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Jason Beck 2096110

EDUC4720/1 2012_Jane Jarvis_Tiering format adapted from Tomlinson (1999)


Tiered Lesson (Differentiated by Readiness)

Name & Student Number: Jason Beck 2096110
Lesson Topic: World War one - Gallipoli
Curriculum Area: History
Year Level: 9

Brief description (2-4 sentences) of the broader unit into which this lesson fits,
and where it fits into that unit:
This lesson is apart of an eight week World War One unit where students
undertake five lessons a week (two doubles and a single). The lesson is a 50
minute single lesson and is the first lesson of one and a half weeks spent on the
Australian Gallipoli campaign which will be undertaken a week into the unit as a
whole. Students spent the first week of the World War One unit learning about
the long and short term causes of the outbreak of war focusing heavily on the
Triple Entente and Triple Alliance, the dates of the war and a brief overview of
Australias involvement in the war as a whole.

The students are also working towards their first summative assessment piece of
the unit which will be a source analysis. Therefore, the main activity, which is a
group source analysis/interpretation is also to be seen as preparation for the
summative assessment. Focusing on the proper analytical progress for a source
analysis will be a main feature.

Learning Objectives*. As a result of engaging with the lesson, students will:
*As appropriate, these should be based on the Australian Curriculum. You can include specific references to
ACARA in parentheses where you have taken an objective verbatim (ACMMG006), or use language like
Adapted from.. if you have made some changes to statements from ACARA, but been guided by these.
Understand that (Concepts, principles, big ideas. Make sure your objectives are statements
that work in the form, students will understand that)

The Gallipoli campaign is deeply important to modern Australian culture.

Cultural understanding and identity can change and be influenced throughout history





Know (e.g. facts, vocabulary, dates,
information)
The origins of the Gallipoli campaign.
The importance and birth of the ANZAC
Spirit on Australian culture.
Australias further involvement in the war.
The period of time and dates of the
Be able to (do) (Skills, processes)
Evaluate the reliability and
usefulness of primary and
secondary sources (ACHHS171)
Use historical terms and concepts
(ACHHS165)
Identify and analyse perspectives
Jason Beck 2096110
EDUC4720/1 2012_Jane Jarvis_Tiering format adapted from Tomlinson (1999)
Gallipoli. and people from the past
(ACHHS172)
Identify the origin, purpose and
context of primary and secondary
sources (ACHHS169)
Essential Questions

What is Culture

How is a country influenced by its culture?

What can change a countrys culture?







Lesson Title: The Understanding of Gallipoli and the influence of Gallipoli on
Australian Culture

Preassessment of Students Readiness
As this lesson is conducted a week into the unit the teacher is already aware of
the different levels of student readiness. Preassessment was carried out at the
end of the last unit allowing time to reflect on the students knowledge and
readiness when learning about World War One. (Refer to appendix 4)




Lesson Plan
Lesson Sequence

Introduction: 5-10 mins
Teacher guided group brainstorm-
on what the class knows about the ANZACs, ANZAC
culture and the ANZAC spirit
Discuss these aspects and then discuss the ways it
has been viewed in the past.

As a group establish all the elements of ANZACs on
Australian life these can be as simplistic as ANZAC
biscuits and football games on ANZAC day to the
ANZAC parade and dawn service. The main focus
here is establishing that the culture of the ANZACS
is well and truly embedded within Australia.

This then leads into discussion about the way it used
to be and how it was not always rated with such high
regard. The examples here are the 1960s-70s
Explanatory notes
(Why have you made the decisions you have in your
planning? How does this relate to what youve
learned in this topic? How are aspects of your
lesson designed to cater for readiness differences?)


This activity is first instance to for students to
understand that culture and influence can change. It
is teacher guided but the focus here is on what the
students know. The objective here is to allow
students to establish that aspects of the ANZACs
are very frequent in Australian life.

Possible question for extension- Why do you think it
is this way? Why is the Gallipoli landing considered
to have Made a Nation? Why do you think it is
important?



Jason Beck 2096110
EDUC4720/1 2012_Jane Jarvis_Tiering format adapted from Tomlinson (1999)
protests on ANZAC day.


