Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 11

Curriculum Areas: English

Stage/ Year: Stage 3

Unit: Author Craft

Unit duration: 8 Weeks, (3-4 Hours per week)

This English unit of work focuses on author craft.


Through an analysis of imaginative, informative and persuasive texts, students will have the opportunity to craft texts that use figurative and
persuasive writing techniques to address different social purposes for writing. Engaging with a rage of informative texts/ websites and videos and
literary texts including The Water Tower by Gary Crew, John Brown, Rose and the Midnight Cat by Jenny Wagner and Ron Brooks and The
Eleventh Hour by Graeme Base students will identify the different organisational frameworks and language features appropriate to imaginative
writing and identify when best to use literary devices for effect.
Students will develop and demonstrate knowledge, skills and understanding for using English more proficiently on their way to becoming better
authors. These include

Setting
Foreshadowing
Characterisation
Persuasion
Literary devices
Alliteration
Irony
Metaphor
Personification
Simile

This unit will culminate in a students presenting their Free Reading Assignments to their peers. Schools could use this an opportunity to link with
book week, national literacy week, or other school based literacy celebrations. Schools may wish to invite parents and community members to the
presentations.

We want students to (outcomes):


EN3-1A communicate effectively for a variety of audiences and purposes using increasingly challenging topics,
ideas, issues and language forms and features
EN3-2A compose, edit and present well-structured and coherent texts

What do we want our


students to learn? (Deep
knowledge element)
Must be guided by syllabus

EN3-3A use an integrated range of skills, strategies and knowledge to read, view and comprehend a wide
range of texts in different media and technologies
EN3-5B discuss how language is used to achieve a widening range of purposes for a widening range of
audiences and contexts
EN3-6B uses knowledge of sentence structure, grammar, punctuation and vocabulary to respond to and
compose clear and cohesive texts in different media and technologies
EN3-7C thinks imaginatively, creatively, interpretively and critically about information and ideas and identifies
connections between texts when responding to and composing texts
EN3-8D identifies and considers how different viewpoints of their world, including aspects of culture, are
represented in text
EN3-9E recognises, reflects on and assesses their strengths as a learner

content pages (not indicators)


and foundation/ stage
statements.

Links to Stage Statements


collaborate with others to share and evaluate ideas and opinions and to develop different points of view
express well-developed and well-organised ideas about literary texts and respond constructively to different
opinions
compare and accurately summarise information on a particular topic from different texts and make wellsupported generalisations about the topic
identify text structure of a range of complex texts and explore how grammatical features work to influence an
audience's understanding of written, visual, media and multimodal texts.
deal with complex topics, issues and language features. Students select information and ideas from personal,
literary and researched resources, and adapt imaginative ideas and situations from literature.

This learning matters because:

Reading outcomes sequentially build on Stage 2,


Writing outcome builds sequentially on Stage 2,
The capacities to self-reflect on own learning against criteria translates across curriculum activities and
allows the opportunity to celebrate success for all learners. It assists Stage 3 students in self adjusting
learning experiences and empowers them to better access the curriculum.
Developing these knowledge, skills and dispositions will assist students to become responsible local and
global citizens in the diverse world of the twenty-first century

Why does this learning


matter? (Significance
dimension)
Are there clear links to prior
and future learning and real
world application?

Assessment task outline


Free Reading Assignment

How will students


demonstrate their deep
understanding?

Writing Tasks
Participation in class/ small group discussions

Design task(s) with authentic


purpose, audience and
communication tools.

Is student direction (content,


process or product) suitable
to the task?
Is there opportunity for
students to demonstrate
learning at an A level?
Key outcomes for assessment
Assessment criteria (Indicators/ Content Descriptors)

How well do we expect


students to do it?
How will this information be
communicated to all students
and parents?

Lesson Sequence
Wee
k
1

Idea/ Content
What is Author
Craft?

