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Lindsey

Webb 1
Ed. 329


Teacher Work Sample-5
Instructional Design

Lesson Plan 1:


Teacher Candidate: Lindsey Webb Date and Time of Lesson: March 30, 2015
at 1:00

School: Springfield Elementary School Subject/Grade Level: Music 5th grade

Description of Lesson:
The students will be learning the song Good Mornin Blues and accompanying
themselves on the boomwhackers.

Lesson Title: Good Mornin Blues

Curriculum Standards Addressed:
National Standard(s):

MU:Cr1.1.5b Generate musical ideas (such as rhythms, melodies, and
accompaniment patterns) within specific related tonalities, meters, and simple
chord changes.

MU:Pr4.2.5c Explain how context (such as social, cultural, and historical) informs
performances.

MU:Pr6.1.5a Perform music, alone or with others, with expression, technical
accuracy, and appropriate interpretation.

MU:Cn11.0.5a Demonstrate understanding of relationships between music and the
other arts, other disciplines, varied contexts, and daily life.
SC Curriculum Standard(s):

Standard 1: The student will sing and perform on instruments, alone and with
others, a variety of music.
MG5-1.3 Sing, alone and with others, a variety of repertoire of music
including partner songs, descants, ostinati, rounds, and two-part song.
MG5-1.4 Play pitched and unpitched instruments, alone and in ensembles, in
rhythm with appropriate posture, dynamics, and timbre while maintaining a
steady tempo.

Standard 5: The student will examine and perform music from a variety of stylistic
and historical periods and cultures.
MG5-5.2 Describe how elements of music are used in music examples from
various genres and cultures of the world.

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Standard 6: The student will make connections between music, other arts
disciplines, other content areas, and the world.
MG5-6.4 Identify how principles and subject matter of non-arts disciplines
interrelate with those of music.

Cross Curricular Connections:
Social Studies, Art, English: The Jazz Age, Harlem Renaissance



Instructional Objective(s) Criteria:
Objective 1: Using rote method and having the song in the textbook, the students
will be able to sing Good Mornin Blues with a 90% accuracy in correct notes,
rhythm, and tempo.

Objective 2:When given the 12-bar blues progression and the color coordinated
chords, the students will play a I-IV-V progression on the boomwhacker with a 90%
accuracy in correct notes, rhythm, and tempo.

Objective3: Having completed objectives 1 and 2, the students will be able to sing
Good Mornin Blues while accompanying themselves on the boomwhackers with
90% accuracy.

Assessment(s) of the Objectives:
Objective 1: Auditory assessment of the correct notes, rhythm, and tempo of the
song.

Objective 2: Visual and auditory assessment of the correct notes, rhythm, and tempo
of the chord progressions as well as question and answerHow many bars are in
the blues progression? How many notes make a chord? What are the three chords in
the progression we learned today? Etc.

Objective 3: Performance assessmentthe students will perform, alone or in small
groups, in front of the teacher and the class.

Materials/Resources:

12-bar blues PowerPoint, music textbook, boomwhackers, Smartboard, audio
recording of Jamtraks-Blues Shuffle, piano

Prerequisites (Prior Knowledge):
-Brief history of Jazz and the Harlem Renaissance
-Steady beat/tempo
-Simple meter
-Scale (using solfege)

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References:
Blues Shuffle in E. (n.d.). Retrieved from
http://www.guitarbackingtrack.com/play/jamtracks/blues_shuffle_in_e.htm

Bond, J., Davidson, M., Goetze, M., Lawrence, V., & Snyder, S. (1995). Blues, How do
you do? In Share the Music (pp. 246-147, 256-257). New York, New York:
Macmillan/McGraw-Hill.

Jazz Month and International Jazz Day: Part Two - 12-Bar Blues Progression. (2014,
April 24). Retrieved March 18, 2015, from
http://www.learnmemusic.com/2014/04/jazzresourcesparttwo.html?m=1

Johnson, R. (2009, December 13). The Birth of Blues and Jazz The Original Birth of
Cool. Retrieved March 18, 2015, from
https://historyrat.wordpress.com/2009/12/13/the-birth-of-blues-and-jazz-the-
original-birth-of-cool/




Procedures:
1. I will ask the students what they remember, from the previous lesson, about
the Harlem Renaissance, jazz, and Louis Armstrong.
a. What decade did the Jazz Age occur?
b. What was Louis Armstrongs Nickname? Why?
2. The students will turn in their textbook to the song Good Mornin Blues,
and we will discuss the similarities and differences in jazz and blues.
a. Blues: came from work songs, field chants, and spirituals (music of
hope, pain suffering, and desire because of slavery)Why do you
think its called the blues? What makes you blue?
b. Jazz: came from New Orleans out of ragtime and continued north in
the Great Migration
c. Blues can be considered a type of jazz
3. I will define chords as 3 or more notes played at the same time. Each chord
has different notes.
a. What is a chord? Is two notes a chord?
4. There is a special type of chord called a triad.
5. I will teach the song using rote method.
6. After the students have learned the song, I will move onto the 12 bar blues
progression slide. I will explain that the boxes in the graph represent one bar,
and how the / marks are for the 4 beats (ta) in each measure.
7. We will practice saying the chord numbers as we patch the beat
(1111,1111,4444etc).
8. We will then discuss that each Roman numeral represents a chord in music.