Activity introduction-How to analyse
sources 5-10 mins
This part of the lesson is very teacher directed,
however, this is an essential part as the points
discussed here are points the students must
understand.
Explicit instruction on how to appropriately analyse
sources. The main part of this instruction will be a
focus on relevance, reliability and
representativeness. When the students soon break
off into their groups and get their own sources,
encourage the students to ask
is the source reliable? How do we know? What key
features show us this?
Is the source relevant? What is our goal here and
does this source match our end goal?
What does it represent? Who or what benefits of
loses out from this?
These are the questions that, at this level, provide
appropriate analytical questioning


Main Activity Source Interpretation
Students in groups analyse different
sources. 25 mins. The students goal here is
to analyse and interpret sources in groups.
During this activity the teacher should be working
around the room visiting each group and helping
them initiate discussion, point out things they
otherwise may have missed, develop deeper
questioning, help students along with their
interpretations and help in any other way possible.
As evident by the appendices, the students in the
first group, the higher level readiness group, will be
comparing and contrasting an Australian soldier
diary entry and photographs of Turkish soldiers.
Their main overriding theme is on the experience of
the war from both perspectives.
The two middle groups are to analyse their source, a
poem printed in a newspaper in 1915 written by a
Sergeant in the Australian army. Again, their main
theme is the war time experience from an Australian
perspective, but what they will also be commenting
on is how true of a portrayal this is, when
understanding the fact it was printed in an Australian
newspaper for the public to read.
The third group, who will be given a recruitment
poster and various newspaper clippings, will be
commentating on the perception of the public and
how factual the medias portrayal of warfare was to
the Australian public.









Although explicit instruction is not ideal teaching all
the time, there are instances where it can be
necessary. This is one on those times. This should
last no longer than 5-10 minutes to make sure the
students do not get to get too bored with a teacher
directed classroom.
Simply discuss the aspect you want the students to
focus on when analysing sources and show them
how it should be done.
As the teacher, because you will be helping each
group out while they are evaluating their sources in
the main activity, the teacher can afford to be slightly
briefer than they would be in another situation.








Groups will be allocated based on student
readiness. The class of 24 will be split into four
groups. The first group are the students who are
showing knowledge beyond their year level in the
WW1 unit, the next two groups are students who are
in the expected range of readiness and are up to the
standards of years 9 history and the final group are
the students who have been struggling to grasp the
concepts in the ww1 unit so far.
The higher level readiness students will be
presented a written source and various photographs
from two different perspectives and asked to
compare and contrast the sources. This will require
some analytical and in depth thinking. (refer to
appendix 1 and 1a).
The two groups with mid range level of readiness
are given just the one text source but it is longer
than the source in the group before hand. Their
questions still require analytical and in-depth
thinking but not to the same level as the first group
(refer to appendix 2 and 2a)
The final group will analyse an enlistment poster and
various newspaper clippings from that period of
time. The questions this group will answer still
require analytical and depth thinking but not to the
extent of the other groups (refer to appendix 3 and
3a)

The allocation of groups based on student readiness
allows the teacher to aim appropriate level and
respectfully challenging work at the different levels
of student readiness(Tomlinson, 2001, Sousa &
Tomlinson, 2011)
A source analysis is good for this exercise as the
sources can be differentiated, as too can the
Jason Beck 2096110
EDUC4720/1 2012_Jane Jarvis_Tiering format adapted from Tomlinson (1999)








questions. Based on simply the sources, it is almost
impossible to tell who has the easier work.
If a teacher gave one student a poster to analyse
and another a paragraph, one would assume the
paragraph is the harder piece of work. However,
depending on the questions that need to be
answered by the students, the poster can end up
being a far more complex and complicated task that
requires far more critical thinking than that of
paragraph.
This is why a source analysis is excellent for
differentiation, the students should not be able to tell
that they are actually working at different levels to
one another.

