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Kindergarten General Music:

Audiation and Voice Exploration Unit

By,
Jeffry Ogden
1

Context Analysis
School District
Whitmore Lake Elementary School is a part of Whitmore Lake Public Schools. The school has
classes ranging from Kindergarten through 6th grade. There are approximately 500 students who
attend the Elementary School. Whitmore lake is a small community with a population of nearly
6,450 residents in Northfield Township. The vast majority of the population is Caucasian,
making up 94% of the residents in Whitmore Lake with small pockets of other races making up
the remaining 6% of the population. This racial distribution is reflected by the students that
attend Whitmore Lake Elementary School. The median household income in 2012 was $53,851,
and the majority of families fall into what would be considered a middle class income group.
41% of the students in the district are eligible for free and reduced lunches. There is also a
significant number of single or unmarried parents whose children are enrolled at WLES.
Classroom Factors
The students leave their primary classrooms every day for 40 minutes to do a special class which
is either music, technology, or physical education. The students and teachers follow a 3 day
rotating schedule so every grade level has their special classes every day during the same time
period. Music class follows a general pattern every day with a voice warm up, a learning
sequence activity, tonal and rhythmic activities, an instrumental activity, and then a move and
freeze song. Every class period also begins and ends with a Hello and Goodbye song that just
alternates lyrics depending on if the class is coming to or going from music class.
Kindergarteners also have a Whose Name song where they get the opportunity to sing alone
every class period. The majority of class time is focused on student learning and student
participation with minimal instructions given for activities. The classroom is located next to the
lunchroom which means that there can be outside noise during lunch periods but the classroom is
relatively quiet during the beginning and ending of the day. The playground is located directly
behind the music room but there are blinds on the window to keep students from focusing on
children outside rather than classroom activities.
Student Characteristics
22% of the student population have an individual education plan. The national average is 11%
which means that Whitmore lake has a much larger percentage of their student body with IEPs.
In Kindergarten, there are several students who will have IEPs when they get older, but have yet
to be officially diagnosed with any sort of learning disability or disorder. Six students receive
some form of speech therapy at this point in time throughout all of kindergarten. Several of the
students have issues focusing in class and the majority of behavior issues stem from a lack of
participation with certain activities. These students need constant stimulation to remain engaged
in class and often need reminders to raise their hand if they have a question. There are also
several Kindergarteners who are still incredibly shy and will not participate in solo singing
activities due to their shy nature. One of the boys has been coming out of his shell a bit in class
2

but it is important not to push these children to participate or they will absolutely close off and be
completely non-responsive for the remainder of the class period.

Implications for Instruction


For my students who struggle with focusing I implement multiple activities where they have
something in their hands to keep them occupied or have them moving around the room. I also
include multiple opportunities for students to sing solos or sing as a group. There will be a wide
range of activities with quick transitions between activities to keep students engaged and
interested in participating. When writing lessons I need to find plenty of opportunities to sing or
participate as a group and make individual participation or solo singing activities minimal so the
students who are less comfortable can still be successful in music class.

Rationale
Students
What is your singing voice? How do we find our singing voice? In this unit we will sing songs
and play games that help us find our singing voice. We use our singing voice in music class
every time we sing so it is very important to learn how to sing properly.
Teachers
This unit is designed to help Kindergarteners find their singing voices. This is accomplished
through activities that help students repeat the resting tone, activities where they echo tonal
patterns, and by performing voice exploration exercises. Songs and activities will include
multiple tonalities and meters to ensure that students are having the best musical experience
possible. We will address each informal assessment as a game to help encourage participation
and to keep students from getting nervous and failing to give their best performance.

Content Analysis
Michigan Standards and Benchmarks in Arts Education
ART.M.I.K.1 Demonstrate uses of the voice, proper instrumental technique, and steady
beat.
ART.M.I.K.4 Sing melodies with confidence in a large group.
ART.M.I.K.5 Follow cues of the conductor to begin and for a cut-off.
ART.M.I.K.7 Replicate short rhythmic and melodic patterns.

Generalizations
1.
2.
3.
4.

I can use my singing voice.


I can sing the resting tone.
I can sing tonal patterns.
I can feel a steady beat.

Concepts

Singing Voice
Listening
Echoing
Resting Tone
Tonal Patterns
Breathing
Move With Flow
Macrobeats
Group Singing
Solo Singing
Playing tonal instruments

Content Outline
I.

I can use my singing voice.


