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Running head: TECHNOLOGY PLAN WASHINGTON COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT

Technology Plan for Washington County School District


Team 3
Margo Adams, Sharon Hanson, Wesley Harpold, and Leslie Meadows
Liberty University
EDUC 638-B02 Leadership In Educational Technology
Dr. Vonda Beavers
March 1, 2015

TECHNOLOGY PLAN WASHINGTON COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT

Table of Contents
I.
II.
III.
IV.
V.
VI.
VII.
VIII.
IX.
X.
XI.

Mission Statement
Vision Statement
Value Statement
Team Members
SMART Goal #1
SMART Goal #2
SMART Goal #3
Childrens Internet Protection Act (CIPA) and E-Rate
Childrens Online Privacy Protection Act
Acceptable / Responsible Use Policies (AUPs / RUPs)
Reference List

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Mission Statement
The mission of Washington County School District is to provide the teaching and
technology learning tools to produce personal growth in students to meet the needs of an ever
changing technological world. Administrators, teacher, and students are expected to effectively
and purposefully integrate technology throughout the curriculum.

TECHNOLOGY PLAN WASHINGTON COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT

Vision Statement
The world of the 21st century is rapidly changing and students need to be immersed in the
latest technology to be successfully connected in a global learning community. A 1:1 iPad
initiative ensures that all students have equal access to technology at school and at home
regardless of their socioeconomic status. This ensures that all students have equal access to
academic and social achievement through the use of technology.
Value Statements
We believe that
all students should have access to the latest technology devices for their education.
all students should have access to a global learning community through the use of technology.
all students should be fully trained in the use of technology to become productive citizens in the
social and work world.
all teachers and staff should have continuous professional development in the use of technology
to provide a 21st century learning environment.
Technology will provide students with the skills to collaborate in the local and global
community.

Team Members
District Superintendent: Dr. Frank Oscar Mayer
Director of Curriculum: Mr. Benjamin Jones
Director of Educational Technology: Mr. Ovi Mustard
Technology Assistant: Mr. Ted Knowle
Middle School Principal: Mr. Eric Belding
Secondary English Teacher: Mr. Thomas English
Secondary Social Studies Teacher: Mr. Seymour D. World
Secondary Mathematics Teacher: Mr. Eric Angle
Secondary World Language: Mrs. Kansas Travel
Secondary Special Education Teacher : Mrs. Lexi A. Dys

TECHNOLOGY PLAN WASHINGTON COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT

Secondary Performing Arts Teacher: Mrs. Lyric Bass


Media Specialist: Mr. Jason Apple
Elementary Teacher: Miss Carrie Bliss
Elementary Teacher: Ms. Betty Pringle
PTA Member: Dr. Eldridge Pain
PTA Member: Mrs. Anita Control
SMART Goal #1
When a teacher is well trained, more opportunities exists for students in the classroom.
Effective professional development and staff training are essential elements in the success of
implementing the technology plan empowering teachers to integrate technology in classroom
instruction. Staff, teachers and administrators will be provided on-going professional
development workshops to assist teachers in designing and delivering relevant and meaningful
content to students that are required for 21st Century skills and technology integration.

Strategies to Support Goal


1)
a)
b)
c)
d)
e)

Technology Instruction Delivery Methods


Delivery of instruction utilizing high-level interactive whiteboards
Delivery of instruction utilizing an iPad and AppleTV
Instructional delivery with web-based technology allowing for differentiated instruction
Web-based programs to provide blended learning solutions with differentiated instruction
Web-based programs allowing for 24/7 access to homework and interactive step-by-step

solutions
f) One-to-one computing technology enhancing project-based learning and beyond the classroom
preparing students for the workplace of tomorrow
2) Learning Management Systems (LMS), Web 2.0 tools, and formation of Personal Learning
Network (PLN)

