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World War 2

Sam Pechac

I. Learners, Learning Differences, and Learning Environment


1. Learners: The grade level this class is for is for a 10th grade class. The classroom
holds a diverse set of students, with some white and some Latino students, with a few
Native Americans present as well. The class is a fairly even mix of girls and boys. They
have various needs, where some can sit, listen, and take notes very well, others have
trouble with lectures as they find them boring, or they are not good at taking notes. Some
of the students can be loud or challenging, trying to waste class time or distract others in
the classroom. Some seem apathetic and need more attention to get work done. Some
come from a full family, while others come from a one parent home. Some have poor
work habits, turning in only some assignments rather than all of them, while others have
consistent A's, turning in most if not all of their work.
2. Learning differences: My lesson plan is varied in that it both provides lectures to
those who learn best through sheer note taking, while also providing activities and a
project for students who need different forms of learning that just a PowerPoint. In one
lesson, I am having the students go around in groups, reading about different ideologies
and comparing them to others they have learned about. A project I am having them do has
them learn about one country in particular, finding out specific information for a small
presentation to be emailed or sent to me in some way for me to look at and grade. The
summative assessment is even an essay rather than a multiple choice test, giving students
a more open way of expressing their views rather than having to know specific pieces of
information. They do have lectures, but they also get to spend time on their own learning
and teaching themselves, and even forming their own arguments for controversial topics,
like the atomic bombs.
3. Learning environment: My classroom will be designed in a manner that tries to
incorporate the history of different cultural backgrounds. While I will have posters of
American History, I will also have items pertaining to history of the cultures of students
in my class. For example, I would have up posters describing different events in Mexican
history, such as a timeline or celebrating heroes of the Mexican Revolution. I could put
up Native American artifacts or pictures, telling the story of Native Americans. I would
want my classroom to be a place where people did not feel excluded from history, where
they could care about what was being taught because it was a history that would pertain
to them. I would have maps of the world hung up, one modern and some from varying
periods in time. I would have newspaper articles talking about famous historical events so

students can read about primary news sources. I would have students sit in table groups
so I could facilitate cooperation among students as well as help the class get to know one
another. I would have clear set rules posted up in the front of the class. Dictating what we
as a class would agree on how we should behave to our fellow students.
II. Content and Content Knowledge Application
1. Introduce topic and explain its historical significance World War II was a
turbulent time in history, with multiple countries being affected by the war, whether they
were part of the fighting or not. World War II occurred from 1939, with the German lead
invasion of Poland, and ended in 1945, with the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and
Nagasaki. Caused by leftover tensions from the first World War, struggling economies on
both sides, and changing ideologies, World War II continued where World War I left off,
pitting the Germans, Italians, and Japanese against the British, Americans, and Russians.
This unit plan will cover the causes of World War II, as well as looking at the state of the
various countries involved and how their nation was doing before the war. This unit plan
will also cover the progression of the War, and then move into the history of the Pacific
Theater, ending with the bombing of Japan. Students will be using sources like war
posters and footage, as well as secondary sources to get a better understanding of the war.
2. Identify the enduring understandings
a. Students will understand the causes of the Second World War, and
how they relate to the ending of the First World War.
b. Students will understand the lasting effects the war had on the
nations involved.
c. Students will be able to identify and describe the impact each
nation had on the war.
d. Students will be able to form their own perspectives on the
bombing of Nagasaki and Hiroshima.
e. Students will understand the effect the war had on civilians.
3. Essential Questions.
a. What caused the Second World War? Were these causes left over
issues from World War I?
b. Was the bombing of Nagasaki and Hiroshima necessary?

c. What was life like for discriminated people, like the Jewish, Roma,
homosexuals, and other minorities living under Nazi rule?
d. What role did each nation play in World War II? Was one nation
more important than others?
e. What do you believe will happen to the countries involved in the
war? Are the conditions the same as they were after World War 1?
4. Identify the standards that align with your unit.
a. Concept 8: World at War; PO 5. Examine World War 2; a. political
ideologies (e.g., Totalitarianism, Democracy) b. military strategies (e.g., air
warfare, atomic bomb, Russian front, concentration camps) c. treatment of
civilian populations d. Holocaust
b. 1.2: Time and Continuity and Change; 1.3: People, Places, and
Environment; 1.5: Individuals, Groups, and Institutions; 1.6: Power, Authority,
and Governance;1.8: Science, Technology, and Society; 1.9: Global Connections;
1.10: Civic Ideals and Practices
c. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.9-10.3 Analyze in detail a series of
events described in a text; determine whether earlier events caused later ones or
simply preceded them. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.9-10.2
Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source;
provide an accurate summary of how key events or ideas develop over the course
of the text. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.9-10.4
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including
vocabulary describing political, social, or economic aspects of history/social
science. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.11-12.3: Evaluate various explanations for
actions or events and determine which explanation best accords with textual
evidence, acknowledging where the text leaves matters uncertain.
III. Assessment
My assessment plan include a variety of assessments to provide to the kids. I
have a pre-assessment for the students where they fill out a column with
what they know about the causes of World War 2, and then they fill out what
they've learned after the lesson, handing it to me. I can use their answers as
a means to adjust the lesson to fit their learning needs. I have some
formative assessments, like the project I'm having them do on a state of
their choosing, where they need to find out the ideology of that nation, the
state of their economy, their allegiances, and various other things about that
nation. The assignment is to make sure that students are understanding the
concepts being taught to them throughout the unit, as they apply what
characteristics of nations and themes to their nation, showing me they're
understanding what is being taught. It could also appear to be a summative

assessment, as it is turned in at the end, and so it can see if the students


really understood everything that was taught to them. The essay at the end
is summative, where students take what they've learned about World War 2
and pick a question to answer using what they have learned. Another
formative assessment is a worksheet they fill out regarding each ideology
they read about, noting what's important, where it came from, and what its
main tenants are. They turn this in at the end of class, and it shows me if
they understand what an ideology is and how it was important.
IV. Teaching methods
For my instructional strategies, I believe that there are a few things a teacher
must always be when teaching his or her students. A teacher must show
respect to his students and act professional. While this doesn't mean he can't
be fun, it does mean that when it comes time to teach, a teacher needs to be
professional about what he is teaching the students. My strategy is treat my
students with respect, and they should respect me back. I would leave an
open air for discussion, with clear class set rules about making arguments. I
would encourage questions about what I'm teaching, and slow down or
elaborate when asked by a student. I want my teaching to be a happy
balance between teacher centered and student centered learning, as I
believe that while a teacher is knowledgeable, students going and finding
information on their own, pulling meaning from text and pictures is very
important, as it develops critical thinking skills. I wouldn't want the class to
be entirely student centered, as I would want to lead the class in lecture but
also discussion, to help them get their points and ideas across while
providing them with the information that will serve as their evidence. In my
unit I have split up the lessons, with some being student centered while
others are teacher centered.
V. Individual Lesson Plans that make up the unit (this will make up the
bulk of the unit plan)
TITLE AND BRIEF DESCRIPTION: World War 1 Aftereffects
Day (s): Monday
FOCUS OF THIS LESSON: State and relations of nations after World War 1
ENDURING UNDERSTANDING: Students will understand that national issues can affect
future decisions.
Students will understand that nations after World War 1 were doing poorly, and that the war
wasn't beneficial for anyone.
Students will understand how World War 1's outcomes affected each nation.
ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS: What was the state of nations involved in World War1 after the

