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The Scripture quotations contained herein are from the Good News Translation 1996, American Bible Society,

used by permission. All rights reserved


Federation items are quoted from the Document de Politique Programme des Jeunes de la Federation Ivorienne du
Scoutisme in Abidjan, Cote dIvoire. Translated by Tyrone LaValley. Used by permission.
Eclaireures and Ecalireuses Unioniste items are quoted from Projet Pedagogique des Branches Eclaireurs et
Eclaireuses Unionistes de Cote dIvoire. Translated by Tyrone LaValley. Used by permission.
Scouting Mission Partner Guide (English Edition)
Copyright 2015 by Tyrone L. LaValley
Also published as
Le Guide du Specialiste de Mouvement Civique, Cote dIvoire (French Edition)
Copyright 2015 by Tyrone L. LaValley

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted by
any form or any means electronic, mechanical, photocopy, recording, or any other except for brief quotations
in printed reviews, without the prior permission of the publisher.
Permission is granted to share the free online pdf version with the understanding that the purpose of sharing is to
promote partnerships for this mission.
Cover Design: Tyrone L. LaValley
Interior design: Tyrone L. LaValley

Dont miss the chance for a partnership between Boy Scouts of America units
and units in Cote dIvoire: See the International Opportunities section of this
leaders guide.

Contact Information
Skype VOIP: (912) 480-0444 (from the USA it is like calling
Savannah, GA)
Skype video/voice: tyrone.lavalley
Email: tyronelavalley@gmail.com
Facebook: ty.lavalley and unitedmethodistscoutingcotedivoire
Blog: tyronelavalley.blogspot.com
Donate to the mission: umcmission.org
Advance # 3022028 (salary support)

Contents
International Partnerships ............................................................................................................................ 3
Three Purposes of this Guide ........................................................................................................................ 4
Background ................................................................................................................................................... 4
Introducing the Coordinator ..................................................................................................................... 4
Introducing the Mission ................................................................................................................................ 5
Organization Structure.............................................................................................................................. 5
Uniform ..................................................................................................................................................... 5
Implementation ........................................................................................................................................ 6
Training Objectives ............................................................................................................................... 6
Timeline................................................................................................................................................. 7
Introducing the Organizations ...................................................................................................................... 8
The Aims and Methods and our Duty ....................................................................................................... 9
The Origins of our Organizations ............................................................................................................ 10
United Methodist Church in Cote dIvoire .............................................................................................. 10
First - Do No Harm: Child Safety ................................................................................................................. 11
Leadership/ Teaching Styles ....................................................................................................................... 12
Lesson Planning........................................................................................................................................... 13
Event Planning ............................................................................................................................................ 15
Testimony Development ............................................................................................................................. 17
Evangelism Styles ........................................................................................................................................ 18
Second - Do all the good you can: Spiritual Gifts ........................................................................................ 20
Mission Engagement ................................................................................................................................... 22
What Does Collaboration Look Like? .......................................................................................................... 23
Resources for Collaboration........................................................................................................................ 27
Third - Attend to the Means of Grace - Master Training Plan .................................................................... 32
The 100,000 Souls Mission.......................................................................................................................... 42
Mission Partner Devotional ........................................................................................................................ 43

International Partnerships
One of the goals set by the General Board of Global Ministries of the United Methodist Church and the
United Methodist Church Cote dIvoire is to form partnerships with churches and Scouting units in the
United States, Europe, and Cote dIvoire. Connecting the churches and the Scouts through various
means strengthens our connectional structure. This may be done through several ways.

Partner Units:

Contact Tyrone LaValley, the coordinator of youth serving


civic movements for the United Methodist Church Cote dIvoire, by email:
tyronelavalley@gmail.com. He will match an Ivorian unit to a unit in the Boy
Scouts of America (BSA) from the USA or Europe. Scouts will then be able to stay
connected through Facebook and other social media in accordance with Cyber
Chip requirements. Imagine the excitement as both groups share what they are
doing through service projects and special events like camporees. Both units will be emailed a poster
that includes a unit photos and Troop/Pack/Company locations on a map.

Requirements for the Scouting Mission Partner Patch:

Read the Scouting Specialist Guide (French) or Scouting for Missions Guide (English)
Register your unit as a partner unit
Share your Christian faith story with someone
Promote one of the mission engagement projects at church or with your unit.

JOTI: The Jamboree on the Internet is held every October through the International Division of the
BSA. A structure is established to communicate by chat sessions with groups
from all around the world. This is a good day to schedule a lock-in and share
the experience with your partner unit through Skype. Times and Skype
addresses will have to be coordinated prior to the actual date. For more
information go to: http://www.scouting.org/joti.aspx

Africa Region Jamboree 2016: will be held in Yamoussoukro, Cote


dIvoire from July 28 August 8, 2016. This is a World Organization of the Scouting
Movement event. Significant planning will go into this event so begin early.

Requirements for the Spcialiste Patch:


Complete safe sanctuaries or youth protection training
Complete Mission Partner requirements (above).
This does not qualify for the adult religious square knot in the BSA.
This is a United Methodist Church Cote dIvoire Annual Conference
award not a General Agency or BSA award.

Three Purposes of this Guide


1.

To provide a single point of reference for the collaboration between the Boys and Girls Brigades
and the Eclaireures et Eclaireuses Unionistes, within the United Methodist Church of Cote
dIvoire.
2. To encourage mission partners in the United Methodist Church worldwide.
3. To serve as a model for collaboration when this missionary assignment is replicated in other
countries.

Background
Both movements have served the United Methodist Church Cote dIvoire within their local
congregations. This will continue. The local units are an important part of the congregations they serve.
Discipleship will continue at the local church level, according to the master training plan in the back of
this guide.
Both movements have been called upon to serve at district and conference events. Although these
movements served with distinction, they have yet to work together as one national youth serving civic
movement.
On January 14, 2015, Bishop Benjamin BONI declared to the people gathered for the New Year worship
service that the Boys and Girls Brigades and the Eclaireures et Eclaireuses would work together as one
movement within the United Methodist Church Cote dIvoire. The Secretary General for the Conference
Grand Reverend BODJE presented GBGM Missionary Tyrone LaVALLEY as the coordinator for youth
serving civic movements in the United Methodist Church Cote dIvoire.

Introducing the Coordinator


Tyrone LaVALLEY is a missionary with the General Board of Global Ministries (GBGM) of the United
Methodist Church. He is from the state of Georgia in the United States. The United Methodist Church
Cote dIvoire requested the creation of this missionary assignment through GBGM in 2013. The GBGM
Cabinet approved the position and began their search for the best candidate for this position. Tyrone
entered this process on 5 March 2014. He was approved as a candidate and was commissioned on 16
November 2014 in Quito, Ecuador. His commission is: Take the Gospel of Jesus Christ into all the
world. He arrived in Cote dIvoire on 5 January 2015. This is the first missionary assignment in the
world that focuses on Scouting and other youth serving civic movements.
Tyrone has over 20 years of church experience working with children and youth. He served the local
church full time for 14 years and was a professional District Scout Executive serving two districts in the
Georgia-Carolina Council, BSA. He is certified in Christian Education through the General Board of
Higher Education and Ministry. He is a certified Scouting Ministry Specialist with the General
Commission on United Methodist Men. He is a recipient of the Silver Torch Award. This is the premier
award for the United Methodist Church for work with children and youth. Tyrone also received the BSA
Heroism award for saving two people from drowning in a rip current.

Introducing the Mission


The Boys and Girls Brigades and the Eclaireurs et Eclaireuses Unionistes Cote dIvoire will collaborate for
spiritual formation, testimony training, and mission engagement for the growth of the United Methodist
Church Cote dIvoire and the spiritual growth of its members.

Organization Structure
Collaboration does not mean fusion. The
two organizations will remain as separate
organizations within their local churches. A
third organization overseeing the two
existing organizations will not be needed.
Both organizations will continue to be
responsible to the United Methodist
Church of Cote dIvoire. This organization
chart illustrates how the two organizations
relate to the United Methodist Church Cote
dIvoire and their parent organizations.