A. Activities will be designed to help students find singing voice
1. Voice exploration activities
2. Solo singing activities
3. Pattern singing
B. Students will sing solo, in small groups, and as a class
1. Solo pattern singing
a) Tonal Pattern songs
(1) High High Hill
2. Group pattern singing and chanting
a) Singing or chanting with props in small groups
b) Singing as a class
II. I can sing the resting tone
A. Activities that focus on finding and singing the resting tone.
1. Old John The Rabbit (Singing resting tone Oh Yes after each phrase)
2. Resting Tone Button
3. Joe Do Song (Singing resting tone on neutral syllable)
4. Popping Bubbles (Sing resting tone when a bubble is popped)
III. I can sing tonal patterns
A. Activities will focus on singing tonal patterns as a group or as a solo
1. High High Hill, etc.
2. Songs that are followed by tonal patterns
a) Students will echo tonic and dominant patterns created by the teacher
b) Students will follow teacher cues
IV. I can feel a steady beat
A. Activities will include movement
1. Move with flow
a) Movement will help students feel space between beats by moving with flow
b) Locomotor and non-locomotor movement
(1) Moving specific body parts without moving around the room.
(2) Moving around the room with the full body exploring high, medium, and low
space.
c) Using props to help students move with flow
2. Feel a Macrobeat
a) Students will tap macrobeats with their hands and other parts of their bodies to the
best of their ability.
b) Students will feel macrobeat with instruments to the best of their abilities.
c) Students will march in activities to the macrobeat.

Outcomes
Michigan Standards/Benchmarks Unit Outcomes: Students will..
for Art Education
ART.M.I.K.1

use their best singing voice at all times


when singing in class

Demonstrate uses of the voice, proper


instrumental technique, and steady beat.

perform voice exploration activities


move with flow and move with a steady
beat as a group
sing the resting tone with teacher when
asked to do so

ART.M.I.K.4

sing along with familiar songs

Sing melodies with confidence in a large


group.

echo patterns as a group


listen to songs in class to gain
confidence to sing them

ART.M.I.K.5

listen before singing patterns

Follow cues of the conductor to begin and sing when they are told or shown to do
for a cut-off.
so

ART.M.I.K.7

sing melodic patterns as a class

Replicate short rhythmic and melodic


patterns.

sing melodic patterns as individuals


listen to patterns before echoing them
sing tonic and dominant pattern after
each activity with the teacher

Pre-Unit Assessment Activity

High High Hill is a song that allows the teacher to create tonal patterns that are echoed by
individual students. Students march around the room and sing the song with the teacher and cross
over a hill. The student who ends the song on the hill will have a turn echoing tonic and
dominant tonal patterns in D Major. I am listening for pitch accuracy and use of singing voice
when the students will sing. I mark by hand what level the students are achieving with their
singing during the assessments and then input the data to my computer.
Each student will echo the following two tonal patterns which will be graded:

The tonic pattern will consist of do, mi, and


sol. These are all of the notes that make up a
major tonic chord so it is a good choice to get
an idea of what level that student is achieving
with their tonal pattern singing.

The dominant pattern will consist of Sol, Fa,


Re, and Ti. These are all of the notes that
make up a dominant 7th chord. I expect this
to be a more difficult pattern to sing
successfully for the students.

Data Categories:
Students will be graded using the following scale based on their singing of the patterns in high
high hill:
S: Evidence of Substantial Understanding
Will represent a student who listens to the teachers pattern before singing, shows substantial
understanding of their singing voice and have good pitch accuracy consistently.
L: Evidence of Limited understanding
Will represent a student who listens to the teachers pattern before singing, and who shows
limited understanding of their singing voice with pitch accuracy some of the time.
N: Evidence of No Understanding
Will represent no understanding of their singing voice and a lack of pitch accuracy, or not
listening to the teachers patterns before singing. An N will also represent a student who does
not participate in the activity.
To keep students engaged in the activity I made sure to include multiple tonic and dominant tonal
patterns that were not the two I was grading. This gave students more opportunities to sing and
also kept them engaged in the activity by giving them variety. This was also a measure to prevent
students from simply memorizing the two answers and to make them continue to listen
throughout the entire lesson.

High High Hill Pre-Unit Assessment Data


Student

Tonic Pattern

Dominant Pattern

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

Objective/
Outcome

Pre-Unit
Assessment
Activity

Summary Of
Results

Implications for
Instruction

Students will
demonstrate proper
use of their singing
voice

Students will echo


tonal patterns in
High High Hill game
individually

The students that


earned an S score
had to show a
singing voice. Most
students earned at
least 1 S with this
activity.

The students who


earned an L or an
N are still working
on finding their
singing voice. I will
include plenty of
exploration activities
to help them
discover their
singing voice.

Objective/
Outcome

Pre-Unit
Assessment
Activity

Summary of
Results

Implications for
Instruction

Students will sing


pitches in patterns
accurately and
consistently

Students will sing


tonal patterns in the
High High Hill game
which will be graded
for consistency and
accuracy

Nine of the 17
students
demonstrated an
ability to sing at
least 1 pattern
accurately, and five
were able to sing
both accurately.

I need to include
activities singing
patterns and solo
notes in every class
to keep building this
skill in my students.

Objective/
Outcome

Pre-Unit
Assessment
Activity

Summary of
Results

Implications for
Instruction

Students will follow


teacher cues

Students will listen


to pattern before
singing and wait for
teacher cue to
begin singing

3 of my students
didnt want to have
a turn and refused
to follow my cues
and sing.

I need to keep
doing activities that
allow these
students to work on
singing comfortably
in a solo setting. I
will include tonal
and rhythmic
activities that help
build the non-verbal
communication
between teacher
and student.

