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Hugo Cisneros

Period 3
Dec 2 2014
Photosynthesis Lab Report
Problem: Will increasing the intensity of light by moving a lamp 50%
closer to a plant, increase the amount of oxygen produced in
photosynthesis by __%?
Hypothesis: If the light intensity increases by 50%, then the amount of
oxygen produced will increase by a number over 1%
Theory:
Photosynthesis is the process in which plants use the energy
from sunlight to produce glucose and oxygen from carbon dioxide and
water. Photosynthesis allows living things to breathe by producing
oxygen. Photosynthesis is vital for living things. If there wasnt
photosynthesis, living things could not survive. If there is 10% of light
intensity there will low amounts of both glucose and oxygen but if
there is 60% of light intensity there will be high amounts of both
oxygen and glucose because photosynthesis levels will increase and
more photosynthesis will occur.
Materials:
Elodea
Baking Soda and Distilled water solution
Scissors
Scale
Test tubes and rack
Lamps and bulbs
Beakers
Procedure for light intensity:
1. Cut elodea 10 cm at an angle.
2. Remove leaves 2 cm from cut end to reveal stem.
3. Put elodea stem side up in test tube. Fill with baking soda
solution 1 cm from top of the test tube.
4. Measure the distance from the middle of BULB to the middle of
elodea 10 cm.
5. Turn on lamp and let heat up for 1 min.
6. After 1 minute, set timer for 3 minutes and count oxygen bubbles
ONLY coming from stem and classify small, medium or large.
7. Record and calculate totals.

8. Repeat at 20 cm.
9. Repeat for 2 trials
Data/Observations:
Mass in grams: 1.0
TRIAL 1
Small x1

Medium
x2

Large x3

Total

Distance
in cm
10 cm

5 x 1=5

0 x 0=0

5 x 3=15

20

20 cm

1 x 1=1

1 x 1=1

5 x 3=15

18

Small x1

Medium
x2

Large x3

Total

Distance
in cm
10 cm

6 x 1=6

3 x 2=6

8 x 3=24

36

20 cm

3 x 1=3

3 x 2=6

1 x 3=3

12

TRIAL 2

Distance

10cm

20cm

Trial 1

20

18

Trial 2

36

12

Total

56

30

Average

28

15

Observations:

On both trial one and trial two, when the light was at 10 cm, 13 more
bubbles were shown on average and when the light was farther, less
oxygen was produced.

CLASS
PERIOD
AVERAGES
1
2
3
4
5
TOTAL/5
AVERAGE

10 cm

20 cm

% Oxygen
Increase or
Decrease

69
24
54.5
12
28.5
188/5
37.6

68.8
4.5
34.2
7.5
41.5
156.5/5
31.3

0.2%
81%
37%
37.5%
- 45%
16.76 %

Note: Period 5 Group 1 had so many Oxygen bubbles releasing from


The stem at 10 cm that it made it impossible to count.
Graph:

PHOTOSYNTHESIS AND LIGHT INTENSITY


60

54.5

50
40
10
Average oxygen in three minutes

30
20

34.2
28

37.6
31.3

20

15

10
0
Group

Class
Distance of light

7th Grade

Conclusion:
We conducted an experiment to find out if moving a lamp 50%
closer to a plant would increase the average oxygen produced and if
so, by what percentage.
In trial 1, there were 4 more small bubbles were produced at 10 cm, 1
more medium bubble produced at 20 cm, and the same amount of
large bubbles produced. In total 2 more bubbles were produced at 10
cm. In trial 2 there were 3 more small and 21 more large bubbles
produced at 10 cm and there were the same amount of medium
bubbles. In total there were 56 bubbles produced at 10 cm and there
were 30 bubbles produced at 20 cm. On average there were 28
bubbles produced at 10 cm and 15 bubbles produced at 20 cm.
All class periods except fifth period had an increase of oxygen at
10 cm. Fifth period had a decrease of 45% of oxygen at 10 cm.
Between all class periods there was an average of 37.6 bubbles
produced at 10 cm and 31.3 bubbles at 20 cm. In conclusion, if the
light intensity increases by 50%, then the amount of oxygen produced
will increase by 16.76%.
Evaluation/Analysis:
In trial 1 there was a decrease of medium bubbles at 10 cm and
there was no difference in large bubbles. In trial 2 there was no
difference in medium bubbles. Period 1 had almost no change between
10 and 20 cm. Period 5 had almost a 50% decrease at 10 cm. These
discrepancies may have occurred because of many factors. For
example, there may have been an error due to miscounting the
bubbles, not turning the light on at the same time as the timer, and the
distance between the light and the plant may not have been exactly 10
or 20 cm for each trial.
To help increase accuracy we can record the bubbles and count
them in slow motion to ensure that every bubble is counted. We can
also have the same person turn the light on and the timer on so that
he/she turns the light on at the same time as he/she turn the timer on.
We can also have a separate lamp for each distance to ensure that you
are measuring at the same distance each time because you dont have
to move the lamps. Finally, to improve the accuracy of the date, we
can do more trials.
Bibliography
Photosynthesis. California Life Science. Ed. Pearson. Boston: Pearson
Prentice Hall, 2008. 118-122.