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Twitter Basic Training

Implementation Plan ACME Chem-Solutions, Inc.

for

by

Designed for Learning

Twitter Basic Training Implementation Plan ACME Chem-Solutions, Inc. for by Designed for Learning July 2013

July 2013

Twitter Basic Training, Implementation Plan

Contents

 

2

3

Introduction:

3

Background:

3

Course Goal:

3

3

Course Prerequisites: ...........................................................................................................................

3

Resource and Software Requirements:

4

Learner Analysis:

4

Instructional Context:

5

5

5

Instructional Objectives:

5

Instructional Strategies:

6

6

7

8

Learner Assessment Strategies:

8

Formative Assessment Strategies .....................................................................................................

8

Summative Assessment Strategies

9

10

Reference List:

10

Twitter Basic Training, Implementation Plan

Implementation Plan

Introduction:

Twitter is a social networking and micro-blogging service that provides the opportunity for users to send messages and media to a broad group of recipients (followers). It is very much unlike Facebook, Pinterest, LinkedIn, Google +, and other social media services in that messages must be in a very concise format of no more than 140 characters. New Twitter users will be unfamiliar with the unique interface and oftentimes not well-explained features (D4L, 2013).

Background:

Over the past few years, ACME Chem-Solutions, Inc. has experienced a decline in product sales. After business analyses, the results pointed to a lack of marketing information reaching potential customers. As a cost-savings measure, the idea of using Twitter to broadcast product information was introduced. The company has whole-heartedly embraced Twitter as a means of broadcasting information about products to potential customers and also communicating within the company. In order for Twitter to become an effective marketing and communication tool, all company users must be instructed and evaluated on the use of Twitter (D4L, 2013).

Course Goal:

The goal of this instruction is to educate employees about the use of Twitter on the topics of account signup, how to tweet, and how to follow other Twitter users.

Module Overview and Description:

The instruction will educate learners about account sign-up which is required before any other topics can be covered. They will then learn how to use their account to send Tweets and follow other Twitter users. Common Twitter terminology will be thoroughly explained (D4L, 2013). The instruction will include an uncomplicated straight-forward multi-media presentation with sound and screencasts to explain the basics and some advanced Twitter functions such as hashtags and mentions. The instruction will feature simple-to-follow steps providing opportunities for the learner to perform them in the actual Twitter environment. This asynchronous, self-paced instruction will be hosted on COURSEsites by Blackboard. Additional Twitter learning opportunities via links to external internet resources such as YouTube will be provided.

Course Prerequisites:

The following are prerequisites for Twitter Basic Training:

Basic computer literacy skills and terminology knowledge

The ability to navigate the internet, follow links, use online applications, use computer programs, and upload/download files

Twitter Basic Training, Implementation Plan

An active e-mail account that is managed and maintained

Resource and Software Requirements:

Computer running Windows OS, XP or later

Input devices, i.e. keyboard and mouse

Internet Connection

Internet Explorer or Firefox internet browser (others may not be optimum)

Microsoft Office PowerPoint or PowerPoint Viewer (free download from Microsoft)

Adobe Reader XI (free download from Adobe)

Email account

Learner Analysis:

All learners participating in the Twitter instruction are adult learners ranging from age 38 to 55. Therefore, we must consider the factors of Andragogy (adult learning) in implementing this instruction: they are independent and self-directed; they have life experiences that provide cognitive and psychomotor resources for learning; they have learning needs related to their changing social roles; they are interested in problem-solving and immediate application of knowledge; and they are motivated to learn internally and do not require external motivation (Merriam, 2001). Time to train must be considered as an additional factor since the instruction will be utilized during the work day. Consequently, instructional materials will be presented online for the sake of self-direction and time.

Additionally, adult learners generally need to be involved with the learning plan and evaluation, prefer experienced based learning opportunities, need to learn subjects they can apply to their jobs or personal life, prefer participating in learning opportunities that are problem-centered versus content-centered (Merriam, 2001). Learning will be tailored to job application based on these principles.

All learners are educated at least to the Bachelor’s degree level. Several learners have Master’s degrees in education, project management, and instructional design. The majority of learners are retired military members who have now transitioned into corporate business. All learners have extensive experience in business development, education, instruction, and instructional design. This positively influences their ability to process the information at a higher cognitive level. The Application Level of learning is required for this Twitter instruction. The learner’s education and experience gives the ability to comfortably present learning objectives at the

Application Level of the Cognitive Domain in Bloom’s Taxonomy.

