incoming and outgoing correspondence must be handled carefully to
prevent any damage. Notations made on correspondence are to be placed in
the margins, not on the text of the documents. In stamping incoming
correspondence, care must be taken not to obscure any part of the
communication.

The use of pins for fastening materials for mailing is prohibited by postal
regulations and must be avoided at all times. Clips, metal staples, rubber
bands or tapes are to be used instead.

Despatches are to be mailed unfolded whenever possible, and placed inside
envelopes in such a manner as to insure the best protection during transit. If a
15 | P a g e
despatch must be folded for transmission to the Ministry, the fold must be
inward so that the typewritten words are not exposed.

The name and address of the sending office are to be shown in the upper left-
hand corner of each official envelope transmitted by pouch. The classification
or administrative control designation is to be shown in the lower left-hand
corner of each official envelope.

Promptness in Reply
Inquiries shall be answered promptly, if possible, on the day of receipt or
within three days of receipt. If delay is necessary in order to make
investigations, receipt of inquiry shall be acknowledged, and the inquirer shall
be advised of the approximate date the information will be available. If the
inquiry concerns information which the office is not permitted or not in a
position to give, the inquiry shall be acknowledged; and if possible, the
inquirer shall be referred to the proper source for the required information.

Transmittal by Diplomatic Pouch
(See also Part G, Transmission of Correspondence and Reports by Mail,
Chapter 6, Revised Foreign Service Rules and Regulations (1962), pp. 12-
14).

All official mail transmitted by foreign service establishments to the Ministry
and vice-versa shall ordinarily be sent by diplomatic pouch.

All official mail transmitted by pouch to the Ministry shall be placed unfolded
in a large envelope and addressed to "The Honorable, the Minister for
Foreign Affairs". The envelope shall then be marked to indicate the nature of
the papers enclosed.

Sending and Receipt of Pouch
All correspondence, papers and any other document sent to the Ministry
through the diplomatic pouch must be listed in triplicate in a "pouch list". The
list is signed by the diplomatic pouch assistant, and certified to as correct by
the chief of mission or principal officer or his duly authorized representative,
who should be a Foreign Service Officer, or in the absence of such officer, the
next ranking officer. A copy of the pouch list shall remain in the post, while the
original and a copy shall be placed inside the pouch, the former to be
returned to the post of origin after it is checked and verified by the proper
receiving officials in the Ministry.

The incoming diplomatic pouch shall not be opened except in the presence of
the chief of mission or of the principal officer, or his authorized representative.
The original list of contents shall be returned to the Ministry duly checked and
verified as to its contents.

Except in cases of emergency, pouches should be opened only in the
chancery or the consular office even when received on holidays or during
weekends.

Abuse of Pouches
No letter, publication or article of any kind whatsoever except those
mentioned below in "Transmission or Extra-Official Mail by Pouch" (Sec. 6,
Part G, Chapter 6 of the Revised Foreign Service Rules and Regulations,
1962), may be accepted for transmittal by pouch, without previous and
express authority of the Ministry. Should any official or person of whatever
rank or position, request transmittal through the pouch of any article other
than those mentioned in the official list, this provision of the Regulations may
be shown to the party concerned as basis for refusal to accept the documents
or articles. Any violation or irregularity discovered in the use of the pouch
shall be reported promptly to the Minister for Foreign Affairs.

Weight of Pouches
Officers of the Foreign Services shall observe Section 6, Article 160,
"Regulations for Execution to the Universal Postal Convention" signed in
Brussels on July 11, 1952 which provides that no sack in the international
mail shall exceed 30 kilograms or 66 pounds in weight.

Non-Mailable Matter
The inclusion in diplomatic pouches of any of the following articles is strictly
prohibited: poison, corrosive materials, explosives, cartridge or load shells,
matches, inflammable materials liable to cause fire through friction or
spontaneous combustion, fresh hides, polts, or any ill-smelling article,
perishable matter likely to spoil, materials requiring special labels, such as
16 | P a g e
"Fragile - this side up" or "Fragile - Liquid", and materials which may kill or in
any way injure a person or damage, deface or injure the mail or other
property.

Transmittal of Extra-Official Mail by Pouch
The following types of extra-official mail may be transmitted by diplomatic
pouch:

1. In exceptional cases, the private correspondence of officers and
Philippine employees of the Foreign Service and their immediate families, and
the correspondence of other Philippine officials and employees of the
Philippine Government stationed abroad, with members of their families in the
Philippines, to be sent in unsealed envelopes;
2. Official mail of foreign governments when specifically authorized by the
Ministry subject to certain rules and regulations;
3. Under exceptional circumstances, when in the interest of Philippine
trade, business letters from private individuals or firms to government officials
in the Philippines to be sent in unsealed envelopes duly endorsed by the
Chief of Mission or his duly authorized representative;
4. As a temporary exception under unusual circumstances or where local
postal facilities are inadequate, letters of representatives of leading Philippine
charitable institutions to be sent in unsealed envelopes;
5. One subscription for any Philippine newspaper by a ranking foreign
service officer in the post in cases where a Philippine foreign service
establishment is not a subscriber.
Extra-official mail transmitted by diplomatic pouch shall not contain
enclosures for third persons, or any form of currency.

Transmittal by Open Mail
When urgent and important communication should reach the Ministry of
Foreign Affairs earlier than the next pouch, mail of UNRESTRICTED or
RESTRICTED classification may be sent in sealed envelopes by international
air mail and registered or unregistered, depending on the importance of the
contents.

Postage stamps purchased with official funds shall be used only on official
correspondence and packages.

Surface Pouch
Books, any printed matter and other bulky materials should be sent by
surface pouch.

Annexes

Annex A
Forms of Address, Salutation and Complimentary Close

General
A. Forms of address, salutation and complimentary close are determined by
social and official customs.

B. The envelope addresses of letters and other communications are more
complete than the addresses in the body of the communications to facilitate
delivery.

C. There are many optional variations in forms of address, especially in the
salutation and complimentary close.
Philippine Forms

Titles of Address
A. In addressing distinguished Filipinos and people of other nationalities the
proper form of address must be ascertained and the correct title should be
used.