Understand and apply


knowledge of language
forms and features
understand how
authors often
innovate on text
structures and
play
with language
features to
achieve
particular
aesthetic,
humorous and
persuasive purpo
ses and effects
(ACELA1518)

Outcomes/ Learning Experience

Resources

EN3-3A use an integrated range of skills, strategies and knowledge to read,


view and comprehend a wide range of texts in different media and technologies
Teacher poses the question What is Author Craft? Make a list of student
answers as part of class discussion.
Just as a woodworker uses many tools and techniques to craft a piece of
furniture, a skilled author uses tools and techniques of language and storytelling
to craft a piece of writing. We have organized author's craft into two categories,
Narrative Elements and Literary Devices. We use the term Narrative Elements
to describe aspects of storytelling. The term Literary Devices refers to specific
tools of language that can appear in any genre of writing

Teacher
Observation
Author Craft Unit
Smart Notebook
Resource
Author Craft

Display author craft scaffold below on IWB. Teacher explicitly teach (explain and
provide examples) each element. Class discuss known examples from favourite
books/authors/TV shows or Movies. Students copy information and add their
own examples for Literary Devices. (This task could be completed in English
workbooks or table could be converted to a worksheet to save time).
Text elements
Setting
Foreshadowing
Characterisation
Persuasion
Literary devices
Alliteration
Irony
Metaphor
Personification

Assessment

The setting is the environment in which a story or event takes place.


Foreshadowing is a way of indicating or hinting at what will come later.
Characterization is the way in which authors convey information about
their characters.
Persuasion is the way in which authors use language to convince the
reader of something
Alliteration is a figure of speech in which the same sound appears at
the beginning of two or more words. Alliterative words are consecutive
or close to each other in the text.
Irony is a disagreement or incongruity between what is said and what
is understood, or what is expected and what actually occurs
Metaphor is a figure of speech that makes a direct comparison
between two unlike things. A metaphor suggests that one thing is
another thing, or is equal to another thing.
Personification is a figure of speech that gives human qualities to
objects, animals, or ideas.

Wee
k

Idea/ Content

Outcomes/ Learning Experience


Simile

Resources

Assessment

A simile is a figure of speech that makes a comparison between two


unlike things and uses the words "like," "as," "than" or "resembles".

Writing Task Poem or Introduction to a short story


Remind students of the meaning of personification. As a class brainstorm ideas
and examples of personification.
Introduce writing task and display writing stimulus on the IWB. Students have 5
minutes to plan their work, 20 minutes to write and 5 minutes to edit. Establish
success criteria for students (paragraphs, sentence structure, punctuation,
spelling, text structure, etc, SEE Writing task rubric) with additional criteria for
students to include at least three examples of personification.
Respond to and
compose texts
create literary
texts that adapt
or combine
aspects of texts
students have
experienced in
innovative ways

Author Craft Unit


Smart Notebook
Resource

Teacher to
mark using
established
criteria

Author Craft Unit


Smart Notebook
Resource

Teacher
Observation

(ACELT1612,
ACELT1618)

Picture Book Study


Author craft and
visual literacy
Respond to
and compose texts
participate in and
contribute to
discussions, clarifying
and interrogating ideas,
developing and
supporting arguments,
sharing and evaluating
information,
experiences and
opinions (ACELY1709)

EN3-5B discuss how language is used to achieve a widening range of purposes


for a widening range of audiences and contexts
EN3-7C thinks imaginatively, creatively, interpretively and critically about
information and ideas and identifies connections between texts when
responding to and composing texts
Begin by re-establishing what author craft is. Ask students; is author craft just
about words? When can it include other things? Discuss use of pictures, graphs,
diagrams, etc. Ask students who often work closely with authors to create
books? Discuss the role of illustrators in creating and adding to author craft.
Introduce the idea of visual literacy. See Visual Literacy resource.
Work through and explicitly teach students about angles, colour, lines, gaze,
vectors and salience. Students should take notes in their English books and to
record understanding and for later use.
Picture Book study The Water Tower by Gary Crews