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9. Using solfege, I will sing and play the chord progressions.


10. Next, I will pass out the boomwhackers. The color of the boomwhacker
corresponds to a note in each chord. The students will be divided into 3
groups, each playing one chord.
11. One by one, each group will practice playing their chord.
12. Once each group has successfully played their chord, we will practice playing
the 12-bar blues progression.
13. Next we will add in the slide with the lyrics underneath the chord
progressions. A few students from each group will then form a separate
group to sing, while the other group accompanies on the boomwhackers.
Then we will switch.
14. After the lesson, a few students will be asked to help put the instruments
back in the closet. As they are doing so, we will review:
a. Today we learned about blues. What are the blues?
b. What is the name of the progression we played?
c. What 3 roman numerals were used?
d. How many notes make up a chord?

Accommodations:
Accommodations will be made for any students with special needs such as, but not
limited to, preferential seating, oral or written directions, repeated directions,
extended time, one on one assistance, etc.






















Lesson Plan 2:

Lindsey Webb 5
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Teacher Candidate: Lindsey Webb Date and Time of Lesson: March 30, 2015
at 2:00

School: Springfield Elementary Subject/Grade Level: Music 5th grade

Description of Lesson:
Syncopation

Lesson Title:
Syn-Co-Pa

Curriculum Standards Addressed:
National Standard(s):
MU:Pr4.2.5a: Demonstrate understanding of the structure and the elements of
music(such as rhythm, pitch, form, and harmony) in music selected for performance
MU:Cn11.0.5a: Demonstrate understanding of relationships between music and the
other arts, other disciplines, varied contexts, and daily life.

SC Curriculum Standard(s):
Standard 1: The student will sing and perform on instruments, alone and with
others, a variety of music.
MG5-1.6 Play rhythmic, melodic, and chordal patterns accurately and
independently.
Standard 3: The student will read and notate music.
MG5-3.1 Read, write, and perform rhythmic notation incorporating
syncopation as well as whole, half, quarter, eighth, sixteenth, dotted half,
dotted quester notes, and corresponding rests.
Standard 5: The student will examine and perform music from a variety of stylistic
and historical periods and cultures.
MG5-5.2 Describe how elements of music are used in music examples from
various genres and cultures of the world.

Cross Curricular Connections:
Social studies: jazz

Instructional Objective(s) Criteria:
Objective 1: Given a chart of rhythms, the students will be able to correctly identify
and clap the syncopated rhythm.

Assessment(s) of the Objectives:
The students will be assessed through visual and auditory means throughout the
lesson. At the end of the lesson, I have a chart with different rhythms. I will speak

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each rhythm and call on students to come up to the board to select the correct
rhythm.

Materials/Resources:

SmartBaord, music textbook

Prerequisites (Prior Knowledge):
Simple rhythms, some knowledge of jazz history, steady beat

References:
Bond, J., Davidson, M., Goetze, M., Lawrence, V., & Snyder, S. (1995). Blues, How do
you do? In Share the Music (pp. 246-147, 256-257). New York, New York:
Macmillan/McGraw-Hill.
Procedures:
1. I will ask the students tell me some things they remember about their
previous lessons on jazz.
2. Jazz and a lot of other kinds of music use a type of rhythmic pattern called
syncopation.
3. The students will use the glossary in the back of their music textbook to find
the definition of syncopation.
4. Next we will discuss the difference between strong and weak beats.
5. I will speak some simple rhythms and have the students repeat them back to
me.
6. Next we will look at the slide with 2 measures in 4/4 time. I will ask the
students if they can find the syncopation. I will then speak the rhythm and
have them repeat it.
7. Using the same rhythm, I will notate exactly how that same rhythm could be
notated differently.
8. The next slide has a chart of 9 different rhythms, but only one of them is
syncopation. Can they figure out which one it is?
9. On page 177, I will sing and play the song for the class as they follow along
quietly looking for the syncopation.
10. Then we will all sing the song together, and the students will raise their
hands when they hear the syncopation.
11. I will then move on the next slide and have the students quietly study the
rhythms. I will then have them sight-read the rhythm out loud.
12. The last slide contains a rhythm game. I will randomly chose a rhythms and
speak it out-loud two times. I will then call on a student to come to the board
and correctly identify the rhythm.