Uniform
Both Organizations will be expected to conform to a
single uniform. This promotes unity in the movement
and reflects our collaboration to the observers. Since
both groups already wear dark blue pants and skirts,
the bottom half of the uniform will not change. The
top half of the uniform will be a button up the front
shirt (color to be determined). The Brigades may wear
their hats, and the EEUCI may wear their scarves.
There will be a tee shirt for less formal occasions, such
as work details.
LEglise Methodiste Unie Cote DIvoire
Nous Collaborons Ensemble

Implementation
There are over 3,500 youth and children involved in the youth serving civic movements in the United
Methodist Church Cote dIvoire. The best way to implement this plan is to train the trainers. The
Coordinator will travel to the districts and train the Adult Cadre of the units who will in turn, train the
children and youth in their units. This training is not for youth and children. There will be one training
session per district. In some rare cases, districts may be combined. The BGB and EEUCI will collaborate
together during these training sessions. The following diagram reflects the distribution of units in Cote
dIvoire as of April 2015.

Training Objectives
Cadre completing this training will be awarded the Specialist Brevet
which is worn under their organizations emblem (see uniform
diagram). This is similar to the Trained award in the BSA
Cadre completing this training will understand:

how the two organizations work together


how to protect the youth
how to identify their leadership and evangelism styles
How to serve the church in missions or vocation
how to plan meetings and events
how to organize lesson plans in a strategic manner

Timeline

2015

2016
Invite the Group
to decide the
District Growth
Plan
Finalize District
Growth Plan

The Bishop announced the decision


14 January 2015

The National Leadership sold the decision


18 February 2015

The
Community
should be
ready to
Collaborate
on its own

Grand Ceremony

The Coordinator clarified the decision


21 February Thinking Day
28 February Chef: Federation
Ivorian du Scoutisme
03 March EEUCI
10 March BGB
Seminar to put the program in place and
invite suggestions
14-15 March
Ensignia
Symbols
Uniform
Pedagogie
Final Ratification and Implementation
Plan by District
3-5 July Seminaire Scientifique
Execute the Implementation Plan (together)
September 2015-February 2016

2017

DATE?

Mission and
Service

Continue
Mission and
Service

Execute District
Growth Plan

Present our work to the


African Region Jamboree
29 July 8
August

Continue
District
Growth Plan

This situation leadership model has been around


since the 1990s. As the team grows in proficiency the
leader turns over more control to the group. The
leaders style changes with the situation. The leader
changes focus as the team develops.

Introducing the Organizations


The best place to start is to look at what we have in common as we share a mutual mission:
Both expect a duty to God, to
others, and to their self.
Both serve the community
where they live and worship.
Both teach the Bible to help
each other grow in wisdom,
stature, and favor with God and
each other.
Both are part of the United
Methodist Connection.

Eclaireures et Eclaireuses Motto: Toujour Prt (Always Ready).

Branche Jaune (Louvettes) for 8-11 years.

Branche Vert (Eclaireures) for 12-14 years.


Branche Orange (Pioneers) for 15-17 years.
Branche Rouge (Routiers) for 18-20 years.

Boy and Girls Brigade Motto: Sure and Steadfast in Jesus Christ from Hebrews 6:19 We have this
as a sure and steadfast anchor for the soul, a hope that enters into the inner shrine behind the curtain.
The four Age Groups are combined in one company. The Companies and Squads are led by the Seniors.
The four age groups are:

Anchors for 5-8 years.


Juniors for 8-14 years.
Company for 14-18 years.
Seniors for 18 years and older.

The Aims and Methods and our Duty


Aims of Scouting
Ecalaireures et Eclaireuses Unionist
Spiritual Formation
Character Formation
Physical Formation
Service to Neighbor
Manual Skills

Brigades and Girls Brigade


Balance and Growth in 4 area:
Physical
Social
Mental
Religious
The Bible: Luke 2:52
Wisdom
Stature
Favor with God
Favor with Humanity

Boy Scouts of America


Character
Citizenship
Fitness

Methods of Scouting
Ecalaireures et Eclaireuses Unionist
Education for Action
Small Groups
Personal Discovery
Commitment to the values of the Scout
Oath and Law
Uniform and Advancement
Life in the Outdoors
Interaction with Adults
Boy Scouts of America
Patrols
Ideals (Scout Oath and Law)
Outdoor Program
Advancement
Association with Adults
Personal Growth
Leadership Development
Uniform

Brigades and Girls Brigade


Small Groups
Leadership
Uniform
Commitment to the Four Traits
Adult Interaction

The Bible: Acts 2:43-48


Fellowship
Mission
Service
Worship
Prayer
Small Groups
Evangelism

Duty
Ecalaireures et Eclaireuses Unionist
Duty to God
Duty to Others
Duty to Self
Boy Scouts of America
Duty to God
Duty to Others
Duty to Self

Brigades and Girls Brigade


4 Traits:
Obedience
Reverence
Discipline
Self Respect
The Bible: Luke 10:27
Love the Lord your God with all your heart, soul,
strength, and mind
Love your neighbor
As you love yourself

The Origins of our Organizations


The Boys Brigade began in 1883 in Glasgow, Scotland, by Sir William Alexander
Smith, as part of a disciplined Sunday school movement. Participants did
physical training and practiced military discipline. They had significant spiritual
training. The goal was to make soldiers for Christ and good citizens. The girls
were added later to make it a coed program and is now called the Boys and
Girls Brigades in Cote dIvoire.
The Scouting movement began in 1908 in Europe
through Lord Robert S. S. Baden-Powell of England.
For a short period of time there were Boys Brigade Scouts. It was short lived.
By 1909 they decided to continue as separate organizations. The two men
remained friends. The French adopted the Scouting program in 1911. The
French Protestant Church Scouts were called Eclaireures Unionistes (those who
carry the light into the world).

United Methodist Church in Cote dIvoire


The Origins of the United Methodist Church of Cote dIvoire date back to 1914
when the Prophet William Wade Harris entered Cote dIvoire from Liberia to
preach the Message of Jesus Christ. He was a member of the American
Protestant Episcopal Mission with an extensive background in the Methodist
Church. He would enter a village, shake his gourd rattle and preach when
enough people gathered. He told them to abandon their traditional African
religions and embrace the worship of the one true God through salvation in Jesus
Christ. He would place the Bible on their heads as if asking if they were ready to
accept salvation. Once the message was accepted, and people gave their lives to Christ, he would
immediately baptize them with water from his gourd cup. Not desiring to start his own church, he sent
them to existing churches or directed them to build their own house of prayer until teachers could come
and lead them further.
The Methodist Church reaped the harvest set out by Harris ten years earlier. Through the efforts of
William Platt, the Methodist Church was established in 1924. By 1925 the French Protestant Church
sent missionaries to Cote dIvoire to also spread the Gospel. The Church in Cote dIvoire received full
autonomy from the Methodist Church of England in 1985 becoming the Protest Methodist Church. In
2004 the church joined the United Methodist Churchs connection as a Provisional Annual Conference.
The 2008 General Conference confirmed Cote dIvoire as an Episcopal Area of the United Methodist
Church.
The Scouting movement in Cote dIvoire has its origins in the French Protestant Church, while the
Brigades have their origins in the British Methodist Church
If you are reading this, then you have started towards the mission of collaboration. It is good to
remember that we are all children of God that bear Gods image. Our mission to all of humanity is to
build up the image of God in each other. Your setting of Church, Sunday school, Scouts, or Brigades are
all opportunities to build up the image of God in others. The remainder of this leaders guide will equip
you to build up other people.
10

First - Do No Harm: Child Safety


John Wesley had three rules for membership in the Holy Clubs:
First: do no harm
Second: do all the good you can
Third: pay attention to the ordinances of God
The United Methodist Church has a program called Safe Sanctuaries. Like the Boy Scouts of
Americas Youth Protection, it is designed to ensure safety of our children and youth and protect
innocent adults from unfounded allegations. The programs put up barriers to abuse.