TECHNOLOGY PLAN WASHINGTON COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT

a) Instructional personnel will take part in professional development that will provide necessary skills to
integrate and develop technology skills using LMS, Web 2.0 tools, and PLN
b) Increase administrator, staff and teacher 21st Century technology proficiency in effective uses of

technology through online resources, workshops, with technology staff and coaching support
c) Provide high-quality system support enabling effective technology use for successful
instructional practices
d) Tailor effective on-going professional development courses for staff, administrators and teachers
for effective curricular integration
3) Curriculum Alignment Washington County School District will strengthen instruction utilizing
Web-based Curriculum Mapping
a) Web-based curriculum mapping tools to enhance alignment of existing curriculum with state
standards
b) Web-based curriculum to provide a method for structuring and documenting the work of
professional learning teams
c) Curriculum mapping to assist in making sure that instruction is organized
21st Century Learning Skills.
Rationale. Interactive whiteboards enables delivery of instruction in the three modalities
of learning for student engagement. Elements of text, graphics, sound animation, and video help
teachers create lessons that interest and engage students during the learning process (Biology,
1999). One of the most popular rationales, but very hard to prove, is that one-to-one computing
increases student achievement (Jackson, 2011). However, there is evidence documented that
shows students organizational skills significantly improve using one-to-one computing (Jackson,
2011). The modern classroom is different than what we were accustomed to even just a decade
ago, thanks partly to the advancing nature of Internet technologies (Morris, 2013). One form of
teaching which has benefited from these types of tools is Project-Based Learning (PBL) (Morris,
2013). One main goal and advantage of PBL is putting theory into practice and more meaningful
content for students.

TECHNOLOGY PLAN WASHINGTON COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT

Web-based curriculum mapping tools are useful for aligning existing curriculum with
state standards and allowing teachers to operate collaboratively rather than independently
(Barger, Edens, ONeill, & Wilcoxen, 2007). Web-based curriculum provides a method for
structuring and documenting the work of professional learning teams. Curriculum mapping assist
in making sure that instruction is organized so that students have opportunities to learn and
display skills preceding standardized tests (Barger et al., 2007).
Washington County School District currently employs a Technology Director with five
technicians working as system-wide technical support staff. Each elementary school has a parttime classroom computer lab teacher. Each middle school has two classroom computer
application/technology teachers and the high school employs three computer
application/technology classroom teachers. Additional staffing as funds are available would
include: Instructional Technology Specialist and two additional staff for professional
development programs and utilized for Web-based Curriculum Mapping integration.
Expected Outcomes. Expected outcomes would include: Provide professional
development for teachers, staff and administrators while integrating planning activities,
identifying the professional development while assessing needs, providing incentives for staff to
participate, implementing the identified professional development, and finally evaluating and
reviewing the professional development (Picciano, 2011).

Professional Development Plan


Communication and collaborative tools such as Twitter, Facebook, Edmodo, Blogs, Pinterest,

Google+ and Wikis.


Tablet and Smartphone Apps for iOS mobile learning devices

TECHNOLOGY PLAN WASHINGTON COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT

Technology skills addressed would include: interactive whiteboard proficiency, global


awareness, digital media literacy, digital responsibility, video conferencing, cloud computing,
and digital citizenship.
Technology leaders will develop and implement policies and requirements for participation in
these workshops. Teachers and staff will be given time and flexibility to attend the workshops or
for utilizing online course professional development and learning either through summer months
or after-school.
Ongoing feedback through surveys will be utilized to verify the usefulness and effectiveness of
the professional development.
Administrators, teachers and staff will be provided with course materials, hardware and software
for both workshops and online courses.
Creation of a teachers-helping-teachers database. The database would consist of teacher experts
on various technology topics and applications. This could become a source of help to a teacher
who needs assistance in implementing specific areas of technology in the classroom.

ISTE Standards
For Teachers. 1. Facilitate and inspire student learning and creativity. Teachers use their
knowledge of subject matter, teaching and learning, and technology to facilitate experiences that
advances student learning in both face-to-face and online environments (ISTE, 2008).
2. Design and develop digital age learning experiences and assessments. Teachers
design, develop, and evaluate authentic learning experiences and assessment integrating
contemporary tools and resources to maximize content learning (ISTE, 2008)
3. Model digital age work and learning. Teachers will exhibit knowledge, skills, and
work process processes representative of an innovative professional in a global and digital
society (ISTE, 2008).