B. A spouse does not share her/his spouse's official title and is to be
addressed as Mr. or Mrs. (name).

Forms of Address, Salutation and Complimentary Close Used in Addressing
Government Officials of the Philippines in Their Order of Presence

The President
Address:
The President
Mlacaang Manila
17 | P a g e

Salutation:
His Excellency (very formal; official)
Mr. President (formal)
Dear Mr. President (informal)
Complimentary Close:
Respectfully, (formal; official)
Faithfully yours, (informal; official)
Very respectfully, (private individuals)
Prime Minister
Address:
The Prime Minister
Batasang Pambasa
Manila
Salutation:
His Excellency (very formal; official)
Mr. Prime Minister (informal; official)
Dear Mr. Prime Minister (private individuals)
Complimentary Close:
Respectfully, (formal; official)
Faithfully yours, (informal; official)
Very respectfully, (private individuals)
Former President of the Philippines
Address:
The Honorable
Juan de la Cruz
(office address)
Salutation:
Dear Mr. de la Cruz
Complimentary Close:
Respectfully, or Respectfully yours,
Speaker of the Batasang Pambasa
Address:
The Honorable
Juan de la Cruz
Speaker of the Batasang Pambasa
Quezon City
Salutation:
Sir: (formal)
Dear Mr. Speaker: (informal)
Complimentary Close:
Very truly yours, (formal)
Sincerely yours, (informal)
Chief Justice of the Supreme Court
Address:
The Honorable
The Chief Justice
Supreme Court of the Philippines
Manila
Salutation:
Sir: (formal)
Dear Mr. Chief Justice: (informal)
Complimentary Close:
Very truly yours, (formal)
Sincerely yours, (informal)
Minister for Foreign Affairs
Address:
The Honorable
Juan de la Cruz
Minister for Foreign Affairs
Manila
Salutation:
Sir: (formal)
Dear Mr. Minister: (informal)
Complimentary Close:
Very truly yours, (formal)
Sincerely yours, (informal)
Used by foreign missions:
Address:
The Honorable
Juan de la Cruz
Minister for Foreign Affairs of the
Republic of the Philippines
Manila, Philippines
18 | P a g e
Salutation:
Excellency: (formal)
My dear Mr. Minister: (informal)
Complimentary Close:
Accept, Excellency, the (renewed) assurances of my most distinguished
consideration. (formal diplomatic usage)
Very truly yours, (formal general usage)
Sincerely yours, (informal)
Members of the Cabinet who are Heads of Ministries
Minister of Finance
Minister of Justice
Minister of Agriculture
Minister of Public Works
Minister of Education and Culture
Minister of Labor and Employment
Minister of National Defense
Minister of Health
Minister of Trade
Minister of Social Services and Development
Minister of National Economic and Development Authority
Minister of Agrarian Reform
Minister of Public Information
Minister of Local Governments and Community Development
Minister of Tourism
Minister of Industry
Minister of Public Highways
Minister of Natural Resources
Minister of Youth and Sports Development
Minister of Energy
Minister of Human Settlements
Minister of the Budget
Minister of Transportation and Communication
Solicitor-General
Address:
The Honorable
Juan(a) de la Cruz
Minister for _______________
Salutation:
Sir:/Madam: (formal)
Dear Mr. Minister:/Madam Minister: (informal)
Complimentary Close:
Very truly yours, (formal)
Sincerely yours, (informal)
Officials with Cabinet Rank of Minister
Chairman of the National Science Development Board
Presidential Assistant on National Minorities
Presidential Executive Assistant
Presidential Assistant
Address:
The Honorable
Juan de la Cruz
(position title)
Salutation:
Sir: (formal)
Dear Mr. de la Cruz: (informal)
Complimentary Close:
Very truly yours, (formal)
Sincerely yours, (informal)
Members of the Interim Batasang Pambasa
Address:
The Honorable
Juan de la Cruz
Assemblyman, Region ________
Batasang Pambasa
Quezon City
Associate Justices of the Supreme Court
Address:
The Honorable
Juan de la Cruz
Associate Justice of the
Supreme Court
Manila
Salutation:
Sir: (formal)
19 | P a g e
Dear Mr. Justice de la Cruz: (informal)
Complimentary Close:
Very truly yours, (formal)
Sincerely yours, (informal)
Chairmen of the Civil Service Commission, Commission on Audit and
Commission on Elections
Address:
The Honorable
Juan de la Cruz
Chairman of the ____________
Salutation:
Sir: (formal)
Dear Mr. Chairman: (informal)
Complimentary Close:
Very truly yours, (formal)
Sincerely yours, (informal)
Presiding Justice and Associate Justices of the Court of Appeals
Address:
The Honorable
Juan de la Cruz
Presiding (Associate) Justice
Court of Appeals
Manila
Salutation:
Sir: (formal)
Dear Mr. Justice de la Cruz: (informal)
Ambassador of the Philippines
Address:
The Honorable
Juan de la Cruz
(Position at MFA - may be eliminated)
Ministry of Foreign Affairs
Manila
Address (at post):
The Honorable
Juan de la Cruz
Ambassador of the (Republic of the)
Philippines
City, Country
Salutation:
Sir: (formal)
Dear Mr. Ambassador: (informal)
Complimentary Close:
Very truly yours, (formal)
Sincerely yours, (informal)
Deputy Ministers of other Ministries
Address:
The Honorable
Juan de la Cruz
Deputy Minister of ______________
Manila
Salutation:
Sir: (formal)
Dear Mr. Deputy Minister: (informal)
Complimentary Close:
Very truly yours, (formal)
Sincerely yours, (informal)
Principal Officers with the Rank of Ambassador of the Ministry of Foreign
Affairs
Address:
The Honorable
Juan de la Cruz
Ministry of Foreign Affairs
Salutation:
Sir: (formal)
Dear Mr. de la Cruz: (informal)
Complimentary Close:
Very truly yours, (formal)
Sincerely yours, (informal)
Commissioners of the Civil Service Commission, Commission on Audit, and
the Commission on Elections
Address:
The Honorable
Juan de la Cruz
20 | P a g e
Commissioner of the _______________
Manila
Salutation:
Sir: (formal)
Dear Mr. Commissioner: (informal)
Complimentary Close:
Very truly yours, (formal)
Sincerely yours, (informal)
Governor of the Central Bank
Address:
The Honorable
Juan de la Cruz
Governor of the Central Bank
of the Philippines
Manila
Salutation:
Sir: (formal)
Dear Mr. Governor: (informal)
