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CHAPTER 1
The Problem and Its Setting

Introduction
Stress is a part of the peoples lives because they experience it every day. Stress
comes from the activities that require effort and time management. Another root of stress
is the pressure from the expectations of the other people to the students in their
performance either in academics or in sports. Those students belonging in varsity teams
are one of the best examples of people who are stressed out almost every day. Managing
both studies and sports, cramming for examinations and assignments, and inadequate
sleep because of staying up all night are the most popular examples of stress factors in
their academic environment. (Valdez, 2006)
The most common stress factor that the varsity players experience from their
sports environment aside from stress factors from their academics is the pressure of
winning for their school, maintaining a fit body, balancing time for studies, social life,
and their trainings. (Munar, 2010)
Stress management is something that people do to lessen the stress coming from
the external factors for them to stay focused on what they are doing. Students usually
manage stress by doing recreational activities to entertain themselves like watching
movies, listening to music, reading books, playing online games or even bar-hopping.
(Valdez, 2006)
It is important for the students to know stress management for them to apply it
whenever they feel pressured and anxious about their studies. The efficiency of the stress

management is essential not only to the CEU Manila varsity players but also the other
varsity players in different universities around the world.
This research dealt to establish a basic background to which varsity players can
efficiently overcome their stress for the betterment of their academic performances,
without affecting their sports performance.

Background of the Study


Stress management is the set of techniques to control ones stress level. The term
stress was studied by one of the Father of Stress Research, Hans Selye (1907-1982).
During 1920s, after his completion in medical training in University of Montreal, he first
used the word stress. He noticed that his patients did not only suffer from one sickness,
but they also had one thing in common, and that is they all look sick. He found out that
these patients suffered from physical stress.
In 1926, Selye used rats for tests and subjected them to extreme temperatures,
made them hungry or made them exercise a lot. The test concludes that changes in
adrenal gland occurred. He suggested that subjecting an animal to prolonged stress led to
physiological changes that would cause disease and death of an animal. And so, the idea
of stress was born.
In physics, stress is defined as the force that produces strain on the body. Since
Selye defined stress as a strain on the body, many individuals seeks to know how to
manage stress for the purpose of improving their everyday lives.

Today, the question on whether what techniques varsity players used to help them
manage their stress in regards to the sport they are engaged in and their academic
performance was raised by the researchers.

Setting of the Study

This study was conducted in Centro Escolar University, Mendiola. CEU is a


private university in Manila, Phlippines. Librada Avelino and Carmen de Luna founded it
on June 03, 1907. The campus is 3.8 hectares composed of 14 buildings that house
around 25,000 students a year. Known for its pink buildings, the campus is located in the
western side of Mendiola Street in Manila, the heart of Manila's "University Belt" (Figure
1). As of 2011, CEU Mendiola houses 26,000 Escolarians enrolled. The school has
different sports facilities like covered and open court for basketball and volleyball,
swimming pool, dancing studios, taekwondo and table tennis centers. These facilities are
free to use providing a permit from the students affairs office. The covered basketball
and volleyball court can be found at the Technology Center while the open court is
located at the north quadrangle of the school (Figure 2). The schools swimming pool,
together with the dancing studio, taekwondo and table tennis center, is located at the
Dentistry and Science Building (Figure 2). Moreover, the Upper SAC located at the
second floor of the Student Activity Center also serves as training grounds for the
universitys pep squad.

Figure 1
Map of Mendiola Street, Manila, Philippines

Figure 2
Centro Escolar University, Mendiola Campus Plan

Theoretical Framework

High

Performance

Best Performance

High Stress
Anxiety
Unhappiness

Boredom
Low Pressure

Low

Stress

High

Figure 3
Paradigm showing the relationship between stress and performance of an individual.

This study was based on the Yerkes-Dodson Law, created by psychologists


Robert Yerkes and John Dodson as long ago as 1908. Yerkes-Dodson Law shows how
performance varies with arousal or stress. It stated that a performance can be at its best
with the increase of physiological and mental arousal up to a certain point only.
In Figure 3, it showed that levels of stress or pressure are associated with the
performance of a certain subject. According to this figure, best performance is achieved
when a person experiences a moderate level of stress, whereas too much or too little
stress or pressure results in declination of performance. In the left hand side of the graph,
it shows that people in this level are under-challenge. No challenge and no pressure
means no motivation to work hard, resulting in an average or sloppy work. In the
middle hand side of the graph, it shows that people in this level are being effective in

their performance. That is because theyre adequately motivated to work hard, while not
too pressured or stressed that theyre starting to struggle. In the right hand side of the
graph, it shows that people in this level are under too much pressure. Theyre starting to
become anxious because of the excessive stress theyre experiencing, resulting in the
diminishing of motivation in their performance.
In this research, the researchers aimed to present the efficiency of stress
management for the betterment of sports performance and academic performance of
varsity players in CEU Manila. In regards to sports, when a player experiences a
sensation of pressure or stress, he becomes more motivated and focuses on the task at
hand, resulting in having a better outcome towards a game. However, this only applies up
to a certain point of stress only. On the other hand, when a player, for example a
basketball player, experiences extreme pressure in a game, he might flunk or miss his
shot because of the extreme anxiety and panic he is experiencing.
The same is applied in the academic performance. During an exam of an easy
subject, a student tends to get only fair scores because he/she didnt feel challenged or
pressured in the said subject. On the other hand, when a student is somewhat anxious
about his grades, he tends to be motivated to study hard for the exam, thus, doing a lot
better in his exams. However, when a student is experiencing high stress level, he/she
might lose his concentration and flunk his/her exam because of extreme anxiety.
The theory was used to show how stress management can do an efficient job in
maintaining a good performance in both the sports and academic performance of the
varsity players in CEU Manila.

Statement of the Problem:


This study aimed to determine the Efficiency of Stress Management on Sports and
Academic Performances of Varsity Players in CEU Manila.

Specifically, the study sought answers to the following questions:

1. What are the profile of the respondents in terms of:


1.1. Age
1.2. Gender
1.3. Sport
1.4. Sports engagement
1.5. Level of Anxiety
2. What are the sources of stress among the varsity players in CEU Manila?
3. What are the stress management of varsity players in CEU Manila?
4. What are the effects of stress on the sports and academic performance of varsity
players in CEU Manila?
5. What is the efficiency of stress management on sports and academic performance
of varsity players in CEU Manila?