10

Students With Special Concerns:


In this Kindergarten Class there are 3 students who have issues remaining focused during class.
They often need reminders to stay in their seats or to raise their hand when they have a question.
For these students, I need to prepare activities every day which will allow them to move
frequently. One of the students is only interested in activities where instruments are involved so I
need to include plenty of instrument activities where they will be given opportunities to play
multiple instruments in class. I also have 2 students in the class who get very nervous when they
are asked to sing in class or do anything alone. For these two students, I cant try to push them
into participating because they both have a tendency to shut down. They are both getting
comfortable with music class so I need to just allow them time and space to participate and get
comfortable before I can expect them to truly participate comfortably with solo activities.

Student For Learning Analysis:


The student I picked for the learning analysis is one of my two students who is nervous to
perform in class. I will be checking on his comfort levels with doing group activities as well as
solo activities on a daily basis. I will be interested to see if he becomes more comfortable as the
unit progresses with lessons that are more focused on including plenty of tonal patterns to keep
students working towards the goals associated with my unit. In his pre assessment he was very
nervous and was unable to sing the patterns at all in a solo setting. I hope he will get more
comfortable throughout my unit and be able to participate more successfully by the end of the
unit. He is labeled as Student 1 when looking at the data.

11

Music Lesson Plan


Dates: October 7 - October 9, 2014

Grade:

Kindergarten

Objectives:

Tonal Activities:

ART.M.I.K.1

Hello Song: Major, Duple Meter

Demonstrate uses of the


voice, proper instrumental
technique, and steady beat.

Have students sing song with teacher while tapping macrobeats on


their laps.

ART.M.I.K.4
Sing melodies with
confidence in a large group.

ART.M.I.K.7
Replicate short rhythmic
and melodic patterns.

Whose Name Song: Major, Duple Meter


Materials: Superstar Microphone
Sing song with class passing around the microphone. Each student
has a turn singing their name with the microphone solo and the class
sings the verses together.

*Pre Assess Activity*


High High Hill: D Major, Duple Meter
Materials: High Hill (Rugs)

ART.M.I.K.1
Demonstrate uses of the
voice, proper instrumental
technique, and steady beat.
ART.M.I.K.5
Follow cues of the
conductor to begin and for
a cut-off.

ART.M.I.K.7
Replicate short rhythmic
and melodic patterns.
ART.M.I.K.5
Follow cues of the
conductor to begin and for
a cut-off.

Sing with students at beginning of class. Sing tonal patterns to the


group and have them echo the teacher. Remind students of the rules
for the activity. Sing the song with the students and have them go
through it enough times to make sure that every student has a turn.
Assess students on singing voice, pitch accuracy, and ability to listen to
patterns before echoing the patterns.

Stop: Phrygian Mode, Triple Meter


Materials: Bubbles
Sing the song for students several times while they move with flow and
listen. Sing the resting tone every time I stop a phrase and pop a
bubble. Ask students to identify what I do every time I pop a bubble.
Ask them to join me in singing bum on the resting tone every time I
pop a bubble. Have students move around the room with me when Im
singing and stop when I stop singing. Have them sing the resting tone
whenever I pop a bubble.

12

Objectives:
ART.M.I.K.1

Rhythmic Activities:
Here is the Beehive: Triple Meter
Perform chant with students moving with flow. Demonstrate multiple

Demonstrate uses of the


voices while chanting for students. Label voices; speaking voice, high
voice, proper
instrumental technique, voice, low voice, mouse voice, whisper voice, robot voice, etc. Repeat
chant multiple times with these different voices. Have students echo
and steady beat.
ART.M.I.K.5

patterns after each chant with their specified voice for that time through
the chant.

Follow cues of the


conductor to begin and
for a cut-off.

Instrument
Study

Learn about the bass and listen to a bass playing music with the
students.

Objectives:

Move and Freeze:

ART.M.I.K.5
Follow cues of the
conductor to begin and
for a cut-off.

Play move and freeze game to piece of music. When the music starts
the students move freely around the room. Whenever the music stops
they need to freeze. Pick places at ends of musical phrases initially to
stop the music, then pick less obvious places so the students have to
be listening carefully to be successful.

Objectives:

Tonal Activity:

ART.M.I.K.1

Goodbye Song: Major, Duple

Demonstrate uses of the


Sing Goodbye Song as a class while the students lightly tap the
voice, proper
instrumental technique, macrobeats on their laps.
and steady beat.
ART.M.I.K.4
Sing melodies with
confidence in a large
group.

13

Music Lesson Plan


Dates:

Grade: Kindergarten

Oct 10 - Oct14 2014

Objectives:

Tonal Activities:

ART.M.I.K.1

Hello Song: Major, Duple Meter

Demonstrate uses of the


voice, proper
instrumental technique,
and steady beat.

Have students sing song with teacher while tapping macrobeats


on their laps.

ART.M.I.K.4

Whose Name Song: Major, Duple Meter


Materials: Superstar Microphone

Sing melodies with


confidence in a large
group.