Learners are provided company email accounts that are actively managed. All learners are highly skilled with computer and information processing since it is a primary skill required for their jobs. Computer skills and information processing are the primary means of conducting business development, instructing, and completing instructional design projects. This gives the ability to include more complex online experiences and interactions that will assist in attaining

Twitter Basic Training, Implementation Plan

the learning objectives and utilizing scaffolding (Ormrod, Schunk, & Gredler, 2009). They are excited about the opportunity to learn about Twitter. They have never used Twitter and do not have Twitter accounts.

It is important to note the learning styles of this group of learners. All learners are especially self-directed; therefore, they appreciate the opportunity to learn independently. The group is comprised of roughly an equal split of visual and kinesthetic learners. This means that they prefer learning through a visual approach, i.e. reading information, and through the manipulation of objects, i.e. touch and handling objects (Morrison, Ross, Kalman, & Kemp, 2011). This enables us to present text and graphics, and it validates using step-by-step processes that can be followed online in the actual Twitter application. This group of learners has no disabilities; however, we will modify the training to be 508 Disabilities Act compliant at a future time if future learners are disabled.

Instructional Context:

Minimal distractions are desired during the 30 - 45 minutes of instruction. The context for this instruction is an office environment. Each learner will receive the instruction in an office that affords a quiet and controlled atmosphere. Internet use and Twitter is permitted by the company, so learners can setup accounts and experiment with the application online. Computers capable of COURSEsites by Blackboard and Twitter are also provided by the company. Learners will simply sign in to both COURSEsites by Blackboard and Twitter to begin their instruction. The first module on COURSEsites will guide them about initial Twitter account creation and about proper positioning of screens for optimum learning and viewing.

Unit Goals and Instructional Objectives:

Unit Goals:

Lesson 1: Create a personal micro-blogging account with Twitter.

Lesson 2: Send messages or postings using Twitter.

Lesson 3: Follow and unfollow other users on Twitter.

Instructional Objectives:

Lesson 1: Create a Twitter Account

Topic Learning Objective:

After completing this lesson of instruction, the learner will create Twitter account.

Enabling Learning Objectives:

Twitter Basic Training, Implementation Plan

Recall terms associated with a personal Twitter account

Create a personal Twitter account

Lesson 2: Compose and Send a Tweet

Topic Learning Objective:

After completing this lesson of instruction, the learner will demonstrate various functions involved with composing and sending tweets.

Enabling Learning Objectives:

Compose a tweet using Twitter

Send tweet using Twitter

Demonstrate the function of retweeting with Twitter

Demonstrate the function of direct mentioning with Twitter

Demonstrate the function of direct messaging a follower with Twitter

Use an established hashtag with Twitter

Lesson 3: Follow and Unfollow Twitter Users

Topic Learning Objective:

After completing this lesson of instruction, the learner will demonstrate how to follow and unfollow other Twitter users.

Module 3: Enabling Learning Objectives:

Demonstrate how to search for other users with Twitter

Demonstrate how to follow other users with Twitter

Demonstrate how to unfollow other users with Twitter

(D4L, 2013)

Instructional Strategies:

The following instructional strategies will be utilized in this instruction:

Lesson 1: Create a Twitter Account

 

Instructional

Approximate

Strategy Description

Strategy

Time

Pre-Test

  • 5 minutes

Participate in pre-test and print the results for the supervisor or education record

Opening Presentation

  • 5 minutes

PowerPoint Presentation with sound,

Twitter Basic Training, Implementation Plan

   

Overview of Twitter

Lecture

10

minutes

PowerPoint Presentation with sound

 

Definition of microblogging

Description of the microblogging service Twitter

Definitions for the following terms:

o

Tweet

o

Retweet

o

Feed

o

Follow

o

Handle

o

Mention

o

Direct Mention

Printing of Job Aid

1

minute

Print the job aid for reference

Video (optional)

2:25 minutes

Twitter in Plain English by Common Craft

Demonstration

5

minutes

Screencast Video with sound:

Create a personal Twitter account

Add contacts from student’s email

account address book to personal Twitter account

Student Activity

10

minutes

Create a personal Twitter account

 

Add contacts from email account

address book Print screen for supervisor evaluation of task

Quiz

5

minutes

Quiz of the terms covered in Lecture

1

Tour of Twitter

10

Minutes

View the Tour of Twitter by Twitter at

(optional)

 

https://support.twitter.com/articles/2016

9519#

Lesson 2: Compose and Send a Tweet

 

Instructional

Approximate

Strategy Description

Strategy

Time

Demonstration

20

minutes

Screencast Video with sound

 

Creating and sending a tweet

How to locate tweets about a

specific topic How modify a searched and found tweet using the correct abbreviation.