Assumption
This study assumed that varsity players of Centro Escolar University have different
stress management methods and that some of these stress management methods vary in
their efficiency. This study also assumed that varsity players with stress management
methods with low efficiency may want to reconsider their ways in managing stress in

their academic and sports life.

Hypotheses
The study tried to prove the null hypotheses as follows:
1. An efficient stress management will result in an effective performance in both
academics and sports.
2. Those who were able to balance stress or pressure will benefit an individuals
well-being and performance.

Significance of the Study


The study is believed to be beneficial not only to varsity players of CEU Manila,
but also helped other students in managing stress in their academic life. Students may
adapt the same stress management activities that would be applicable for their lifestyle.
This study also provided an overview for teachers, coaches and parents in understanding
how the varsity players cope up with stress and for them to help varsity players and other
students to lessen or eliminate factors that contribute to stress. For readers, this study
provided insights on stress management issues and may also be helpful in selecting ways
to cope up with stress. For future researchers, this study can be a basis for future studies
on a larger scale or a more in depth study.
For students and readers that may be practicing the wrong stress management,
information from this study will provide options for better handling of stress management
issues and enable them to change ways of managing stress.

Scope, Delimitation, and Limitation


This study included only the varsity players of Centro Escolar University in
Mendiola, Manila. Varsity teams from the other universities and other branches of CEU
will not be covered by the study. The study will not give recommendations in changing
stress management methods of the varsity players because this study will only cover the
efficiency of the stress management of the varsity players. The lifestyle and activities of
the subjects outside the campus and beyond their academic and sports life will not be
included in the study.

Definition of Terms
The following terms were used in the context and will be defined for clearer
understanding of what they mean in the study:
Academic performance. It refers to how well a student is accomplishing his or
her tasks and studies
Efficiency. It refers to the effectiveness of a thing or certain technique.
Homeostasis. It refers to the tendency of a system to maintain internal stability
while adjusting to conditions that are optimal for survival.
Sports performance. It means to show quality and confidence in playing sports
in front of a crowd.
Stress. It is a state of mental or emotional strain or tension.

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Stress management. A set of techniques intended to help people deal more


effectively with stress in their lives by analyzing the specific stressors and taking positive
actions to lessen their effects.
Stressor. It is an agent or stimulus that causes stress.
Team. It refers to a group of individuals with a common purpose.
Technique. It refers to the method or practice to accomplish a certain task.
Varsity. It refers to the players or team that plays a certain sports that represents a
school, university or college

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CHAPTER 2
Review of Related Literature and Studies

This chapter includes the discussions on related foreign and local studies and
literature which provides relevant facts that will guide the researchers to achieve their
target objectives by getting ideas on other related studies and make improvements as
possible.

Foreign Literature
College students learn techniques to manage stress as well as to incorporate some
beneficial stress-busters into their busy college lifestyle. (Anon, 2013)
Stress is an integral part of life, especially for a college student. In fact, not all
stress is bad. Those times when a little stress causes you to take more time with a course
project and for other students cramming with their requirements made their work good.
There are a number of techniques to help college students minimize the stress they are
feeling. Proper stress management will help you to cope with the daily pressures of
college and give you more time and energy to enjoy your college life. (Anon, 2013)
Time management is just one of many techniques in managing stress. The author
stated here that colleges across the country agree that time management is a major hurdle
for college students. College students hardly balance their time between coursework,
major projects, studying, socializing and a job. The author suggests that it is good to use a
notebook or a planner in order you to keep track due dates. Work schedules, etc. The
author also stated that learn to plan ahead and avoid procrastination. (Anon, 2013)

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Other technique for managing stress is goal setting. Goal setting may sound the
opposite of stress management but with realistic goals it is not. With realistic goals, you
will have something concrete to work toward. Setting many smaller goals, like steps
toward the large goal. (Anon, 2013)
Set your priorities, this stress management technique will help when done
correctly and not a hindrance, to stress management. Combined with time management
setting your priorities will keep you on schedule. College students will certainly put their
major course works at the top on their lists, and they dont forget their YOLO time or
relaxation on their lists. Having daily, weekly and monthly lists will help you more.
(Anon, 2013)
Space to be alone is also part of managing stress. Everyone needs a few minutes
alone, whether to think without interruption or just enjoy the quiet. Best places to be in
peace are the library, grassland by the lake or simply that comfy chair at the bookstore.
(Anon, 2013)
Talking about stress also helps to manage stress. Bursting out your feelings about
stress is less overwhelming. Voicing your concerns to a friend will decrease that stress
building up on yourself. Whether you talk about a specific stress causing event or talk
about stressing-out in general, you will feel better. Plus, your friend can benefit too if
they are also stressed out. You may even be able to help each other de-stress by doing
something fun and great. (Anon, 2013)
A diary or journal, this may not be appealing to others and may seem like more
work than its worth to others, but for those who are fond of writing, this is another way
to manage stress of college life. This can have the same result like talking to a friend,

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getting your thoughts down on a paper or in your computer puts those feeling where you
can work on a strategy to manage your stress. (Anon, 2013)
Dont do quick solutions. Some college students release stress by drinking alcohol
and hitting cigarettes when they are pressured or stress-out. The cigarette and alcohol
may delay your stress but the feeling wont last. Do not ever use drugs as a coping tool.
Be independent in managing stress without these vices. (Anon, 2013)
College counseling and health services can also help in managing your stress.
Most colleges have extensive tools to aid students with stress management. There are
programs and peer groups to help you burst out you stress. College guidance counselors
provide workshops on coping skills, guest speakers and activities designed to help you
deal with your stress. (Anon, 2013)
Relaxation can be a big help in managing stress. Many college students know how
to study, work, protest, etc. But what about relaxing? Your schedule might be full and
you dont have the time to relax but you need it. Doing whatever is fun and is not a chore
for you is relaxation. Give your brain a break to rest and recover. (Anon, 2013)
The foreign literature is somehow related to the current study for it directly
mentions that proper stress management will help students to cope with the daily
pressures of college and give more time and energy to enjoy college life using techniques
such as time management, goal setting, setting priorities, counseling, relaxation, and
bursting out emotions. The present study, like the article reviewed, aimed to discover
more proper stress management techniques to cope up with pressures in school and
sports.