TECHNOLOGY PLAN WASHINGTON COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT

4. Promote and model digital citizenship and responsibility. Teachers understand local
and global societal issues and responsibilities in an evolving digital culture and exhibit legal and
ethical behavior in their professional practices (ISTE, 2008).
5. Engage in professional growth and leadership. Teachers will continuously improve
their professional practice, model lifelong learning, and exhibit leadership in their school and
professional community by promoting and demonstrating the effective use of digital tools and
resources (ISTE, 2008).

SMART Goal #2
Throughout first year implementation of Ipads in classrooms, teachers and students will
be able to use distance learning techniques, video conferencing communication and encourage
community involvement to increase student learning opportunities.

Strategies to Support Goal


1. Teachers attending professional development opportunities during the summer or teacher work
week to learn all tools/resources.
a. Learn the video conferencing communication system. Required wires and connection feeds for
success.
b. Provide instructional tools and ideas to help teachers incorporate community involvement.
Communicate with professionals within the community to video conference to answer student
questions.
2. Teachers and administration collect data on how and when they implement the Ipads into lesson
plans for specific distance learning, video conferencing and/or community outreach
opportunities.
a. Administration require one of the three to be used at one point during the year within a lesson
plan.

TECHNOLOGY PLAN WASHINGTON COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT

b.
3.
a.
b.

Teacher provides the lesson plan, implementation and reflection to submit to administration.
Students complete a content unit strictly online to emulate a distance learning environment.
Students are aware of online identity and appropriate sources.
Teachers use resources and tools to reinforce content in the classroom.
21st Century Learning Skill. All desired 21st Century learning skills are applied to this goal.
Teachers must work collaboratively to provide learning experiences for their students that are
clearly instructed, fresh and new. Students must work collaboratively through creatively and
critical thinking to reach higher level education.
Rationale. Educators and students alike need each other to coexist. Stated by Cassella
and Gregory (2014), Educational leaders need to acquire the same technology skills as their
teachers and students in order to have the ability to support them, provide them with challenges,
and offer guidance when a solution is needed. This goal clearly links new technology to each
individual requiring the implementation and development of 21st Century learning skills. These
skills and new technology will increase productivity and future endeavors. For example, students
are required to reach beyond the classroom to ensure their understanding on course work. They
need to search and discover the course concepts through distance learning opportunities,
establishing technology communication etiquette and reaching into the community.
Higher education and some states are requiring a distant learning opportunity for students
upon graduation. The state of Virginia is requiring that all high school students complete an
online course as one of many graduation requirements. By allowing students to have one to one
instruction with the use of Ipads will only provide the students experience that will help them in
the future. This one to one will develop concepts and responsibilities for their higher education
and workforce experience. Each student will be held more accountable for their own work and
products. Also, students will understand the importance of appropriate communication through

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technology. It is important to establish a communication etiquette foundation before joining the


workforce. Professional conversation should be kept at all times whether online, paper or in
person.
Finally, with this technology students can reach beyond their four walls that make their
classrooms. Virtual field trips and collaboration with professionals in the community can
increase student understanding and enhance learning opportunities. For example, Wakes (2012)
conducted research implementing technology in two rural middle schools to connect within their
communities (2012). In the end, Wakes (2012) study findings indicate that the rural nature of
the participants communities had a significant impact on their identity formation and
understanding of community. Schools implementing project based learning will see strides in
productivity and easier ways to incorporate those professional panels for evaluations. Although
there will be a lot of money for implementation of this one to one learning environment it will
pay for itself over time.
Expected Outcomes. Students will understand and enjoy learning more because of the
variety of resources provided to the teacher. Students from all learning styles will be positively
affected by this technology integration. Teachers will be asked to collect data throughout the
course of the year. Each marking period will consist of a pre and post assessments to evaluate
student achievement through technology.