Sing song with class passing around the microphone. Each


student has a turn singing their name with the microphone solo
and the class sings the verses together.

ART.M.I.K.1

Joe Do: Duple Meter, Major or Harmonic Minor


Sing the song for students and introduce Joe Do. Tell them that
Demonstrate uses of the
Joe likes to be a very tricky friend who will do everything he can
voice, proper
instrumental technique, to trick them into singing the resting tone when he isnt singing.
and steady beat.
Repeat the song multiple times in major then switch to minor.
Repeat activity with minor.
ART.M.I.K.7
Replicate short rhythmic
and melodic patterns.

ART.M.I.K.4
Sing melodies with
confidence in a large
group.

Stop: Phrygian Mode, Triple Meter


Materials: Bubbles

Sing the song for students several times while they move with
flow and listen. Sing the resting tone every time I stop a phrase
ART.M.I.K.1
and pop a bubble. Ask students to identify what I do every time I
pop a bubble. Ask them to join me in singing bum on the resting
Demonstrate uses of the
tone every time I pop a bubble. Have students move around the
voice, proper
instrumental technique, room with me when Im singing and stop when I stop singing.
and steady beat.
Have them sing the resting tone whenever I pop a bubble. Move
around the room and allow individuals who are moving with flow
pop a bubble and sing the resting tone as a solo.

14

Objectives:
ART.M.I.K.1
Demonstrate uses of the
voice, proper instrumental
technique, and steady beat.

Rhythmic Activities:
Here is the Beehive: Triple Meter
Perform chant with students moving with flow. Demonstrate multiple
voices while chanting for students. Label voices; speaking voice, high
voice, low voice, mouse voice, whisper voice, robot voice, etc. Repeat
chant multiple times with these different voices. Have students echo
patterns after each chant with their specified voice for that time through
the chant.

ART.M.I.K.1
Demonstrate uses of the
voice, proper instrumental
technique, and steady beat.
ART.M.I.K.5
Follow cues of the
conductor to begin and for
a cut-off.

Objectives:
ART.M.I.K.5

My Mother Your Mother: Duple Meter


Materials: Creature Puppets
Perform Chant with Creatures. Ask students to identify same and
different patterns. Pass out creatures to the class and let them make
creatures of their own. Have them echo my patterns with the creatures
as individuals and in a large group.

Move and Freeze:

Follow cues of the


conductor to begin and
for a cut-off.

Play move and freeze game to piece of music. When the music starts
the students move freely around the room. Whenever the music stops
they need to freeze. Pick places at ends of musical phrases initially to
stop the music, then pick less obvious places so the students have to
be listening carefully to be successful.

Objectives:

Tonal Activity:

ART.M.I.K.1
Demonstrate uses of the
voice, proper instrumental
technique, and steady beat.

Goodbye Song: Major, Duple


Sing Goodbye Song as a class while the students lightly tap the
macrobeats on their laps.

ART.M.I.K.4
Sing melodies with
confidence in a large group.

15

Music Lesson Plan


Dates:

Oct 15 - Oct 17

Grade: Kindergarten

Objectives:

Tonal Activities:

ART.M.I.K.1

Hello Song: Major, Duple Meter

Demonstrate uses of the


voice, proper instrumental
technique, and steady beat.
ART.M.I.K.4

Have students sing song with teacher while tapping macrobeats on


their laps.
Whose Name Song: Major, Duple Meter
Materials: Superstar Microphone

Sing melodies with


confidence in a large group.

Sing song with class passing around the microphone. Each student
has a turn singing their name with the microphone solo and the class
sings the verses together.

ART.M.I.K.1

Kaikoura Harbor: Mixolydian, Usual Duple Meter


Materials:Boomwackers

Demonstrate uses of the


voice, proper instrumental
technique, and steady beat.

Sing song for students while they move with flow. Reintroduce
boomwackers. Demonstrate proper boomwacker playing while
students practice with their imaginary boomwackers. Pass
ART.M.I.K.4
boomwackers out and have students play boomwacker while listening
to the song and playing on the macrobeats. Give each student a turn
Sing melodies with
confidence in a large group. with the boomwackers. Collect boomwackers at the end of song.
Harvest: Lydian, Triple Meter
Materials: Scarves
Sing song for students while they move with flow. Introduce resting
Demonstrate uses of the
voice, proper instrumental tone button. Explain that they sing bum every time I touch my button.
technique, and steady beat. Start them off on resting tone drone and sing song again. Repeat
several times. Make the floor the resting tone button and have the
ART.M.I.K.7
students move with flow with their scarves. Every time the song ends
they blow their scarves in the air and sing the resting tone when the
Replicate short rhythmic
scarf hits the ground.
ART.M.I.K.1

and melodic patterns.


ART.M.I.K.5

Follow cues of the


conductor to begin and for
a cut-off.

Objectives:

Voice Exploration Activities:


Write shapes on the board and have the students follow the shapes
with their voices. Include gradual slides from the top of their voice to
the bottom of their voice. Have several shapes that require fast
movements and several that are slow. Allow students opportunity to
explore and create their own sounds based on how they feel it should
sound.