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Local Literature
"We dont tell that we are in stress. Well, at least not in a way that we would in
English: I am stressed. It just doesnt work out; we dont, as far as I know, have a word in
any of our Philippine languages for stress and being stressed." (Philippine Center for
Investigative Journalism, 2006)
But that doesnt mean the Filipinos dont ever experience stress. They can feel it
all the time and it is noticeable that it is producing illnesses, both physical and mental,
and serious life-threatening diseases. Because stress affects the bodys immune system,
we can say all ailments are in one way or another stress-related. (Tan, 2006)
Theres also a tendency to dismiss stress-related illnesses as only in the mind and
this is self-limiting. The fact is that stress can so overwhelm people that they go into
depression, resorting to destructive behavior, directed toward the self/toward others.
(Tan, 2006)
The drug companies, especially those producing vitamins, have tried to cash in,
pushing their products through advertisements showing stressed people and dangling
promises: "with our product, you can meet the many stresses of life, and of the world, and
survive without falling ill." (Tan, 2006)
But doctors at least reputable ones will tell people that medicines are of
limited use for handling stress. Vitamins can help you to cope up with the harmful
chemicals produced in the body that come after stress, but as long as you dont deal with
the stress itself, you eventually lose control. (Santiago, 2005)
Besides the vitamin ads, the media bombard us with all kinds of articles about,
and ads for, New Age therapies that supposedly help people deal with stress, spas

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offering massage and aromatherapy, soothing music interspersed with sounds of birds
and frogs. But these are often expensive with exaggerated claims. (Santonia, 2011)
Not enoughs being done to understanding stress in its local context, yet stress is
mediated through culture from the very nature of the stressors, to the ways individuals
respond to the stress. Understanding this local context might help those to develop more
culturally appropriate, and therefore more effective, ways to deal with stress. (Tan, 2006)
Stressors are not universal. For example, they say noise is stressful, but what
exactly is noise? (Tan, 2006)
Culturally, people have different thresholds for these sounds. When a Filipino
sees a crowd, they became delighted. But westerners crave privacy. The Filipino is
stressed by solitude. Culture adapts to circumstances and we are only one of the countries
with large dense populations that have learned to live with the crowds. The Chinese, for
example, refer to merriment as re nao, the words for hot and noisy. While Filipinos enjoy
noise, theyre quite sensitive to olfactory assaults. Filipinos will claim some odors are so
bad they cause a stomachache. (Chan, 2008)
Beyond these sensory stresses, Filipinos do face many sources of stress, around
work and livelihood mainly. Farmers worry about drought and typhoons. Workers go
berserk with tyrannical bosses and vicious gossipy office-mates. (Sonio, 2007)
Rural or urban, Filipinos all face the stresses of family, perhaps more so than in
Western countries. They say that Filipinos are family-oriented with relatives always on
hand to help out. But the extended Filipino family can be stressful too. Overseas workers
have a particularly difficult time with all the expectations family members have back
home. There are those Filipinos who work overseas, from Hong Kong domestic workers

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to physicians in the United States, who postpone returning home for years because they
dread the jeepney loads of relatives waiting for pasalubong. (Frilles, 2012)
But the balikbayan in California has the advantage of distance. The poor
migrants who go from impoverished rural areas to work in big cities face even greater
stress from family relations, who can easily contact their now rich urban cousins for a
share these earn in the city. (Caseria, 2010)
Filipinos are resilient. they said. Chinese Asia week once had a cover story
featuring Filipinos as the happiest people in the world, unfazed by the most difficult of
circumstances. One photo had a group of men drinking away in the middle of knee-high
floodwaters. (Chinese Asia week, 2008)
But the scenes of smiling and laughing Filipinos, singing and dancing (and
drinking) away can be deceptive. Quite often, they deal with stress by trying to be happy
which is really more of an externalized merriment. (Frilles, 2012)
But for all the talk about their communitarian orientation, of helping friends to
overcome stress, social pressures in the Philippines can also be counterproductive with
the way they sometimes force people to repress the stress. Enjoy! People urge them, not
realizing there are limits to resilience. (Frilles, 2012)
There are power dimensions to all this, such as those found in gender. Contrary to
stereotypes about women being more expressive, Filipinas are actually more prone to
dealing with stressful situations through tiis (endurance) and kimkim (repression). Check
out the local scenes of merriment: its usually men having a good time, bringing out the
beer and toasting their problems away, while their women look for ways to make ends
meet. (Frilles, 2012)

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Men, too, are expected to keep their feelings in check, but more out of masculine
values of strength. Men are generally not allowed to cry, much less to go into hysterics.
This probably helps to explain why more men suffer from cardiovascular disease.
Many Filipinos will express their stress by complaining about recurring headaches,
or abdominal pains, accompanied by dizziness, nausea, fatigue. Doctors used to dismiss
these as being all in the mind, but it has become clear the physical pain and distress may
be quite real, that the pent-up stress is expressed through the body. (Bartolome, 2013)
These vague symptoms have been labeled as somatization syndrome, and are often
hard to treat, partly because medical professionals still havent figured out the biological
processes involved. Culturally people may attach labels that dont quite reflect the actual
part of the body thats affected, as when they say that theyre suffering from nerbyos or
nerves. Nerbyos doesnt necessarily mean being nervous. Its often hypertension or
high blood pressure, for example, and a health professional or caregiver may miss the
problem. (Bartolome, 2013)
Then, too, theres the intriguing bangungot, those sudden deaths, usually at night,
associated with nightmares. The term itself is derived from bangon, to rise, and ungol,
to moan. Young healthy men, like the late actor Rico Yan, die mysteriously and the
diagnosis is immediate: bangungot. The medical world remains stumped, attributing the
deaths to everything, from pancreatitis to congenital defects in the heart, but too little has
been done to explore the stress angle. Similar culture-bound illnesses are found also in
other neighboring countries and the deaths tend to be reported in international medical
journals because they often occur in people who are away from home. The first cases
reported in U.S. medical literature involved Filipinos in the U.S. Navy. In recent years,

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medical reports have included Thai men doing construction work in Singapore, and
Indochinese refugees who have just relocated to the United States. (Bartolome, 2013)
Its not surprising if bangungot is reported as well among our 8.5 million overseas
Filipinos. The Filipino is so attached to home and hearth that we even have a term
namamahay, missing home, to describe a range of symptoms, from insomnia to
constipation that plagues us when we are away from home. Thats stress too. And with
men, given the cultural imperative of suppressing their distress, people might expect
nightmares, some with fatal endings. (Marcos, 2005)
The local literature is closely related to current study as it mentions how Filipino
individuals experience and put up with stress. It was stated in the article that Filipinos
dealt with stress a lot different from the westerners. It also mentioned sensory stresses
such as olfactory and noise stress, stress around work and livelihood, stresses of family,
and social pressure are what Filipino individuals commonly experience. The present
study, like the article, tackled a lot of different types of stress and stressors that the
varsity players experience in their environment such as noise stress, social stress, stress of
family, stress in school, and stress in sports.

