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Lesson Plan

James R. Wallbaum

Subject & Topic: Math 11-1 Multiplying Fractions and Whole Numbers
Page: 278

Date: 2/12/14

Time Required: 70 mins

Standards:
CC.5.NF.4 Apply and extend previous understanding of multiplication to
multiply a fraction or whole number by a fraction.
Learning Objectives:
Students will be able to multiply a fraction by a whole number, as seen by
their ability to do so on an exit slip with 75% accuracy.
Assessment:
Exit slip
Homework 11-1
Adaptations and Accommodations:
Put reteach on the back of the homework
Resources:
Projector, white board, book: Envision Math, homework 11-1 with reteach on
back, exit slip
Prerequisite Skills:
Multiplication, Understanding of Fractions
Academic Language:
Numerator, Denominator
Anticipatory Set:
Introduce the three ways to look at multiplying fractions:

Concretely
Pictorially
Symbolically

Statement of Objective or Purpose:

You already know how to multiply whole numbers. Today you will learn to
multiply whole numbers by fractions.
Sequence of Activities:

Anticipatory set: Introduce the three ways to look at multiplying fractions.


When in everyday life might you want to multiply a fraction and a whole
number? (When increasing a recipe)
Lets think about this problem: Emily has six eggs. She needs 2/3 of the
eggs to make an omelet. How many eggs does she need? Give students
five minutes to work and discuss the problem.
Draw six eggs on the board. Separate it into three equal parts. There
are two eggs in each part. If there are two eggs in one part, or 1/3, then
how many eggs are in 2/3 of the six eggs? How do you know? (four eggs)
Have students explain their methods of finding 2/3 of six.
What operations can be used to solve this problem? How? (First, you
could multiply the numerator and the whole number, then divide the new
numerator by the denominator to get the answer.)
Is the product of a fraction and a whole number less than or greater than
the whole number? Why? (less than)
Take a look at page 278, the visual learning problem. cup of orange
juice is needed for each batch of fruit drink. If we are making eight
batches of fruit drink, how would we find how many cups of orange juice
to use? Allow students to answer. We could use one of the three ways
we talked about earlier, or we could multiply 8 x . In order to multiply a
fraction by a whole number, we need to multiply the numerators and the
denominators. In the case of a whole number, the denominator, the
denominator will always be one. When we start to multiply fractions by
fractions, that wont always be the case. As you can see, our product is
24 over 4. 24 over 4 is also a way of writing 24 divided by 4. The
quotient is six, so of 8 is 6. When you multiply fractions by whole
numbers, the problem will often say find of 8. In this case, when you
see the word of, it just means to multiply.
Model guided practice 1 and 2.
Assign independent practice. Give students 15-20 minutes to work on
independent practice. Circulate, answer questions, and informally assess
the students as they work.
Go over independent practice problems.
At 1:50, stop and hand out the exit slip (quick check). Have student
complete the quick check.
Assign homework 11-1.

Questions to ask:

When in everyday life might you want to multiply a fraction and a whole
number?
What operations can be used to solve this type of problem? How?

Is the product of a fraction and a whole number less than or greater than
the whole number? Why?

Conclusion and Summary:


Today we have learned how to find the product of a whole number and a
fraction. The simplest way to complete this problem is to calculate the
product of the numerators and divide that by the product of the
denominators.
Self Evaluation and Reflection:

Exit Slip: Multiplying Fractions and Whole Numbers


Find each product. Name: _________________________
1. 2 of 18
3

2. 3 of 16
4

3. 1 of 24
8

4. 3 of 21
7

Exit Slip: Multiplying Fractions and Whole Numbers


Find each product. Name: _________________________
1. 2 of 18
3

2. 3 of 16
4

3. 1 of 24
8

4. 3 of 21
7