Complimentary Close:
Very truly yours, (formal)
Sincerely yours, (informal)
Envoys Extraordinary and Ministers Plenipotentiary of the Philippines
Address:
The Honorable
Juan de la Cruz
(office address)
Salutation:
Sir: (formal)
Dear Mr. de la Cruz: (informal)
Complimentary Close:
Very truly yours, (formal)
Sincerely yours, (informal)
Principal Officers with the Rank of Counselor of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs
If the officer is the head of an office or division, he is addressed as "The
Honorable";
if he is not, he is simply addressed as Mr. _____________.
Address:
The Honorable
Juan de la Cruz
Ministry of Foreign Affairs
Manila
Salutation:
Sir: (formal)
Dear Mr. de la Cruz: (informal)
Complimentary Close:
Very truly yours, (formal)
Sincerely yours, (informal)
Mayor of Manila, President of the University of the Philippines, Chief of Staff,
Commissioners and Officials with the Rank of Deputy Minister
Mayor of Manila
Address:
His Honor
Juan de la Cruz
Mayor of Manila
President of the University of the Philippines
Address:
Mr. Juan de la Cruz
President of the University of the
Philippines
Diliman, Quezon City
Chief of Staff
Address:
(AFP Rank) de la Cruz
Chief of Staff
Armed Forces of the Philippines
Fort Emilio Aguilando
Quezon City
Address:
The Honorable
Juan de la Cruz
(position title)
Salutation:
Sir: (formal)
Dear Mr. de la Cruz: (informal)
21 | P a g e
Dear Mr. (Title): (informal)
Complimentary Close:
Very truly yours, (formal)
Sincerely yours, (informal)
Provincial Governors
Address:
The Honorable
Juan de la Cruz
Governor of ______________
(name of provincial capital)
Salutation:
Sir: (formal)
Dear Mr. Governor: (informal)
Complimentary Close:
Very truly yours, (formal)
Sincerely yours, (informal)
Mayors of Chartered Cities
A mayor of an unchantered city is addressed as "The Mayour".
Address:
The Honorable
Juan de la Cruz
Mayor of (name of city)
Salutation:
Sir: (formal)
Dear Mr. Mayor: (informal)
Complimentary Close:
Very truly yours, (formal)
Sincerely yours, (informal)
Vice Chiefs of Staff and Heads of Major AFP Command with the Rank of
Major General
Address:
Major General (other higher rank) de la Cruz
(service designation, i.e., PA, PAF, PC)
(position title)
Salutation:
Sir: or Dear Major General de la Cruz: (formal; official)
Complimentary Close:
Very truly yours, (formal)
Officers of the Armed Forces of the Philippines with the Rank of Major
General or Rear Admiral
Address:
Major General/Rear Admiral de la Cruz
(PA, PAF, PC, PCG)
(position title and/or address)
Salutation:
Sir: or Dear General/Admiral de la Cruz: (formal; official)
Complimentary Close:
Very truly yours, (formal)
Judges of the Courts of First Instance
Address:
The Honorable
Juan de la Cruz
Judge of the Court of First Instance
(place of jurisdiction)
Salutation:
Sir: (formal)
Dear Judge de la Cruz: (informal)
Complimentary Close:
Very truly yours, (formal)
Sincerely yours, (informal)
Officers of the Armed Forces of the Philippines with the Rank of Brigadier
General or Commodore
Address:
Brigadier General/Commodore (appropriate rank title) de la Cruz
(service designation)
(office address)
Salutation:
Sir: or Dear General/Commodore de la Cruz: (formal; official)
Complimentary Close:
Very truly yours, (formal)
Directors of Bureaus and Chiefs of Offices
Address:
Mr. Juan de la Cruz
(title)
22 | P a g e
(name of bureau/office)
Salutation:
Sir: (formal)
Dear Mr. de la Cruz: (informal)
Complimentary Close:
Very truly yours, (formal)
Sincerely yours, (informal)
Presidents, Chairmen, and Managers of Government Corporations
Address:
Mr. Juan de la Cruz
(title)
(name of corporation)
Salutation:
Sir: (formal)
Dear Mr. de la Cruz: (informal)
Complimentary Close:
Very truly yours, (formal)
Sincerely yours, (informal)
Officers of the Armed Forces of the Philippines with the Rank of Colonel or
Lieutenant Colonel
Address:
Colonel/Lieutenant Colonel de la Cruz
(service designation)
(office address)
Salutation:
Sir: or Dear Colonel de la Cruz: (formal; official)
Complimentary Close:
Very truly yours, (formal)
Officers of the Armed Forces of the Philippines with the Rank of Major or
Captain
Address:
Major/Captain de la Cruz
(service designation)
Salutation:
Sir: or Dear Major/Captain de la Cruz: (formal; official)
Complimentary Close:
Very truly yours, (formal)
Forms of Address, Salutation and Complimentary Close Used in Addressing
Foreign Government Officials in the Philippines
Foreign Ambassadors Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary
Address:
His Excellency
______________________
Ambassador of (country)
Manila
Salutation:
Excellency: (formal)
My dear Mr. Ambassador: or My dear Ambassador (last name): (informal)
Complimentary Close:
Accept, Excellency, the (renewed) assurances of my highest consideration.
(formal)
Sincerely yours, (informal)
Foreign Charge d'Affaires (de misi or ad interim)
Address:
Mr. (full name)
Charge d'Affaires (ad interim) of (country)
Manila
Salutation:
Sir: (formal)
My dear Mr. Charge d'Affaires: or My dear Mr. (last name): (informal)
Complimentary Close:
Accept, Sir, the (renewed) assurances of my high consideration. (formal)
Sincerely yours, (informal)
Charge d'Affaires ad interim with Rank of Minister
Address:
The Honorable
____________________________
Minister Plenipotentiary
Charge d'Affaires of (country)
Manila
Salutation:
Sir: (formal)
My dear Mr. Charge d'Affaires: or My dear Minister (last name): (informal)
Complimentary Close:
23 | P a g e
Accept, Sir, the (renewed) assurances of my high consideration. (formal)
Sincerely yours, (informal)
Consul General, Consul, or Vice Consul
Address:
Mr. (full name)
Consul General/Consul/Vice Consul of (country) or
(nationality, i.e., British) Consul General/Consul/Vice Consul
(city)
Salutation:
Sir: (formal)
My dear Consul General/Consul/Vice Consul: or My dear Mr. (last name):
(informal)
Complimentary Close:
Very truly yours, (formal)
Sincerely yours, (informal)