Foreign Studies
(Wilson, & Pritchard, 2005) in their study titled Comparing Sources of Stress
in College Student Athletes and Non-Athletes, stated that there is a need to identify
specific sources of stress that significantly affect student-athletes that may differ from
those experienced by the traditional non-sport college student. The transition from high
school to college can be stressful for any student (Hudd et al., 2000; Pritchard, Wilson, &

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Yamnitz, 2004), but recent evidence suggests that athletes may experience even greater
levels of stress due to the dual demands of athletics and academics placed on them during
their freshman year. Lazarus and Folkman (1996) have defined stress as the negative
feeling that occurs when an individual feels unable to cope with the demands placed upon
them by their environment. For the matriculating freshman student athlete, these demands
may at times seem overwhelming.

Although researchers acknowledge that participation in athletics can serve as a buffer


to stress (Hudd et al., 2000; Kimball & Freysinger, 2003; Kudlacek, 1997; Shirka, 1997),
studies also suggest that athletic participation itself can become an additional stressor that
traditional college students do not experience (Kimball & Freysinger, 2003;
Papanikolaou, Nikolaidis, Patsiaouras, & Alexopoulos, 2003). Athletes experience
unique stressors related to their athletic status such as extensive time demands; a loss of
the star status that many had experienced as high school athletes; injuries; the
possibility of being benched/red-shirted their freshman year and conflicts with their
coaches, among other factors (Humphrey, Yow, & Bowden, 2000; Papanikolaou et al.,
2003). In addition to these stresses, freshmen athletes must also meet the increased
academic demands at the college level. The interaction of these multiple stressors
presents a unique problem for the college student athlete, and evidence suggests that the
combination of these stressors has a negative affect on their well-being. For example, a
recent investigation found that almost half of the male athletes and slightly more than half
of the female athletes interviewed indicated that stresses associated with sport
participation, such as pressure to win, excessive anxiety, frustration conflict, irritation
and fear significantly affected their mental or emotional health (Humphrey et al., 2000).

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Moreover, studies have suggested that college athletes who experience high levels of
stress are more likely to practice bad health habits (Hudd et al., 2000) and to experience
psychological problems (Shirka, 1997), including low self-esteem (Hudd et al., 2000;
Papanikolaou et al., 2003).

In addition to mental health concerns, many athletes report physical health concerns
as well, such as lack of sleep, continuous tension, fatigue, headaches, and digestive
problems (Humphrey et al., 2000). In fact, 10% of college athletes suffer from
psychological and physiological problems that are severe enough to require counseling
intervention (Hinkle, 1994). Even more alarming is the fact that college student athletes
tend to avoid seeking out available counseling (Murray, 1997), so the percentage of
student athletes who may actually require such intervention is possibly higher than this
figure. This is important since Murray (1997) has learned that in addition to those
psychological and physiological issues mentioned above, athletes may also be in
particular need of counseling for a variety of additional stress-related concerns, including
time management, burnout, fear of failure, anxiety, depression, and self-esteem issues.
Recent research has supported the contention that time in particular is an important
obstacle for many athletes. Humphrey et al. (2000) report that for more than 40 percent of
male athletes and well over half for the female athletes, factors related to time were the
most serious causes of stress. Most of the respondents in this study felt that there was
simply not enough time to combine academics and athletics and to do their best in both
areas (Humphrey et al., 2000).

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Complicating the freshman transition for the student athlete are difficulties related to
academic success (Humphrey et al., 2000; Papanikolaou et al., 2003). In fact, 95% of
male athletes and 86% of female athletes were stressed by factors such as: tests and
examinations, preparing papers for class, missing classes because of travel, and making
up missed assignments (Humphrey et al., 2000). In addition, many athletes find they are
unprepared for academic life in college or falsely believe that they will be treated
differently in the classroom because they are athletes (Papanikolaou et al., 2003).

Finally, athletes often find relationships with others quite stressful. For instance,
recent findings have suggested that athletes often report problems such as negative and
unsatisfactory relationships with teachers, coaches, and fellow athletes (Humphrey et al.,
2000; Papanikolaou et al., 2003).

In summary, there is a need to identify specific sources of stress that significantly


affect student-athletes that may differ from those experienced by the traditional non-sport
college student. This is especially true for the college freshman student-athlete who is
facing multiple new challenges arising from athletic, academic and social demands.
Many freshmen student-athletes are unprepared to successfully deal with these stressors,
and knowledge about those specific factors leading to heightened stress levels is essential
in the planning of effective intervention programs. Hence, the purpose of this exploratory
study was to identify those stressors identified by Division-I freshmen athletes as most
prevalent during their first semester in college.

Likewise, the present study will identify the sources of stress that college student
athletes experience to be able to know how to deal with the stressors. Non-athlete

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students may have experience stress in their everyday lives but athletic participation itself
can become an additional stressor that traditional college students do not experience.

Local Studies
It is stated in the study made by Bulo and Sanchez at the year 2014 titled,
Sources of stress among College students that college students are exposed to many
problems from family, financially, friends and school environment. They focused their
study affecting the college students on its major concept of stress and stressors in the
college environment. They formulated a Questionnaire on the students life stress
inventory was adopted to gather the needed data among 150 college students. They also
mentioned that College Students are prone to stress because of their transitional nature of
adjustment to the rudiments of higher education program. In their stay in college
environment, they need to cope up with the standards of higher education. They added
that with repeated stressful situations, causes tension and pressure on the body that
contribute to physical and psychological problems.
It is also included that the most common form of stress that college students may
face, one of them was to get good grades and having to do other responsibilities at the
same time focusing on schoolwork, financial responsibilities. Earning high grades is a
source of stress that affects them to succeed in making good impression to their parents,
classmates, and their significant other persons. Based on the result of their study, if the
college students focuses more on these stressors they may lead to failure, so keeping
things in balanced and having fun with hobbies are the keys to eliminate stress. Because
of these problems schools had an idea in creating a stress management program for
higher education institution to consider implementation. (Bulo & Sanchez, 2014)