war?
How might the problems the nations were going through affect the near future?
CONTENT OBJECTIVES: Knowing the state of the economy, ideology, and alliances of the
USSR, United States, Great Britain, France, Italy, Germany, and Japan, and how these issues can
affect a nations near future.
SKILL OBJECTIVES: Being able to use cause and effect to explain the state of nations after
World War 1 and predict what they might due in the 1940's.
COMMON CORE CCR STANDARDS: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.9-10.3 Analyze in
detail a series of events described in a text; determine whether earlier events caused later ones or
simply preceded them.
ARIZONA STANDARDS: Concept 8: World at War, PO 4.
NCSS THEME/S: 1.3: People, Places, and Environment
DESCRIPTION OF WHAT YOU AS AN INSTRUCTOR NEED TO KNOW TO TEACH
THIS LESSON (be specific): As an instructor, I will need to know the state of national relations
after World War 1, specifically what the nations economy was like, what ideological belief did
they hold, and what alliances did they have in World War 1 and did they still exist? I would need
to know these facts for the USSR, Great Britain, United States, France, Italy, Germany, and
Japan.
ASSESSMENT/s: The assessment is going to be a simple check for understanding at the end
after everyone has presented. I will ask the students from the groups what they think the future of
their nation is and why, having them back up their statements with what they just researched.
This will show me that they understand the concept I am trying to teach them, while also
checking to see if they understand cause and effect.
INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS: The only materials I would need for this lesson would be a
whiteboard, whiteboard markers, and technology with access to the internet, such as a computer
or iPad.
USE OF TECHNOLOGY: The technology I will use in this assignment would be iPad's, as I
would be asking the students to get into groups and research what the state of their nation was
after World War 1. iPad's would be necessary as it allows for students to research in class. If no
iPad's are available, then the computer lab would also be used, as the access to the internet is
necessary for the lesson.
USE OF INQUIRY: Since students will be working in groups to determine the facts they need
to find out, they will be researching and finding answers without me, encouraging inquiry as they
ask questions as to why the information they find might have to do with their nation being
affected by World War 1.

ACCOMMODATIONS: As the students will be working in groups, students with disabilities


such as hearing problems or sight problems, can work with their group mates and still contribute
their findings and ideas to their group.
VOCABULARY: Students will need to know and understand the words:
Ideology
Depression (Economic)
LESSON OUTLINE AND DESCRIPTION OF STRATEGIES: The lesson will start out with
myself asking the class what they remember about World War 1, specifically what nations took
part, who won, why the war was started, etc. Afterwards, I will split them into their table groups
and provide them with a country to study, either the USSR, Great Britain, United States, France,
Italy, Germany, or Japan, and then have them grab iPads to do the research on. They will be
given the instructions to look for information about the state of their nation after World War 1,
like whether they had a good or poor economy, what ideologies did they adhere to, and what
alliances they had in place. I will also ask them to look for information that might point towards
the country going to war again. After they have all completed their research, I will bring the class
back together and go over what each group has found out. Students will be encouraged to take
notes as to what the other groups are saying. I will then ask them some questions about what they
think the state of their nations means for their country, and why do they think that?
STEP BY STEP SEQUENCE OF DAILY PLAN:
10 Minutes-Discuss/Review what we remember from World War 1
30 Minutes-Split the class up into their table groups, delegating a country for each of them to
research. Students should be researching their nation with their group, trying to find out details
about their economy, alliances, and government types. I as the teacher should be walking around
providing them with help as they need it.
15 Minutes-Bring the class back together. Have the class take turns talking about their nation and
the state of affairs after World War 1. Students will be expected to present their information or
talk notes. I will be letting the students present and guiding them along with some helpful
questions if they get stuck. I will also lead the discussion on comparing and contrasting the
nations situation.
TITLE AND BRIEF DESCRIPTION: Causes of World War 2. This lesson will teach the
students about the causes of World War 2, tying in with the last lesson, and setting the stage
for the rest of the unit. It will also help students with one of their enduring understandings.
Day (s): Tuesday
FOCUS OF THIS LESSON: Causes of World War 2
ENDURING UNDERSTANDING: Students will understand that unresolved issues after World
War 1 lead to World War 2.

Students will be able to draw connections between problems after World War 1 to causes of
World War 2.
Students will understand how leaders like Hitler and Stalin came to power.
ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS: Why did Germany choose to have Adolf Hitler as its leader?
Why did World War 2 occur?
How did the effects of World War 1 play a part in causing World War 2?
CONTENT OBJECTIVES: Knowing the causes of World War 2
SKILL OBJECTIVES: Cause and effect, being able to identify actions and conditions that lead
to war.
COMMON CORE CCR STANDARDS: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.9-10.3
Analyze in detail a series of events described in a text; determine whether earlier events caused
later ones or simply preceded them.
ARIZONA STANDARDS: Concept 8: World at War; PO 4
NCSS THEME/S: 1.3: People, Places, and Environment
1.5: Individuals, Groups, and Institutions
1.6: Power, Authority, and Governance
DESCRIPTION OF WHAT YOU AS AN INSTRUCTOR NEED TO KNOW TO TEACH
THIS LESSON (be specific): As an instructor, I would need to know the causes of World War
2, such as Hitler rising to power, unresolved issues leftover from World War 1, and economic
problems around the globe, as well as the issues leftover from World War 1, such as Germany's
economic reparations and various political turmoil.
ASSESSMENT/s: I will be giving the students a chart, with two columns to it. The first column
will be the Already Know section, where I will have the students fill in what they already
know about the causes of World War 2. The second column will be what they know after the
lecture. At the bottom will be a section asking the students to describe two of the causes they
think were most important, and why. I will be collecting these charts at the end of class so I can
see how much people know about WW2, so I can tweak the lesson as it goes along in the day. It
can also help me determine what causes to focus on.
INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS: For this instruction, I will need a PowerPoint to go through
the lecture, with information on the countries, which we had went over in the last class, to review
on and then going through causes as a whole, and then deeper into individual countries and their
reasons for going to war.
USE OF TECHNOLOGY: The technology I will be using in this lesson is a computer,
projection screen, projector and a PowerPoint, as a PowerPoint is the best way to give a lecture
the whole class can see and take notes on.