Annex B
Diplomatic Terms
The following words are used in diplomatic parlance with the restricted
meaning indicated:
1. agration - an inquiry, usually informal, addressed by the
sending state to the receiving state regarding the acceptability of an individual
to be its chief of mission.
2. agrment - official approval by a foreign government of an
ambassador-designate or a minister-designate.
3. alternat - the principle whereby each country party to a
treaty or other international compact receives precedence in the original
instrument retained by it.
4. ambassador -
a. ambassador-designate - a diplomatic agent who has been
designated by the head of state, approved by the head of state to whom he
will be accredited, but has not presented his credentials.
b. appointed ambassador - a diplomatic agent; the personal
representative of a head of state, one who has been received by a secretary
of state or minister for foreign affairs prior to presenting his credentials to the
head of state.
c. ambassador extraordinary or plenipotentiary - the highest rank
of diplomatic agent; the personal representative of the head of one state
accredited to the head of another state. (Ambassadors represent the person
of the head of state, as well as the state from which they come, and are
entitled to ask an audience at any time with the Chief of the state to which
they are accredited, although in general practice the request is submitted
through the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.)
5. ambassador extraordinary - a designation ordinarily given to a
non-accredited personal representative of the head of state.
6. asylum, the right of - the competence of every state, inferred
from its territorial supremacy, to allow a persecuted alien to enter and to
remain on its territory under its protection and thereby to grant an asylum to
him. It is generally accepted practice that a political refugee who takes asylum
in a foreign country should not be deported back to his own country from
which he has escaped. A more difficult question arises when a political
refugee takes asylum, not in a foreign country, but in foreign embassy or
legation in his own capital.
7. chancery - a term used to designate the actual office of a
head of a diplomatic mission, namely, his first, second, and third secretaries,
plus the attendant clerks. It is also used to designate the premises in which
they exercise their functions.
8. charge d'affaires (de missi) - accredited by letter to the secretary
of state or minister for foreign affairs of one country by the secretary of state
or minister for foreign affairs of another country, in lieu of a duly accredited
ambassador or minister. The complete title is seldom used, being customarily
shortened to charge d'affaires.
9. charge d'affaires ad interim - usually the counselor or
secretary of an embassy or legation, who automatically assumes charge of a
diplomatic mission in the temporary absence of an ambassador or minister.
The words "ad interim" should not be omitted from this title except in a
salutation. A charge d'affaires ad interim who has the personal rank of
minister plenipotentiary is addressed the same as other charges d'affaires ad
interim, the ministerial rank being merely personal and having no connection
with his diplomatic status of charge d'affaires ad interim. Such a personal
ministerial title may follow a name but precede an official diplomatic title. The
complimentary title "The Honorable" should be used.
24 | P a g e
10. charge d'affaires - sometimes used to describe a person who
has been placed in custody of the archives and other property of a mission in
a country with which formal diplomatic relations are not maintained.
11. compromis (sometimes called compromis d'arbitrage) - a formal
agreement between two or more countries setting forth the terms and
conditions of an arbitration between them.
12. convention - a less important form of treaty, namely one which
is concluded, not between heads of states but between governments. It
generally suggests a multinational agreement. Its scope is usually but not
always, restricted to some specific or technical matter. This is the term
commonly used by the United Nations to denominate agreements concluded
under its auspices.
13. delegation - a group of persons appointed to an international
conference, commission, or organization.
14. dmarche - a French word traditionally used in a diplomatic
sense to describe a formal action or measure, especially one involving a
charge of direction or policy, undertaken by an official foreign representative
and addressed to the government of the country to which he is accredited.
15. development diplomacy - a major component of Philippine
foreign policy, also known as economic diplomacy. It is a general policy
objective of seeking to satisfy on maximum terms the country's basic social
and development needs. It concerns itself with the promotion of the Philippine
exports in both traditional and non-traditional markets, the promotion of
tourism, the promotion of foreign investments, transfer of technology, the
procurement of economic and technical assistance from other countries and
international financial institutions, the protection and advancement of interests
of Filipino migrant workers and the reform of the international economic order
to ensure more equitable sharing of the world's resources.
16. dtente - relaxation, easing of tension.
17. diplomacy - the application of intelligence and tact to the
conduct of official relations between the governments of independent states.
18. diplomatic agent - a general term denoting a person who
carries on regular diplomatic relations of the state he represents in the
country to which he has been appointed; an agent representing a sovereign
or state for some special purpose.
19. diplomatic corps - the collective heads of foreign diplomatic
missions and their staff within the capital of any country.
20. diplomatic correspondence - official correspondence between the
agents authorized by a state to conduct its foreign relations either at home or
abroad, or between them and similarly authorized representatives of foreign
governments.
21. envoy - a diplomatic agent. A special envoy is one designated for
a particular purpose, such as the conduct of special negotiations and
attendance at coronations, inaugurations, or other state ceremonies to which
special importance is attached. The designation is always of a temporary
character.
22. envoy extraordinary - a diplomatic agent.
23. envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary - a
diplomatic agent accredited to a government.
24. extradition - the surrender by one state to another state of an
individual convicted or accused of having committed a crime within the
jurisdiction of the demanding state, for trial and punishment. It usually applies
to fugitive criminals.
25. extraterritoriality - special jurisdiction exercised by a nation in
other countries, under treaty.
26. final act
(sometimes called protocol de cloture) - a summary of the proceedings
of a diplomatic conference and usually includes a reproduction of the texts of
treaties, conventions, recommendations and other acts agreed upon by the
plenipotentiaries attending the conference.
27. general act - a summary of the conclusions of a conference or
detailed regulations deriving from certain principles embodied in a treaty.
28. good offices - a term applied to the attempt of a third party to
bring together two parties to effect a settlement of their disputes. The function
of good offices may be performed by states, either singly or acting jointly.
29. immunity - exemption of foreign diplomatic agents or
representatives from local jurisdiction.
30. minister -
a. minister-designate - a diplomatic agent who has been
designated by his government and approved by the head of government to
which he has been accredited but who has not presented his credentials.
b. appointed minister - a diplomatic agent, the
representative of his government, who has been received by a secretary of
25 | P a g e
state or minister for foreign affairs prior to presenting his credentials to the
head of a government.
c. envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary - a
diplomatic agent accredited to a government.
31. minister plenipotentiary - a non-accredited diplomatic agent,
the representative of his government.
32. minister resident - a diplomatic agent.
33. mission - a general term for a commission, delegation,
embassy, or legation.
34. modus vivendi - a temporary agreement intended to be
replaced by a more permanent and detailed agreement.
35. pact - a treaty surrounded by a special atmosphere, formed in
part by a mystic sentiment or an intention of guaranty.
36. passport - in international law, an official document issued to
a person by his own government certifying to his citizenship and requesting
foreign governments to grant him safe and free passage, lawful aid, and
protection while under their jurisdiction.
37. persona non grata
(plu. personae non gratae) - one who is not acceptable.
38. proces-verbal - protocol of deposit - to record formally the
deposit of a sufficient number of ratifications to bring a multilateral treaty into
force.
39. protocol - a term applied to diplomatic formalities (official
ceremonials, precedence, immunities, privileges, courtesies, etc.). It may also
refer to an instrument which amends or supplements an existing treaty or
convention, but sometimes it is used to designate an altogether independent
agreement.
40. rapprochement - establishment or state of cordial relations.
Sometimes, it means bringing closer together.
41. treaty - the Vienna Convention defines a treaty as "an
international agreement" concluded between states in written form and
governed by international law, whether embodied in a single instrument or in
two or more related instruments. In its broad sense, it embraces all kinds of
international agreements, regardless of the nomenclature used to designate
them. In its restricted sense, the term is commonly employed to designate the
more important instruments, usually of political or quasi-political character,
such as treaties of peace, cession, alliance, friendship and commerce.
Treaties are either "bilateral", or concluded between two countries only, or
"multilateral", or concluded between several countries. Treaties of "mutual
guarantee" are those international compacts which aim at guarateeing each
signatory against attack from another.
42. ultimatum - the word "ultimatum" is sometimes regarded as
meaning "declaration of war". This is incorrect. It is often merely "the last
word" before a negotiation is broken off. It generally takes the form of a
written intimation that unless a satisfactory reply is received by a certain hour
on a certain date, certain consequences will follow. These consequences are
not necessarily war.
43. visa - in international law, an endorsement made on a passport
by the proper officials of a foreign country, denoting that it has been examined
and that the holder may enter the country; also a document issued permitting
entry into a country for permanent residence.
44. voeu (Fr.) - an official expression by an international
conference of a wish or a hope; often in the form of a resolution.

