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Digital Unit Plan Template

Unit Title: Changes In 1960s America

Name: Edward Espinoza

Content Area: History

Grade Level: 11

CA Content Standard(s)/Common Core Standard(s):

Historical Research, Evidence, and Point of View


1. Students distinguish valid arguments from fallacious arguments in historical interpretations.
2. Students identify bias and prejudice in historical interpretations.
3. Students evaluate major debates among historians concerning alternative interpretations of the past, including an
analysis of authors use of evidence and the distinctions between sound generalizations and misleading
oversimplifications.
4. Students construct and test hypotheses; collect, evaluate, and employ information from multiple primary and secondary
sources; and apply it in oral and written presentations.

11.10 Students analyze the development of federal civil rights and voting rights.
1. Explain how demands of African Americans helped produce a stimulus for civil rights, including President
Roosevelts ban on racial discrimination in defense industries in 1941, and how African Americans service in
World War II produced a stimulus for President Trumans decision to end segregation in the armed forces in 1948.
2. Describe the collaboration on legal strategy between African American and white civil rights lawyers to end racial
segregation in higher education.
3. Examine the roles of civil rights advocates (e.g., A. Philip Randolph, Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcom X, Thurgood
Marshall, James Farmer, Rosa Parks), including the significance of Martin Luther King, Jr.s Letter from
Birmingham Jail and I Have a Dream speech.
4. Analyze the womens rights movement from the era of Elizabeth Stanton and Susan Anthony and the passage of the
Nineteenth Amendment to the movement launched in the 1960s, including differing perspectives on the roles of
women.

Big Ideas:

Importance of Change over time: The 1960s in America were a time of changes that dramatically altered American society. Certain minority
groups looked to change their social standings that previously went unchallenged. These groups used certain methods and had strong
leadership to overcome the status qua. Their importance can still be felt today.
Understanding the importance of the Civil Rights movements: The different groups that were involved in the movements had all been held
out of the social rights that others were privileged of having. It is important to know the context of the movements and how they came about
during this time.
Identifying key events: As in any movement, there are always key events that had a greater impact on society. The Civil Rights movement of
the 1960's is no different; there are many different key events that were important to the different groups involved. These movements were
important to the group's ability to win social justice.
Evaluating the impacts of the Civil Rights Movements beyond the 1960's: America drastically changed after the Civil Rights Movements
of the 1960's.Historians often look back at this event and look at its overarching influences, whether impactful or not, and determine the overall
legacy.

Unit Goals and Objectives:


1) Students will choose and analyze a key event or group during the 1960's civil rights movements and be able to explain their social and historical impacts in
American Society by writing a well thought out and researched essay.
2) Students will choose and identify the people who made significant contributions to the Civil Rights Movements of the 1960's and compare and contrast them
to demonstrate their findings to the class using a visual representation.
3) Once students have finished the Guided Notes, they will be able to understand the motivations behind certain civil rights groups from the 1960's.
4) Students will chronologically place events that transpired before the 1960's movements and describe how these causes helped create momentum for the civil
rights movements of the 1960's.

Unit Summary:
The 1960's in America were a tumultuous time in its history. Different groups were trying to fight injustice or stop a war in which thousands of Americans were
dying for no apparent reason. The complexities of all the issues with certain Civil rights groups like African-Americans, Women, & gays and lesbians, to name a
few, have impacted America long after the 1960's, but these issues are still present in today's society.
The issues that these groups faced will be examined and analyzed in in this unit. These groups helped propel America into the way it is today by bringing up
questions that had been left unanswered since the creation of this country. While there are many groups who voiced their opinion on matters that were
important, this unit will focus on just a few national civil rights groups, as well as regional groups within the context of the unit.
On top of learning what these groups wanted to change, students will also learn about some of the leaders and how they wanted to create the change they sought.
Also students will look at how the groups changed the social dynamics of the country i.e. through laws, protests, and certain movements.

Assessment Plan:
Entry-Level: Brainstorm- What comes to
mind when you hear America in the
1960s?
What do you think Civil Rights are?
Based on your definition, how could they
be violated?

Formative:
Webercise- looks at certain events and people of
the 1960s.
Guided Notes- based off the teacher lecture on Civil
Rights in the 1960s.
Quiz-key terms and figures of the 1960s
Ranking- List at least 10 events that highlighted the
1960s.

Summative:
Concept map-Students choose three events, people,
or groups that they think had a bigger impact from
the 1960s.
Essay-the defining moments of the 1960s and their
impact on todays world.

Lesson 1
Student Learning Objective:
Students should be able to
know who the main
correspondents of change
were during the 1960s in
America, after the teacher
lecture.

Acceptable Evidence:
Students will use guided
notes to organize the
lecture into a chronological
timeline and then be able
to tell who the key
participants were during
the 1960s by answering
questions relating to the
teacher lecture.

Instructional Strategies:
Communication
Collection
Collaboration
Presentation
Organization
Interaction

Lesson Activities: Students will use the Guided Notes and the Teacher
Lecture to answer the questions that have been posed. Students will also use
a Venn Diagram to compare and contrast either key people, events, or
groups during the 1960s.

Acceptable Evidence:
Students will choose three
events, groups, or

Instructional Strategies:
Communication
Collection

Lesson Activities: Students will make a concept map and they will use the
three individuals, groups, or events they used to establish a significance of
their topics. Then they will carefully examine and consider the three they

Lesson 2
Student Learning Objective:
Should have a clear idea on
what the person, event, or

group accomplished, what


their historical significance
was for the era, and the
overall legacy. Students
should be able to point out
the significance.

individuals from our


discussion and reflect on
their or its contributions in
the 1960s as well as its
historical significance and
its overall impact on
American society. They will
do this by creating a
Concept map to organize
and prepare their topics for
a well-researched essay.

Collaboration
Presentation
Organization
Interaction

chose and pick one that suits their preference. Students will discuss the
Historical significance, what it, they or he/she accomplished, and its overall
impact on American Society.

Acceptable Evidence:
Students will demonstrate
this by using one of the
three concept bubbles they
used for their concept map
and create a wellresearched historical essay
that points out the persons,
groups, or events legacy to
American Society. They will
make a thesis statement
that asserts their
hypothesis and defend their
stance using credible
sources.

Instructional Strategies:
Communication
Collection
Collaboration
Presentation
Organization
Interaction

Lesson Activities: Students will use their concept maps, choose one of the
bubbles they thought about, and then use this to write an essay
demonstrating that the 1960s and the changes that happened during this
time were significant then and now.

Lesson 3
Student Learning Objective:
Students should be able to
define the group, event, or
individual and connect it to
the overall legacy it had on
American Society. They
should remember that
history is overarching and
not cause and effect.

Unit Resources:
Top Music from the 1960's.
Martin Luther King's "I have A Dream Speech"
Civil Rights Virtual Field Trip
The United Farm Workers Association
Women in the Civil Rights Movement
The Year of the Students (Protest demonstrations in the 1960's)
The Story Of Emmett Till
The Actual Document of the 1954 Supreme Court Decision of Brown Vs. Board of Education

The Civil Rights Movement and California


The Watts Rebellion (1965)

Useful Websites:
Top Music from the 1960's.
Martin Luther King's "I have A Dream Speech"
Civil Rights Virtual Field Trip
The United Farm Workers Association
Women in the Civil Rights Movement
The Year of the Students (Protest demonstrations in the 1960's)
The Story Of Emmett Till
The Actual Document of the 1954 Supreme Court Decision of Brown Vs. Board of Education
The Civil Rights Movement and California
The Watts Rebellion (1965)