USE OF INQUIRY: Inquiry will not play a large part in this lesson, as the lesson is mostly
teacher centered, with myself giving the lecture to the students.
ACCOMMODATIONS: As I will both be showing the slides and talking about what's on the
slide, so if a student has a hearing/seeing disability, they will be able to get the information they
will need. If a student has a rough time with English, I will help them with the information they
need to get by doing my best to get them a PowerPoint version with their language.
VOCABULARY: Vocabulary students will need to know are:
Multi-party system (as opposed to our two party system)
Demilitarized
Reparations
Fascism
Communism
Isolationism
LESSON OUTLINE AND DESCRIPTION OF STRATEGIES: The class will start out with
students receiving their worksheet, and will be asked to fill out the left column before the lecture
begins. I will then proceed to give the lecture about the issues left over from World War 1,
Hitler's rise to power and early aggression, the fascist transformation of Italy, Russia's change to
the USSR, Japan's growing empire, and the United States' isolationism. The PowerPoint will
conclude with me summing up the causes of WW2. The students will then be asked to provide
answers to the second half or the chart, and the bottom half of the paper. We will then go over
volunteered answers to the two parts occurring after the lecture. I will then collect the papers to
see where the class stands on knowing the causes, and whether I need to tweak the lesson.
STEP BY STEP SEQUENCE OF DAILY PLAN:
5 Minutes-Welcome the students, handing out the worksheet and asking them to put their name
on the worksheet and to begin filling out the first part of the worksheet. Students will be jotting
down what they know about the causes of WW2, while I will be setting up the PowerPoint for
them.
30 Minutes-Give the lecture about the causes of the of World War 2, covering the rise of fascism,
Hitler's rise to power and early aggression, Japan's growing empire, and the United States'
isolationism, among other things. The students should be paying attention and taking notes of the
causes of the war. I should be up front giving the lecture, making sure everyone is listening and
paying attention.
10 Minutes-Have students finish the second column of their worksheet and have them get to
work on or finish the bottom half. The students should be filling out their worksheets, while I
would be walking around, making sure students are staying focused on their work and offering
help where I can.
10 Minutes-Have a discussion with the class on what new things they learned from the
PowerPoint, and what they already knew before the PowerPoint. Then I would lead a discussion
on what causes the students thought we most important. Collect the papers. Students should be
participating in the discussion, providing answers and arguments to the proposed question. I

should be leading the discussion, making sure the students stay respectful and encourage
participation
TITLE AND BRIEF DESCRIPTION: History of World War 2. This two day lesson is
essentially a break down of specific events in World War 2, generally events that were
important in the war, with things like Germany's conquest of Europe, the bombing of
Britain, Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor, Germany's invasion of the USSR, Germany's
defeat, and the island hopping campaign. This will provide them with all the information
they will need for the upcoming essay and provide context to the themes we would be
covering the following days.
Day (s): Wednesday, Thursday
FOCUS OF THIS LESSON: Outline of the course of the World War 2
ENDURING UNDERSTANDING: Students will understand that, while called World War 2,
not the whole world was involved.
Students will understand the expansion of Germany, and be able to identify factors as to why the
Axis lost.
Students will understand the reasons the Allies won the war.
ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS: Why did the Allies win the war?
Why did the Axis powers lose?
How did Germany grow to be so big during World War 2?
CONTENT OBJECTIVES: Students will know the general history of World War 2, from the
early German aggression, to Germany's dominance over Europe. To Japanese bombing of Pearl
Harbor, to German defeat in Europe and Japanese defeat in Japan.
SKILL OBJECTIVES: Students will be able to draw conclusions from different examples,
forming arguments to make a point about the outcomes of the war.
COMMON CORE CCR STANDARDS: N/A, as this is much more content focused than it is
skill/analysis focused.
ARIZONA STANDARDS: Concept 8: World at War; PO 5. Examine World War 2
NCSS THEME/S: 1.2: Time and Continuity and Change
1.3: People, Places, and Environment
1.5: Individuals, Groups, and Institutions
1.6: Power, Authority, and Governance
1.9: Global Connections
DESCRIPTION OF WHAT YOU AS AN INSTRUCTOR NEED TO KNOW TO TEACH
THIS LESSON (be specific): As an instructor, I would need to know the basic history of World

War 2, as this lesson will be giving a brief outline of the war, highlighting key events such as the
Blitzkrieg in Poland, to the bombing of London, to the invasion of Russia, to Japanese invasions
of the Philippines and Indochina, to the bombing of Pearl Harbor, to D-Day, to VE day, the
bombing of Japan. I would need knowledge of he history of the second World War to teach this
lesson.
ASSESSMENT/s: Between the two days, there will be a bell work question on the white board
asking the students about the events discussed in the previous day. The question will be How
did German aggression go unchecked? Do you think Germany had any intention of stopping
their invasions?The assessment for this lesson would be summed up into an in-class essay to be
given on the last day of the unit. The students would use these pieces of information, plus the
other themes they learned about, to make an argument about World War 2 in regards to a prompt
I give them. The prompt question will be asking them, either: Did Germany's geographic location
assist them in controlling Europe or hinder them? Why did the Allies eventually defeat Germany
and the Axis powers? People like to paint the war as good versus evil. Were the all the actions
done by the Allies good?; or What are the ideals of isolationism and neutrality? Were the nations
who claimed to be isolationists or neutral really what they claimed? If they weren't, what were
they then?
INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS: For this lesson, I would need a PowerPoint to teach this
lesson, as I would need a medium to convey all the information being given to the students.
USE OF TECHNOLOGY: The standard set up for a PowerPoint presentation would be the use
of technology for this lesson, as it is one of the best ways to present information to the students
in a lecture based format.
USE OF INQUIRY: Inquiry would not be a driving factor in this lesson as it is in the other
lessons, as this lesson is to get the nuts and bolts of the war, the battles and expansion of nations,
and this information is going to be talked about in lecture format.
ACCOMMODATIONS: As I will both be showing the slides and talking about what's on the
slide, so if a student has a hearing/seeing disability, they will be able to get the information they
will need. If a student has a rough time with English, I will help them with the information they
need to get by doing my best to get them a PowerPoint version with their language.
VOCABULARY: Blitzkrieg
Axis
Allies
Fronts
Siege
Island-Hopping
Third Reich
Appeasement
LESSON OUTLINE AND DESCRIPTION OF STRATEGIES: The lesson would be two

