Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 5

Backwards Design Submission

John Williams, Ph.D

Part I: Student Learning Outcomes


A.
What course will I target for curriculum
and instruction redesign? Why?

B.
What is my larger goal(s) for student
achievement?

C.
What are my measurable objectives for
student achievement that directly align
to the larger goal?

D.
What is the current achievement level of
students (based on existing
data/evidence) as it relates to my
measurable objectives?

E.
What is the best evidence or indicators
of student achievement that directly
align to my measurable objectives?

F.
What are my measurable objectives for
FA14 course that will demonstrate
progress for student achievement from

Human Anatomy and Physiology II


Reasons:
This course is a prerequisite for nursing
students as well as a preparatory course
for Human Performance and Pre-medical
students. It is important that these
students become as proficient as
possible in the information of this course.
1. To increase the students' retention
of information and recall
2. To increase student critical
thinking as it relates to processes
involved in physiology
To increase the course average by
20% compared to previous
courses
To provide students opportunities
to conduct research (not just
laboratory exercises) during the
laboratory sections
Students currently average 75% in my
courses, but the range of these grades
vary from class to class. Typically, lower
grade averages hover around 40%, while
the upper 5% of the classes hover
around 90%
Students tend to perform well with
projects and presentations, and are
typically able to demonstrate better
understanding orally rather than by
examination.
Pre- and posttest assessments for
the course and for individual
topics
Project-based learning activities
that focus on one or more critical
topic in HAP
Collecting baseline data for the
course as it relates to homeostasis
and basic functions of each
system.

Backwards Design Submission

John Williams, Ph.D

the previous semester?

Collect Baseline Data; Revise if


necessary. (Only 20% of students
understand an assessment map.
Acceptable growth is to increase this
number by 30%. Therefore, by end of
course, 50% of students will
satisfactorily complete an assessment
map.)

Provide pre- and post tests for the


course.
Provide remediation activities and
assessments for those who do not
meet satisfactory performance on
assessments.

Part II: Design Assessments/Evidence


Learning Objective

Evidence

To describe
homeostasis as it
relates to the
human body

Pre- and posttest


assessments
Concept map for
homeostasis

To identify the
functions and
characteristics of
the endocrine
system

Pre- and post test


assessments
Oral
interviews/discussi
ons

To compare and
contrast the
functions of the
nervous and
endocrine systems
To map the
connections
between the
nervous and
endocrine systems
with every other
system

Pre- and post test


assessments

Concept outlines of
system
connections

Method of
Evaluation
Examination
for
homeostasis
Project
based
assignment
focusing on
homeostasis
Inquiry
based
assignment
Examination
on endocrine
system
Case studies
Student
writing
assignments

Student
generated
outlines
Case studies

Scale/Weight
10%

10%

20%

20%

Backwards Design Submission

John Williams, Ph.D

Part III: Develop Curriculum and Instruction


Curriculum - What is taught?
Instruction - How do you explain (teach) it?
Work with your mentor to finalize assessments and
determine the best instructional strategies for
meeting each learning objective.

Backwards Design Submission

Chapter Title: The


Cardiovascular System

John Williams, Ph.D

Stage One: Desired Results


Course: Human Anatomy
and Physiology II

Dates: 6/23-6/30 (Summer)

Big Ideas: Circulation


Professor: Williams
Established Goals:
Students will be able to describe and explain the following concepts
I.
Circulation and Homeostasis
II.
Characteristics and Functions of the Heart
III.
Components and Functions of Blood Vessels and Blood
IV.
Connections between the CV system and other systems

Key Vocabulary (Academic Language):


Homeostasis

Critical Demonstrated Knowledge:


Blood flow through the heart
Biometrics of the heart and associated
components
Factors that affect blood flow
Disease conditions affecting circulation

Key Assessments:
On board, diagram the path of blood
flow

Essential Questions:
Describe the contributions of the
chambers of the heart to circulation
Explain the key characteristics of each
blood vessel type
Map the functional connections
between the CV system and
1)respiratory system 2)urinary system
3) endocrine system

Stage Two: Assessment Evidence


Performance Tasks/Summary:
Pre-test on basic concepts
Team discovery exercises
Practice problems (cardiac output, Poiseulles equation)
Test covering Chapters 1 and 2
Stage Three: Learning Plan
Day
Instruction Plan
Instructional Strategies
6/23

Lecture

Pre-reading assignment

Day
6/24

Instruction Plan
Lecture: Mapping Circulation

Instructional Strategies
Practice Case Studies Assigned

Backwards Design Submission


6/25

Lecture: powerpoint

6/30

Examination

John Williams, Ph.D


N/A