16

Objectives:

Rhythmic Activities:
Jack OLantern: Usual Duple Meter
Explain the game to the students. They must go in self space and
become pumpkins. If I come by and tap them on the back then they will
quietly grow into Jack OLanterns by the end of the chant. If they are a
Jack OLantern, they echo my patterns then they get to quietly walk
around the pumpkin patch and choose 1 person to lightly tap to
become a Jack OLantern. Repeat until every child is a Jack OLantern.

Instrument
Study

Introduce woodwind family of instruments. Teach the students about


the flute and piccolo. Ask what parts of these instruments are made of
wood. Explain that they were originally made of wood. Listen to
examples of flute playing music and have students practice on their
imaginary flutes while they listen.

Objectives:

Move and Freeze:

ART.M.I.K.5
Follow cues of the
conductor to begin and
for a cut-off.

Play move and freeze game to piece of music. When the music starts
the students move freely around the room. Whenever the music stops
they need to freeze. Pick places at ends of musical phrases initially to
stop the music, then pick less obvious places so the students have to
be listening carefully to be successful.

Objectives:

Tonal Activity:

ART.M.I.K.1

Goodbye Song: Major, Duple

Demonstrate uses of the


Sing Goodbye Song as a class while the students lightly tap the
voice, proper
instrumental technique, macrobeats on their laps.
and steady beat.
ART.M.I.K.4
Sing melodies with
confidence in a large
group.

17

Music Lesson Plan


Dates:

Oct 20 - Oct 22

Objectives:
ART.M.I.K.1

Grade: Kindergarten

Tonal Activities:
Hello Song: Major, Duple Meter
Have students sing song with teacher while tapping macrobeats on

Demonstrate uses of the


their laps.
voice, proper
instrumental technique,
and steady beat.
ART.M.I.K.4

Whose Name Song: Major, Duple Meter


Materials: Superstar Microphone

Sing melodies with


confidence in a large
group.

Sing song with class passing around the microphone. Each student
has a turn singing their name with the microphone solo and the class
sings the verses together.

ART.M.I.K.1

Kaikoura Harbor: Mixolydian, Usual Duple Meter


Materials: Magic Expanding Ball

Demonstrate uses of the


voice, proper
Sing song for students while they move with flow. Introduce expanding
instrumental technique,
ball. Sing resting tone every time the ball closes. Tell students I will try
and steady beat.
ART.M.I.K.5
Follow cues of the
conductor to begin and
for a cut-off.

ART.M.I.K.4
Sing melodies with
confidence in a large
group.
ART.M.I.K.5
Follow cues of the
conductor to begin and
for a cut-off.

to trick them by closing the ball at different points during the song.
Make sure they are paying close attention to the ball. Have them sing
the resting tone at phrase endings with the ball. Sing tonal patterns in
mixolydian mode to the class at the end of the song.

Harvest: Lydian, Triple Meter


Materials: Scarves
Sing song for students while they move with flow. Reintroduce resting
tone button. Explain that they sing bum every time I touch my button.
Start them off on resting tone drone and sing song again. Repeat
several times. Make the floor the resting tone button and have the
students move with flow with their scarves. Every time the song ends
they blow their scarves in the air and sing the resting tone when the
scarf hits the ground.

ART.M.I.K.7
Replicate short rhythmic
and melodic patterns.

18

Objectives:
ART.M.I.K.5

Rhythmic Activity:
Jack OLantern: Usual Duple Meter

Remind the students the rules of the game. Have them move into self
space and become pumpkins. If I come by and tap them on the back
then they quietly grow into Jack OLanterns by the end of the chant. If
they are a Jack OLantern, they echo my rhythmic patterns then they
get to quietly walk around the pumpkin patch and choose 1 person to
ART.M.I.K.7
lightly tap to become a Jack OLantern. Repeat until every child is a
Replicate short rhythmic Jack OLantern.
Follow cues of the
conductor to begin and
for a cut-off.

and melodic patterns.

Objectives:

Voice Exploration Activities:

ART.M.I.K.1

Materials: Laser Pointer

Demonstrate uses of the


voice, proper
instrumental technique,
and steady beat.

Have students follow laser pointer on the board with their voices.
Demonstrate some ways to follow the laser pointer with my voice then
allow students to attempt to follow my laser pointer with their voices.
Try and use the full extent of their voices, with lots of quick slides
between high and low sounds.

Instrument
Study

Discuss the flute and piccolo again. Introduce clarinet and bass
clarinet. Ask students what part of the clarinet is made of wood.
Discuss the function of the reed and the parts of the clarinet. Play a
clarinet piece and have students practice their imaginary clarinets.

Objectives:

Move and Freeze:

ART.M.I.K.5
Follow cues of the
conductor to begin and
for a cut-off.

Play move and freeze game to piece of music. When the music starts
the students move freely around the room. Whenever the music stops
they need to freeze. Pick places at ends of musical phrases initially to
stop the music, then pick less obvious places so the students have to
be listening carefully to be successful.