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Garcia and Mendoza, in their study Coping with Stress: The Case of Board
Courses Students in University of Baguio found out that students find school work very
stressful, but others who were able to fight stress see themselves walking towards the
achievement of their dreams .One of these is telling stress related issues to parents,
relatives and friends. It focuses that the stress can affect students performance, but it was
found that knowing how to handle it, or having someone to tell with about the stress and
the problems related to it, managing and coping to stress becomes easier. (Garcia &
Mendoza, 2014)
In a study conducted by the students of Lyceum of the Philippines University on
Vulnerability of the Graduating Students to Different Symptoms of Stress and Its
Influence to Level a Satisfaction, they found out that students are experiencing headache
more frequently in a week for two to three weeks and the least among them are difficulty
in falling asleep, increase in heart rate and dizziness, while in psychological stress, they
are experiencing negative thinking, being tense and irritability more frequently with two
to three times a week. However, the least psychological stress variables that are being
encountered are the feeling of frustration, anxious and blaming others. They are
experiencing physical and psychological stress`s in a week only which means that theres
a very low possibility of stress occurrence. (Anon, 2012)
Assessing the stress level among college students has been a helpful addition to
the understanding of student experiences and development. According on their study they
found out that students especially scholars had different adjustment level when it comes
to academic requirements obtaining different level of adjustments. They also stated that
student organizations will also serve as good instrument to become a medium on how to

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deliver the programs that will handle such activities in stress management for the
students. (Garcia & Mendoza, 2014)
The present study discussed the proper stress management that will help the
varsity players to cope up with pressures in both their sports and academic performance.
It will point out how varsity players will put up with stress along with their environment.
This study will also mention how different stress managements are used to manage the
environmental and psychological factors that cause the stress among student athletes.

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CHAPTER 3
Methods and Procedure

Introduction
This chapter presents the description of the methods and procedures done in order
to obtain the data, how they will be analyzed, interpreted, and how the conclusion will be
met. This section is to justify the means in which the study was obtained and will help in
giving it purpose and strength as it will then be truthful and analytical.

Methods of Research
Under the quantitative research method, the researchers used several types of the
said method; these are the Survey, Correlational, and Descriptive.
Survey research uses question based or statistical surveys to collect information
about how people think and act. Correlational research is defined as a relationship
between two variables. Descriptive research is about describing people who take part in
the study. The researchers will perform a survey to gather information about the CEU
Manila varsity players and their stress management. The researchers will correlate the
CEU Manila varsity players stress management techniques and their respective
efficiency to the sports and academic performance of CEU Manila varsity players. The
researchers will describe the CEU Manila varsity players, the student athletes
performance in both academic and sports, and their chosen stress management.

26

Subject/Respondents of the Study


The subjects and respondents of this study were composed of fifty (50) students
from CEU Manila. The researchers selected random students coming from different types
of sports including Mens Basketball, Womens Basketball, Cheerleading, Womens
Volleyball, Mens Futsal, Badminton, and Swimming.

Sampling Technique
Cluster Sampling Technique was utilized in this research. In this sampling, the
population will be grouped by the sports they are engaged in and then choose members
randomly from each groups/cluster. Since there is a huge population, we will only be
getting fifty (50) respondents from it.

Research Instrument
The following instruments were used in the conducting of research:
1. Questionnaire. The questionnaire was used to identify the sources of stress of
each student athletes, including the different stress management used by the
athletes in their respective sports.
2. Interview. This is a face to face or direct method that is used in collection of
data. Unstructured Interview was used where in the atmosphere is casual.
There are sets of questions to be asked. One coach and one captain per sport
were interviewed.

27

Validation of the Instrument


For validation, the researchers used a survey questionnaire to an expert faculty
member, and after approval, the questionnaires will be given to students who will not be
included as the final respondents. Their response will be tested for reliability.

Procedure of Data Gathering


This study is consisted of five stages:
Stage 1: deals with the analysis and formulation of questionnaires in order to get
the results regarding the study. The researchers will use the survey questionnaires. The
question will be based on the statement of the problem.
Stage 2: deals with the validation of the questionnaires. The researchers will pass
the questionnaires to Dr. Coquia to amend and to evaluate the survey questionnaires that
will be disseminated to the respondents before making and conducting the study.
Stage 3: deals with the distribution of the questionnaires. After approving the
survey questionnaires, the researchers will disseminate the copies of the questionnaire to
the selected CEU varsity players. The respondents are asked to accomplish and fill in
completely the following questions and answer it concise, objective and honest.
Stage 4: deals with collection of the questionnaires. The researchers will gather all
the questionnaires and will evaluate and examine all the papers.
Stage 5: deals with the interpretation of the gathered data. The researchers will
tabulate and tally the questionnaires on different selection. After all that, the researchers
will proceed to the proper statistical treatment of the gather data.

28

Statistical Treatment
To classify and to interpret the gathered data, the researchers used the following:
1. Frequency counts and percentage using the simple descriptive survey to evaluate
and to describe the profile of CEU varsity players.

Frequency and Percentage Distribution this was used to arrange the data
gathered by its categories. The formula is:
P = f / n 100
Where:
P Percentage
f Frequency
n Number of respondents

29

CHAPTER 4
Presentation, Analysis and Interpretation of Data

This chapter includes the presentation, analysis and interpretation of data that
have been gathered from the questionnaires distributed to the respondents. This chapter
also contains the presentation of data in tabular form along with their corresponding
interpretations.

1. Profile
1.1 Age
Table 1.1
Profile of Respondents According to Age
Age
15-17
18-20
21-23
24 and above
Total

f
10
31
9
0
50

%
20
62
18
0
100

As shown in table 1.1, out of 50 respondents, 62% are in the age bracket of 18-20
years old, followed by age bracket of 15-17 years old with 20%, and last by age bracket
of 21-23 years old with 18%.
This reveals that the majority of the respondents are in their second or third year
in college. The majority have at least a one year experience in their designated sport. This
also implies that there is no one in the respondents belong to the age bracket of 24 and
above.

30

Table 1.2
Profile of Respondents According to Gender
Gender
Female
Male
Total

f
30
20
50

%
60
40
100

As shown in table 1.2, majority of the respondents were female with a frequency
of 30 or 60% of the population while the male had a frequency of 20 or 40%.
This reveals that the majority of the respondents are female. Since CEU
comprises of more female students than male students, it is more likely to have more
female varsity players than male.