Annex C
Foreign Phrases
The following list comprises foreign phrases which are frequently used in
official correspondence and state papers. They should generally be
underscored in typewritten matter.
a fortiori - with stronger reason; much more.
a posteriori - from effect to cause; from what comes after.
a priori - from cause to effect; from what went before.
ad hoc - as to this.
ad infinitum - without limit.
ad interim - in the meantime. (Not underscored in title "Charge
d'Affaires ad interim")
ad referendum - for reference; for further consideration.
ad valorem - according to the valuation. (Not italicized in English text)
bona fide - in good faith.
bona fides - good faith.
casus belli - an event which is allegedly the cause of war.
casus foederis - some action or event which brings into operation a
particular treaty of alliance and justifies one party to that treaty in calling upon
another party to come to his assistance.
26 | P a g e
ceteris paribus - other things being equal.
coup d'etat - unexpected stroke of policy or statesmanships: often
accompanied by violence; often involves a charge in government.
de facto - actually; in fact; in deed.
de jure - rightfully; lawfully; by legal title.
droit civil - common law.
droit de detraction - emigration duty.
et sequentes, et sequentia - and the following.
ex aequo et bono - according to what is just and good.
ex gratia - in favour.
ex officio - by virtue of his office.
ex post facto - from or by an artefact; by subsequent matter.
ex professo - openly; avowedly.
force majeure - superior or irresistible force.
gotong royong - collectivity.
hors de cause - outside of the cause.
in extenso - fully; at length.
in fine - in or at the end.
in flagrante delicto - in the very act of committing the crime.
in tot. - in the whole; completely.
inter alia - among other things.
ipso facto - by the fact itself.
ipso jure - by the law itself.
jus civile - civil law.
jus gentium - the law of nations.
jus sanguinis - the right of blood.
jus soli - right of the scil: indicating the citizenship of a person by
the place of his birth.
lapsus calami - slip of the pen.
lapsus linguae - slip of the tongue.
lapsus memoriae - slip of the memory.
lex loci - the law of the place.
locus standi (a place of standing) - a right to be heard.
mala fides - bad faith.
mali exempli - of bad example.
mare clausum - closed sea.
mare liberum - free sea.
modus operandi - mode of operations.
modus Vivendi (plu. modi vivendi) - a temporary arrangement between
two sovereignties providing for the conduct
of certain affairs pending negotiations for a treaty on the same subject.
mufakat - consensus.
mushawarah - discussion; consultation.
mutatis mutandis - with necessary changes.
non compas mentia - not of sound mind, memory, or understanding.
non sequitur - it does not follow.
opere citato - in the work cited. (To be used only with the name of an
author or in connection with the name of the author)
parens patriae - father of his country.
per annum - by the year.
per diem - by the day.
per se - by itself; alone.
persona non grata (plu. personae non gratae) - one who is not
acceptable.
prime facie - at first view; on the first appearance.
pro confesso - as confessed.
pro rata - according to the rate, proportion, or allowance.
pro tanto - for so much.
pro tempore - for the time being.
proces-verbal (proces-verbaux) - official report(s), journal(s), minute(s)
of proceedings.
quid pro quo - one thing for, or in place, of another.
ratione personae - by reason of the person.
requete civile - appeal to the highest court for that court to reconsider its
own decision.
res judicata - a matter that has already been judicially determined.
status quo - the state of things existing at any given time.
status quo ante - the state of things existing before.
ultra vires - beyond their powers.