Wee
k

Idea/ Content

Outcomes/ Learning Experience

Resources

Teacher begins by reading The Water Tower to the class without pausing or
breaking for discussion.
Teacher distributes Examining Author Craft Student Scaffold Worksheet and
explains that during the second reading of the book, students will evaluate
certain elements of the picture book. These elements include those discussed in
week one and also include aspects of visual literacy Colour, Position, Lights,
Direction, Angle, Setting, Body language, Symbolism, Objects, Shapes, Figures,
Contrast, Humour, Gender roles, Clothing, and Text
Teacher reads the picture book a second time, stopping to highlight and
comment on different elements. Students may also suggest ideas or
interpretations.
Class discuss Examining Picture Books Worksheet.
Guiding Questions
Why do you think the water tower is off limits?
Does Bubba change after swimming in the water tower?
Is there something alive in the water tower?

The Water Tower by


Gary Crew
Examining Picture
Books Student
Scaffold Worksheet

Writing Task: Character Description


Students are to write a character description on the mysterious creature or thing
in the water tower that Bubba saw. Students need to use figurative language
and detailed imagery (engaging the senses). 5 minutes to plan their work, 20
minutes to write and 5 minutes to edit.
3

Novel Study
Introduce Free
Reading
Assignment
Develop and apply
contextual knowledge

identify and
discuss how own texts
have been structured
to achieve
their purpose and
discuss ways of
using conventions of
language to shape
readers' and viewers'
understanding of texts

Teacher to
mark using
established
criteria

EN3-2A compose, edit and present well-structured and coherent texts


EN3-7C thinks imaginatively, creatively, interpretively and critically about
information and ideas and identifies connections between texts when
responding to and composing texts
EN3-8D identifies and considers how different viewpoints of their world,
including aspects of culture, are represented in text
Ask students about their favourite books. What do they like to read about? Who
are their favourite authors? What makes their work so enjoyable to read? As a
class you could create a top 10 book list.
Free Reading Assignment Remind student that this unit of work is about
what successful authors do, to use English in a meaningful and purposeful way.
Introduce Free Reading Assignment. In this assignment student will complete a
number of tasks using a novel of their own choosing. See Assignment sheet for
details. Allow time for questions. Students will have to select and obtain a copy

Assessment

Teacher
Observation
Free Reading
Assignment

Wee
k

Idea/ Content

discuss how the


intended audience,
structure and context of
an extended range of
texts influence
responses to texts
Respond to and
compose texts
create literary
texts that adapt
or combine
aspects of texts
students have
experienced in
innovative ways
(ACELT1612,
ACELT1618)

Picture Book Study


Develop and apply
contextual
knowledge

identify and
discuss how own texts
have been structured
to achieve
their purpose and
discuss ways of
using conventions of
language to shape
readers' and viewers'
understanding of texts

discuss how the


intended audience,
structure and context of
an extended range of
texts influence
responses to texts
Develop and apply
contextual knowledge
identify, describe,
and discuss
similarities and
differences
between texts,

Outcomes/ Learning Experience

Resources

Assessment

of their novel by the end of the week (students may bring in own copies or
borrow from school or public libraries).

Writing Task A conversation


Remind student the meaning of simile and metaphor. As a class brainstorm
ideas and examples of both.
Introduce writing task and display writing stimulus on the IWB. Students have 5
minutes to plan their work, 20 minutes to write and 5 minutes to edit. Establish
success criteria for students (paragraphs, sentence structure, punctuation,
spelling, text structure, etc, SEE Writing task rubric) with additional criteria for
students to include at least two examples of both simile and metaphor.
EN3-5B discuss how language is used to achieve a widening range of purposes
for a widening range of audiences and contexts
EN3-7C thinks imaginatively, creatively, interpretively and critically about
information and ideas and identifies connections between texts when
responding to and composing texts
Picture Book study John Brown, Rose and the Midnight Cat by Jenny
Wagner and Ron Brooks. Teacher begins by reading John Brown, Rose and
the Midnight Cat to the class without pausing or breaking for discussion.
Teacher distributes Examining Picture Books Worksheet and explains that
during the second reading of the book, students will evaluate certain elements
of the picture book. These elements include; Colour, Position, Lights, Direction,
Angle, Setting, Body language, Symbolism, Objects, Shapes, Figures, Contrast,
Humour, Gender roles, Clothing, and Text
Teacher reads the picture book a second time, stopping to highlight and
comment on different elements. Students may also suggest ideas or
interpretations.
Class discuss Examining Picture Books Worksheet.
Guiding questions
Who do you think is the main character?
Why do you think John Brown doesnt like the midnight cat?
What is the theme of this story?
Students break into groups of three and select two questions from the Picture