Professional Development Plan


I-Learn Professional Development: Throughout the year offer this session different days and
times for an hour each. This is to learn the new iPad, how to retrieve applications, incorporate
distance learning opportunities into the classroom instruction.

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I-Technology Sessions for teachers/staff: Before school year begins during the summer/teacher

work week. Must complete five out of six sessions and are about 45 minutes in length.
Session 1 - Interactive Achievement and Ipads. Explore your options for assessments.
Session 2 - Navigating Your Google Drive. Understanding Google Drive 101.
Session 3 - Digital Worksheets. Provide an interactive workspace for students.
Session 4 - Managing Your Google Drive. Organize that workspace and be more efficient.
Session 5 - Delivering Media. How to create presentations and learn how to comment on your

students work.
Session 6 - Learn to Survey. Create, gather and find valuable information for your classroom
using Google Form.

ISTE Standards
For Students. 2. Communication & Collaboration. Students use digital media and
environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance, to support
individual learning and contribute to the learning of others (ISTE, 2007).
c. Develop cultural understanding and global awareness by engaging with learners
of other cultures (ISTE, 2007).
6. Technology operations and concepts. Students demonstrate a sound understanding of
technology concepts, systems, and operations (ISTE, 2007).
a. Understand and use technology systems (ISTE, 2007).
b. Select and use applications effectively and productively (ISTE, 2007).
For Teachers. 1. Facilitate and inspire student learning and creativity. Teachers use their
knowledge of subject matter, teaching and learning, and technology to facilitate experiences that
advance student learning, creativity, and innovation in both face-to-face and virtual environments
(ISTE, 2008).

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d. Model collaborative knowledge construction by engaging in learning with


students, colleagues, and others in face-to-face and virtual environments (ISTE,
2008).
2. Design and develop digital age learning experiences and assessments. Teachers
design, develop, and evaluate authentic learning experiences and assessments incorporating
contemporary tools and resources to maximize content learning in context and to develop the
knowledge, skills, and attitudes identified in the Standards (ISTE, 2008).
c. Customize and personalize learning activities to address students diverse
learning styles, working strategies, and abilities using digital tools and resources
(ISTE, 2008).
3. Model digital age work and learning. Teachers exhibit knowledge, skills, and work
processes representative of an innovative professional in a global and digital society (ISTE,
2008).
b. Collaborate with students, peers, parents, and community members using
digital tools and resources to support student success and innovation (ISTE,
2008).
4. Promote and model digital citizenship and responsibility. Teachers understand local
and global societal issues and responsibilities in an evolving digital culture and exhibit legal and
ethical behavior in their professional practices (ISTE, 2008).
c. Promote and model digital etiquette and responsible social interactions related
to the use of technology and information (ISTE, 2008).
5. Engage in professional growth and leadership. Teachers continuously improve their
professional practice, model lifelong learning, and exhibit leadership in their school and

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professional community by promoting and demonstrating the effective use of digital tools and
resources (ISTE, 2008).
a. Participate in local and global learning communities to explore creative
applications of technology to improve student learning (ISTE, 2008).
For Administrators. 1. Visionary leadership. Educational Administrators inspire and
lead development and implementation of a shared vision for comprehensive integration of
technology to promote excellence and support transformation throughout the organization (ISTE,
2009).
b. Engage in an ongoing process to develop, implement, and communicate
technology-infused strategic plans aligned with a shared vision (ISTE, 2007).
c. Advocate on local, state and national levels for policies, programs, and funding
to support implementation of a technology-infused vision and strategic plan
(ISTE, 2009).
2. Digital age learning culture. Educational Administrators create, promote, and sustain a
dynamic, digital-age learning culture that provides a rigorous, relevant, and engaging education
for all students (ISTE, 2009).
b. Model and promote the frequent and effective use of technology for learning
(ISTE, 2009).
c. Provide learner-centered environments equipped with technology and learning
resources to meet the individual, diverse needs of all learners (ISTE, 2009).
3. Excellence in professional practice. Educational Administrators promote an
environment of professional learning and innovation that empowers educators to enhance student
learning through the infusion of contemporary technologies and digital resources (ISTE, 2009).