Annex D

Principal Countries, with Official Designations, Capitals and
National/Independence Days
27 | P a g e

Country Official Designation Capital National/Independence Day

Afghanistan Democratic Republic of Afghanistan Kabul August 19
Albania People's Socialist Republic of Albania Tirana January 11
Algeria Democratic and Popular Republic of Algeria Algiers
July 5
Angola People's Republic of Angola Luanda November 11
Argentina Argentina Republic Buenos Aires July 9
Australia Commonwealth of Australia Canberra January 26
Austria Republic of Austria Vienna October 26
Bahamas The Commonwealth of the Bahamas Nassau July 10
Bahrain State of Bahrain Manama December 16
Bangladesh People's Republic of Bangladesh Dacca March 26
Barbados Barbados Bridgetown November 30
Belgium Kingdom of Belgium Brussels July 21
Benin People's Republic of Benin Porto Novo August 1
Bhutan Kingdom of Bhutan Thimphu December 17
Bolivia Republic of Bolivia La Paz August 6
Botswana Republic of Botswana Gaborone September 30
Brazil Federative Republic of Brazil Brasilia September 7
Bulgaria People's Republic of Bulgaria Sofia September 9
Burma Socialist Republic of the Union of Burma Rangoon January 4
Burundi Republic of Burundi Bujumbura November 28 (Proclamation
of the Republic)
Cameroon United Republic of Cameroon Yaounde May 20
Canada Canada Ottawa July 1
Cape Verde Republic of Cape Verde Ciudad de Praia July 5
Central African Republic Central African Republic Bangui August 13
Chad Republic of Chad N'Djamena August 11
Chile Republic of Chile Santiago September 18
China People's Republic of China Beijing October 1
Colombia Republic of Colombia Bogota July 20
Comoros Federal Islamic Republic of the Comoros Moroni
July 6
Congo People's Republic of the Congo Brazzaville April 15
Costa Rica Republic of Costa Rica San Jose September 15
Cuba Republic of Cuba Havana January 2 (National Liberation Day)
Cyprus Republic of Cyprus Nicosia October 1
Czechoslovakia Czechoslovak Socialist Republic Prague May 9
Denmark Kingdom of Denmark Copenhagen April 16 (Birthday of the
Queen)
Djibouti Republic of Djibouti Djibouti June 27
Dominica Dominica Roseau November 3-4
Dominican Republic Dominican Republic Santo Domingo February 27
Ecuador Republic of Ecuador Quito August 10
Egypt Arab Republic of Egypt Cairo July 23 (Revolution Day)
El Salvador Republic of El Salvador San Salvador September 15
England United Kingdom of Great Britain and North Ireland London
June 2 (Birthday of the Queen)
Equatorial Guinea Republic of Equatorial Guinea Malabo October
12
Ethiopia Ethiopia Addis Ababa
Fiji Fiji Suva October 13
Finland Republic of Finland Helsinki December 6
France Republic of France Paris July 14 (Bastille Day)
Gabon Gabonese Republic Libreville August 17
Gambia The Republic of The Gambia Banjul February 18
Germany, East German Democratic Republic Berlin (East) October 7
Germany, West Federal Republic of Germany Bonn May 23
Ghana Republic of Ghana Accra March 6
Greece Greece Athens March 25
Grenada Grenada St. George's February 7
Guatemala Republic of Guatemala Guatemala City September 15
Guinea Popular and Revolutionary Republic of Guinea Conakry
October 2
Guinea-Bissau Guinea-Bissau Bissau September 10
Guyana Cooperative Republic of Guyana Georgetown May 26
Haiti Republic of Haiti Port-au-Prince January 1
Honduras Republic of Honduras Tegucigalpa September 15
Hungary Hungarian People's Republic Budapest April 4
(Liberation Day)
Iceland Republic of Iceland Reykjavik June 17
India Republic of India New Delhi January 26
28 | P a g e
Indonesia Republic of Indonesia Jakarta August 17
Iran Islamic Republic of Iran Tehran February 11
Iraq Republic of Iraq Baghdad July 17
Ireland Irish Republic (EIRE) Dublin March 17
Israel State of Israel Tel Aviv May 11
Italy Republic of Italy Rome June 2
Ivory Coast Republic of the Ivory Coast Abidjan December 7
Jamaica Jamaica Kingston August 4
Japan Japan Tokyo April 29 (Emperor's Birthday)
Jordan The Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan Amman May 25
Kampuchea People's Republic of Kampuchea Phnom Penh
Kenya Republic of Kenya Nairobi December 12
Korea, North Democratic People's Republic of Korea Pyongyang
September 9
Korea, South Republic of Korea Seoul August 15
Kuwait State of Kuwait Kuwait February 25
Laos Lao People's Democratic Republic Vientiane December 2
Lebanon Republic of Lebanon Beirut November 22
Lesotho Kingdom of Lesotho Maseru October 4
Liberia Republic of Liberia Monrovia July 26
Libya Socialist People's Libyan Arab Jamahiriyah Tripoli September 1
Liechtenstein Principality of Liechtenstein Vaduz
Luxembourg Grand Duchy of Luxembourg Luxembourg June 23
Madagascar The Democratic Republic of Madagascar Antananarivo
June 26
Malawi Republic of Malawi Lilongwe July 6
Malaysia Malaysia Kuala Lumpur August 31
Maldives Republic of Maldives Male July 26
Mali Republic of Mali Bamako September 22
Malta Republic of Malta Valletta September 21
Mauritania Islamic Republic of Mauritania Nuakchott November 28
Mexico United Mexican States Mexico City September 16
Monaco Principality of Monaco Monaco November 19
Mongolia Mongolian People's Republic Ulan Bator July 11
Morocco Kingdom of Morocco Rabat November 18
Mozambique The People's Republic of Mozambique Maputo June 25
Nauru Republic of Nauru January 31
Nepal Kingdom of Nepal Kathmandu December 28 (Birthday of the King)
Netherlands Kingdom of the Netherlands Amsterdam/The Hague
April 30 (Birthday of the Queen)
New Zealand New Zealand Wellington February 6 (Waitangi Day)
Nicaragua Republic of Nicaragua Managua September 15
Niger Republic of the Niger Niamey August 3
Nigeria Federal Republic of Nigeria Lagos October 1
Norway Kingdom of Norway Oslo May 17 (Constitution Day)
Oman Sultanate of Oman Muscat November 18
Pakistan Islamic Republic of Pakistan Islamabad March 23
Panama Republic of Panama Panama City November 3
Papua New Guinea Papua New Guinea Port Moresby September 16
Paraguay Republic of Paraguay Asuncion May 14
Peru Republic of Peru Lima July 28-29
Philippines Republic of the Philippines Manila June 12
Poland Polish People's Republic Warsaw July 22
Portugal Republic of Portugal Lisbon October 5 (Proclamation of
the Republic)
Qatar State of Qatar Doha September 3 (now December 12)
Romania Socialist Republic of Romania Bucharest August 23
Rwanda Rwandese Republic Kigali July 1
St. Lucia St. Lucia Castries December 13
St. Vincent and the Grenadies St. Vincent Kingstown October 27
San Marino Republic of San Marino San Marino
Sao Tome and Principe Democratic Republic of Sao Tome and Principe
Sao Tome July 12
Saudi Arabia Royal Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Riyad/Jeddah
September 23
Senegal Republic of Senegal Dakar August 20
Seychelles Republic of Seychelles Victoria June 29
Sierra Leone Republic of Sierra Leone Freetown April 27
Singapore Republic of Singapore Singapore City August 9
Solomon Islands Solomon Islands Honiara July 7
Somalia Somali Democratic Republic Mogadishu June 26
South Africa Republic of South Africa Pretoria/Cape Town/Bloemfontein