Objectives:

Tonal Activity:

ART.M.I.K.1

Goodbye Song: Major, Duple

Demonstrate uses of the


Sing Goodbye Song as a class while the students lightly tap the
voice, proper
instrumental technique, macrobeats on their laps.
and steady beat.
ART.M.I.K.4
Sing melodies with
confidence in a large
group.

19

Music Lesson Plan


Dates:

Oct 23 - Oct 27

Objectives:
ART.M.I.K.1

Grade: Kindergarten

Tonal Activities:
Hello Song: Major, Duple Meter

Demonstrate uses of the Have students sing song with teacher while tapping macrobeats on
their laps.
voice, proper
instrumental technique,
and steady beat.
ART.M.I.K.4

Whose Name Song: Major, Duple Meter


Materials: Superstar Microphone

Sing melodies with


confidence in a large
group.

Sing song with class passing around the microphone. Each student
has a turn singing their name with the microphone solo and the class
sings the verses together.

ART.M.I.K.7

*Post Assessment Activity*

Replicate short rhythmic High High Hill: D Major, Duple Meter


Materials: High Hill (Rugs)
and melodic patterns.
ART.M.I.K.1

Sing with students at beginning of class. Sing tonal patterns to the


Demonstrate uses of the group and have them echo the teacher. Remind students of the rules
for the activity. Sing the song with the students and have them go
voice, proper
instrumental technique, through it enough times to make sure that every student has a turn.
and steady beat.
Assess students on singing voice, pitch accuracy, and ability to listen to
patterns before echoing the patterns.
ART.M.I.K.5

Follow cues of the


conductor to begin and
for a cut-off.

Dinosaur Diet: Harmonic Minor, Duple Meter


Materials: Bean Bags
Perform song for students while moving with flow. Have students join
me in moving with flow while listening to the song. Bring out bean bags
and have the students

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Objectives:

Rhythmic Activities:

ART.M.I.K.5

Charlie the Fish:


Materials: Charlie Puppets

Follow cues of the


conductor to begin and
for a cut-off.

Perform chant for students while moving my arms with flow. Introduce
Charlie the Fish to the students. Explain that Charlie loves to talk, but
instead of using words, Charlie talks in rhythmic patterns. Perform the
ART.M.I.K.7
chant again and create duple rhythmic patterns for the students to
Replicate short rhythmic echo as a class. Repeat several times. Explain that charlie likes to
change his voice sometimes for his patterns. Label different voices,
and melodic patterns.

Objectives:

Voice Exploration Activities:

ART.M.I.K.1

Materials: Laser Pointer

Demonstrate uses of the


voice, proper
instrumental technique,
and steady beat.

Have students follow laser pointer on the board with their voices.
Demonstrate some ways to follow the laser pointer with my voice then
allow students to attempt to follow my laser pointer with their voices.
Try and use the full extent of their voices, with lots of quick slides
between high and low sounds.

ART.M.I.K.7

Move and Freeze:

Follow cues of the


conductor to begin and
for a cut-off.

Play move and freeze game to piece of music. When the music starts
the students move freely around the room. Whenever the music stops
they need to freeze. Pick places at ends of musical phrases initially to
stop the music, then pick less obvious places so the students have to
be listening carefully to be successful.

Objectives:

Tonal Activity:

ART.M.I.K.1

Goodbye Song: Major, Duple

Demonstrate uses of the


Sing Goodbye Song as a class while the students lightly tap the
voice, proper
instrumental technique, macrobeats on their laps.
and steady beat.
ART.M.I.K.4
Sing melodies with
confidence in a large
group.

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Post Unit Assessment Activity

High High Hill was the song that I chose to test my students with on their pre-unit assessment
activity so I also chose it as their post unit assessment activity. On the last day of classes with
this kindergarten class I will be testing them on their ability to sing solo tonal patterns on the hill
just like they did on the first day of class. After doing so many solo activities and voice
exploration activities, I hope to see growth between the first day of class and the last day of my
unit. Several of the goals for this unit are long term goals that often take time to show progress.
Each student will echo the following two tonal patterns which will be graded:
The tonic pattern will consist of do, mi, and
sol. These are all of the notes that make up a
major tonic chord so it is a good choice to get
an idea of what level that student is achieving
with their tonal pattern singing. It is an easier
pattern to sing so it will help students who are
not as highly achieving in their singing a
better chance to succeed.
The dominant pattern will consist of Sol, Fa,
Re, and Ti. These are all of the notes that
make up a dominant 7th chord. This pattern
will be more of a challenge and will keep the
higher achieving students engaged.
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Data Categories:
Students will be graded using the following scale based on their singing of the patterns in high
high hill:
S: Evidence of Substantial Understanding
Will represent a student who listens to the teachers pattern before singing, shows substantial
understanding of their singing voice and have good pitch accuracy consistently.
L: Evidence of Limited understanding
Will represent a student who listens to the teachers pattern before singing, and who shows
limited understanding of their singing voice with pitch accuracy some of the time.
N: Evidence of No Understanding
Will represent no understanding of their singing voice and a lack of pitch accuracy, or not
listening to the teachers patterns before singing. An N will also represent a student who does not
participate in the activity.