days long, involving a PowerPoint on the outline of World War 2. The classes would be similar,
with a PowerPoint lecture being given for the two days trying to cover the war from start to
finish, touching on important battles and events during the war. It would start with early German
aggression then go onto talk about appeasement, then the blitzkrieg by Germany and the USSR,
German Expansion, German bombing of Great Britain, German invasion of the USSR, Japanese
bombing of Pearl Harbor, American involvement in Europe, German downfall, island hopping
campaign, bombing of Japan, end of the war. The students will be expected to take notes
throughout the lecture so we can move on to themes of the war with a knowledge of the events of
the war.
STEP BY STEP SEQUENCE OF DAILY PLAN:
DAY 1
5 Minutes-Students come to class, get out a pencil and paper, and wait for the lesson to begin.
25 minutes-Lecture is given to the students about the series of the War. This day would cover the
first half, like Germany's aggression and conquest of Europe, the bombing of Great Britain, the
Lend-Lease Act, and Germany's invasion of the USSR. Students are expected to take notes while
I'm giving them all the information they'll be needing.
1 Minute to stretch-Students are encouraged to stand up and stretch, so we aren't all sitting in one
place for too long.
25 minutes-Lecture resumes, covering what was listed earlier. Students continue to take notes.
Class finishes and students are dismissed.
DAY 2
10 Minutes-Students come in and get out paper and a pencil, and get to work on the bell question
on the board: How did German aggression go unchecked? Do you think Germany had any
intention of stopping their invasions? Have students answer the question, and go over it after
everyone has finished.
20 Minutes-Finish the second half of the lecture, with the students taking notes down in their
notebooks/paper, and myself giving the lecture.
5 minutes of discussion-Give the students time to stretch. I will be asking the students what their
thoughts are on World War 2, and if they have anything interesting to add.
20 minutes-Finish the second half of the lecture, covering topics like the Japanese attack at Pearl
Harbor, Germany losing in Russia, Germany having to fight two fronts with the invasion of DDay, Germany's eventual defeat, the start of the island hopping campaign and a few battles from
it. Students should be finishing their notes while I give the lecture.
1 minute-Thank the students for bearing with me as we got through the two days of straight
lecture.
TITLE AND BRIEF DESCRIPTION: Nations of World War 2. In this lesson, I am
assigning the student groups a nation of their choosing, where they will be researching its
place in World War 2. This is meant to give the students a closer look at a specific nation
during the war, as the larger overview did not go into a great amount of detail on each

nation. The short project will help the students work as a team and also learn more about
ideologies and aliances.
Day (s): Friday
FOCUS OF THIS LESSON: Details on Countries During the War
ENDURING UNDERSTANDING: Students will be able to recognize the effects of the war on
different nations.
Students will be able to conduct research and compile it into a thoughtful, well put together
PowerPoint.
ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:What role did your nation play in the war?
What ideologies did your nation adopt?
How did the war affect your nation?
CONTENT OBJECTIVES: Getting more detailed into a specific countries participation in
World War 2
SKILL OBJECTIVES: Ability to work with others on an assignment, presentation skills.
COMMON CORE CCR STANDARDS: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.9-10.2
Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate
summary of how key events or ideas develop over the course of the text.
ARIZONA STANDARDS: Concept 8: World at War; PO 5. Examine World War 2
NCSS THEME/S:1.9: Global Connections
1.5: Individuals, Groups, and Institutions
1.3: People, Places, and Environment
DESCRIPTION OF WHAT YOU AS AN INSTRUCTOR NEED TO KNOW TO TEACH
THIS LESSON (be specific): As it is almost entirely student lead, as they will mostly be
working on their projects to find out the information for themselves, I don't need to have
extensive knowledge on each country to assist. Instead, I need to know what sites can be trusted
to provide accurate historical information to the students, and be able to give them examples of
the things I would be looking for in their presentation about their country.
ASSESSMENT/s: The assessment is the lesson itself, as this is not so much a lesson but giving
the students time to work on their project in class so they can get some work done with their
group. The project is an essay on a country of a group or four's choosing that participated in the
war. The students would be presenting the country, it's allegiances (if any), how World War 1
affected it, the role it played in the war, and what happened to it/what their nation got out of
World War 2. I would offer time to come in at lunch to continue working on the assignment,
as well as my free period. The assignment would be due the Monday after the unit summative

exam.
INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS: The only instructional materials I would need for this
assignment would be the computers/iPads, as I would need them to help the groups get started on
their projects.
USE OF TECHNOLOGY: We as a class would be using computers in the lab, or iPads in the
classroom if they are available, to find and take note of information on the chosen country.
USE OF INQUIRY: This project and lesson is based on inquiry, as I am having the groups get
together and choose a nation they want to learn more about, and then doing the research on their
own. This assignment is very student focused, as they are the ones teaching themselves about the
information, inquiring the internet about it, rather than me just telling them the information.
ACCOMMODATIONS: If students don't work well together, or if a group is complaining that
one partner is not putting in the same amount of effort, I will have designed a system where the
grade is based both as a group and on peer reviews to be filled out by group members, showing
me any issues the group was having with a member.
VOCABULARY: N/A
LESSON OUTLINE AND DESCRIPTION OF STRATEGIES: For his lesson, I would not
be exactly teaching anything. We would start class with an introduction to the project, which
would be getting into groups of 4 (table groups) and making a short essay on a country of their
choice that participated in the war to be sent to me. I will hand them the prompt and grading
rubric, and then we will all go to the computer lab to give them a day to work on the assignment
in class, so they can ask me questions about the prompt, topics, and other issues while working
on it. We would spend the whole time in the lab, with the students finding information on their
topic and beginning to write it/getting notes down. At the end of class, I would tell them that the
project is due by the Monday after the in class essay final assessment.
STEP BY STEP SEQUENCE OF DAILY PLAN:
5 minutes-Split class up into table groups, having them decide a country they want to make
a short PowerPoint on, and have them bring their choice to me. Walk to the computer lab.
45 minutes-Let the students get to work on researching their nation on the computers and
even let them start working on their essay if they have a way of working on it at home with
the progress they make on here. The students should be working on their projects with
their group, looking up information on their country, while I should be walking around the
room, answering questions about the assignment and making sure people aren't goofing off
on the computers.
5 minutes-Head back to the classroom. Tell the students the project will be due the Monday
after the final essay. Dismiss the students.