Spain Kingdom of Spain Madrid June 24 (Feast of the King)
29 | P a g e
Sri Lanka Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka Colombo
February 4
Sudan The Democratic Republic of the Sudan Khartoum January 1
Surinam Republic of Surinam Paramaribo November 25
Swaziland Kingdom of Swaziland Mbabane/Lobamba September 6
Sweden Kingdom of Sweden Stockholm April 30 (Birthday of the King)
Switzerland Swiss Confederation Berne August 1
Syria Syrian Arab Republic Damascus April 17
Tanzania United Republic of Tanzania Dar es Salaam
December 9
Thailand Kingdom of Thailand Bangkok December 5 (Birthday
of the King)
Togo Togolose Republic Lome April 27
Tonga Kingdom of Tonga (Friendly Islands) Nuku'alofa June 4
Trinidad and Tobago Republic of Trinidad and Tobago Port of Spain
August 31
Tunisia Republic of Tunisia Tunis March 20
Turkey Republic of Turkey Ankara October 29 (Proclamation of
the Republic)
Tuvalu Tuvalu Funafuti October 1
Uganda Republic of Uganda Kampala October 9
U.S.S.R. Union of Soviet Socialist Republics Moscow
November 7
United Arab Emirates United Arab Emirates Abu Dhabi
December 2
U.S.A. United States of America Washington D.C. July 4
Upper Volta Republic of Upper Volta Ouagadougou August 5
Uruguay Republic of Uruguay Montevideo August 25
Vanatu Vanatu Vila July 30
Vatican Vatican City State Vatican City October 22 (Coronation of the
Pope)
Venezuela Republic of Venezuela Caracas July 5
Vietnam The Socialist Republic of Vietnam Hanoi September 2
Samoa Samoa Apia January 1
Yemen, North Yemen Arab Republic Sana'a October 14
Yemen, South People's Democratic Republic of Yemen Aden October
14
Yugoslavia Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Belgrade
November 29-30 (Day of the Republic)
Zaire Republic of Zaire Kinshasa June 30
Zambia Republic of Zambia Lusaka October 24
Zimbabwe Zimbabwe Salisbury April 18

Annex E
Countries and Regions of the World, with the Corresponding Nouns and
Adjectives Denoting Nationality
Country or Region Noun
(Plural ending in parentheses) Adjective
Afghanistan Afghan(s) Afghan
Albania Albanian(s) Albanian
Algeria Algerian(s) Algerian
Angola Angolan(s) Angolan
Andorra Andorran(s) Andorran
Argentina Argentine(s) Argentine
Australia Australian(s) Australian
Austria Austrian(s) Austrian
Bahamas Bahamian(s) Bahamian
Bahrain Bahreini(s) Bahreini
Bangladesh Bangladeshi
Barbados
Belgium Belgian(s) Belgian
Benin Beninese (sing., pl.) Beninese
Bhutan Bhutanese (sing., pl.) Bhutanese
Bolivia Bolivian(s) Bolivian
Botswana
Brazil Brazilian(s) Brazilian
Bulgaria Bulgarian(s) Bulgarian
Burma Burman(s) preferred, Burmese(sing., pl.) Burmese
Burundi
Byelorussia Byelorussian(s) Byelorussian
Cambodia (Kampuchea) Cambodian(s) (Kampuchean(s)) Cambodian
(Kampuchean)
Cameroon
Canada Canadian(s) Canadian
30 | P a g e
Cape Verde Cape Verdean(s) Cape Verde
Central African Republic Central African(s) Central African
Chad Chadian(s) Chadian
Chile Chilean(s) Chilean
China, People's Republic Chinese (sing., pl.) Chinese
Colombia Colombian(s) Colombian
Comoros Comoran(s) Comoran
Congo
Costa Rica Costa Rican(s) Costa Rican
Cuba Cuban(s) Cuban
Cyprus Cypriot(s) Cypriot
Czechoslovakia Czechoslovak(s) Czechoslovak
Denmark Dane(s) Danish
Dominica Dominican(s) Dominican
Dominican Republic Dominican(s) Dominican
Djibouti
Ecuador Ecuadoran(s) Ecuadoran
Egypt Egyptian(s) Egyptian
El Salvador El Salvadoran(s) El Salvadoran
Equatorial Guinea Equatorial Guinean(s) Equatorial Guinean
Ethiopia Ethiopian(s) Ethiopian
Fiji Fijian(s) Fijian
Finland Finn(s) Finnish
France Frenchman (men) French
Gabon Gabonese (sing., pl.) Gabonese
Gambia
Germany German(s) German
Ghana Ghanaian(s) Ghanaian
Great Britain Briton(s) British
Greece Greek(s) Greek
Grenada Grenadine(s) Grenadine
Guatemala Guatemalan(s) Guatemala
Guinea Guinean(s) Guinean
Guinea-Bissau
Guyana
Haiti Haitian(s) Haitian
Honduras Honduran(s) Honduran
Hungary Hungarian(s) Hungarian
Iceland Icelander(s) Icelandic
India Indian(s) Indian
Indonesia Indonesian(s) Indonesian
Iran Iranian(s) Iranian
Iraq Iraqi(s) Iraq or Iraqi
Ireland Irishman(men), Irish (collective pl.) Irish
Israel Israeli(s) Israel or Israeli
Italy Italian(s) Italian
Ivory Coast
Jamaica Jamaican(s) Jamaican
Japan Japanese (sing., pl.) Japanese
Jordan Jordan(s), Jordanian(s) Jordan or Jordanian
Kenya Kenyan(s) Kenyan
Korea Korean(s) Korean
Kuwait Kuwaiti(s) Kuwait or Kuwaiti
Laos Lao (sing., pl.) Lao
Lebanon Lebanese (sing., pl.) Lebanese
Lesotho
Liberia Liberian(s) Liberian
Lybia Libyan(s) Libyan
Liechtenstein Liechtensteiner(s) Liechtenstein
Lithuania Lithuanian(s) Lithuanian
Luxembourg Luxembourger(s) Luxembourg
Madagascar
Malawi
Malaysia Malaysian(s) Malaysian
Maldives
Mali
Malta Maltese (sing., pl.) Maltese
Mauritania
Mauritius
Mexico Mexican(s) Mexican
Mongolia
Monaco Monacan(s) Monacan
Morocco Moroccan(s) Moroccan
Mozambique
31 | P a g e
Nauru Nauruan(s) Nauruan
Nepal Nepalese (sing., pl.) Nepalese
Netherlands Dutch (sing., pl.) Dutch
New Zealand New Zealander(s) New Zealand
Nicaragua Nicaraguan(s) Nicaraguan
Niger
Nigeria Nigerian(s) Nigerian
Norway Norwegian(s) Norwegian
Oman Omani(s) Oman or Omani
Pakistan Pakistani(s) Pakistan or Pakistani
Palestine Palestinian(s) Palestinian
Panama Panamanian(s) Panamanian
Papua New Guinea
Paraguay Paraguayan(s) Paraguayan
Peru Peruvian(s) Peruvian
Philippines Filipino(s) Philippine
Poland Pole(s) Polish
Portugal Portuguese (sing., pl.) Portuguese
Qatar Qatari(s) Qatari
Romania Romanian(s) Romanian
Rwanda Rwandan(s) Rwandan
Saint Christopher-Nevis-Anguilla Kittsian(s), Nevisian(s), Anguillan(s)
Kittsian, Nevisian, Anguillan
Santa Lucia Santa Lucian(s) Santa Lucian
Saint Vincent Saint Vincentian(s) or Vincentian(s) Saint Vincentian or
Vincentian
San Marino Sanmarinese (sing., pl.) Sanmarinese
Sao Tome and Principe Sao Tomean(s) Sao Tomean
Saudi Arabia Saudi(s) Saudi Arabian or Saudi
Senegal Senegalese (sing., pl.) Senegalese
Seychelles Seychellois (sing., pl.) Seychelles
Sierra Leone Sierra Leonean(s) Sierra Leonean
Singapore Singaporean(s) Singaporean
Solomon Islands Solomon Islander(s) Solomon Islander
Somalia Somali(s) Somali
South Africa South African(s) South African
Soviet Union Soviet(s) Soviet
Spain Spaniard(s) Spanish
Sri Lanka Sri Lankan(s) Sri Lankan
Sudan Sudanese (sing., pl.) Sudanese
Suriname Surinamer(s) Surinamese
Swaziland Swazi(s) Swazi
Sweden Swede(s) Swedish
Switzerland Swiss (sing., pl.) Swiss
Syria Syrian(s) Syrian
Tanzania Tanzanian(s) Tanzanian
Thailand Thai (sing., pl.) Thai
Togo Togolese (sing., pl.) Togolese
Tonga Tongan(s) Tongan
Trinidad and Tobago
Tunisia Tunisian(s) Tunisian
Turkey Turk(s) Turkish
Tuvalu
Uganda Ugandan(s) Ugandan
United Arab Emirates
United States of America American(s) American
Uruguay Uruguayan(s) Uruguayan
Vanuatu Vanuatuan(s) Vanuatu
Venezuela Venezuelan(s) Venezuela
Vietnam Vietnamese (sing., pl.) Vietnamese
Western Samoa Western Samoan(s) Western Samoan
Yemen Yemeni(s) Yemen or Yemeni
Yugoslavia Yugoslav(s) Yugoslav
Zaire Zairean(s)