If you work with children and youth, you must follow these guidelines:
All volunteers must be cleared through background checks and references before working with
children and youth. In Cote dIvoire this is a local church responsibility.
At least two trained adults must be present.
Married couples count as one person if working together.
No one-on-one contact between adults and youth.
If both genders are included, then there must be a trained male and trained female leader
present.
Adults will not share a tent, a bed, or a bed with youth or children.
There are no secrets or secret societies.
All activities must be age appropriate.

Reporting Procedures:
In the event that an adult is accused of inappropriate behavior, the following guidelines will be
followed:
The child will be placed in a safe location. If the child is in danger then the police or medical
people will be called.
The adult will be removed from the situation with instructions to not approach the child or the
family of the child.
The conference office will be notified immediately. The point of contact for the Conference is:
____________________________, phone number: ______________________________.
Members of the Conference Response team will conduct an investigation and if necessary notify
the police.
The conference Spokesperson is the only person authorized to speak to the press about the
incident.
The reason for these procedures is to protect the dignity of the child. It assumes innocence until
proven guilty.

11

Leadership/ Teaching Styles


Congratulations! You are a leader of youth and children. This is a position of trust. This model is based
on a situational leadership model that has been around since the 1990s. It is also based on the
EDGE method used in the Boy Scouts of America. The leadership style changes as the team becomes
more developed and performance improves. The leader moves through four phases: directing coaching,
aiding, and collaborating.
Teaching is a form of classroom leadership. The teaching style also changes with the students growth.
You begin by telling, then demonstrating. As the students become more familiar, you help each other
on the task together. Finally you observe as the student works. You will discover that your style must
change for every situation.

The teacher begins the lesson by telling the students about the subject or task. The teacher gives
specific directives with little input from others when the training begins. This is a directive approach to
leadership.
As the students develop and understanding improves they are given a demonstration. Because they
heard it first, they can anticipate the context of the demonstration. The director has turned into a
coach. The people the coach supervises are gaining in understanding. They coach spends time and
materials to help them succeed. This is the coaching style of leadership.
The next step is to allow the students to work alongside the teacher. It becomes a step by step
approach to learning together. The coach has joined the team as a team member yet still acts like the
team captain. The team captain spends a lot of time equipping the members to grow. This is the joining
style of leadership.
By this time the students have learned the task. The teacher gives them a chance to complete the task
on their own. The teacher observes the students and is ready to assist when needed. This is the
collaboration style of leadership.

12

Lesson Planning
Lesson Title: Potable Water
Scripture: Exodus 15:22-27
Objectives:
Understand that God provides clean water through Gods people
Understand the basics of safe drinking water.
Demonstrate how to install, operate, and maintain a Sawyer Water
Purification System.
Material Needed
1 plastic bucket with lid
Sawyer .1 micron filter kit
Drill
Water Source

Standard Number
M.2
Evaluation
+ or + or + or Classroom
Environment
Outdoors

Tell:
Moses and the people escaped from slavery in Egypt and needed a source of clean water.
They arrived at the first camp only to discover that the water was not potable. God
created a way for the water to be safe. As people of God we have to believe that God can
use modern technology and Christians that care about others to provide clean drinking
water.
Surface water that has not been filtered through several meters of sand may not be safe
to drink. Water in a well that is not sealed may have contamination from the surface.
One way to make the water safe is to boil it for at least one minute at a full boil.
The .1 micron filter cleans the water by trapping the bacteria (E-coli, Cholera, and
Typhoid) that it is the water. The bad things in the water are too large to pass through the
membrane. The water that passes through is 99.9998% safe to drink.
Demonstrate:
Install: Mark a spot 3 cm from the bottom of the bucket and use the hole cutter to cut the
hole. Clean out the hole and bucket of debris. Install the connector, hose, and filter.
Operate: Hang the filter above the water line. Fill the bucket full of water from any water
source. Lower the filter below the water line and allow the water to flow into a clean
container.
Maintain: Use the backwash syringe to clean the filter when the rate of flow decreases. If
maintained properly, the filter will last for 4 million liters of water at a rate of 680 liters in
a 24 hour period.
Aid:
Work together to prefabricate the buckets before going to the sites. Also work together
to practice operating and backwashing the filter.
Observe:
Listen as the student talks you through the process of operating and maintaining the
device.

13

A lesson plan must have a title. It makes it easier to track and sets the expectation of the students
A lesson plan must have a connection to Scriptures.
A lesson plan must be part of the Master Training Plan as indicated by its Standard number.
A lesson plan must have objectives. This allows for measuring success of the class time.
A lesson plan must take into consideration the classroom environment.
Is it an indoor space or an outdoor space?
Is there adequate room for students to participate?
Are the students in rows, small groups, or at work stations?
A lesson plan must have a list of materiel needed for a successful class time.

Four Phases of the Lesson:


Tell:
o

In Matthew 5-7, Jesus spent a lot of time telling the gathered crowd what was expected.
We know this as the Sermon on the Mount.
Demonstrate:
o In Matthew 8-9, Jesus heals the sick and lame, calms a storm, and casts out demons. He
did this in the presence of many people.
Aid:
o In Matthew 10, Jesus sends the 12 Apostles to go into the towns to do what he had
been doing in Matthew 8-9. He was not physically with them, but he was surely aiding
their actions.
Observe
o In Matthew 14:13-21, Jesus sends the Apostles into the crowd with the loaves of bread
and fish that he consecrated. He sent them with what appeared to be a limited supply.
He observed as they served food to everyone.
A Lesson plan must have an evaluation so that you can evaluate if the training objectives were
completed. This can be done by asking questions, observing.

14

Event Planning
Event Name: Seminaire Scientifique
Date/ Time: 3 July at 1500 to 5 July 1400
Location: Cocody-Angre, 8e Tranche
Cite Wedouwel, Villa 81
Attendees
Chaplain, youth and civic movements
Coordinator, youth civic movements
Le President de la Juenesse
BGB (7 Adult Leaders)
EEUCI (7 Adult Leaders)

Contact Information for location


Tyrone LaValley
(225) 45.82.33.36
tyronelavalley@gmail.com
Event Leadership
Director Rev. Catherine ACHY
Organizer Tyrone LAVALLEY
Secretary (BGB)
Treasurer (EEUCI)
Spiritual Formation (BGB)
Meals (EEUCI)
Logistics (At the Mission House)

Objectives
Approve the Manual
Approve Implementation Plan by District
Set a 2016 date for the Grand Ceremony
Set a 2016 date for the District Growth Conference
Itinerary
03 July Arrival and welcome, dinner, worship
04 July Workshops
Morning - Manual
Afternoon Manual
Evening District Implementation Plan
05 July Date for Grand Ceremony, Date for District Growth Conference, Worship
Detailed itinerary will be provided to all participants upon arrival.
Logistics
Name of contact
Phone
Email
Transportation
# seats 0
Housing

Evaluation
+ or
+ or
+ or
+ or

Cost
Personal
Cost
0F CFA

Rooms 2
Toilets 4
Showers - 4
Water filtered or
bottled
Food
Breakfast X2
Lunch X2
Dinner X2
Classrooms 2
17 Chairs and 4
tables Needed
Administrative