UNIT TITLE AND BRIEF DESCRIPTION: German Expansion and Neutrality. This lesson
is covering the topic of how far Germany expanded during the war, and how certain nations
remained independent of German control. It will also question the idea of neutrality, and if true
neutrality existed during World War 2.
Day: Monday
FOCUS OF THIS LESSON: Geographic changes during World War 2 and Nations Opposing
Germany
ENDURING UNDERSTANDING: Students will understand how a world war can drastically
change borders.
Students will understand the ways a nation can resist an aggressor.
Students will understand neutrality and how hard it is to maintain.
ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS: How did the borders in Europe change in World War 2?
Why did some borders never change?
How did nations resist German intrusion in World War 2?
CONTENT OBJECTIVES: Understanding country relations during World War 2
SKILL OBJECTIVE: Analyzing changes in maps and national relations.
COMMON CORE CCR STANDARDS: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.11-12.3: Evaluate
various explanations for actions or events and determine which explanation best accords with
textual evidence, acknowledging where the text leaves matters uncertain.
ARIZONA STANDARDS: Concept 8: World at War, PO 5: Examine aspects of World War 2.
NCSS THEME/S 1.3: People, Places, and Environment
DESCRIPTION OF WHAT YOU AS AN INSTRUCTOR NEED TO KNOW TO TEACH
THIS LESSON (be specific): As an instructor, I would need to have knowledge on World War
2, specifically how borders changed over the course of the war, and knowledge as to why certain
nations remained out of German control during the war.
ASSESSMENT/s: The assessment will be going over with each group with what they
discovered about the nation in question and why it didn't get invaded. We then as a class can
compare the nations to see if they had any similarities with each other.
INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS: I will be using handouts for the class, where each group of
students will be given an informational sheet concerning a country that had not been successfully
invaded by Germany during the war. The students will use these worksheets to determine why
Germany did not/could not invade these countries in their groups. They will be given the
information sheet, and asked to use a sheet of paper to answer in their groups.

USE OF TECHNOLOGY: The technology that will be used in this lesson is a PowerPoint
depicting a map of Europe, where Germany was at its peak during World War 2. The PowerPoint
is mainly used for The small background on German expansion and the map so people can see
the state of the borders of European nations at the time, showing vocab words like neutrality and
natural barrier.
USE OF INQUIRY: The whole lesson is about reading information on why nations kept
themselves out of German control, with the groups reading and pulling information from the
texts to find their reasoning to present the the class as a whole. The whole lesson is based on
inquiry.
ACCOMMODATIONS: By putting the students into groups, even if a student can't read the
paper, their group mates can read it to them, helping them contribute to the activity. Since the
work is visual, someone who has a hearing impairment should be able to participate in the
activity as well.
VOCABULARY:

World War 2
Borders
Blitzkrieg
Neutrality
Natural Barrier

LESSON OUTLINE AND DESCRIPTION OF STRATEGIES: My lesson will start by


refreshing the students memory on the state of World War 2, such as German expansion and
Allied resistance. After the introduction, I'll show them a map of Europe where Germany was at
its peak, controlling the most land throughout the war. I will also introduce them to vocab words
like natural barrier and neutrality. Afterwards, I'll split the students up into 3 groups, and give
each group a case study on a nation that wasn't invaded by Germany. I will leave the map up,
letting students see where the nations are in regards to Germany and just how much Germany's
influence had spread. The students will be looking for reasons as to why the nations remained out
of German control during the war. Afterwards, we'll come back together as a class and discuss
why each nation remained out of German control, and compare each nation with the others,
looking for similarities and differences.
STEP BY STEP SEQUENCE OF DAILY PLAN:
Time

Activity

Students Learning
Tasks

Teachers Learning
Tasks

10 Minutes

Introduction
powerpoint

Remind themselves
about WW2 and the
idea of German
expansion.
Associate

Presenting the
PowerPoint,
reminding the
students about
German expansion

themselves with the


vocab words.
30 minutes

Students are split


into groups,
receiving a case
study on one of the
three nations during
the war. Students
then analyze why
each nation
remained separate
from Germany.

10 Minutes

Class comes back


together, discussing
what they found
about their nation
and comparing it to
what other groups
found.

and show them the


map. Talk about the
idea of neutrality
with the students.
Read the
Split the students up,
information sheet,
give them their
determine reasons as worksheet, go around
to how and why the the class answering
nation remained out questions if need be.
of German control.
Students should also
be determining if
their nation they are
reading about is
neutral or not.
Present their
Lead the discussion,
information, discuss asking each group
with other groups
what they found out
how their nation are about their nation.
similar or different
Ask the students
in regards to
what it truly means to
German invasion.
be neutral, and if any
of the nations we
looked at could be
considered neutral.

Sources:
"Churchill Decides to Fight On." BBC News. BBC. Web. 28 Apr. 2015.
<http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/events/churchill_decides_to_fight_on>.

"Battle of Britain Day." BBC News. BBC. Web. 28 Apr. 2015.


<http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/events/battle_of_britain_day>.
"Hitler Postpones the Invasion of Britain." BBC News. BBC. Web. 28 Apr. 2015.
<http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/events/hitler_postpones_the_invasion_of_britain>.
"Why Did Hitler Not Attack Switzerland?" Switzerland's Role in World War II. Ed. Markus Jud.
Web. 28 Apr. 2015. <http://history-switzerland.geschichte-schweiz.ch/switzerland-second-worldwar-ii.html>.
Park, Jihyeon. "WHKMLA : Sweden's Neutrality during Two World Wars." ZUM. Korean
Minjok Leadership Academy, 1 July 2008. Web. 28 Apr. 2015.
<http://www.zum.de/whkmla/sp/0809/pjh/pjh2.html#IV1>.
TITLE AND BRIEF DESCRIPTION: The Ideologies of World War 2. This lesson will focus