Annex F
Annotated Bibliography
Castro, Pacifico A.
Philippine Diplomatic and Consular Practice (Rev. Ed.).
Manila: Enriquez Printing Co., 1967.
This book on diplomatic and consular relations reflecting Philippine laws,
regulations and practices gives the Filipino students and the public in general,
a proper perspective of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Philippine
32 | P a g e
Foreign Service. It supplies the available informational materials relevant to
the execution of Philippine foreign policy.
Foreign Service Institute.
Philippine Foreign Service Reader (Prov. Ed.).
Manila, 1980.
It is a handy reference on the basic laws governing the day-to-day operations
of the Philippine Foreign Service and it provides materials which will aid the
Foreign Service Officers in their daily functions.
McCaffree, Mary Jane, and Innis, Pauline.
Protocol: The Complete Handbook of Diplomatic, Official and Social Usage.
New York: Prentice Hall, Inc. 1977.
This book was written to help the newcomer in the Foreign Service cope up
with the official life at the local, and international level through the
understanding of the rules of protocol. It also shows the many changes in
customs and manners brought about by the rapidly changing times.
Meyer, Milton Walter.
A Diplomatic History of the Philippine Republic.
Hawaii: University of Hawaii Press, 1965.
This study traces the origins and the development of Philippine Diplomacy
from its formative years (1945-1946) up to 1961. It provides valuable
information on the internal and external factors whichhelped shape the
country's foreign policy under Roxas, Quirino, Magsaysay and Garcia.
Nicolson, Sir Harold.
Diplomacy (3rd Ed.)
London: Oxford University Press 1969.
This brief and lucid study outlines the history of diplomacy as te art of
implementing foreign policy by negotiation. It describes the ideal diplomatist,
discusses the recent changes in diplomatic procedure and defines diplomatic
language. First published in 1939, it has become "invaluable to any young
man entering the service and to any student of history interested in foreign
politics".
Office of Protocol, Ministry of Foreign Affairs.
Diplomatic and Consular List.
Manila, 1980.
This directory, published annually, provides up-to-date information on the
different diplomatic and consular representatives accredited to the
Philippines.
Salcedo, Luis Moreno.
A Guide to Protocol (Rev. Ed.).
Manila: University Book Supply, 1959.
This book is a practical guide to proper diplomatic behavior as applied by the
Ministry of Foreign affairs, Philippines. It starts with an exposition of the
meaning and scope of protocol and proceeds to a discussion of its different
aspects. It also includes a chapter on military courtesy or "Protocol in the
Armed Forces of the Philippines".
Satow, Sir Ernest M.
Satow's Guide to Diplomatic Practice (5th Ed.).
London: Longman Group Limited, 1979.
This book described as an invaluable work of reference and a masterpiece is
considered as the standard encyclopedia on Diplomatic Practice. Lord Gore-
Booth supervised its fifth edition.
Wood, John R., and Serres, Jean.
Diplomatic Ceremonial and Protocol: Principles, Procedures and Practices.
Great Britain: MacMillan and Co., Ltd., 1970.
Regarded as a reliable reference on ceremonial and protocol, this book is
helpful to foreign service practitioners and institutions. It discusses the Status
of Diplomats, Official Protocol, Diplomatic Action in various forms, and
International Organizations.
US Foreign Service Institute.
The Foreign Service Correspondence Handbook.
USA, 1956.
Prepared by the US Foreign Service Institute in collaboration with the
Correspondence Review Staff of the Executive Secretarat, this handbook
serves as a guide in the preparation of Foreign Service Correspondence.