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High High Hill Post Unit Assessment Data


Student

Tonic Pattern

Dominant Pattern

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

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Pre Unit Assessment

Post Unit Assessment

High High Hill Score Chart


14

Number Of Students

10.5

3.5

Tonic S

Tonic L

Tonic N

Dominant S

Dominant L

Dominant N

Pattern Scores

Post Unit Data Assessment


Objective/Outcome

Assessment Activity

Summary Of Results

Students will demonstrate


proper use of their singing
voice

Students will echo tonal


patterns in High High Hill
game individually

There was a much higher


number of students who
successfully used their
singing voice. Only 2
students in the class did
not ever use their singing
voice during the post
assessment activities.

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Objective/Outcome

Assessment Activity

Summary of Results

Students will sing pitches in Students will sing a tonic


patterns accurately and
and dominant tonal pattern
consistently
for a grade during the
activities in a solo setting.

13 students showed they


were capable of singing the
tonic pattern accurately
compared to the 9 in the
pre-unit assessment. 12 of
the students sang the
dominant pattern correctly
which is a great
improvement over the preunit assessment scores.
Students who earned an L
showed an understanding
of the contour of the
patterns even if they sang
some incorrect pitches.

Objective/Outcome

Summary of Results

Assessment Activity

Students will follow teacher Students will listen to


cues
pattern before singing and
wait for teacher cue to
begin singing

Only 1 student showed no


understanding of their task
with echoing the pattern.
This student didnt ever use
their singing voice and did
not show an understanding
of listening to my patterns
before singing the patterns
back to me. Every student
in the class willingly
participated and had a turn
in the song for the post unit
assessment.

Summary Statement for Student Learning


There was strong evidence of student learning and growth between the pre-unit assessment and
post unit assessment. In the pre-unit assessment, many students were unable to sing pitches
accurately and there were a limited number of students who showed an understanding of their
required task in the activity. I marked students with an L if they were singing inaccurately or
attempting the patterns but without using a proper singing voice. In the post assessment I had 13
students sing the tonic pattern accurately and 12 sing the dominant pattern accurately. The biggest
improvement as a class was in the dominant pattern. This pattern was designed to be more difficult
and it was wonderful to have so many students improve their ability to sing pitches consistently for
both patterns.
In the pre assessment, some students were unable to demonstrate a light singing voice, but there
were quite a few who werent able to demonstrate a beautiful singing voice the whole time. By the
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post assessment, the vast majority of students used their singing voice and they were able to sing
the patterns consistently with a much higher accuracy as a class because they used a singing voice
for the activity. Being able to use your singing voice is a difficult task for most elementary
students, so having such a high number of students in a Kindergarten class singing well is an
anomaly.
In the pre unit assessment, there were multiple students who refused to attempt to sing the patterns
back at all during the pre assessment activity. Every student willingly participated in the post
assessment activity. This shows a much higher comfort in performing solo activities which was one
of the focuses of my activities in the unit.

Individual Analysis
The student I chose for the individual analysis showed a great improvement in both his
participation in class activities and his ability to perform solo patterns in the post assessment.
When he was asked to sing a solo for the pre unit assessment, he became very physically
uncomfortable and started fidgeting with his shirt. When asked questions in class or asked to sing
or chant in a solo setting he would shut down and not respond verbally for the first several weeks
of school. Being in Kindergarten, he doesnt have an IEP and from his growth in the classes he
likely is still getting used to being in school and actively participating in class.
The first activities I saw a great improvement in were group activities. He really began to show
signs of a growing comfort level in class during activities where he wasnt singled out to perform
patterns but was able to explore with his peers. I noticed he would be singing and chanting along
quietly whenever there were group patterns and group singing activities. I made sure to include
opportunities for him to explore with his peers on a daily basis so he could be successful in class. I
watched him get more and more comfortable with his singing and participating every day, but also
made sure to give him plenty of space so he wouldnt feel pressure to participate in class. He
passed up his opportunity to sing during the Whose Name song in every lesson until October 20th,
which was a major accomplishment for him. When he received the microphone to sing his solo for
his name, he smiled and confidently started to sing. He didnt use his singing voice in the post unit
assessment, but he happily echoed the patterns and followed the contours of the notes earning an
L on both patterns rather than an N which he earned in the pre unit assessment.