Table 1.3
Profile of Respondents According to Sports
Sport

Basketball

16

32

Volleyball

10

20

Futsal

10

20

Cheerleading

10

20

Badminton

Swimming

Total

50

100

As shown in table 1.3, majority of the respondents are players of basketball with
frequency of 16 or 32%, followed by volleyball, futsal and cheerleading with frequency
of 10 or 20%, badminton with frequency of 3 or 6% and swimming with frequency of 1
or 2%.

31

This reveals that there are more basketball players than the other sports, given that
the researchers were able to get in touch with both male and female basketball varsity
players. This also shows that the majority of the sports are categorized in the team sports
consisting of four sports such as volleyball, basketball, cheerleading, and futsal, while the
minority are categorized into individual/dual sports consisting of two sports such as
badminton and swimming.
Table 1.4
Profile of Respondents According to Sports Engagement
Sports Engagement

Elementary

High School

18

College

38

76

Total

50

100

As shown in table 1.4, majority of the respondents started to be engaged in their


respective sport during College with frequency of 38 or 76% while the minority started to
be engaged in their respective sport during Elementary with frequency of 3 or 6%.
This reveals that the majority of the respondents started their designated sport
during their college days. There are a few who had started and had been a star player or
varsity player during elementary or high school days, but the rest or most of them
discovered their sport in college.

32

Table 1.5
Profile of Respondents According to Anxiety Levels
Anxiety Level

Low Anxiety Level

17

34

Average Anxiety Level

24

48

High Anxiety Level

18

Total

50

100

As shown in table 1.5, majority of the respondents have an Average Anxiety level
with frequency of 24 or 48% while the minority have a High Anxiety level with
frequency of 9 or 18%.
This reveals that the majority of varsity players have average anxiety level. Since
they have average anxiety levels, they are being effective in their performance. Their
built up anxiety or stress makes them motivated to work hard, while not too pressured or
stressed that theyre starting to struggle.

2. Sources of Stress
Table 2
Sources of Stress
Sources of Stress
Balancing sport and
academic demands
Too many
responsibilities
Finance
Pressure to win a
competition
Social life

f
%
Always Sometimes Never Always Sometimes Never
20
26
4
40
52
8
15

32

30

64

15

24

11

30

48

22

23

23

46

46

29

16

10

58

32

33

Conflict with the coach


Not getting the
necessary amount of
sleep
Injury or illness

2
14

16
25

32
11

4
28

32
50

64
22

34

10

12

68

20

As shown in table 2, the always source of stress is Pressure to win a competition


with the frequency of 23 or 46%, followed by the sometimes source of stress is Too many
responsibilities with frequency of 32 or 64%, and never source of stress is Conflict with
the coach with frequency of 32 or 64%.
This reveals that varsity players reported the most stress in Pressure to win a
competition and the least stress in Conflict with the coach.

3. Stress Managements

Table 3
Stress Managements
Stress Managements
Hanging out with
friends
Completing tasks one
by one
Talking about stress
problems
Exercising and
maintaining a healthy
life
Practicing faith
Playing games
Going to the bar and
partying

f
Always Sometimes
25
25

%
Never
0

Always Sometimes Never


50
50
0

28

21

56

42

22

25

44

50

29

18

58

36

27
27
6

22
22
25

1
1
19

54
54
12

44
44
50

2
2
38

34

Table 3 shows that most of stress managements the respondents always do is


Exercising and maintaining a healthy life with the frequency of 29 or 58%, sometimes
Hanging out with friends and Talking about stress problems with frequency of 25 or 50%
and never Going to bar and partying with frequency of 19 or 38%.
This reveals that varsity players cope up with their stress the most is by
Exercising and maintaining a healthy life and the least is Going to bar and partying.

4. Effects of Stress on Academic and Sports Performance


Table 4.1
Effects of Stress in Academic Performance
Often
Sometimes
Rarely
Total

f
79
156
15
250

%
32
62
6
100

As shown in table 4.1, 62% of the respondents can sometimes cope up with their
academics. This is followed by 32% of respondents who can often cope up. On the other
hand, there are only 6% who rarely cope up with their academic performance.

Table 4.2
Effects of Stress in Sports Performance

Often
Sometimes
Rarely
Total

f
97
136
17
250

%
39
54
7
100

35

As shown in table 4.2, 54% of the respondents can sometimes cope up with their
sports performance. This is followed by 39% of respondents who can often cope up. On
the other hand, only 7% of the respondents can rarely cope up with their sports
performance.

5. Efficiency of Stress Management


Table 5
Efficiency of Stress Management
Efficiency
More
Efficient
Less
Efficient
Total

Academic
Performance
f
%

Sports Performance

Overall

34

68

37

74

26

52

16

32

13

26

24

48

50

100

50

100

50

100

As shown in table 5, 34 or 68% of the respondents stress management technique


are efficient in their academic performance, while 37 or 74% are effective in their sports
performance. Overall, in both sports and academics, 26 or 52% are effective while 24 or
48% are not effective.
This reveals that the respondents stress management techniques are more
effective in Sports than Academics. The table also implies that the majority of the
respondents stress management techniques are efficient individually in sports and
academics than not efficient. Overall, 52% of the respondents stress management
techniques are effective and 48% are not. Therefore, we conclude that the majority of the

36

respondents stress management are usually efficient either in sports or in academics, but
not usually both.

37

CHAPTER 5
Summary, Conclusions and Recommendations

This chapter presents the summary of findings, conclusions and recommendations


of the research entitled The Efficiency of Stress Management on Sports and Academic
Performance of Varsity Players in CEU Manila.

Summary of Findings
1. What were the profile of the respondents in terms of:
1.1 Age

Out of 50 respondents, 62 percent are in the age bracket of 18-20 which


means that most of the respondents have at least one year experience in
their designated sport.

1.2 Gender

Based on gender, majority of the respondents were female with a


frequency of 30 or 60 percent of the population, while the male had a
frequency of 20 or 40 percent only, seeing as CEU Manila comprises
mostly of female students.

1.3 Sport

Majority of the respondents are players of basketball with frequency of 16


or 32%, followed by volleyball, futsal and cheerleading with frequency of
10 or 20%, badminton with frequency of 3 or 6% and swimming with
frequency of 1 or 2%. Also, majority of the respondents are playing team

38

sports such as basketball, volleyball, futsal, and cheerleading, than


individual/dual sports such as swimming and badminton.
1.4 Sports Engagement

Majority of the respondents started to be engaged in their respective sport


during College with frequency of 38 or 76%, which means that there are a
few who had started and had been a star player or varsity player during
elementary or high school days, but the rest or most of them discovered
their sport in college.