Twitter Basic Training, Implementation Plan

     

How to retweet

How to direct mention a follower

How to use a hashtag

Student Activity

 

30

minutes

 

Create and send a tweet

 

Locate a tweet about weather

Modify the search about weather

using the abbreviation WTX Directly mention a follower

Find and follow a topic by using the hash tag function

Review

5

minutes

View a PowerPoint review presentation

Lesson 3: Follow and Unfollow Twitter Users

 

Instructional

Approximate

Strategy Description

Strategy

Time

Demonstration

5

minutes

Screencast Video with sound:

 

Follow another user on Twitter

Unfollow another user on Twitter

Student Activity

 

10

minutes

Follow another user on Twitter

 

Unfollow another user on Twitter

Print screen for supervisor evaluation of task

Review

5

minutes

View a PowerPoint review presentation

Post-Test

5

minutes

Participate in post-test and print the results for supervisor or education record

Print a Completion Certificate

1

minute

Print a completion certificate for Twitter Basic Training

(D4L, 2013)

Learner Assessment Strategies:

Formative Assessment Strategies

Formative evaluations consist of the steps and checks required to ensure the course is designed and developed according to the learning need and with the highest quality. It is conducted before, during, and after implementation (Morrison, Ross, Kalman, & Kemp, 2011).

Informal assessment of participants will be conducted by supervisors at the conclusion of Topics 1 and 2. They will print the final screens and present them to their supervisor

Twitter Basic Training, Implementation Plan

for evaluation and discussion. D4L will be consulted on any required changes to the instruction.

Summative Assessment Strategies

Summative evaluation measures the degree to which major outcomes are attained by the end of the course (Morrison, Ross, Kalman, & Kemp, 2011). It occurs after implementation and involves tryout or teach-back of the instruction in an operational environment on a target audience. Surveys or Level 1 and 2 (Kirkpatrick Model) evaluation instruments are typically used in summative evaluation. Level 1 course evaluations consist of a single evaluation instrument to measure how students feel about the course. Level 2 course evaluations consist of pre- and post- evaluation instruments to measure whether the students have attained the learning objectives (D4L, 2013).

Level 1 surveys will be implemented at the discretion of ACME Chem-Solutions, Inc. to determine the attitude of participants. However, participants will be asked to complete a brief Level 2 pre-evaluation at the beginning of the course. The evaluation is designed to measure the participants’ ability to successful complete all objectives effectively before the instruction. Participants will be asked to complete a Level 2 post-evaluation at the conclusion of the instruction. This will be used to measure the outcome of the instruction. Learners must score a 70% or above in order for the instruction to be considered successful. Comparison of pre and post evaluations should assist in revealing whether learning has occurred overall.

After the training course has been completed D4L will be available for consulting on any changes to the instruction or implementation. Based on the participants’ Level 1 responses and the outcome of Level 2 evaluations, adjustments to the training course may be made.

Twitter Basic Training, Implementation Plan

Summary of Modifications:

The following is a brief list of modifications and rationale for the modifications from the original instructional plan and materials:

Changed course name from Twitter 101 to Twitter Basic Training because it more aptly

represents the purpose of the course Added course prerequisites and resources needed to further define course

requirements Tailored the learner analysis to the audience that has been identified

Changed instructional context because it was more advantageous for the instruction to

be implemented completely online Reworded the unit goals and leaning objectives to simplify the meanings and reduce redundant wording

Revised some verbs to ensure the instruction was at or below the application level of

the Cognitive Domain of Bloom’s Taxonomy

Revised the instructional strategies for clearer understanding and better meet the

targeted learner’s needs

Revised the assessment strategies to include Level 1 surveys and Level 2 evaluation that fit the new learning environment (online instruction)

Added an optional activity for Lesson 1, Tour of Twitter by Twitter

Added new references

Reference List:

Conlan, J., Grabowski, S., & Smith, K. (2003). Adult Learning. In M. Orey (Ed.), Emerging perspectives on learning, teaching, and technology. Retrieved from http://projects.coe.uga.edu/epltt/

D4L. (2013). Instructional Plan for Twitter 101 Course. Retrieved from

Merriam, S. B. (2001). Andragogy and self-directed learning: Pillars of adult learning theory. New Directions for Adult & Continuing Education, v. 89, p. 3-14.

Morrison, G. R., Ross, S. M., Kalman, H. K., & Kemp, J. E. (2011). Designing effective instruction

(6th ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Ormrod, J., Schunk, D., & Gredler, M. (2009). Learning theories and instruction (Laureate custom edition). New York: Pearson.