primarily on the various ideologies that existed during World War 2, such as Communism,
Democracy, Fascism, even Isolationism and Neutrality. The students will need to look at
these ideologies in great depth, as they will have something to do with one of the prompts
for the in class essay.
Day (s): Tuesday
FOCUS OF THIS LESSON: Ideologies of World War 2
ENDURING UNDERSTANDING: Students will know an understand the various ideologies
that existed during World War 2.
Students will be able to define the main tenants of each ideology.
Students will be able to compare and contrast ideologies.
ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS: What ideologies existed during World War 2?
How were they the same? How were they different?
What did each ideology believe in?
CONTENT OBJECTIVES: Students will know the various political ideologies that existed
during World War 2
SKILL OBJECTIVES: Defining vocabulary.
COMMON CORE CCR STANDARDS: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.9-10.2
Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate
summary of how key events or ideas develop over the course of the text.
ARIZONA STANDARDS: Concept 8: World at War; PO 5. Examine World War 2; a. political
ideologies
NCSS THEME/S: 1.6: Power, Authority, and Governance
DESCRIPTION OF WHAT YOU AS AN INSTRUCTOR NEED TO KNOW TO TEACH
THIS LESSON (be specific): As an instructor, I would need to know the various ideologies that
existed during World War 2, more specifically Fascism, Communism, Democracy, Isolationism,
Neutrality, and Dictatorship, and the main tenants of each of them.
ASSESSMENT/s: The formative assessment is going to be a work sheet that the students will
turn in at the end of class, as I will need the worksheets to make sure that they are learning the
idea of ideologies and their characteristics. The worksheet will consist of multiple sections with
similar questions, generally in relation to the ideology they are looking at, asking questions like
what the ideology was, what nations adopted it, what were the main tenants, where did it begin,
etc. The back will also have a few charts to fill in differences and similarities between the
ideologies.

INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS: For this lesson, I would need worksheets for the students,
along with information sheets to be placed at each table for the students to read and discuss,
filling in the questions on their worksheets. I would also need white board markers to makes lists
of things people put down for an ideology when we discuss our findings at the end of class.
USE OF TECHNOLOGY: N/A
USE OF INQUIRY: The students would be going to each table, reading the text and trying to
pull information out of them, enhancing their critical thinking and reading skills, as they need to
look for things that would be relevant and useful to answering their questions.
ACCOMMODATIONS: The students would be in groups, so if they had trouble reading
something or coming up with answers, the students in their group can help them. As for students
with vision impalement, as this is a reading activity, I would have them listen to videos or
podcasts that talk about the ideologies, or have some one in their group read the paper to them.
VOCABULARY: Ideology
Fascism
Communism
Democracy
Isolationism
Neutrality
Dictatorship/Totalitarianism
Neutrality
LESSON OUTLINE AND DESCRIPTION OF STRATEGIES: For the lesson, I would have
a sheet filled with information on each of the ideologies, and then have the students in their table
groups start with the ideology that was already on their table. The students would be asked to fill
out a worksheet that had similar questions for each ideology, essentially asking what the
ideology was, what nations adopted it, what were the main tenants, where did it begin, etc. After
they had enough time to read over their sheet and jot down the answers, the class would rotate
around the room to the next station. The students would then continue the process with the new
ideology. The class would keep rotating until everyone got a chance to take notes on each of the
ideologies. We would then come together as a class and discuss the various ideologies the
students talked about. We then, as class, would discuss similarities and differences between some
of them.
STEP BY STEP SEQUENCE OF DAILY PLAN:
10 minutes-Introduction to the activity. Ask students what they know about ideologies, and
which ones they know of already. Let them know there is going to be an activity today regarding
ideologies. Give directions on how the activity is going to work, and have the students begin at
the table they are sitting at.
35 minutes-Students do the activity, going from table to table, sitting down and reading the
information sheet on that ideology. They then fill out their worksheets, answering the questions

about the characteristics and origins of the ideology. After they have finished, they should be
back at their original desks again.
10 minutes-Gather the students' attention and start the discussion. Ask around the room or choose
volunteers to go over each ideology and then lead a discussion on comparing and contrasting
them.
TITLE AND BRIEF DESCRIPTION: The Holocaust. This is an important unit, as it both
covers an Arizona state standard as well as highlights a dark time in human history, which
shows how civilians who were considered lesser by the German people were treated, which
can tie in with one of our enduring understandings. This lesson will be about showing the
students the Holocaust and having them understand that there were many civilian
casualties in this war, and the reason they were casualties at all.
Day (s): Wednesday
FOCUS OF THIS LESSON: Holocaust
ENDURING UNDERSTANDING: Students will understand the events that took place in
concentration camps.
Students will understand that not just Jewish people were targeted in the Holocaust.
ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS: Who was included in the concentration camps?
Why did Germany remove these people from society?
What ended the holocaust?
CONTENT OBJECTIVES: Students will learn about the atrocities of the Holocaust. They will
also learn about the horrors the victims of the Holocaust had to go through. They will also learn
the history of the Holocaust.
SKILL OBJECTIVES: Analysis of pictures and primary sources.
COMMON CORE CCR STANDARDS: N/A
ARIZONA STANDARDS: Concept 8: World at War; PO 5. Examine World War 2; d. Holocaust
NCSS THEME/S: 1.1: Culture and Cultural Diversity
1.6: Power, Authority, and Governance
DESCRIPTION OF WHAT YOU AS AN INSTRUCTOR NEED TO KNOW TO TEACH
THIS LESSON (be specific): As an instructor, I need to know the history of the holocaust,
including the progression of Jewish and minority suppression, the creation of concentration and
death camps, the final solution, and the end of the Holocaust.
ASSESSMENT/s: At the beginning of the class, I will have the students fill in a worksheet,

asking them what they know about the Holocaust, such as who was in it, who started it, who
ended it, etc. After the lesson is over, I will ask them to fill in the second half, asking them what
they learned after listening to the lecture and watching the video. I would ask them to point out
any differences with what they thought they knew and anything new they learned from the
lesson.
INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS: I would need a worksheet for every student, a Prezi for the
presentation of information and photos, and access to the internet to show a video about the
Holocaust.
USE OF TECHNOLOGY: I will use technology in two ways for this lesson. I will be using a
Prezi to present information, pictures and a time line for the Holocaust, and then I will show the
class a short video on the holocaust.
USE OF INQUIRY: N/A
ACCOMMODATIONS:
VOCABULARY: Concentration Camp
Final Solution
Aryan
Holocaust
Discrimination
Genocide
Ghetto
LESSON OUTLINE AND DESCRIPTION OF STRATEGIES: The lesson will start with me
handing out the worksheet, asking the students to fill out the first half of the worksheet with the
best of their ability. After they have had some time to fill out their worksheets, I will ask them to
give some examples of things they know about the Holocaust. After taking some ideas, I will
move on to the Prezi, which will take the class through a sort of timeline of the Holocaust. From
the Night of Broken Glass, to further Jewish and minority discrimination, to the movement to the
ghettos, to the movement to the concentration camps, to the final solution, death camps, and end
of the Holocaust. We will be analyzing pictures of the Holocaust during the lecture. After taking
them through the lecture, I will show them a short video called The Holocaust: A Deception of
Truth. After the video is done, I will ask students to fill in the last section of their worksheet,
and then we will share as a class what new things they have learned and what things were
different from what they said.
STEP BY STEP SEQUENCE OF DAILY PLAN:
5 minutes-Class gets situated, have students take out a pencil and paper for notes. Hand them the
worksheet and ask them to fill in the first half, putting down what they know about the
Holocaust. Ask for examples of what students put.