1.5 Level of Anxiety

Majority of the respondents have an Average Anxiety level with


frequency of 24 or 48%, which means that they are being effective in
their performance and at the peak of their best performance.

2. What were the sources of stress among the varsity players in CEU Manila?
The always source of stress among varsity players in CEU Manila is pressure in
winning a game with the frequency of 23 or 46%, and never source of stress is in
conflict with the coach with frequency of 32 or 64%. As varsity players, their major
concern is their performance during a competition. It also shows that majority of the
respondents have a good relationship with their coach since most of them never
experience conflicts with them.

39

3. What were the stress management techniques of varsity players in CEU Manila?
Most of the stress managements that the respondents always do are Exercising
and maintaining a healthy life with the frequency of 29 or 58%, and never Going to
bar with frequency of 19 or 38%. They believe that when theyre healthy and fit, it
would be beneficial to them. As college students, it is viewed well that majority of
the varsity players never went to bar to party and to drink alcohol because it will not
only be beneficial to their performance in sports, but also to their well-being.

4. What were the effects of stress on sports and academic performance of varsity
players in CEU Manila?

Effects of Stress on Academic Performance


Sixty-two percent of the respondents can sometimes cope up with their
academics. This is followed by 32% of respondents who can often cope
up. On the other hand, there are only 6% who can rarely cope up with their
academic performance.

Effects of Stress on Sports Performance


Fifty-four percent of the respondents can sometimes cope up with their
sports performance. This is followed by 39% of respondents who can
often cope up. On the other hand, only 7% of the respondents can rarely
cope up with their sports performance.

40

5. What is the efficiency of stress management on sports and academic performance of


varsity players in CEU Manila?
Majority of the respondents stress management techniques are more effective in
Sports than Academics. This also implies that the majority of the respondents stress
management techniques are efficient individually in sports and academics than not
efficient. Overall, we conclude that the majority of the respondents stress
management are usually efficient either in sports or in academics, but not usually
both.

Conclusions
Based on the above mentioned findings, the following conclusions were drawn:
1. The performance of the varsity player, in sports or academics, depends on the
stress management that they use.
2. Varsity players in CEU Manila were able to maintain best performance, if not
always, in either sports or academics only.
3. It is not necessary to eliminate stress; rather, it should be balanced to attain the
best performance.

Recommendations
Based on the above mentioned conclusion, the researchers would like to
recommend the following:
1. For the college student athletes
1.1. To practice effective stress management for maintaining good performance.

41

1.2. To change their stress management if not effective.


1.3. To learn how to balance stress, instead of aiming to eliminate them.
2. For the coaches, instructors, and parents
2.1. To identify the unique sources of stresses that the student athletes experience
during the first semester of the freshman year.
2.2. To have serious consideration of academic support services and adequate inputs
for teaching and learning in universities.
2.3. To encourage leisure activities that give students a broader experience in a
variety of sports and exercise; encourage the development of practical skills,
improve overall health, and encourage a level of curiosity and enthusiasm.
3. For the future researchers
3.1. To undertake similar studies regarding the efficiency of stress management on
academic and sports performance of varsity players or college student athletes
3.2. To conduct a more in depth research in the said study.
3.3. To carry out further studies that will focus on stress management of varsity
players using other factors that are not mentioned in the study.

42

REFERENCES

Bulo, J.G., Sanchez, M. G. (2014). Sources of stress among college students.


CVCITC Research Journal, 1 (1), pp 16 25.

Pritchard, M. E., Wilson, G. (2005). Comparing of Stress in College Student Athletes


and Non-Athletes. Athletic Insight: The On-line Journal of Sport Psychology

Rumbold, J., Fletcher D., Daniels K. (2012). A systematic review of stress management
interventions with sport performers. Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology, 1(3)
173-193. ISSN 2157-3905
Santos, R., De Guzman, T., Yabut, E., et.al (2012). Frequency Distribution. Statistics.
(Centro Escolar University Manila)
Singh, A. (2003) Stress, Sports, and Performance. Serendip Studio
Tan, M. (2006). Stress and the Filipino. Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism
http://www.thesportinmind.com/articles/stress-in-sport/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stress_management
http://www.essortment.com/stress-management-techniques-college-students-40346.html
http://www.brianmac.co.uk/stress.htm

43

APPENDICES

44

Appendix A
Sample Letter of Request

February 09, 2015

Dr. Carlito B. Olaer


VP, Student Affairs Office
Centro Escolar University

Dear Sir:
We, bona fide Psychology students of Centro Escolar University from section 2-A, are
currently conducting an undergraduate research titled The Efficiency of Stress
Management in Sports and Academic Performances of Varsity Players in CEU
Manila, as a partial requirement for our course in Communication Skills 14.
In connection with this, we are asking for your permission to allow us to conduct a brief
interview with the coach and Team captain of the following:
1. University Pep Squad
2. Mens Basketball
3. Womens Basketball
4. Womens Volleyball
5. Mens Futsal
6. Badminton
7. Swimming
Only ten (10) randomly selected players of each team will participate as the respondents
of our thesis. Rest assured that all the data gathered will be kept confidentially and for
research purpose only.
We hope for your favorable action on our request. Thank you.

Respectfully yours,

Mangandi, Krizelle Raine V.


BSPSY2A

45

Appendix B
Sample Letter of Request to Coach
February 09, 2015

Mr. Vincent Raphael Manarang


Head Coach, Pep Squad
Centro Escolar University
Mendiola, Manila

Dear Sir:

We, bona fide Psychology students of Centro Escolar University from section 2-A, are
currently conducting an undergraduate research titled The Efficiency of Stress
Management in Sports and Academic Performances of Varsity Players in CEU
Manila, as a partial requirement for our course in Communication Skills 14.
In connection with this, we are asking for your permission to allow us to undergo a
survey to the players that will be used as the respondents of our thesis, and to conduct a
brief interview with the coach and team captain of the following:
1. University Pep Squad
2. Mens Basketball
3. Womens Basketball
4. Womens Volleyball
5. Mens Futsal
6. Badminton
7. Swimming
Only ten (10) randomly selected players of each team will participate as the respondents
of our thesis. Rest assured that all the data gathered will be kept confidentially and for
research purpose only.
We hope for your favorable action on our request. Thank you.

Respectfully yours,

Mangandi, Krizelle Raine V.