80,000F CFA

20,000F CFA

15

Proper planning keeps the event safe and free of distractions. Having a plan also lowers the cost of the
event, because you are able to consider other options early in the process. Having a plan gives other
people an opportunity to join you in the event. Each person takes their part of the plan and gives it the
attention that is needed. Going to an event that is disorganized is not fun.
An event should have an Event Name. This makes it easier to track and sets the expectation by
attendees.
An event needs a date, time and location that has been reserved for this event. Contact information for
the location is important.
A general list of attendees allows for the rest of the logistics team to organize for the size of the event.
It also sets the expectation for the type of group, (children, youth, or adults).
The leadership for this event must be listed. They should be notified of their responsibilities early in the
process and held accountable for their results.
The event plan must list objectives. This ensures focus and provides a means of evaluating the success
of the event.
The itinerary in the event plan should be strong. If we do not follow a schedule then other things are
affected (food, sleep, hygiene ).
Logistics require special attention by specific leaders responsible for the proper execution.
Transportation should be safe, reliable, and on time. The number of people riding in the vehicle should
not exceed the number of seats. Consider the driver when counting seats.
Housing should be safe and adequate for the group you have at the event. The United Methodist
Church has strict guidelines when it comes to youth protection. Male and female participants should be
housed in separate rooms. Adults and youth/ children should be housed in separate rooms. Showers
and toilets with doors should be provided for privacy. Access to clean drinking water in mandatory.
Food that is nutritious, safe, and on time will make participants very happy. Food not prepared properly
can ruin an event.
Classrooms, meeting space, and worship space should be coordinated with the host location.
In Matthew 25:1-13 Jesus uses a parable to remind people to be ready.
In Matthew 25:14-30 Jesus uses a parable to remind people to work hard and smart.
In Matthew 25:31-46 Jesus uses a parable for a mission engagement focus:
Feed the hungry
Give water to the thirsty
Welcome strangers
Clothe the naked
Care for the sick
Visit the prisoners
Proper planning for spiritual formation, evangelism, and mission ensures that we are ready. It ensures
we are working hard and smart. It ensures that we are doing the right thing as we engage in missions.
16

Testimony Development
Sharing the story of the faith is complicated if you do not know where to begin.
The tool illustrated below is here to help you develop an outline for
understanding the Good News of Jesus Christ. It should not be used as the
only way to share the Good News, but it is a helpful tool. Each color and
symbol has a meaning that is easy to remember. Color each section according
to its designated color. Take a few minutes and practice sharing your faith
story with someone.

If you are hearing this Good News for the first time and have not asked Jesus to be Lord and Savior of
your life, than please stop everything you are doing and pray with someone now! Your eternal salvation
depends on it!
This Ivorian game is called
Awal. It is similar to the Game
Mancala. Each hole begins
with 4 beans. The board can be
painted to coordinate the
colors of the Gospel message
above. You may share the
Gospel when someone asks.

17

Evangelism Styles
In this section, we will identify 16 evangelism styles. Every Christian is called to share the Good News of
Jesus Christ to the world. How we do it is a matter of personal evangelism style and opportunity.
Discovering your personal evangelism style is as simple as asking four questions. Discovering the
opportunity is a spiritual practice of listening to the call of the Holy Spirit on your heart. Let us begin:

Where do you prefer to share your testimony: in public or in private? Circle the word in the
diagram.
When do you prefer to share your testimony: on your own initiative or by invitation of others?
Circle the word in the diagram.

The quadrant (A, B, C, or D) where the two intersect is the place where you will begin the next two
questions.

What do you prefer to share: explain the meaning behind the testimony or simply give your
testimony? Circle the word in your quadrant.
How do you prefer to share your testimony: by using words or using your actions? Circle the
word in your quadrant.

The sub quadrant where the two words intersect is your preferred evangelism style.
My preferred Evangelism Style is: ___ --- ____

18

STOP:
DO NOT READ THIS PAGE UNTIL YOU COMPLETED THE EXERCISE ON THE PREVIOUS PAGE

We will now explain the quadrants and sub-quadrants on the previous page. The letter A, B, C, or D is
the preferred role you assume when sharing your faith story. The number 1, 2, 3, or 4 is the action verb
that you employ to fulfil that role.
For example: If you are an A-1 then you assume the role of pastor and use speaking as your method of
communication. An example from the Bible is Peter at Pentecost. So many times evangelism is
assumed to be the job of the preacher. This is only one of sixteen ways of sharing your faith story. A
friend waiting for another friend to invite them to share their faith story is just as valid. A person with a
preferred style of D-3 would be a friend that uses their words to tell their faith story, but waits for an
invitation in a private setting.
A.

Pastor
1. Speak: Peter at Pentecost (Acts 2)
2. Serve: Lydia and her whole house (Act 16:11-15)
3. Encourage: Zechariahs Prophesy (Luke1:67-80)
4. Help: Zacchaeus (Luke 19:1-10)
B. Teacher:
1. Speak: Paul in Athens (Acts 17:16-34)
2. Serve: The one leper who returned (Luke 17:11-19)
3. Encourage: Blind Man (John 9)
4. Help: Levis (aka Matthew) dinner party (Mark 2:13-17)
C. Mentor:
1. Speak: Priscilla and Aquila to Apollos (Acts 18:24-28)
2. Serve: Andrew to Simon and Philip to Nathanael (John 1:43-51)
3. Encourage: John the Baptist to Andrew (John 1:29-34)
4. Help: Joseph of Arimathea (Luke 23:50-56)
D. Friend:
1. Speak: Philip and the Ethiopian (Acts 8:26-40)
2. Serve: Shepherds of Bethlehem (Luke 2:8-20)
3. Encourage: Barnabas (Act 9:26-31)
4. Help: Ananias to Saul (Acts 9:10-19)
Each one of these styles will be explored in the lesson plan section of this leaders guide.

19

Second - Do all the good you can: Spiritual Gifts

Prophesy
Teaching

Rom
12
X
X

Serving

Exhortation

Giving
Giving Aid

X
X

Compassion

Cor
12
X
X

Healing

Miracles

Tongues
(Speak)
Tongues
(Interpret)

Wisdom

Knowledge
Faith
Discernment
Apostleship

X
X
X
X

Helping
Administration
Evangelism
Shepherding

X
X

Eph
4
X
X

X
X

Inspired Speaking on behalf of God. Light for the present.


Impart truth to others in a relevant way so the Gospel can
be understood and applied to life.
One who serves. Task oriented ministry to the
community.
Help others develop ways of growing spiritually.
Comforter Encourager
God given capacity to give materially for Gods work.
See the need, assume leadership to deliver aid to meet
needs.
Special working of Gods love enabling one to feel mercy
for another.
Places faith in Gods power to heal then trusts the results
to God. Instrument of Gods healing.
Each one unique as a need arises. Greatest miracle is
transformation of a persons life not the physical act.
Utterance of a prayer in a language known or unknown to
humans for prayer, praise, or thanksgiving.
Translate or interpret the utterance of tongues for the
purpose of refocusing the attention from the person to
God.
Application of a spiritual truth in a way that others know a
truth has been spoken.
Inspired insight. Perceive a fact as God sees it.
Belief in God for mighty results.
The ability to discern a spirit as divine, human, or demonic.
Introduce the Gospel to another culture or race then
nurture the converts in Christian discipleship.
Support person. See the needs of others and respond.
Lead in matters of church organization and government.
Proclaim the Good News!
Feed, guide, and minister to a community of Christians.

We serve best when we serve according to the spiritual gifts that God gives us. The moment
we accept Jesus Christ and are baptized into the faith, the Holy Spirit of God takes up residence
in our being and gives us a purpose (calling) in life. With this call is the free gift from God to
exercise this call. God gives us all spiritual gifts. They must be exercised in community. All gifts
are equal in value and part of the functioning of the Body of Christ.

20

People become frustrated in ministry when they serve outside of their gift area for extended
time. For example: people who have the gift of helping like to work in the background. They
may choose to teach, because they want to help. They realize that they are not called to teach
nor are they gifted in teaching. We all have to serve outside of our call for short periods,
because work still needs to be done, but long term should be according to our gifts and call.
The spiritual gifts may be found in Romans 12, 1 Corinthians 12, and Ephesians 4. Different
versions of the Bible use different names, but this is the basic understanding.
There are spiritual gifts inventories online and entire courses you can take to determine your
gifts. I found the best way to determine your gifts is to share in a small group of people who
really know you.
Have several people read the above tables and secretly list your top three spiritual gifts on a
piece of paper.
When you get your papers back give each one a value:
o #1=3 points
o #2=2 points,
o #3=1 point.
Add them all up and this is how others see your gifts.
Another way to determine your gifts is to ask yourself:
o
o
o
o

Where do I spend my time?