Teacher to mark
using established
criteria

John Brown, Rose


and the Midnight Cat
by Jenny Wagner
and Ron Brooks.
Examining Picture
Books Student
Scaffold Worksheet

Teacher to
mark using
established
criteria

Teacher
Observation

Wee
k

Idea/ Content
including those
by the same
author or
illustrator, and
evaluate
characteristics
that define an
author's
individual style
(ACELT1616)

compare how
composers and
illustrators make
stories exciting, moving
and absorbing to hold
readers' interest

Outcomes/ Learning Experience

Resources

Book question box. (See questions below)


Groups spend time discussing their questions and report back to the whole
class.

Free Reading
Assignment
Activity: Advertisement
Show students a range of print advertisements.
Students design a print advertisement for any product they wish. It must include
text and image. Students need to explain (one paragraph) the visual literacy
techniques and figurative language (metaphor, simile, irony etc.) they used, and
give reasons on how these techniques enhances the meaning of their
advertisement.

Teacher to
mark using
established
criteria

Free Reading Assignment Allow time (45 mins -1 hour) for students to
continue working on Free Reading Assignment. During this time the teacher
should be working one on one with students as needed by providing the
necessary advice, instruction and feedback.

Digital Text
Analysis
Understand and apply
knowledge of language
forms and features

identify and explain


how analytical
images like figures,
tables, diagrams,
maps and graphs
contribute to our
understanding of
verbal information
in factual and
persuasive texts
(ACELA1524)

explain sequences

Assessment

EN3-3A Uses an integrated range of skills, strategies and knowledge to read,


view and comprehend a wide range of texts in different media and technologies
Text Analysis: The Bionic Body
As a class view The Bionic Body interactive on The National Geographic
website. So each child can view and interact with the website, the lesson should
be taught in the computer room.
- Factual or fiction? How do you know? Use of colour and design of the
diagram.
- Whats happening? Without reading the text, what information do the
images provide?
- How does the image relate to the text? Do we need both to relate to the
text?
- Which part of the screen is salient? Why?
- What is the viewers reading path? Is there a reason for what the viewer
is drawn to first and then next?
- What shots has the designer used? How does this help the explanation

The Bionic Body


webpage:
http://ngm.nationalg
eographic.com/2010
/01/bionics/bionicsanimation
Computers

Wee
k

Idea/ Content
of images in print
texts and compare
these to the ways
hyperlinked digital
texts are
organised,
explaining their
effect on viewers'
interpretations
(ACELA1511)

Picture Book Study

Students:
Engage personally with
texts
recognise and
explain creative
language features in
imaginative,
informative and
persuasive texts that
contribute to
engagement and
meaning
interpret events,
situations and
characters in texts
explain own
preferences for a
particular interpretation
of a text, referring to
text details and own
knowledge and
experience
think critically abou
t aspects of texts such
as ideas and events
think imaginatively
when engaging with
texts, using prediction,
for example, to imagine
what happens to
characters after the
text

Outcomes/ Learning Experience


-

Resources

Assessment

of the Bionic Body?


Layout and design: Is this user friendly? i.e. Make reference to the
labels, dotted lines, icons and positioning of these features.