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a. Allocate time, resources, and access to ensure ongoing professional growth in


technology fluency and integration (ISTE, 2009).
b. Facilitate and participate in learning communities that stimulate, nurture and
support administrators, faculty, and staff in the study and use of technology
(ISTE, 2009).
4. Systemic improvement. Educational Administrators provide digital age leadership and
management to continuously improve the organization through the effective use of information
and technology resources (ISTE, 2009).
a. Lead purposeful change to maximize the achievement of learning goals through
the appropriate use of technology and media-rich resources (ISTE, 2009).
5. Digital citizenship. Educational Administrators model and facilitate understanding of
social, ethical and legal issues and responsibilities related to an evolving digital culture (ISTE,
2009).
b. Promote, model and establish policies for safe, legal, and ethical use of digital
information and technology (ISTE, 2009).

SMART Goal #3
Educators will develop instructional techniques to enhance learning and improve student
achievement on state standardized test and teacher assessments through the appropriate use of
iPads and other technology in the classroom and outside the classroom. Students will be strongly
encouraged to use the iPad for many of the day-to-day classroom activities to produce digitally
literate students that are prepared for a future in society.

Strategies to Support Goal

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Students will learn the appropriate use of the iPad and other technology within the
classroom and outside of the classroom.

2.

Student will be trained and encouraged to manage classroom activities such as


note-taking, data collection and organization, web searching, social collaboration,
and creative thinking using the iPad.

3.

Teachers will design and implement interactive, engaging lessons using the iPad
or laptop in conjunction with an interactive whiteboard or an AppleTV.

4.

Students will learn 21st century skills such as online collaboration, creativity,
problems solving, critical thinking, and proficient knowledge in the core subject
areas.

21st Century Learning Skills. Simply being able to use technology is no longer enough.
Today's students need to be able to use technology to analyze, learn and explore. Digital age
skills are vital for preparing students to work, live and contribute to the social and civic fabric of
their communities (ISTE, 2008). Affordances of these devices is defined as the perceived and
actual properties of the thing, primarily those fundamental properties that determine just how the
thing could possibly be used (Norman, 1988, p. 9). Some of the affordances of the iPad for
developing 21st century learning skills for students can be divided into the following:
1.

A resource tool for educational content and knowledge delivery.

2.

A connectivity and portability tool, which is the ability to connect to networks, to


other devices, and to learn almost anywhere, 24/7.

3,

A collaboration tool by being able to connect with other people.

4.

A capture tool to collect and gather real data by taking photos, recording videos,
and recording sounds.

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5.

A creative tool for designing engaging, artistic, educational media.

6.

An analytic tool to draw conclusions based on interpreting and synthesizing data


and information.

7.

A representation tool to organize and present information and data in appealing


formats.

8.

An administrative tool to organize data, notes and other media (Churchill &
Wang, 2014).

Rationale. Because the iPad was only launched in 2010, there is a limited amount of
research into the benefits of the iPad in the classroom. But some studies have indicate that
students are very eager to use the iPads. In one study, it became apparent to principals, and
teachers that the device themselves are less important than how they can be used to support
teaching and learning (Pegrum, Oakley, & Faulkner, p. 73, 2013). One study suggested that
students were generally very eager to use the device, and able to pick it up and use it

intuitively with little instruction (Henderson & Yeow, p. 87, 2012). Pegrum et al, (2013)
indicated that the level of motivation and engagement increased for students as they
seemed to be very excited when iPads were brought out. Another study indicated that
student engagement was very high, especially among those that struggle to participate in
classroom activity (Ward, Finley, Keil, & Clay, 2013). The use of the iPad in the classroom
should increase student achievement, engagement, creativity, and 21st century technology
skills. In a study involving a 1:1 iPad initiative in a Lakewood, Minnesota school district,
20 classrooms out of 31 observed gains in student learning (Adler, 2013).
While the interactive whiteboard still has its purpose, one ot the emerging technologies is
the use of an AppleTV in combination with an iPad or other Airplay device (Mahaley, 2012). An