Where do I spend my money?
What do I do for fun?
If money was not important, what would I be doing?

Go back to your Evangelism style. How does this fit into your spiritual gifts?
Pray for guidance from Gods Holy Spirit. Claim the gift and show your thankfulness to God by
serving according to your gifts.

21

Mission Engagement
The Church is the Body of Christ and is
responsible to serve Jesus Christ by serving in
the world. There are many needs in this
world. As Scouts we are called to help other
people. As Christians we are called to help
other people in the name of Jesus Christ.
The Apostle James wrote in his Epistle: Faith
without works is dead. We are saved by the
grace of God through our faith in Jesus
Christ. We exercise our faith by the good
works that we do in the name of Jesus Christ.
The two cannot be separated. Our youth
serving civic movements are organized for
service.
The United Methodist Church Cote dIvoire is
one of the fastest growing annual
conferences in the world. The growth of the
conference requires each person that is able
to assist in building up the church and caring
for its people. Each person is also expected
to share their faith as they serve in the
villages and the cities. Members will be trained on their specific task before going out to serve.
These mission opportunities are best completed when grouped together with other events. For
example: A group of Scouts and Brigades may be working on building one of the 100 Temples. Other
groups will also be present to distribute nets and water purification systems in the village. They would
use the opportunity to train people on the correct employment of nets and water systems while sharing
their faith story. Another group could set up a learning center for Ebola awareness.
The United Methodist School System in Cote dIvoire has 18,000 students. Many students are members
of the Scouts or the Brigades. These are excellent places to set up a day of training as classes rotate
through a series of learning stations to learn about so many of these items.
Partnerships exist throughout our United Methodist Connectional structure and Scouting connection to
provide some resources for these events. Resources also exist within the structures of the United
Methodist Church Cote dIvoire. As leaders we must coordinate these resources. Please see the
Resources section for these connections.

22

What Does Collaboration Look Like?


Collaboration at District and Conference Events:

This model is the most widely used in the United Methodist Church Cote dIvoire. Scouts and Brigades
are called upon to provide the welcome to dignitaries. In most cases it is one group or the other group.
Large Annual Conference events draw both groups. Collaboration should be the model for every event.
The companies and Troops may line up according to their specific groups. This reinforces the idea that
the two groups are separate entities. The teams that are formed for the temporary service of security,
ushers, and stewards should consist of equal numbers of Brigades and Scouts. This reinforces the idea
that the two groups work together for service. The color guard should also be a joint endeavor.

23

Collaboration at School:

The United Methodist Churches in Cote dIvoire that have a youth serving civic movement unit have
either a Scout Troop or a Company of the Boys Brigade. No church has both. Many students in the
United Methodist School system belong to Brigades or Scouts. This makes the school system an
excellent place to collaborate in service and mission. Classmates that belong to these two groups can
work together to research, prepare, practice, and deliver a presentation to their classmates. It would be
best to do this all in one day for their school. The unit leader can coordinate with the headmaster of the
school to set up a day of Peer learning. Students can rotate between stations.

24

Collaboration at Training Events:

Small groups are the best places to learn and meet people on a more personal level. When Scouts and
Brigades arrive at a training event, they should be given a small group identification badge that lets
them know what Holy Club they are in. This becomes their small group for all sessions. It does not
take long to set up a sense of belonging in the new group.
The Church group they belong to is important also. For this reason, events should include time for the
church group leaders to go over the events of the day with their people. The seeds for many new ideas
will be planted at these events. Scheduling Church group time helps the leader know what seeds found
fertile ground and can be cultivated at home.

25

Collaboration at the Mission Site:

This diagram shows a mission site where a combined group of Scouts and Brigades are working together
to build a Temple in a village. While a large group works side by side at the construction site, other
teams of Scouts and Brigades rotate through different parts of the village teaching classes to small
groups of people. These classes would be the same classes taught in the school rotation model.
At night the group can lead a parade of torches through the village and lead a worship outside the
construction area. If security permits, they could resume their daytime post and lead small group
prayers and hymn singing.

26

Resources for Collaboration


Messengers of Peace:
From Scout.org webpage:
Throughout its history, Scouting has inspired its millions of members to
make a difference applying their leadership to creating a better world.
Scouts do some amazing things, from simple community actions to
large-scale projects such as preventing bullying in schools in the UK,
helping street gangs in El Salvador to reduce violence, cleaning up a playground in Texas and planting
millions of trees all over Africa. In some of the most difficult conflict areas in the world Kashmir,
Israel/Palestine, Rwanda/Burundi and Northern Ireland, to name a few Scouts are coming together in
local communities to make a difference. Adding all this together Scouts, as part of a global Movement,
are making the world a more peaceful place.
Observing this excellent work, the King of Saudi Arabia, King Abdullah and the King of Sweden, King Carl
Gustaf came together to recognise Scouts as Messengers of Peace. They believe that the work Scouts
are doing is so impressive, and that Scouting needs to be recognized for its contribution to world peace,
and be supported to do even more.
World Scoutings Messengers of Peace Initiative, launched by the World Scout Committee in 2011, aims
to inspire the millions of Scouts who are doing amazing things in their local communities to tell the
world about it, and thus inspire other Scouts to do even more. Any Scout project that brings a positive
change in a community - its health, environment, social circumstances, safety or addresses conflict is a
Messengers of Peace project.
United Methodist Church General Agency Connection:
The General Board of Church and Society:
United Methodist Church Cote dIvoire Connection:
Conseil Eglise et Societe
Scouting Connection:
www.Scout.org
https://www.facebook.com/MessagersDeLaPaixDeCoteDivoire
http://www.scouting.org/messengersofpeace.aspx

27

Trees for the World:


In 2014, 15,000 Scouts, in 23 countries, planted 56,000
trees as part of the Messengers of Peace Program: Trees
for the World. 5,000 were planted in Cote dIvoire
Tentative Goal for United Methodist Scouting in Cote
dIvoire is 1,000 Trees
Join us in 2015 as we work together to restore Gods
creation, one tree at a time

United Methodist Church General Agency Connection:


Church and Society
United Methodist Church Cote dIvoire Connection:
Conseil Eglise et Societe (Church and Society) hosts an Environmental Day the first week in June
each year.
Scouting Connection:
http://scout.org/node/60691
https://www.facebook.com/TreesForTheWorld

28

Clean Drinking Water:


The

Village Well is only 20 feet deep.


The handheld Sawyer-Mini Water Filter provides clean drinking water to individuals.
Sawyer International has a program to provide Sawyer Point ONE kits with filters that filter up to 170
gallons (680 liters) of water a day and a lifetime of a million gallons. (buckets not included).
Training will be provided to the villages by Scouts and the Boys and Girls Brigades.
https://sawyer.com/international/products/sawyer-pointone-filter-with-bucket-adapter-kit-3-ft-hose
United Methodist Church General Agency Connection:
Global Health
United Methodist Church Cote dIvoire Connection:
United Methodist Women
Scouting Connection:
Service Project

29

The Fight against Ebola

United Methodist Church General Agency Connection:


Global Health
United Methodist Committee on Relief (UMCOR)
United Methodist Communications (UMCOM)
United Methodist Church Cote dIvoire Connection:
Health Council
Editions Kanien (Publisher)
United Methodist Schools
Scouting Connection:
30

The Fight against Malaria

United Methodist Church General Agency Connection:


Global Health
United Methodist Committee on Relief (UMCOR)
United Methodist Communications (UMCOM)
United Methodist Church Cote dIvoire Connection:
Health Council
Editions Kanien (Publisher)
United Methodist Schools
Scouting Connection:
31

Third - Attend to the Means of Grace - Master Training Plan


Le Prix du Cheminement (Pathway Award)
One Pathway with Three Journeys
The Pathways award has three journeys: The spiritual formation
journey, the testimony development journey, and the mission
engagement journey. Scouts need to have a relationship with
Jesus Christ, know how to tell others about the relationship, and
walk the talk.