Accommodations:
Accommodations will be made for any students with special needs such as, but not
limited to, preferential seating, oral or written directions, repeated directions,
extended time, one on one assistance, etc.

Lesson Plan 3 (Showcase):


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Teacher Candidate: Lindsey Webb Date and Time of Lesson: April 2, 2015
at 1:35

School: Springfield Elementary Subject/Grade Level: Music 5th grade

Description of Lesson:
The students will be listening to Pennsylvania 6-5000 to identify the different types
of instruments used in jazz improvisation. Afterwards, the students will improvise
on Orff instruments.

Lesson Title:
Improvisation

Curriculum Standards Addressed:
National Standard(s):

MU:Cr1.1.5a Improvise rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic ideas, and explain
connection to specific purpose and context(such as social, cultural, and historical).

MU:Pr6.1.5b Demonstrate performance decorum and audience etiquette
appropriate for the context, venue, genre, and style.
SC Curriculum Standard(s):

Standard 2: The student will improvise, compose, and arrange music within
specified guidelines

MG5-2.3 Improvise simple rhythmic variations and melodic embellishments.

Standard 4: The student will listen to, describe, analyze, and evaluate music and
music performances.

MG5-4.4 Identify, describe, and classify by sight and sound a variety of
instruments including orchestral, band, multicultural, and electronic.

Cross Curricular Connections:
Social Studies: Harlem Renaissance, The Jazz Age

Instructional Objective(s) Criteria:
Objective 1: Given a listening example and a choice of six instruments, the students
will correctly identify 5 out of the 6 of the instruments being played.
Objective 2: Given an Orff instrument and accompaniment track, the students will
improvise a 6-12 bar melody with a 90% accuracy in correct tempo and a rating of
satisfactory or unsatisfactory in performance decorum.

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Assessment(s) of the Objectives:
Objective 1: The students will be assessed through the PBS Kids interactive game.
Objective 2: The improvisation will be assessed visually and auditorily through
observation of students performance within their respective groups.

Materials/Resources:

Smartboard, YouTube recording of Pennsylvania 6-5000, PBS Kids Chuck
Vanderchuck website, blues shuffle track, 6 Orff instruments each with 2 mallets.

Prerequisites (Prior Knowledge):
History of Jazz, steady beat

References:
Blues Shuffle in E. (n.d.). Retrieved from
http://www.guitarbackingtrack.com/play/jamtracks/blues_shuffle_in_e.htm

Glenn Miller & His Orchestra-Pennsylvania 6-5000. (2012, March 31). Retrieved
from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0OUkNOwpXtc

Jam Sessions. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://pbskids.org/chuck/

Pennsylvania 6-5000. (n.d.). Retrieved from
http://www.songfacts.com/detail.php?id=15122

.
Procedures:
1. I will ask the students some of the things they can recall from their studies on
Jazz.
2. After we have reviewed, I will introduce and define improvisation.
3. I will ask the students to think of other areas that improvisation can be found
other than jazz.
4. We will then listen to the recording of Pennsylvania 6-5000. Before listening,
I will give some background information on the song and why it has that
particular title.
5. As they are listening, the students should be listening for the different
instrumentation used and how the two solos are improvised.
6. Once they have listened to the recording, we will then move onto the Jazz
activity on PBS Kids.
7. I will assign each student to a group. There will be 6 groups of 3.
8. The students must then listen to each example played, and one person from
each group will come up and click on the correct answer. (The students are
allowed to quietly collaborate with their group members.)
9. After one complete ground of the Jazz activity, we will move on to the student
improvisation.
10. Before beginning, I will remind the students of how to play correctly on the

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Orff instruments.
11. I will explain that the scale we are using is an E blues scale and that every not
in the scale is on their instruments.
12. We will discuss some common rhythms used in Jazz (swinging, syncopated)
and suggest they try to incorporate them into their improvisations.
13. I will then demonstrate.
14. Next, I will call the groups one by one to go to their respective station. Once
everyone is there, I will start the blues track and one by one, each student in
the groups will play for 12 measures. Once 12 measures are up, I will tell
them to switch. This process will repeat until all 3 students in each group
have had a turn.
15. After everyone has had a change to improve, I will ask if anyone would like to
volunteer to improve for the class.
16. I will incorporate the SSCA standards by discussing appropriate behavior
when other students are performing.
17. Each student that volunteers will then play individually for the whole class.

Accommodations:
Accommodations will be made for any students with special needs such as, but not
limited to, preferential seating, oral or written directions, repeated directions,
extended time, one on one assistance, etc.