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Lesson Plan Template ED 3501 (Version C)

Lesson
Title/Focus
Subject/Grade
Level
Unit

March 11, 2015

Storing Energy from the Sun

Date

Science 14

Time
Duration

80 minutes

Unit D: Matter and Energy in the Biosphere

Teacher

Mr. Stephen Bore

OUTCOMES FROM ALBERTA PROGRAM OF STUDIES


General
Learning
Outcomes:
Specific
Learning
Outcomes:

Describe how the flow of matter in the biosphere is cyclical along characteristic pathways and
can be disrupted by human activity
explain why the flow of energy through the biosphere is linear and noncyclical
explain the role of living systems in the cycling of matter in the biosphere (e.g., food chains)

LEARNING OBJECTIVES
Students will:
1. Understand the basics of photosynthesis and cellular respiration
2.
ASSESSMENTS
Observations:

Key Questions:
Why is photosynthesis the key to life on earth
Products/Performances Marshmallow or jellybean molecules to show understanding of photosynthesis
:
and cellular respiration

LEARNING RESOURCES CONSULTED


MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x-t0sGyjfto
Iodine with dropper
http://www.answers.com/Q/How_is_photosynthesis Various items to test for starch
_effected_by_winter
MM/marshmallows to model photosynthesis.
Colbourne, H., Fernandez, E., Hutton, G., Jantzen, S., Paper towels/Styrofoam plates
MacFadyen, D., Sosnowski, C., Stoten, M., (2002).

Science.connect 1. Toronto: McGraw-Hill Ryerson.


Bourassa, G., Campbell, E., Colbourne, H., Fernandez,
E., Hutton, S., MacFadyen, D., Smith, T., (2002).
Science.connect 1 Teachers Resource. Toronto:
McGraw-Hill Ryerson.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VeU7ULL9Usw

PROCEDURE
Prior to lesson
Begin with prayer- Anything can be Accomplished page 55, from Notre Dame
Prayer book for students.
Introduction
Time
Attention Grabber
PPT slide #1
Video introduction to photosynthesis:
5 minutes
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x-t0sGyjfto

Assessment of Prior
Knowledge

Remind students that the concepts of photosynthesis and cellular


respiration were also discussed in Chapter 9.

Adapted from a template created by Dr. K. Roscoe

Lesson Plan Template ED 3501 (Version C)

Expectations for
Students are respectful of each other, and generally focused on
Learning and Behaviour learning.
Advance
Organizer/Agenda
Transition to Body
Yesterday we began talking about photosynthesis, and today we will
go into the concept a bit further.

Learning Activity #1

Body
PPT Slide #2
Plants use energy from the sun.
Plants get their energy from the Sun, where they use light energy during
a process called photosynthesis. Plants transform the light energy to
produce glucose, which is a type of sugar. If plants create more sugar
than they need, then the excess glucose is stored as starch.
The starch gets stored in the plants leaves, stems, seeds, and roots.
What about in winter?

Time

Plants that perform winter photosynthesis spend time during the spring
and summer storing energy. Some plants even have bulbs or tubers
that hold the energy in special collections of starch cells for them. In
the cold months, plants can convert these starch cells back to simple
sugars that can be used to produce energy for the plant's system, or to
provide energy for new growth in the springtime. Plants that grow
throughout the winter also tend to store energy to help them get by in
the cold months.
This allows them to carry out their life activities - mainly for growth and
reproduction. Carbon dioxide and water are the raw materials in this
process.
60 minutes
PPT Slide #3
Glucose is one of the primary energy sources for both plants and
animals, and is referred to a chemical energy. In fact, all organisms use
glucose. Organisms take the chemical energy stored as glucose, and
transform that energy to other types such as mechanical energy or
thermal energy. This process is referred to as cellular respiration.
Plants also make more glucose than they need to carry out their life
activities. This extra glucose is stored as starch.
The starch gets stored in the plants leaves, stems, seeds, and roots.
We consume this starch when we eat carbohydrate foods such as pasta,
rice, or potatoes.
Our bodies break down this starch into glucose during digestion.
The mitochondria in our cells then release this chemical energy for us to
use in our life activities.
PPT Slide #4, 5
Class activity: Create marshmallow or jellybean molecules to
demonstrate photosynthesis (Show diagrams of photosynthesis and
cellular respiration equations)
Adapted from a template created by Dr. K. Roscoe

Lesson Plan Template ED 3501 (Version C)

Procedure:
Tell the class I will hand out jellybeans or marshmallows to each student
so that they can create the molecules used in photosynthesis. When
you are done, let me know so that I can check and then when everyone
in the class is finished you get to eat them!!
Display the photosynthesis equations on screen for students to follow
along or they can use their textbook.
Hand out the jellybeans to each student.
PPT Slide #6, 7
Test foods for starch activity
Video on how to test starch
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VeU7ULL9Usw
Why is iodine used to test for starch?
There is a substance in starch called amylose that is responsible for
the formation of a deep blue color in the presence of iodine. By
looking for the blue colour, we can tell whether starch is present or
not.
(Have students who dont have someone at their table, find someone
to work with.)
We cant do the same test as in the video, but we will do something
similar. I will hand out some items, and as table groups you will have
the opportunity to test a variety of items for starch. Then we will gather
at the front and I will demonstrate with a few other items.
At your tables, you will be able to test the following items:
Soda crackers
Almonds
Chocolate chips
Marshmallows
Orange peels
The class demonstration items will be:
Salt
Sugar
Chia seeds
Ground flax seeds
As a table group, work together to determine which of the ingredients
will contain starch.
CAUTION:
Be careful in handling iodine. It can stain clothing, equipment and skin.
Avoid touching items stained with iodine. DO NOT put iodine in your
mouth and DO NOT eat any tested foods, as iodine can be poisonous.
Wash your hands and throw everything away when done.
Procedure:
Adapted from a template created by Dr. K. Roscoe

Lesson Plan Template ED 3501 (Version C)

Remove books from desk area.


Place paper towels on the desk, and a Styrofoam plate on the paper
towels.
Place one of the items (almond, marshmallow, etc.) on the plate. Using
the dropper from the bottle of iodine carefully place one (1) drop on
each item and observe the reaction and note which of the items tested
positive for the presence of starch.
Leave the tested item on the plate- remember no to touch it.
Repeat for the other items.
We have just finished testing for starch, and have seen what materials
do and do not have starch.
What about our bodies? As I mentioned before, our bodies break down
this starch into glucose during digestion.
The mitochondria in our cells then release this chemical energy for us to
use in our life activities.
Here is a video to demonstrate the digestive process.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b20VRR9C37Q

Assessments/
Differentiation:
Learning Activity #2
Assessments/
Differentiation
Assessment of Learning:
Feedback From
Students:
Feedback To Students
Transition To Next
Lesson
Sponge
Activity/Activities

Class participation, observation, working on guided notes.


Making correct molecule models
Joseph Priestleys experiments
Have class work on logbook worksheet
Class participation, observation, completion of first worksheet,
working on guided notes.
Closure

10 minutes

Time

Exit slip- one thing that worked well for the lesson, one thing to know
more about
Thank students for listening, participating

http://www.wonderville.ca/asset/photosynthesis
If there is still time, there are activities at this website about photosynthesis.

Reflections from the


lesson

Adapted from a template created by Dr. K. Roscoe