How to Use this Guide:


The first three tables spell out the requirements for the Pathways
award. Each one is specific to an age group. A child/ youth only
needs to complete the requirements in the table designated for
their age group. The columns to the left let you know where the
requirement originated. The Federation (F) has its requirement
and the Church (C) has theirs for Unionistes and Brigades. Additionally, the missionary nature of
Scouting and the Church expects a practical application of our belief system. To that end, we have
added a mission (M) requirement.

32

The Promise
I Promise to do my best:
To be faithful to God, to my parents, to the law of the pack, and render service to someone every day.
* When an Ivorian Scout (at any age) takes the Promise for the first time, they do it in a Crmonie
dEngagement (ceremony of commitment) in the Church.
To engage in the French language is to commit oneself fully to the task at hand.
The Law of the Pack
The Cub Scout is not listening to others.
The Cub Scout is listening to the Old Wolf.
The Cub Scout thinks first of others.
The Cub Scout opens his or her eyes and ears.
The Cub Scout is always clean.
The Cub Scout always tells the truth.
The Cub Scout is always cheerful.

EEUCI: Yellow Branch Step One

BGB: Anchors

Requirements for 8-9 year old Cubs


F.1 - Explain in your own words what it means to think about others
first
F.2 - Go to church, on a regular basis, for at least a month with your
family or other persons.
C.1 - Learn about the life of Jesus from birth to death.
C.2 - Learn the Lords Prayer
M.1 - Work with other Cubs Scouts to create a display about the
Scouting mission in Cote dIvoire. Display it at your Church.
F=Federation Ivorian du Scoutisme Standard
C=Church Requirements (EEUCI and BGB)
M=Mission Engagement Standard

33

Journey
Testimony Development
Spiritual Formation
Spiritual Formation
Spiritual Formation
Mission Engagement

EEUCI: Yellow Branch Step Two

BGB: Juniors

Requirements for 9-10 year old Cubs


F.3 Continue to attend church for at least two months
F.4 Attend a small group study (ie. Sunday school) and have a good
record of attendance
F.5 Express your understanding of the beauty of nature and your
awareness of the existence of God to grow the flowers and other plants
F.6 Put into practice the teachings of your faith
F.7 Explain the need to protect Gods Creation, in particular Nature.
C.1 and C.2 Complete C.1 and C.2 for 8 year old requirements
C.3 Be familiar with the stories of the New Testament
C.4 Learn Christian Songs
C.5 Learn short prayers
M.2 Choose a mission from our We are Engaged in Missions
Together section. Be creative in how you communicate the needs to
others. Engage in missions with us.
F=Federation Ivorian du Scoutisme Standard
C=Church Requirements (EEUCI and BGB)
M=Mission Engagement Standard

34

Journey
Spiritual Formation
Spiritual Formation
Testimony Development
Mission Engagement
Testimony Development
Spiritual Formation
Spiritual Formation
Spiritual Formation
Spiritual Formation
Mission Engagement

EEUCI: Yellow Branch Step Three

BGB: Juniors

Requirements for 10-11 year old Cubs


F.8 Say a prayer before meals regularly, for at least two months
F.9 Say the Promise and the Law with the Cubmaster and give simple
examples of their application in your daily life.
F.10 Continue to attend religious activities with your family or others.
F.11 Memorize several Bible verses and recite them to your Cubmaster
C.6 Master the Lords Prayer
C.7 Know the large steps of Jesus ministry
C.8 Have the aptitude to pray for subjects
C.9 Know the major events in Genesis
M.2 Choose a mission from our We are Engaged in Missions
Together section. Be creative in how you communicate the needs to
others. Engage in missions with us.
F=Federation Ivorian du Scoutisme Standard
C=Church Requirements (EEUCI and BGB)
M=Mission Engagement Standard

35

Journey
Spiritual Formation
Testimony Development
Spiritual Formation
Testimony Development
Spiritual Formation
Spiritual Formation
Spiritual Formation
Spiritual Formation
Mission Engagement

The Promise
I promise on my honor and with the Grace of God to do all I possibly can for: service to God, my parents,
and my neighbor; to render service on all occasions and obey the Scout Law.
The Scout Law
A Scout keeps his word
A Scout is loyal
A Scout does a good turn daily
A Scout is a friend to all and a brother to all other Scouts
A Scout is courteous
A Scout is good to animals and respects nature
A Scout is disciplined and does nothing half way
A Scout is cheerful
A Scout is a worker
A Scout is clean in body, thoughts, words, and actions
EEUCI: Green Branch Step One

BGB: Juniors

Requirements for 12-13 year old Cubs


F.12 Give some examples of the Promise and the Law from your daily
life
F.13 Attend religious activities with your family or others for at least
two months
F.14 Read a chapter of the Bible and be able to share your
understanding with others
F.15 Learn the story of a person in the Bible
C.10 Study I & II Kings
C.11 Study the New Testament without Revelation
C.12 Know the 10 Commandments
C.13 Study the books of the Prophets in the Bible
M.2 Choose a mission from our We are Engaged in Missions
Together section. Be creative in how you communicate the needs to
others. Engage in missions with us.
M3 Share your faith story with someone during a mission engagement
F=Federation Ivorian du Scoutisme Standard
C=Church Requirements (EEUCI and BGB)
M=Mission Engagement Standard

36

Journey
Testimony Development
Spiritual Formation
Testimony Development
Spiritual Formation

Mission Engagement
Testimony Development

EEUCI: Green Branch Step Two

BGB: Juniors

Requirements for 13-14 year old Scouts


F.16 Tell about family, religious, or social traditions and encourage
others to try
F.17 Encourage other members of your patrol to go to church
F.18 Read the Bible regularly for at least a month so as to stimulate an
awareness of your faith
F.19 Show the ability to cooperate with your patrol in acceptance of
other traditions and attitudes
F.20 Encourage the members of your family and your friends to go to
church
C.10-C.13 (See Step one table) If this is your first year
C.14 Study a book in its entirety every year
C.15 Learn to pray for others (intercession) and spiritual warfare
prayers
M.2 Choose a mission from our We are Engaged in Missions
Together section. Be creative in how you communicate the needs to
others. Engage in missions with us.
M3 Share your faith story with someone during a mission engagement
F=Federation Ivorian du Scoutisme Standard
C=Church Requirements (EEUCI and BGB)
M=Mission Engagement Standard

37

Journey
Testimony Development
Testimony Development
Spiritual Formation
Testimony Development
Testimony Development
Spiritual Formation
Spiritual Formation
Testimony Development
Mission Engagement
Testimony Development

EEUCI: Green Branch Step Three

BGB: Company

Requirements for 14-15 year old Scouts


F.21 Praise and worship God on a regular basis and develop an
individual prayer life
F.22 Recognize God in Nature
F.23 Explain to your patrol how your faith helps you in your daily life
and at home.
F.24 Have a discussion about other religions with your branch leader or
religious leader
C.10-C.13 (See Step one table) If this is your first year
C.14 Study a book in its entirety every year
C.15 Learn to pray for others (intercession) and spiritual warfare
prayers
M.2 Choose a mission from our We are Engaged in Missions
Together section. Be creative in how you communicate the needs to
others. Engage in missions with us.
M3 Share your faith story with someone during a mission engagement
F=Federation Ivorian du Scoutisme Standard
C=Church Requirements (EEUCI and BGB)
M=Mission Engagement Standard

38

Journey
Spiritual Formation
Spiritual Formation
Testimony Development
Testimony Development
Spiritual Formation
Spiritual Formation
Testimony Development
Mission Engagement
Testimony Development

Scout Promise and Scout Law are the same as Green Branch
The Charter of the Pioneer
A Pioneer loves life.
He develops all his capacities.
He cares for his body and respects that of others
A Pioneer is an actor and not a spectator.
A Pioneer Searches for God.
A Pioneer finds in their doubts a reason to believe.
A Pioneer prays for those who believe in God.
A Pioneer refuses injustice and gives the same attention to all.
A Pioneer knows to make choices and goes all the way.
EEUCI: Orange Branch Step One