Free Reading Assignment Allow time (45 mins -1 hour)for students to


continue working on Free Reading Assignment. During this time the teacher
should be working one on one with students as needed by providing the
necessary advice, instruction and feedback.
EN3-3A use an integrated range of skills, strategies and knowledge to read,
view and comprehend a wide range of texts in different media and technologies
EN3-5B discuss how language is used to achieve a widening range of purposes
for a widening range of audiences and contexts
Picture Book study The Eleventh Hour By Graeme Base Teacher begins
by reading The Eleventh Hour to the class without pausing or breaking for
discussion.
Class break into groups of 4, as teacher distributes question cards and explains
that during the second reading of the book, students will evaluate certain
elements of the picture book.
Teacher reads the picture book a second time, stopping to highlight and
comment on different elements. Students may also suggest ideas or
interpretations.
Class discuss Examining Picture Books Worksheet.
Guiding questions
How does the author use symbolism?
How does the author use codes, and clues to help the reader?
Read the students a short Garfield cartoon students fill out the examining
picture book scaffold. Discuss the visual literacy techniques such as colour,
angles, gaze, offer and demand.
Writing Task Cartoon
Remind students the meaning of the purpose of a persuasive text. Revise
meaning of metaphor and simile and discuss how they can be used to enforce
an idea. As a class brainstorm ideas and examples of both.
Introduce writing task and display writing stimulus on the IWB. Students have 5
minutes to plan their work, 20 minutes to write and 5 minutes to edit. Establish
success criteria for students (paragraphs, sentence structure, punctuation,

The Eleventh Hour


By Graeme Base
Examining Picture
Books Student
Scaffold Worksheet

Garfield Cartoon

Teacher to
mark using
established
criteria

Wee
k

Idea/ Content

Outcomes/ Learning Experience

Resources

Assessment

spelling, text structure, etc, SEE Writing task rubric) with additional criteria for
students to include at least two examples of both simile and metaphor.
Free Reading
Assignment

Engage personally
with texts
recognise and
explain creative
language features in
imaginative,
informative and
persuasive texts that
contribute to
engagement and
meaning
interpret events,
situations and
characters in texts
explain own
preferences for a
particular interpretation
of a text, referring to
text details and own
knowledge and
experience
think critically abou
t aspects of texts such
as ideas and events
Respond to
and compose texts
plan, rehearse
and deliver
presentations,
selecting and
sequencing
appropriate
content
and multimodal
elements for
defined

Free Reading Assignment Allow time (45 mins -1 hour) for students to
continue working on Free Reading Assignment. During this time the teacher
should be working one on one with students as needed by providing the
necessary advice, instruction and feedback.
EN3-7C thinks imaginatively, creatively, interpretively and critically about
information and ideas and identifies connections between texts when
responding to and composing texts
EN3-8D identifies and considers how different viewpoints of their world,
including aspects of culture, are represented in text
Writing Task: Book review
Scaffold how to write a book review and read/analyse a good example. Then
students review either The Watertower, The Eleventh Hour or John Brown,
Rose and The Midnight Cat. Students will need to make reference to visual
literacy techniques and elements, as well as their own opinion and
recommendation. Allow for two lessons.

Free Reading
Assignment
Example of a book
good book review.

Teacher to
mark using
established
criteria

Free Reading Assignment Allow time (45 mins -1 hour) for students to
continue working on Free Reading Assignment. During this time the teacher
should be working one on one with students as needed by providing the
necessary advice, instruction and feedback.

EN3-1A communicate effectively for a variety of audiences and purposes using


increasingly challenging topics, ideas, issues and language forms and features
EN3-9E recognises, reflects on and assesses their strengths as a learner
EN3-5B discuss how language is used to achieve a widening range of purposes
for a widening range of audiences and contexts
Presentation of Free Reading Assignment As part of students free reading
assignment, students were required to create a showbag based on their chosen
novel. Students present their showbag to the class and explain the contents of
their showbag and how it relates to their chosen novel.

Teacher to
mark using
established
criteria

Wee
k

Idea/ Content
audiences and
purposes,
making
appropriate
choices
for modality and
emphasis
(ACELY1700,
ACELY1710)

use interaction
skills, for
example
paraphrasing,
questioning and
interpreting nonverbal cues and
choose
vocabulary and
vocal effects
appropriate for
different
audiences and
purposes
(ACELY1796)

Outcomes/ Learning Experience

Resources

Assessment