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AppleTV with an iPad can do anything that an interactive whiteboard can do and more. The
AppleTV/iPad allows the teacher to roam around the room while writing on the iPad, presenting
the lesson, displaying content from the internet, or running an app. With the 1:1 iPad initiative,
any project that a student is working on with an iPad can be mirrored from the students seat to
the screen using the AppleTV (Orilio, 2013).
While the large initial cost of supplying iPads may seem daunting, the use of digital
textbooks on iPads can save districts up to $250 per student per year (Electronista, 2012).
Furthermore, the use of iPad apps such as Notability on digital worksheets or for taking notes
will reduce the use and cost of copiers and paper. The use of digital textbooks, and the
organization of notes, worksheets, etc. on the iPad will reduce the weight and clutter of
notebooks and textbooks in a students backpack.
Expected Outcomes. By using some of the latest technology in most of their classroom
activities, students will be prepared for an ever-changing global technological society and
workplace. Through the use of technology, 80% of students will perform at a proficient level on
state mandated standardized exams that are administered using technology as measured over a
two year period. Teachers will provide supporting evidence in the form of classroom assessments
to measure the effectiveness of the iPad initiative.
ISTE Standards
For Students. 2. Communication and collaboration. Students use digital media and
environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance, to support
individual learning and contribute to the learning of others (ISTE, 2007).
a. Interact, collaborate, and publish with peers, experts, or others employing a
variety of digital environments and media (ISTE, 2007).

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b. Communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences using a


variety of media and formats (ISTE, 2007).
3. Research and information fluency. Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and
use information (ISTE, 2007).
a. Plan strategies to guide inquiry (ISTE, 2007).
b. Locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information
from a variety of sources and media (ISTE, 2007).
c. Evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the
appropriateness to specific tasks (ISTE, 2007).
d. Process data and report results (ISTE, 2007).
For Teachers. 2. Design and develop digital age learning experiences and assessments.
Teachers design, develop, and evaluate authentic learning experiences and assessments
incorporating contemporary tools and resources to maximize content learning in context and to
develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes identified in the standards (ISTE, 2008).
a. Design or adapt relevant learning experiences that incorporate digital tools and
resources to promote student learning and creativity (ISTE, 2008).
b. Develop technology-enriched learning environments that enable all students to
pursue their individual curiosities and become active participants in setting their
own educational goals, managing their own learning, and assessing their own
progress (ISTE, 2008).

Budget for all Goals


Budget
Unit Cost- iPad mini- $350.00

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Total Cost: 7, 500 iPad Minis equal a total of $2,625,000


Unit Cost- AppleTV- $90.00
Total Cost: 250 AppleTVs equal a total of $22,500.00
10 Schools with a total of 4 Internal Technicians at 30,000 a year
Total Cost: 4 Internal Technicians equal a total of $120,000.00
Head of Technology for the district at 45,000 a year
Funding. Title I Funding will be used for this entire technology integration
Timeline. All iPad minis will be purchased by July 30th for the 2015-2016 school year
Teacher and Parent Training
Budget. No additional costs outside the technology staff
Evaluation Measures. Internal Technicians (4) and Lead Technology school
representative
Timeline. Teacher Training

August 10th-12th Full day training on the iPad mini device and programs (I-Technology Sessions)
September 9th Curriculum Integration/Teachers helping Teachers data base
October 7th Learning Management Systems, Web 2.0 and Personal Learning Network
November 4th Curriculum Integration
December 2nd Individual school and grade level concerns
January 6th Curriculum Integration/Teachers helping Teachers data base
February 3rd Learning Management Systems, Web 2.0 and Personal Learning Network
March 2nd Individual school and grade level concerns
April 6th Curriculum Integration/Teachers helping Teachers data base
May 4th Individual school and grade level concerns
Parent Training