BGB: Company

Requirements for 15-16 year old Scouts

Journey

F.25 Have a base of knowledge of at least two other religions


F.26 Explain the significance of three of your most important festivals or
holy day observances
C.10-C.13 (See Step one table) If this is your first year
C.14 Study a book in its entirety every year
C.15 Learn to pray for others (intercession) and spiritual warfare
prayers
M.2 Choose a mission from our We are Engaged in Missions
Together section. Be creative in how you communicate the needs to
others. Engage in missions with us.
M3 Share your faith story with someone during a mission engagement
F=Federation Ivorian du Scoutisme Standard

Testimony Development

C=Church Requirements (EEUCI and BGB)


M=Mission Engagement Standard

39

Testimony Development
Spiritual Formation
Spiritual Formation
Testimony Development
Mission Engagement
Testimony Development

EEUCI: Orange Branch Step Two

BGB: Company

Requirements for 16-17 year old Scouts


F.27 Understand the significance of the rituals of your religion
F.28 Organize a Scout celebration
F.29 Discuss with your Branch leader the religious practices and the
connection between the spirit of service and the doctrines of the faith
F.30 Encourage the youth to pray
C.10-C.13 (See Step one table) If this is your first year
C.14 Study a book in its entirety every year
C.15 Learn to pray for others (intercession) and spiritual warfare
prayers
M.2 Choose a mission from our We are Engaged in Missions
Together section. Be creative in how you communicate the needs to
others. Engage in missions with us.
M3 Share your faith story with someone during a mission engagement
F=Federation Ivorian du Scoutisme Standard
C=Church Requirements (EEUCI and BGB)
M=Mission Engagement Standard

40

Journey
Testimony Development
Testimony Development
Testimony Development
Testimony Development
Spiritual Formation
Spiritual Formation
Testimony Development
Mission Engagement
Testimony Development

Scout Promise and Scout Law are the same as Green and Orange Branches
The Engagement of the Routier
The Routier is a man of honor.
The Routier is a man of character and discovers his faith.
The Routier has a sense of responsibility.
The Routier is responsible for himself.
The Routier is formed and fights for a more humane world.
EEUCI: Red Branch

BGB: Seniors

Requirements for 18-20 year old Scouts


F.31 Engage themselves deeper into the life of Christian service
F.32 Show how to lead a Christian life in service to God and man
F.33 Live according to the Promise and the Law in every daily action for
at least six months
F.34 Help new members who belong to no religion to become members
of one of their choice
F.35 Follow a program of daily Bible reading
F.36 Participate in a religious exchange forum
F.37 Know about other Holy books
C.16 Be familiar with the teachings on the big journeys of Christs
ministries
C.17 Acquire an understanding of the terminology of the Bible
C.18 Be familiar with the teachings of the basic values of the Christian
life
C.19 Use the worship book Glorire a Dieu
C.20 Prepare the youth choir
M.2 Choose a mission from our We are Engaged in Missions
Together section. Be creative in how you communicate the needs to
others. Engage in missions with us.
M3 Share your faith story with someone during a mission engagement
F=Federation Ivorian du Scoutisme Standard
C=Church Requirements (EEUCI and BGB)
M=Mission Engagement Standard

41

Journey
Mission Engagement
Mission Engagement
Testimony Development
Testimony Development
Spiritual Formation
Testimony Development
Spiritual Formation
Spiritual Formation
Spiritual Formation
Spiritual Formation
Spiritual Formation
Mission Engagement
Mission Engagement
Testimony Development

The 100,000 Souls Mission

As this guide is being written, there are over 3,000 active Scouts and over 500 active Cadets in the
United Methodist Church Cote dIvoire. In addition to these youth, there are over 700 adult leaders.
This means that we are beginning this mission with 4,200 workers for the harvest. Additionally, we have
access to 18,000 students in the United Methodist School system in the country. Many are not
Christian. Less than one-third of the local churches currently have a Scouting unit or Brigade. Over the
course of the next three years we will work to expand the reach of this ministry.
No person can be responsible for someone accepting Jesus as Lord and Savior. Each person must come
to conviction through the Holy Spirit. We do however, have responsibilities.

We are responsible to tell people about the love of God revealed in Jesus Christ.
We are responsible to show people the love of God as revealed in the Body of Christ.
We are responsible to alleviate the suffering of those around us in the name of Jesus Christ.
We are responsible to make disciples of the ones that have professed faith in Jesus.

Since conviction is a divine encounter, our focus is to create 100,000 personal opportunities through
three methods:

Empower local leaders to follow a systematic plan of spiritual formation at the local church
Train young people on how to share their faith
Provide opportunities to share the faith and alleviate suffering in Cote dIvoire

Children youth and adults will be equipped to lead others to Christ in multiple settings. Our goal is to
help them develop their story and share it at home, in school, at work, in the village, in the mission field,
or wherever they have the opportunity. The goal is not to have a spiritual headcount by which we
measure the success or failure of the mission. Personal conversion is of the highest importance, but the
focus is on the relationship not the headcount.

42

Mission Partner Devotional


Light in the Darkness
The Word was the source of life, and this life brought light to humanity. The light shines in the
darkness and the darkness has never put it out. (John 1:4-5).

The name Eclaireures et Eclaireuses Unionistes is does not translate directly to English. The word Eclaire
means light. It is sometimes used to describe lightening. The Eclaireures (masculine) and Eclaireuses
(feminine) are therefore people who carry the light into the world.
Mission journal entry from February 22, 2015:
At night, we marched through the rough part of the city with torches to illuminate the darkness. During
the day, the Scouts (co-ed) and Guides (Girl Scouts) were doing projects and learning about creating
peace. The night walk was an opportunity to share the peace with others. We marched through the
urban streets of Adjame, where the sewers are broken and flooding the area. Catholics, Protestants,
Muslims, and Laics (non-sectarian), marched passed bars and prostitutes, singing chants of hope. We
marched passed the overworked people in the market and the cab drivers trying to survive. We marched
passed tenement buildings where tens of thousands of people were given a glimpse of hope. At the end, I
was called forward to lead the procession into the soccer stadium. Once inside the stadium the Cub
Scouts joined our march. A Girl Guides leader lit the bonfire. It was a very spiritual evening with the
Scouts. Their campfires are not like ours. It was an overwhelming evening of cultural expression and
community. This is only the starting point of what the Church is helping us do in West Africa.

43

Living as Children of the Promise


Now you, my brothers and sisters, are Gods children as a result of his promise, just as Isaac
was. (Galatians 4:28)
Mission Journal Entry from March 22,
2015
I was at a gathering of 5,000 youth and
young adults in Grand-Bassam, Cote
dIvoire. The preaching was evangelical to
say the least. My task was to work with
the Boys and Girls Brigade to provide
security for the event. I was part of the
detail to protect the preacher. Yes,
preachers need protection here. The
Scripture context was: We are the
offspring of Abraham and are children of
promise not children of slavery. I was
following along in French and scanning the
crowd when the preacher said: You have freedom in Jesus Christ! The village witchdoctor has no power
over you, the village prophets have no power over you. Claim your freedom in Jesus! Within seconds
people surged from the crowd, into the sandy sports field and headed straight for the preacher. It
became the task to put them on the ground without causing any harm to them. This continued for
several minutes. They wailed like possessed animals and rolled on the ground thrashing and screaming.
By the time all things settled, there were at least 150 bodies all around us. My Christian perspective
informs me that they called on the name of Jesus and were immediately Christs. There is no room for
evil spirits and Gods Holy Spirit. The evil spirits had to leave, but did not go without a fight. Soon, the
ground became a place of liberation as the new Christians raised their hands towards heaven in
surrender and gratitude, claiming victory. Spiritual warfare is real, and in this part of the world, is
magnified by the context that people live in. It is so strong that people will sacrifice children to the
village witchdoctor.

