Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 5

BPV - Position vs.

Time
LAB #1
Abstract:
1. In this lab, we are developing a descriptive model that represents the motion of
battery powered vehicle (BPV) in order to find the relationship between position (x) and time (t),
for the moving BPV.
2. Purpose: Determine the relationship between position, x and time, t for a moving
battery powered vehicle.
a. The variable that we are using to investigate the relationship are position which
is x, and time which is t. Position, x is where the car is ,and time, t is when the car is at
the certain position.
b. Independent variable: Time
Dependent variable: Position
3. To find the relationship between position and the time of the moving BPV, we first
plan out our procedure by drawing a diagram. To do the real investigation, we would need one
BPV with two batteries, and another one with only one. Taking the chalk, we would mark the
starting position which is 0m, and place the BPV with two batteries first, right behind the starting
line. We are trying to see car would travel in every 2 sec, so one of us would the timer, another
would be the one with the chalk to mark behind the car every time the timer called out that its 2
sec, and the other person would be the one who measure the length between each mark and
records in the data table. So, for the 2s,4s,6s,8s,10s, and 12s we would have a distant travelled in
m in those time. We would then run this procedure 2 more times, three times in total, then
average the result for each 2 sec. Lastly, we repeat this all over again for the BPV with only one
battery for comparing.
4. After the investigation, we found that the relationship between the position and time
of a moving vehicle is a linear relationship when position is proportional to time. The car with
only one battery travelled less distant than with two batteries in every two sec, thus having a
lower less steep slope than the two batteries powered vehicle.
Procedure:
1. Get the supplies:
a. BPV.
b. chalk.
c. stopwatch/ lap timer.
d. batteries.
e. nails.

2. Find a workspace.

3. Draw a starting point on the floor, and place the vehicle behind it. Have a stopwatch
ready.
4. Start the timer and the car. At every two seconds, mark the back of the car.
5. After the last mark at 12 seconds, measure the distance of every mark.
6. Record data.
7. Take out one battery in the car and repeat steps again.
8. Repeat steps 1-6 three times for each car.
Data Tables:
BPV with 2 Batteries
Position (m)

Position (m)

Position (m)

Position (m)

Time (s)

RUN 1

RUN 2

RUN 3

Average

1.0

.70

.72

.81

1.86

1.67

1.61

1.71

2.71

1.53

2.44

2.56

3.59

3.25

3.31

3.38

10

4.46

4.39

4.02

4.29

12

5.33

4.78

4.92

5.01

Position (m)

Position (m)

Position (m)

Position (m)

Times (s)

RUN 1

RUN 2

RUN 3

Average

.3

.2

.33

.28

.7

.6

.73

.68

1.1

.9

1.10

1.03

1.5

1.34

1.50

1.45

10

1.84

1.59

1.98

1.80

12

2.16

2.04

2.43

2.21

BPV with 1 Battery

Evaluation of Data Sets:


1. Clear Explanation of each step of the data evaluation

Mark the distance each battery powered vehicle travels every two seconds.
Make a chart to organize data and find the average
Graph each car on a separate Position Vs. Time Graph
Use the equation x=(slope)t+(intercept) and plug in the values for both cars.
Find the uncertainty values using Logger Pro
Add uncertainty values to equation
2. Graph

3. Written Interpretation of general trends:


-BPV With Two Batteries
By looking at the graph for the battery powered vehicle, it is clear that the car was moving at a
constant speed because of the straight line. The slope is positive, so the vehicle was moving
away from zero, in a positive direction as time passes. By looking at the y-intercept, we can tell
what the cars position was at 0.0 seconds. The red bars on the line indicate the error bar

calculations which show how steep or low the line could really be, since the results probably
were not 100% accurate.
-BPV With One Battery
By looking at the graph for the battery powered vehicle, it is clear that the car was moving at a
constant speed because of the straight line. The slope is positive as well, so the vehicle was
moving away from zero, in a positive direction as time passes. Although it was moving away
from zero, by the steepness of the line, we can tell that this car moved slower than the car with
two batteries. By looking at the y-intercept, we can tell what the cars position was at 0.0
seconds. The red bars on the line indicate the error bar calculations which show how steep or low
the line really could be, since the results probably were not 100% accurate.
4. Equations
BPV With 2 Batteries
Slope = 0.4269
Intercept = -0.02697
x=(slope)t +(intercept)
x=(0.4269 m/sec)t + (0.02697m)
BPV With 1 Battery
Slope = 0.1811
Intercept = -0.03533
x=(slope)t + (intercept)
x=(0.1811 m/sec)t + (-0.03533 m)

5. Uncertainty Discussion
In order to to get the uncertainty values, the minimum and maximum slopes and intercepts of
each graph are needed. Once this data is recorded, subtract the original slope from the
maximum slope, and the minimum slope from the original slope, then do the same for the
intercepts. Then, round the numbers and plug them into the equation with the original slope, t,
and original intercept. This should be done for both graphs.

So, the final equations with the uncertainty values would be:
BPV With 2 Batteries
x=(0.42 +/- .25 m/s)t + (0.02,m +/- .08)
BPV With 1 Battery
x=(.18+/- 0.02 m/s)t + (-0.03m +/- .20)

6. Meaning of Slopes
Slope is the change in x, or position, over the change in t, or time.
The slope represents how the object is moving. It shows in which way it is moving, whether it is
positive or negative, and it shows how fast or slow the object is moving.
7. Meaning of Intercepts
The y-intercept in a graph represents where the object was, or what its position was at exactly 0.0
seconds, and whether it was at a positive or negative position.