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Teacher Education Lesson Plan Template

Teacher: Jennifer King

Date: 02-02-15

Title of Lesson: Partial Products and Partial


Quotients Review

Cooperating Teacher: Cynthia George

Core Components
Subject, Content Area, or Topic
Math, Partial Products and Partial Quotients
Student Population
23 4th grade students; Gifted cluster
Learning Objectives
VDOE SOL 4.4 The student will a) estimate sums, differences, products, and quotients of whole
numbers; b) add, subtract, and multiply whole numbers; c) divide whole numbers, finding quotients
with and without remainders
Virginia Essential Knowledge and Skills
VDOE Technology Standards
English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS)
Materials/Resources
Document Camera
Black, red, and blue pens
Paper
Carter, J. A., Cuevas, G. J., Day, R., & Malloy, C. E. (2013). Math connects: Customized for
Virginia Beach Public Schools, Vol. 1, (Teachers Edition). Columbus, OH: McGraw-Hill Education
Safety (if applicable)
Time
(min.)
5

Process Components
*Anticipatory Set
The last couple week we have been practicing partial products, a strategy to help us
multiply two- and three-digit numbers by a two-digit number.
Open your math journals and write Partial Products on the first line of the page. [Write
partial products on the paper underneath the document camera.]
(Review of Partial Products)
Today we are going to multiply 325 by 16. [Write the hundreds in black ink, tens in blue
ink and the ones in blue ink.]
Write this problem in your math journals. [Allow students 30 seconds to copy the work in
their math journals.]
What is the first step we take? Multiply the 6 by 5, then 6 times 20, and then 6 times 300.
[Ask a different student for each step. Highlight the value of the numbers in the tens and
hundreds place. Allow students 30 seconds to copy the steps in their notebook.]
Now what do we do? Multiply the 10 by 5, and then 10 times 20, and then 10 times 300.
[Again, ask a different student for each step. Highlight the value of the numbers in the
tens and hundreds place. Allow students 30 seconds to copy the steps in their notebook.]

McDonalds Draft (2010). Modified by Kreassig and Gould (2014) for use with student teachers.

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3

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Now what do we do? Find the products of our multiplication sentences. 65=30;
620=120; 6300=1800; 105=50; 1020=200; 10300=3000. [Again, ask a different
student for each step. Highlight the value of the numbers in the tens and hundreds place.
Allow students 30 seconds to copy the steps in their notebook.]
What should we do next to reach the final answer? Add the products together starting with
the largest number and lining them up. 3000+1800+200+120+50+30=5200.
[Again, ask a different student for each step. Highlight the value of the numbers in the
tens and hundreds place. Allow students 30 seconds to copy the steps in their notebook.
Recap steps.]
*State the Objectives (grade-level terms)
Now we are going to practice division using partial quotients.
*Instructional Input or Procedure
On the next page in your math journals, write Partial Quotients on the top line. Today we
are going to work on dividing 162 by 3. We are looking for how many groups of 3 we can
make out of 162. First we write it out. [Write 3162 on paper under document camera.]
We are dividing. Remember, the number that we are dividing into smaller groups is called
the dividend. Which number is the dividend? 162.
The divisor is the number we are dividing by, it is the number that we are using to break
up the dividend. Which number is the divisor? 3.
*Modeling
Write the problem in your math journal. [Allow students 30 seconds to copy the problem
into their math journal.]
Now we are going to write out our reference list. Remember, this reference list is to help
us. We are going to use 10, 20, 50, and 100, but you can use any number. It is important
to use numbers that are easy to work with.
(Think, Pair Share)
We want to divide 162 into groups of 3. 162 is a large number, we are going to make an
estimate of how many groups can fit into 162. Think quietly to yourself, about how many
groups of three could we make with 162? [Allow 30 seconds of think time.] Times up.
Share with your shoulder partner how many groups of 3 we can make with 162. [Allow 30
seconds to share.]
Times up. How many groups of 3 can we make with 162? [Call on one or two students to
share. Use number one of them suggests, such as 50.]
Okay, lets try 50 groups. What is 50 times 3? 150. We made 50 groups [write 50 on the
right] of 3. We need to multiply 50 times 3 [point to numbers] so we know how much is in
our groups. Write the multiplication symbol next to the divisor to remind you to multiply the
groups with the divisor.
Can we subtract 150 from 162? Yes. Lets do that. 162-150? 12. [Allow students time to
follow along in their math journals.]
How many groups of 3 can we make with 12? 4. We write 4 with our groups, and then we
multiply 4 by 3, which is? 12. We subtract 12 from 12, which equals? 0.
We have divided 162 into groups of 3. How many groups did we make? Where do we find
our answer? Add our groups, 12+4=54.
We add all of the groups we made together, which gives us 54.
How do we check our answer? Multiply 54 times 3.
What is our answer called? The quotient
*Check for Understanding
In your math journals, write 315 divided by 7. [Allow students 30 seconds to write out the
problem. Walk around and make sure the students set up the problem correctly.] Now find
the quotient using partial quotients. Remember your reference list. [Allow students 3-5
minutes to solve problem. Walk around the room and check on students work.]

McDonalds Draft (2010). Modified by Kreassig and Gould (2014) for use with student teachers.

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*Guided Practice
Times up. Lets check our work together. [Write 7315 on the board.]
How many groups of 7 can we make with 315? 40>.
[Go through the steps modeled, but this time have one student at a time come up to the
document camera and write the next step on the paper to demonstrate to the class.
Clarify any misunderstandings that are exposed. Highlight the steps so students can
follow their classmates.]
Our quotient, the answer, is 45.
How do we check our answer? Multiply the quotient by the divisor; 457.
*Independent Practice
Math stations:
Dreamers: 3, 12, 14, 17, 21, 22
Collaborators:4, 7, 8, 11, 16
Critical Thinkers: 2, 6, 13, 15, 18, 20

Creative Thinkers: 1, 5, 9, 10, 19, 23


Assessment
During small group review partial products and partial quotients using problems from the
textbook pp.
Look for understanding of the process of division.
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*Closure
(Exit Ticket)
Times up. Clean up your math stations then return to your desk. Before we move on to
Language Arts, open your math journals. [Allow students 20 seconds to open math
journals.] I would like you to explain, in your own words, how to use partial quotients to
divide. [Allow students 3-5 minutes to write exit ticket.]
Differentiation Strategies (enrichment, accommodations, remediation, or by learning style).
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Addresses needs of visual, oral and intrapersonal learning styles.


Small groups allow for remediation for students struggling with the concept and extra practice for the students who grasp
partial quotients.

Classroom Management Issues (optional)


Keep an eye on the time during think, pair, share to make sure students have enough time to discuss but not
too much time.
Establish expectation that students will work quietly in their groups waiting so everyone can concentrate.

Lesson Critique. To be completed following the lesson. Did your students meet the objective(s)? What part
of the lesson would you change? Why?
The students are struggling to meet the objectives. I would close the lesson with an anchor chart rather than an exit
ticket. The students need to work together and discuss the concepts but they also need a visual reminder in the room of
how partial quotients work.

*Denotes Madeline Hunter lesson plan elements.

Intern Signature

Cooperating Teacher Signature

McDonalds Draft (2010). Modified by Kreassig and Gould (2014) for use with student teachers.

Date