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Access to Christ Gives us Hope


We have this hope as an anchor for our lives. It is safe and sure and goes through the curtain of the
heavenly temple into the inner sanctuary. (Hebrews 6:19)

The motto of the Boys and Girls Brigade is: Sure and Steadfast in Jesus Christ. The French translation
is: Sure et Solide en Jesus-Christ. I like the way the Good News Translation uses Safe where other
versions use Sure. We can be sure because we feel safe in what Jesus has done. We can remain
steadfast because our anchor of hope is connected to a solid rock. This rock is hidden below the surface
of the water. Even though it is unseen, we know that it holds us in the storm.
The context of this Scripture passage is taken from the letter to the Hebrews. The letter tells of the
greatness of Jesus and the way of salvation made by God through his Son Jesus Christ. The letter
explains that Jesus satisfied the Law through obedience to God. It clarifies that Jesus is now the High
Priest and we have direct access to God through him. The need for ritual sacrifice through an
intermediate priest is gone. The curtain has been torn in two from heaven (Matthew 27:51).
As we go about our shared ministry to children in youth on multiple continents, let us remember that
our goal is to guide these young people to the place where they can encounter the risen Christ. We
must help them identify the Holy of Holies, wherever they encounter Jesus. We must encourage them
to weigh anchor as they develop their hope in the message of Salvation.

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The Shepherds Must be Properly Trained


I appeal to you to be shepherds of the flock that God gave you and to take care of it willingly, as God
wants you to, and not unwillingly. Do your work, not for mere pay, but from a real desire to serve. Do
not try to rule over those who have been put in your care, but be examples to the flock. And when the
Chief Shepherd appears, you will receive the glorious crown which will never lose its brightness. (1
Peter 5:2-4).
The author is writing to a scattered church that is facing
persecution. The community must live in the tension
between the current struggles and the promised
redemption. In this tension they are reminded to lead the
flock into holy living. They are called to be different than
the world around them.
Like the Church in 1 Peter, Scouts are different than the
world around them. They are expected to be transformed
into the ethical standards they profess. This can be
achieved when the shepherds of the flock are equipped to
lead them to this state of being. Scouting has a program for
this. Wood Badge is the top program for preparing leaders
for service to young people. This course trains the
shepherds for service to the flock.
Cote dIvoire has their version of Wood Badge, which
follows an international guideline. The courses in the Ivory
Coast Scouting Federation (FIS) are held separately,
according to their groups. This means that the United
Methodist Church has its own ten day course. This allows
for a uniquely United Methodist focus in addition to the regular six day course.
In Cote dIvoire we take training seriously. All Scout leaders must complete Badge du Bois. All leaders in
the Brigades must complete Officers training. Both groups will complete Specialist training so they know
how the two groups collaborate for the mission of the Church. I encourage every leader of Scouts to
also prepare themselves to serve, by attending training that is offered as your means permit.

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The Advance is an official program of The United Methodist


Church for voluntary, designated, second-mile giving.
Through The Advance, United Methodist annual
conferences, districts, local churches, and organizations, as well as individuals and families, may choose
to support mission programs or mission personnel with their financial gifts. Each Advance project has
been vetted and approved by Global Ministries and Advance staff.

Tyrone LaValley Scout Ministry Coordinator (Advance # 3022028)


http://www.umcmission.org/explore-our-work/missionaries-in-service/missionary-profiles/lavalleytyrone
Tyrone (Ty) LaValley is a missionary with the General Board of
Global Ministries of The United Methodist Church serving as
coordinator of scouting ministry of the Cte dIvoire Annual
Conference based in Abidjan. He was commissioned in late 2014.
His wife Cheryl is also a missionary.
The scouting ministry in Cte dIvoire (Ivory Coast) is similar to the
Boy Scouts in the United States. It is part of the youth outreach of
an annual conference that is one of the largest and fastest growing
within the United Methodist connection. Ty provides training for
leadership development and links scouting in Cte dIvoire to similar
programs in churches throughout the world.
Ty LaValley is from Martinez, Georgia, where he is a member of Marvin United Methodist Church in Martinez, a
congregation of the North Georgia Annual Conference. He had a 15-year career in the US Army and after retirement
from that service became engaged in ministry. He was director of spiritual formation at Springfield United Methodist
Church, in Springfield, Georgia, and director of student ministries at Riverside United Methodist Church, in Macon,
Georgia. He was the district executive for the Georgia-Carolina Council of the Boy Scouts of America from 2012 to
near the end of 2014. He was also recalled for a tour of military service in Iraq.
He earned both Associate of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees, the later in social science, from Campbell
University, Buies Creek, North Carolina, and holds a certificate in Christian education from the Garrett-Evangelical
Theological Seminary, Evanston, Illinois. He has wide experience in mission volunteer disaster response.
Ty attended Roman Catholic services as a child with his grandmother and was active in chapels on military bases
during his Army years. In the Army he gave his life to Christ and engaged in ministry service as opportunities allowed.
He experienced a call to mission when in Bosnia in 1997 as a NATO staff member. He worked in that trouble spot to
distribute both Catholic and Protestant Bibles, and to build common ground between Christians and Muslims.
He is the author of the 40 Day Shepherd Challenge: Spiritual Formation Workbook Based on the Aims and Methods
of Scouting, available for free from the General Commission on United Methodist Men, online
athttp://www.gcumm.org/scouting/news/2014/02-11/scout-leader-prepares-a-40-day-spiritual-formation-guide. The
print copy is available at http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/tyronelavalley.
Blessed are the flexible for they will not be bent out of shape, Ty says. My ability and willingness to accept that
some things are unknown, until revealed by God, has served well during disaster response trips and three overseas
missions that I led. Ty is married to Cheryl LaValley and the couple has two grown children, Stephen Joseph and
Dana Nicole.

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Cheryl LaValley Childrens Ministry Trainer (Advance # 3022055)


http://www.umcmission.org/explore-our-work/missionaries-in-service/missionary-profiles/lavalleycheryl
Cheryl LaValley is a missionary with the General Board of Global Ministries of
The United Methodist Church serving as a trainer in childrens ministry in the
Cte dIvoire Annual Conference in West Africa. She was commissioned in
June 2015. Her husband Tyrone is also a missionary.
Ministry with children is a priority of The United Methodist Church in Cte
dIvoire. Cheryl is involved in developing and implementing a program for
training teachers. She also serves as an advocate for mission education
among children.
The conference in Cte dIvoire is one of the fastest growing in Africa.
Continuing to emerge from years of civil conflict, it struggles with economic
challenges and with limited educational opportunities, notably for girls.
Methodism in this French speaking country is rooted in British missionary
work. It gained autonomy in 1985 and in the early 2000s became part of The
United Methodist Church. It has 17 districts and a constituency of some one
million people.
Cheryl LaValley is from Martinez, Georgia, where she is a member of Marvin
United Methodist Church, a congregation of the North Georgia Annual Conference. A career teacher, she holds a
Bachelor of Arts degree in graphic design from Campbell University, Buies Creek, North Carolina, and a Master of
Arts in Teaching degree from Armstrong Atlantic State University in Savannah, Georgia. Her emphasis was in early
childhood education. Cheryl took the Georgia Assessments for the Certification of Educators (GACE) in 2011 and is
certified in special education as well. She has taught in Chatham, Bibb, Effingham, and Columbia Counties in
Georgia.
My husband, Ty, asked me how I felt about going to Africa. My response was what? He had been offered a position
in Cte dIvoire. That was March 2014. We discussed the pros and cons. I was teaching in a lower-income school
and debated whether I was already doing mission work on a daily basis. We listened to the voice of God. After much
discussion, listening, and prayer it was decided: we were going to become missionaries!
Cheryl and Ty have two grown children, Joey and Dana.

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Coming Later in 2015: The 10 Day Missionary Challenge benefitting the World
Friendship Fund of the World Organization of the Scout Movement.

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