Lesson Closure/ Check for Understanding

Concluding Activity- Group discussion (Teacher Guided) 10 mins
In the concluding activity the class will have a teacher guided class discussion. In this discussion each group
will inform the rest of the class what they have learnt through the source analysis. As each group focused
their questioning on a different aspect of the Gallipoli campaign each group will be able to adequately inform
the others. The goal here is to encourage students to discuss what they have learnt with the other three
groups. This allows the students to articulate the group discussions they had to allow the remainder of the
class to understand.

This, again, is to be teacher guided. The content knowledge and focus here is on what the students have
learnt but prompts from the teacher and questions that allow them to elaborate will be essential

Exit activity Exit cards. 5 mins
For their exit activity the students will undertake their normal 3,2,1 exit cards. However, rather than the
students answering 3 things they learnt, 2 things they contributed and 1 question they still have, they
students will answers 3 things they learnt from their sources, 2 things they learnt from other groups in the
discussion and 1 question they still have.


Evaluation
Given that this is not yet summative assessment the students will only be assessed formatively, making sure
they are on the right track and are ready for their summative assessment. This will simply be done by
wandering group by group making sure the students are asking the appropriate analytical questions in order
to properly deconstruct the sources, emphasis will be placed on relevance, reliability and
representativeness.



Checklist of assignment components:
Complete, step-by-step lesson description, with notes explaining how the lesson
represents an example of a tiered lesson to address various readiness levels
Supplementary materials (e.g., copies of directions, handouts, etc. provided to
students)
Copy and/or description of preassessment task used to assign individual
students to appropriate tiers
Evaluation/ assessment criteria (e.g., rubric or checklist used to guide evaluation
of student work)



Jason Beck 2096110
EDUC4720/1 2012_Jane Jarvis_Tiering format adapted from Tomlinson (1999)




Reference List

Tomlinson, C. A. (2001). The How Tos of planning lessons differentiated by readiness. In C. A.
Tomlinson, How to differentiate instruction in mixed ability classrooms (2nd ed., pp. 45-51).
Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.

Sousa, D. A. & Tomlinson, C. A. (2011). Differentiating in response to student readiness. In
Differentiation and the brain: How neuroscience supports the learner-friendly classroom (pp.
85-108). Bloomington, IN: Solution Tree Press
































Jason Beck 2096110
EDUC4720/1 2012_Jane Jarvis_Tiering format adapted from Tomlinson (1999)




Appendices

Appendix 1
Source Analysis

Questions One
What does the first source describe? Write three key points









Question Two
What does the photo sources describe? Write three key points?









Question Three
In what ways do the two sources content differ? (at least 4 examples)









Questions Four
In what ways do the sources share similarities? (at least 4 examples)


Jason Beck 2096110
EDUC4720/1 2012_Jane Jarvis_Tiering format adapted from Tomlinson (1999)




Question Five
Based on the sources, do you think the Australian and Turkish soldiers had similar or
different experiences? Why?









Question Six
Do you think the Australians and Turkish soldiers had the same level of morale and
shared the same attitude to war as each other? Why or why not?



























Jason Beck 2096110
EDUC4720/1 2012_Jane Jarvis_Tiering format adapted from Tomlinson (1999)




Appendix 1a
Diary of Signaller Ellis Silas diary
extract : May 1915
We are relieved from the firing line the battle still raging; every nerve strained. Australians
have done splendidly, holding a very difficult position; have been much troubled with snipers.
Am glad I have done my duty. First wash for a week go down to the Water Hole, which is
always covered by Turkish snipers it was safer in the trenches than here all around this
spot are dead and wounded who have been hit when dodging round this corner; however, one
must drink, even if the price be Death. Make dug-outs in our rest camps, but men are
continually caught by the snipers. Many are commencing to suffer from dysentery, though the
spirit of the men is splendid, always ready for a joke.
Signaller Walker just hit in the mouth we considered we were out of range in our dug-out
but the snipers are everywhere. Sergeant of the machine gun is writing a very amusing diary,
full of humour; I wish I had his spirit.
In the dug-out just above me a poor chap is lying very ill but has asked me to say nothing to
the medical officer as he does not want to get sent away in the middle of the fun, as he calls
it. Of such stuff are soldiers made I think if I were in his place Id be glad of an excuse to
get out of this Hell, though I dont think I should ever have forgiven myself if I had not come.
I hear that to-morrow we are going to make a charge the Turks are cutting our supplies off;
the situation is severely critical. To read this in a newspaper makes an item of passing
interest; to experience it is something quite different if we are up against it, please God I
may die in the same spirit that I know my comrades will display, for they know not defeat.
Jason Beck 2096110
EDUC4720/1 2012_Jane Jarvis_Tiering format adapted from Tomlinson (1999)