35 minutes-Give the students the Prezi of the Holocaust, asking them to take notes during the
presentation. After going through the history of it, show a few pictures of the Holocaust and have
the students analyze them.
7 minutes-Show the Deception of Truth video to the students.
5 minutes- Have the students finish the work sheet, using what they learned from the lecture and
video.
UNIT TITLE AND BRIEF DESCRIPTION: Dropping the Atom Bomb
Day: Thursday
FOCUS OF THIS LESSON: Atomic Bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki
ENDURING UNDERSTANDING: Students will understand the reasons the United States had
for bombing two Japanese civilian cities.
Students will understand the morality of dropping the bombs on civilians.
ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS: Why did the United States bomb Hiroshima and Nagasaki?
Did we have to drop the atomic bombs? What was the alternative?
CONTENT OBJECTIVES: Learning about the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.
SKILL OBJECTIVES: Forming an argument back by evidence.
COMMON CORE CCR STANDARDS:
ARIZONA STANDARDS: Concept 8: World at War; PO 5: Examine World War 2; b. military
strategies, c. treatment of civilians.
NCSS THEME/S: 1.8: Science, Technology, and Society
1.10: Civic Ideals and Practices
DESCRIPTION OF WHAT YOU AS AN INSTRUCTOR NEED TO KNOW TO TEACH
THIS LESSON (be specific): As an instructor, I would need to know about the bombing of the
two cities, specifically I would need to know about the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and
Nagasaki, reasons for using the atomic bomb, the Island hopping campaign, and the civilian
casualties.
ASSESSMENT/s: The assessment for this lesson is going to be oral, as after the presentation of
the last of the information on the island hopping campaign, the bombing of Japan, and the video,
I'm going to ask the students to take some time and write down some arguments about the atomic
bombing of Japan, using the same question as at the end of the video: Was it a bomb that should
have been dropped? Students will have to back up their claim using evidence provided through
the lecture to support their argument, but the point of the assessment is to get students to see the
moral dilemma of dropping the bombs on a civilian city. After the writing is done, I'll have a few

volunteers offer their arguments, and then I'll collect their work at the end of the class.
INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS: I will need a Prezi to show to my students the information
on the end of the island hopping campaign and the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. I will
also be using a BBC video to show them clips of the bombing and destruction at the two cities.
USE OF TECHNOLOGY: I will be using a Prezi and a video in this lesson, as they help
convey the information I am teaching and the video gives pictures to the information I have
covered already.
USE OF INQUIRY: Students will be making their own arguments using critical thinking skills
by using information I have provided them on whether the bombs should have been dropped or
not. This is my example of inquiry.
ACCOMMODATIONS:
VOCABULARY: Atomic Bomb
Fat Boy
Little Man
Hiroshima
Nagasaki
Ultimatum
LESSON OUTLINE AND DESCRIPTION OF STRATEGIES: The lesson will start with me
asking the students what they remember about the island hopping campaign. I will then move on
to the Prezi, giving them the last bit of information on the ending of the campaign. I will then
turn the lecture towards Hiroshima and Nagasaki, talking about the two cities, and the creation of
the atom bomb. I will take students through the steps of America giving Japan a
warning/ultimatum to surrender or face destruction, America bombing Hiroshima, and then
Nagasaki, before Japan finally surrendering a few days later. After the Prezi, I will have students
watch a very short video, explaining the events of the bombings and showing images of the
destruction. After the video, I will ask the students to write on a piece of paper, whether they
thought America should have dropped the bomb or not, using evidence to support their claim.
After giving them enough time, I will take volunteers to offer their arguments, before collecting
the papers at the end of the class.
STEP BY STEP SEQUENCE OF DAILY PLAN:
5-10 minutes-Review what we remember about the U.S. And Japanese involvement in World
War 2, including the attack on Pearl Harbor and the island-hopping campaign.
25 minutes-Finish PowerPoint on island hopping campaign and move on to talk about the atomic
bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and Japan's eventual surrender.
5 minutes- Show the class the video Day that Shook the World. Students should be watching as
the video has images to help show the devastation.
15 minutes- Have the students, using evidence from what we just learned, make an argument on

whether we should have dropped the bomb or if we should not have. After everyone has had a
chance to write something, I will then start taking volunteers for what they argued, before
eventually calling on people with cold call.
UNIT TITLE AND BRIEF DESCRIPTION: Essay on World War 2. This is the summative
assessment for this unit, the one where I check to see if the students learned the goals I
wanted them to learn and to see if things need to be changed in the future. The essay is
meant to be a way to improve a students writing skills as well as their memory retention.
Day: Friday, the last day
FOCUS OF THIS LESSON: Test of World War 2
ENDURING UNDERSTANDING: Students will understand the geography of Europe affected
Germany's outcome in the war.
Students will understand how and why the Allies defeated the Axis.
Students will know and understand the different ideologies.
ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS: What is true isolationism and neutrality?
Did Germany's geographic location help them or hinder them?
How did the Allies beat the Axis?
CONTENT OBJECTIVES: Reviewing all the information from the unit.
SKILL OBJECTIVES: Effective Writing, Using evidence to make an argument.
COMMON CORE CCR STANDARDS CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.9-10.4
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary
describing political, social, or economic aspects of history/social science.
ARIZONA STANDARDS Concept 8: World at War; PO 5: Examine World War 2
NCSS THEME/S: 1.2: Time and Continuity and Change
1.3: People, Places, and Environment
1.5: Individuals, Groups, and Institutions
1.6: Power, Authority, and Governance
1.9: Global Connections
DESCRIPTION OF WHAT YOU AS AN INSTRUCTOR NEED TO KNOW TO TEACH
THIS LESSON (be specific): As an instructor, as this is not a lesson but rather an assessment
day where the students are writing an in class essay, I would only need to know how to assist
students with grammar and spelling, as well as how to grade an essay following a rubric.
ASSESSMENT/s: The assessment for this lesson would be summed up into an in-class essay to
be given on the last day of the unit. The students would use these pieces of information, plus the