September 21st- Online Resources and Student Expectations


November 16th Curriculum Access and Information
January 11th Personal Learning Network (PLN)
March 21st Online Resources aligned with grade level of student
May 16th Test Preparation with programs purchased by the school
Student Training

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Budget. No additional funding needed


Evaluation Measures. Internal Technicians (4) and Lead Technology school
representative
Timeline. Student Training
August 17th-21st Specific Expectations, Goals and Tutorials of programs that will be used
Monthly Review lessons
Childrens Internet Protection Act (CIPA) and E-Rate
In 2000 Congress enacted the Childrens Internet Protection Act (CIPA). This act was
created to address concerns about childrens access to obscene or harmful content over the
Internet (Federal Communications Commission, 2014). In order for schools and libraries to
receive a reduced rate for Internet access or internal connections through the E-rate program,
CIPA requires regulations to be followed according to CIPA.
The requirements according to the CIPA regulations are: 1) their Internet safety policies
must monitor online activities of minors; and 2) according to the Protecting Children in the 21st
Century Act, minors must be educated about appropriate online behavior that includes social
networking websites, cyberbullying awareness and response (Federal Communications
Commission, 2014).
According to the Federal Communications Commission (2014), CIPA requires schools
and libraries to adopt the following Internet safety policy:

Access by minors to inappropriate material on the Internet


Safety policy must address e-mail, chat rooms, and other forms of direct communication
Unauthorized access and other unlawful activities will not be allowed
Unauthorized disclosure of personal information regarding minors not allowed
Internet safety policy restricts minors access to harmful materials

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Further requirements for schools and libraries must certify compliance with CIPA before
receiving E-rate funding:
CIPA does not apply to schools and libraries receiving discounts only for telecommunications
services only (Federal Communications Commission, 2014)
An authorized adult can disable filtering for research and other lawful purposes (Federal
Communications Commission, 2014)
Tracking of Internet use by minors or adults is required by CIPA (Federal Communications
Commission, 2014)

Childrens Online Privacy Protection Act


The Childrens Online Privacy Protection Act is an act put in place to protect the
information and material being accessed to anyone child 13 or under. This Act insures that before
a child under the age of 13 gives any personal information that the parent be notified and comply
with the rules and regulations. Sites must have a link that states this information and notification
and compliance must come from the parent before the site may use any personal information of
the childs (Federal Trade Commission, 1999).
This will further help our school district protect the students and the staff of the sites that
are made for the students from the school. It will be key to have the opportunity as a school to
insure the parents are allowing their child to use the sites provided and if personal information is
needed that the parents comply with the rules and regulations. This is further a safety net of
support and services that will only aid the school district in safety precautions for students and
their learning with online databases.

Acceptable/Responsible Use Policies

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1. Develop a digital citizenship committee or taskforce to discuss and implement digital


citizenship procedures.
2. Instruct students and families on what is appropriate, acceptable, and ethical use of the
school owned device and the internet.
3. Establish procedures to be followed if a student, family member, etc. uses a school
owned device in an inappropriate manner.
4. Establish guidelines for downloading programs and apps from the internet.
5. Students are responsible for their individual account and should take all reasonable
precautions to prevent others from being able to use their account. Under no conditions should
students provide their passwords for another person. In addition students will not set or reset
passwords without approval from district staff.
6. Students will not harass or cyberbully another person. Harassment is defined as
persistently acting in a manner that distresses or annoys another person. If a student is addressed
about a situation they must stop and engage in only appropriate behavior for the discussion
forums or any other form of online communication.
7. Students will only use the system for educational and career development activities.
There should be no personal use on these devices.
8. Students will not download large files or unwanted applications without prior approval
from district personnel.
9. Students will not plagiarize or download material found on the internet. They will
respect the right of copyright and yield to proper internet citing when necessary.

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10. Students will not use the districts network system to access material that is profane or
obscene, that advocates illegal acts or that advocates violence or any other discrimination
towards others.

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References
Adler, E. (2013, June 29). Lakeville test shows iPads boosted education in many classrooms. In
StarTribune. Retrieved from http://www.startribune.com/local/south/213709671.html.
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