Jason Beck 2096110
EDUC4720/1 2012_Jane Jarvis_Tiering format adapted from Tomlinson (1999)








Jason Beck 2096110
EDUC4720/1 2012_Jane Jarvis_Tiering format adapted from Tomlinson (1999)
















Jason Beck 2096110
EDUC4720/1 2012_Jane Jarvis_Tiering format adapted from Tomlinson (1999)
Appendix 2
Source Analysis

Question one
Write three key points from the poem.









Question Two
How does this poem depict the Australian Gallipoli campaign?










Question Three
What does the poem suggest about the Australian culture and morale?











Question Four
Think about why the author may have constructed this poem, why do you think he wrote
it?




Jason Beck 2096110
EDUC4720/1 2012_Jane Jarvis_Tiering format adapted from Tomlinson (1999)





Question Five
What other factors could influence what this poem depicts?









Question Six
Why do you think the poem was printed in a newspaper?




























Jason Beck 2096110
EDUC4720/1 2012_Jane Jarvis_Tiering format adapted from Tomlinson (1999)
Appendix 3
Source Analysis

Question One

What do you think the Australian recruitment poster portrays to the Australian public?
And do you think this is an accurate portrayal of war?








Question Two

How do the newspaper clippings portray the war?








Question Three

Do you think they are detailed descriptions of the Gallipoli campaign, why/why not?








Questions Four

Based on your answer to question three, why do you think the Australian newspapers
have decided to report on the war in this manor?





Jason Beck 2096110
EDUC4720/1 2012_Jane Jarvis_Tiering format adapted from Tomlinson (1999)



Question Five

What do all the sources depict about the war?









Question Six

Do you think this is an accurate description of the War? Why or why not?




























Jason Beck 2096110
EDUC4720/1 2012_Jane Jarvis_Tiering format adapted from Tomlinson (1999)
Appendix 3a


Newspaper Clippings

The Maitland Daily Mercury Wednesday 13 October 1915, page 5
GALLIPOLI.
Turkish newspapers announce that the Allies are preparing to evacuate Gallipoli.



Jason Beck 2096110
EDUC4720/1 2012_Jane Jarvis_Tiering format adapted from Tomlinson (1999)
Cootamundra Herald, Tuesday 24 August 1915, page 2
GALLIPOLI.
War correspondents state that the Allies' forces in Gallipoli have a number of difficulties
to overcome more than the Turkish enemy.


Cowra Free Press Saturday 1 May 1915, page 5
Gallipoli.
The Gallipoli peninsula, which the Allied forces propose to occupy is defended by 60,000
Turks.
The naval bombardment on Tuesday was concentrated against Kalid Bahr forts.


The Prahran Telegraph, Saturday 24 July 1915, page 4
Gallipoli.
Allies attacking along the whole line, warships co-operating. All attacks successful.
































Jason Beck 2096110
EDUC4720/1 2012_Jane Jarvis_Tiering format adapted from Tomlinson (1999)
Appendix 4

World War One What do you know?
Remember - Answer the questions to the best of your ability
More importantly- Dont worry if you cant answer a question or any of the questions, we are here to learn it
not because we already know it.

What was World War One?






When was World War one?






How long did it last?






Who were the major countries fighting and on what side?






What caused World War One?






Was Australia involved in World War One?







Where did it take place?




Jason Beck 2096110
EDUC4720/1 2012_Jane Jarvis_Tiering format adapted from Tomlinson (1999)



Is there anything else you want to tell me about World War One? Is there anything special you
know?