other themes they learned about, to make an argument about World War 2 in regards to a prompt
I give them. The prompt question will be asking them, either: Did Germany's geographic location
assist them in controlling Europe or hinder them? Why did the Allies eventually defeat Germany
and the Axis powers? What significant events lead up to Germany's defeat?; or What are the
ideals of isolationism and neutrality? Were the nations who claimed to be isolationists or neutral
really what they claimed? If they weren't, what were they then? Do these ideologies often pair up
with other ideologies? If so, which ones and why?
INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS: I will need an essay prompt to give to the students so they
know what to write their essay about. I will also need a rubric to grade said essay.
USE OF TECHNOLOGY: N/A
USE OF INQUIRY: The essay is about inquiry, as they will be thinking through what they've
learned and applying it to their paper to create an answer to the prompt. It should also encourage
them to strengthen their writing skills.
ACCOMMODATIONS: I believe that an essay both challenges students and pulls them away
from the standard multiple choice test, so I feel this testing idea is accommodating. If a student
has trouble writing the essay or needs help, I can put aside time during my lunch for the student
to come in and continue his essay if he or she needs more time.
VOCABULARY: N/A
LESSON OUTLINE AND DESCRIPTION OF STRATEGIES: The students will come in,
be told to take out a few sheets of paper and to sit at their desks. They will then be given the
prompt and asked to start on the paper, being asked to write as much as they feel they need to to
support their argument. Once the time period has ended, I will collect the essays and release the
students.
STEP BY STEP SEQUENCE OF DAILY PLAN:
2 Minutes-Tell students to take out a pencil and some sheets of paper. Hand them the
prompt for the in class essay and let them get started. I will explain the prompts if they are
confusing for students.
52 minutes-Students work on writing their essays, trying to make arguments backed up by
evidence from what we've learned in the classroom. I will be walking around, making sure
no one is cheating or if anyone has questions for me about the essay, I can stop to answer
them.
2 minutes- Collect the papers from the students, wish them a happy weekend, reminding
them their group project is due next Monday.

Assessments
In-Class Essay Exam for World War 2
World War 2 In Class Essay Prompt

Please choose one of the two sets of questions below. There is no required page
minimum, but use as much space as you need to support your arguments and claims. You will be
graded on a rubric. The questions are:
Did Germany's geographic location assist them in controlling Europe or hinder them?
Why did the Allies eventually defeat Germany and the Axis powers? What significant events
lead up to Germany's defeat?
What are the ideals of isolationism and neutrality? Were the nations who claimed to be
isolationists or neutral really what they claimed? If they weren't, what were they then? Do these
ideologies often pair up with other ideologies? If so, which ones and why?
Remember, choose one and being writing.

Name______________________

Ideologies Worksheet

1. Isolationism

What are its main tenants?

What nation followed it during World War 2? Why?

Is it a government type? Or does it need to be paired with another


ideology? If so, name an ideology it has existed with.

2. Neutrality

What are its main tenants?

What nations followed it in World War 2? Why?

Is it a government type? Or does it need to be paired with another


ideology? If so, name an ideology it has existed with.

3. Communism

What are its main tenants?

What nations followed it in World War 2? Why?

Is it a government type? Or does it need to be paired with another


ideology? If so, name an ideology it has existed with.

4. Fascism

What are its main tenants?

What nations followed it in World War 2? Why?

Is it a government type? Or does it need to be paired with another


ideology? If so, name an ideology it has existed with.

5. Totalitarianism

What are its main tenants?

What nations followed it in World War 2? Why?

Is it a government type? Or does it need to be paired with another


ideology? If so, name an ideology it has existed with.

6. Democracy

What are its main tenants?

What nations followed it in World War 2? Why?

Is it a government type? Or does it need to be paired with another ideology?


If so, name an ideology it has existed with.

IDEAS

The essay is clear and


focused, using many
ideas to support the
argument.

The essay is fairly


focused and
contains a fair
amount of ideas and
examples to support
their argument.

The essay is
adequately focused,
with a few ideas and
examples to support
their argument.

The essay is
barely focused,
with very few,
very vague
examples to
support their

Essay lacks focus


entirely. Next to no
examples or ideas to
support your
argument.

argument.

ORGANIZAT
ION

STYLE

CONVENTIO
NS

The organization of
the paper is excellent.
All the ideas and
examples fit together
perfectly.

The organization is
good, and their
ideas and examples
fit together nicely.

The organization is
mediocre, with some
organization to the
ideas and examples.

The
organization is
rigid or just
poor, very little
organization
when it comes
to ideas and
examples.

Essay has very little


evidence of
organization, ideas
and examples are
either not present or
lost.

Student has excellent


world choice, makes
the essay interesting
to read. Tone of the
essay fits.

Student has good


word choice, and a
appropriate style
and tone for the
paper.

Word choice is
simple or adequate.
Some style is seen,
but not much.

Word choice is
poor, tone and
style do not
match that
essay.

Word choice is very


poor here, tone and
style cause confusion
when reading the
papers.

The student has full


control of the English
language with no
mistakes to be found.

The student has a


good grasp on the
English language
and has little to no
mistakes.

The students has


adequate control
over the English
language. Has some
mistakes, but aren't
as distracting.

The student's
grammar is
poor. Many
mistakes
throughout the
paper that
serve as a
distraction.

Grammar is very
poor. Student shows
very little to no
understanding of the
rules of the English
language.

What do you know about the Holocaust?

What I now know after listening to the


lesson and watching the video.

What are your feelings on the Holocaust? Why would they do this to civilians?

What I know about causes of World War 2

What I now know after listening to the


lesson.

Describe two of the causes of World War 2. Which do you think was the most
important or influential? Why?

1.

2.

Sources

"Churchill Decides to Fight On." BBC News. BBC. Web. 28 Apr. 2015.
<http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/events/churchill_decides_to_fight_on>.

"Battle of Britain Day." BBC News. BBC. Web. 28 Apr. 2015.


<http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/events/battle_of_britain_day>.
"Hitler Postpones the Invasion of Britain." BBC News. BBC. Web. 28 Apr. 2015.
<http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/events/hitler_postpones_the_invasion_of_britain>.
"Why Did Hitler Not Attack Switzerland?" Switzerland's Role in World War II. Ed. Markus Jud.
Web. 28 Apr. 2015. <http://history-switzerland.geschichte-schweiz.ch/switzerland-second-worldwar-ii.html>.
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