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Kelsey Kinard
TWS 3: Short Range Learning Objectives/Standards for Unit

The objectives of this first grade social studies unit were to differentiate between rural, urban,
and suburban communities and identify characteristics of each type of community through
various learning strategies and instruction. I designed the unit to include whole group and paired
learning activities. The students were taught through direct instruction and visual learning styles:
images found on the internet, bubble maps, Are, Can, Have charts, and age appropriate videos.
In addition, the use of probing questions, whole group discussion, and turn and talk opportunities
with peers reinforced the direct instruction. Many of the unit objective assessments involved
journaling in Discovery Journals about the different types of communities and the specific
characteristics associated with each. Each lesson concluded with the students reflecting on what
they learned by journaling, illustrating, and adding to previous journal entries. A summative
assessment worksheet at the end of the unit was used to measure the students understanding
and knowledge of the types of communities. The unit was concluded by a class-made mural
featuring each type of community through artistic representation.
Unit Objective
When given Discovery
Journals the students will
write a sentence and
illustrate a fact about
rural/urban/suburban
communities correctly.
SC Social Studies Curriculum
Standards:
Standard 1-1: The student will
demonstrate an understanding
of how families interact with
their environment both locally
and globally.
Standard 1-4: The student will
demonstrate an understanding
of how individuals, families,
and communities live and work
together in America and
around the world.

Activities/Instructional
Strategies

Assessment of
Objective

Accommodations
Adaptations

Model vocabulary
using direct instruction
and bubble mapping.

Discovery Journal
entry showing a
written sentence
and illustration for
each type of
community.

Provide verbal
cues and extra
wait time for Q &
A. Name of each
type of community
are provided for
spelling. Journal
prompts provided
as a guide.

When given Discovery


Journals, the students will
add one sentence telling
what rural/urban/suburban
communities can be to their
earlier journal entry about
communities.

Formulate ideas about


each type of
community using direct
instruction, probing
questions, and Are,
Can, Have charts.

Discovery Journal
entry showing an
extended
understanding of
each type of
community by
adding to a
previous journal
entry.

Provide verbal
cues and extra
wait time for Q &
A. Journal
prompts provided
as a guide.

Evaluate knowledge of
the types of
communities through a
summative
assessment.
Collaborative studentcreated community
mural project.

Individual
summative
assessment on the
types of
communities.

Repeat
instructions as
needed. Provide
extra wait time.

SC Social Studies Curriculum


Standards:
Standard 1-1: The student will
demonstrate an understanding
of how families interact with
their environment both locally
and globally.
Standard 1-4: The student will
demonstrate an understanding
of how individuals, families,
and communities live and work
together in America and
around the world.

When given a summative


assessment worksheet, the
students will answer five
questions about rural, urban,
and suburban communities
with 80% accuracy or 4 out
of 5 questions correct.
SC Social Studies Curriculum
Standards:
Standard 1-1: The student will
demonstrate an understanding
of how families interact with
their environment both locally
and globally.
Standard 1-4: The student will
demonstrate an understanding
of how individuals, families,
and communities live and work
together in America and
around the world.

Learning Objectives and Contextual Factors


The South Carolina State Social Studies Standards used in creating this unit follow the
school and district pacing guides for first grade Social Sciences. The standards are used to guide
a study on communities. The unit was narrowed down into a study of the three types of
communities, a topic that will be addressed again in second grade. This unit is a broad and
basic introduction to the types of communities, allowing students to think about the
community they live in in relation to the world around them. This is the first time students are
formally introduced to the vocabulary rural, urban, and suburban. Developmentally, a
first graders world consists almost entirely of the community around them therefore it is
appropriate to study more about the community and broaden their view.
The students are not developmentally ready to research independently during the first
nine weeks of first grade. The topic of communities is not concrete concept for first graders to
observe and understand. Therefore, most of the instructional strategies involved in this unit
were performed as a whole group and used direct instruction and probing questions. Additional
resources such as age appropriate videos, internet images, and charts created by the class were
included when applicable. This group of learners enjoys discussion and collaboration
opportunities which were included in instruction through whole group research projects,
meaningful discussions about our findings, and opportunities to turn and talk with peers. Most
of the objectives of this unit involve the students recalling facts and journaling which is
developmentally appropriate for first graders. A majority of these students show difficulty
formulating and writing sentences so they were provided with journal prompts as a guide for
their writing and were encouraged to create illustrations to go along with their writing. The
objectives were challenging for all students because journaling is an individualized activity. The
higher-achieving students were given additional higher order thinking questions and were
encouraged to write and draw more. The unit and objectives were significant because through
the study, the students were able to reflect on their own community and the impact the
community has on individuals living and working. This class is made up of students from
varying backgrounds, cultures, languages, and ethnicities. They all perceive the world around
them differently so it is insightful and unifying to study their community and other types of
communities together as a class.