Reflection and Self Evaluation


Students were most successful with using their singing voices in the class. Using a proper
singing voice is also necessary for singing patterns accurately which showed a major
improvement in the post unit assessment from the pre unit assessment. There were multiple voice
exploration activities built into my unit which were designed to help the students explore using
their voice in a wide range of creative ways to help them discover their singing voice. I also
made sure to include as many opportunities to let students sing tonal patterns and sing the resting
tone in activities in class. I was very pleased with their growth in these two areas.
The area that was least successful in my unit was the lesson planning portion and implementing
my lessons in a way that was most beneficial for my students. I felt that some of the activities I
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chose were less effective than i had hoped they would be. As a new teacher Im still learning to
find the balance of activities that is most effective for student learning and engagement. Often
times in my classes, especially at the beginning of the semester, my pacing was very uneven and
lead to spending too much time on certain activities and not having enough time at the end of the
lesson for other activities. Being cognizant of the amount of time Im spending on activities is a
good way to combat my timing issues with the pacing of the classes. I also need to work towards
finding a better variety of activities within my lessons. Thankfully this group of students had
very few behavior problems within classes but if I dont find a better variety of activities
throughout the year, I could very easily lose their focus as the school year progresses.
My students were very successful with the goals I had set for them within this unit. Singing is
more about the journey than the destination and being able to sing lightly with a beautiful tone is
the first step in that journey. I felt that the amount of singing my students did due to the activities
gave them a wide variety of scenarios to practice their best singing voice. The singing activities
gave students opportunities to sing solos and opportunities to sing as a group. I included games
that focused on singing tonal patterns and singing the resting tone. I did let them do some voice
exploration, but in order to allow them more voice exploration opportunities, I need to make sure
I dont give them examples for every activity. Exploration requires independence and I always
want to participate along with my students so that is something as a teacher I need to continue to
improve throughout my career.
As I mentioned before, my biggest struggles as a teacher were keeping my lessons both unique
and beneficial, and keeping track of my time within class activities. I was very pleased with my
classroom management and my ability to keep the students engaged throughout the class period.
I had to tailor activities to meet the needs of a wide range of abilities and confidence levels
within the kindergarten class. If I included instruments in my lessons, I tried to make sure they
were tonal so they could help build my students audition centers within their ears if they werent
singing the song. I did attempt a couple activities that were not as successful as I had hoped they
would be. I tried having them create their own patterns in Kindergarten at one point and it was
completely unsuccessful. They were not prepared to create solo patterns yet, but they were much
more successful with the same activity simply echoing the patterns that I created. I had to adjust
my lesson plans for the next classes based on the activities that were successful and I had to cut
some activities out of lessons that I had originally written due to a lesson the class before not
working how I had hoped they would be. Reflection and flexibility are important aspects of
being an educator. I need to continue to improve upon my flexibility in the class setting. I am
plan oriented, but sometimes that leads to an unwillingness to stray from the plan and allow
spontaneous learning to occur. I also am continuing to strive towards gearing lessons and
activities towards students with special needs. The students I worked with did not require many
adaptations to lessons and activities to be successful, but that is something to improve upon as I
continue to grow as a teacher.
This experience has really helped shape my views on teaching music and has helped affirm my
beliefs that music is an integral part of a childs development as a member of society. Watching
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the joy it brings to the students every day is inspiring. Feeling the accomplishment from little
things that students do or say in class and being challenged by their questions has improved the
quality of my every day life in ways I could never comprehend before student teaching. As a
professional, I am very confident and I am also able to create a fun and safe classroom
environment that allows students to succeed and explore through music. I need to continue to
grow as a teacher who is able to focus more on individual needs than on my personal preferences
for songs and activities. I was able to create very special bonds with many of my students and
took every opportunity I could to get to know each student in the school. When I went to school,
the music teacher acknowledging me was one of the things that made school a positive
experience for me and I wanted to be able to give that opportunity and experience to my
students. I have gained a higher appreciation for teachers at an elementary level because they
have such a large impact on the students they teach and they influence the people we turn into
later in life. I am working on being more aware of student needs both on an emotional level, but
also what they need to be successful on an academic level. In order to continue to improve with
that I need to be in contact with their classroom teachers and their aides if they have an IEP to be
successful in school. I also am working towards finding activities that are developmentally
appropriate for the students. I am very ambitious and sometimes my ambitions lead to asking
students to attempt activities that are not developmentally appropriate for their age group. In
order to work on this I need to do more research on child development and do more research on
Music Learning Theory activities for each step of childhood development.

Resources

Rugs
Bubbles
Magic Expanding Ball
Superstar Microphone
Joe Puppet
Charlie the Fish Puppets and Chomp the Shark Puppet
Creature Hand Puppets
Scarves
Boomwackers
Laser Pointer
Chalk and Chalk Board

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Jump Right In Books


Pitch Pipe (To establish tonalities for activities)
Instrument families CD
Music for Move and freeze game
Sound System
Large Room
Bean Bags

References
Heather Shouldice's Music Packets (From MUSC 330 Class)
Lisa Shanks lesson plan templates and activities
Musicianship Songs in Varied Tonalities and Meters Developing Audiation by Beth M. Bolton
Music Play Book 1 First Steps in Music for Preschool and Beyond by John. M. Feierabend
Jump Right In: The Music Curriculum, Teachers Edition Book 1
Jump Right In: The Music Curriculum, Teachers Edition Book 2
Jump Right In: Reference Handbook for Learning Sequence Activities by Edward Gordon,
2001 Revision
www.giml.org/
www.westmusic.com
http://www.musick8.com/

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