BSPSY2A

46

Appendix C
Sample Letter of Request to Respondents

Dear respondents,

We, the researchers from BS Psychology Second Year Section A, would like to ask you to
answer the questionnaire for our undergraduate research titled The Efficiency of Stress
Management on Sports and Academic Performance of Varsity players in CEU Manila. The
purpose of this study is to find out the efficiency of the stress management that the CEU Manila
varsity teams are engaged in. Your response to this questionnaire will be treated with utmost
confidentiality and shall be restricted for reference purposes only.

I acknowledge that I have answered this given questionnaire freely and without
coercion.

Printed name with signature

47

Appendix D
Sample Survey Questionnaire

Centro Escolar University


Mendiola, Manila

The Efficiency of Stress Management on Sports


and Academic Performances
of Varsity Players in
CEU Manila

Direction: Put a check () if it corresponds to your answer.


1. What is your profile in terms of:
1.1. Age:
_____15-17

_____18- 20 _____21-23

_____24 and above

1.2 Gender:
_____Female

_______Male

1.3 Course
_____Science Courses

______Non-Science Courses

48

1.4 Year level


_____1st year

_____2nd year

_____3rd year

_____4th year

_____5th year

_____6th year

_____Basketball

____Volleyball

_____Futsal/Football

_____Cheerleading

____Badminton

_____Taekwondo

_____Table Tennis

____Swimming

_____Chess

1.5 Sport engaged into

1.6 Type of sport


_____Individual/Dual sports

_____Team Sports

1.7 Sports engagement


_____Elementary

_____High School

_____College

Anxiety Test
Direction: Put a check () on the box that corresponds to your answer.

OFTEN
1

I start to feel uneasy before a competition starts.

Before I compete, I notice my heart beats faster than normal.

Before I compete, I get a queasy feeling in my stomach.

Before I compete, I worry about not being able to perform well.

I fear that I might disappoint my coach.

SOMETIMES RARELY

49

6
7

I worry that I might let down my team


I worry that I might leave the team/this sport if I got failing grades
in school.

Direction: Read each statement below and encircle that letter that corresponds to your
answer.

As a college student-athlete, do these concerns made up the sources of your stress?

ALWAYS

SOMETIMES

NEVER

1 Balancing sport and academic demands

2 Too many responsibilities

3 Finances (e.g. tuition, misc., etc.)

4 Pressure to win a competition

5 Social Life

6 Conflict with the coach

7 Not getting the necessary amount of sleep

8 Injury or illness

Do these activities help you cope up with your stress?

ALWAYS

SOMETIMES

NEVER

1 Hanging out with friends

2 Completing tasks one by one

3 Talking about stress problems

4 Exercising and maintaining a healthy life

50

5 Practicing Faith

6 Playing games

7 Going to the bar and partying

Direction: Put a check () on the box that corresponds to your answer.

OFTEN
1 Do you still have time to self-study?
2 Do you bring school works at home?
3 Do you cram your school works?
4 Do you still get high grades when you cram?

Do you get higher grades when you cram than when


5 not?
6
7

8
9
10

When the audience cheer you and your team, does it


helps you win the game/competition?
When the audience cheer your opponent, does it
discourage you during the game/competition?
When your coach yell at you during a
game/competition, does it help you to perform
better?
Do you feel discouraged if there is no one to cheer
you on?
Does stress/pressure motivates you to perform
better?

SOMETIMES

RARELY

51

Direction: Encircle the letter that corresponds to your answer.

1. When Im chosen to perform/play in a competition/game, I feel


a. I feel proud and confident
b. I feel anxiety creeping on me
c. I have this fear that my coach will be disappointed if I fail this
d. I feel nothing
2. When I got home late because of training and still have loads of school works to do..
a. I will pull an all-nighter just to finish my school works
b. I will just sleep in because I feel tired after all those training
c. I will never do my school works, theyre not important to me.
d. I will just copy my friends work tomorrow.
3. When I get a severe injury and wont be able to participate in the competition after all
those training
a. I would just wait to recover fully so I can go back to playing
b. I would feel discouraged and might decide to quit
c. I would just focus on my studies
d. I feel nothing
4. When I lose in a game/competition..
a. I feel motivated to work harder than before
b. I feel like I want to quit
c. I feel embarrassed
d. I feel nothing

52

5. When I'm benched or not allowed to play in the competition for the whole season, I
feel...
a. I feel motivated to train harder
b. I feel disappointed with myself
c. I feel that I want to quit.
d. I feel nothing.
6. When I participate in the game/competition and achieved triumph, I
a. I feel proud and confident
b. I became more pressured than before
c. I feel motivated to train harder
d. I don't feel anything
7. When I passed the exam even if I didn't review because of training, I
a. I feel happy and proud
b. I feel anxious
c. I dont care about it at all
d. I don't feel anything
8. When I'm the reason why my co-player is injured, I
a. I feel guilty and might decide to quit
b. I feel anxious
c. I will feel bad about but I wont be discouraged because of it.
d. I don't feel anything
9. When my coach is mad at me because i didn't train because of school works, I..
a. I feel embarassed

53

b. I feel more stressful than before


c. I feel pressured but I will not let it affect me
d. I don't feel anything
10. When I fail an exam, I usually..
a. Push myself and study harder than before
b. I go to parties and drink
c. I will take a break from training and focus more on studies.
d. I will just hang out with my friends
11. When my teacher warned me about my missed classes and requirements, I
a. I feel pressured more than before
b. I cant balance academics and sports, so I might quit the sport.
c. I will feel pressured but wont let it affect my performance
d. I don't feel anything
12. When I miss class, quizzes, and exams because of training..
a. I feel disappointed with myself
b. I feel fine. I dont care about my grades anyway
c. I will try my very hardest to catch up with my studies
d. I feel nothing

54

Appendix E
Sample Interview Questions for Coach

Interview Questions for Coach


1. Does the school provide stress management program for our varsity players?
2. How are you as a coach to them?
Are you strict?
Do you reward and punish them?
3. How do you motivate the players to do well during training?
Do you yell at them when they make a mistake?
What is your view with regards to yelling, do you think it will help them to cope
up with the game or the other way around?
4. How do you uplift the spirit of the team?
5. How do you bring hope in the next quarter/set in a scenario where your team is left
behind or is about to lose in the game?
Do you advise them to never give up?
6. How do you feel when the team lose in a game/competition?
Do you train them harder? Are they not allowed to have fun?
Do you encourage them to push forward? How do you do so?
7. After winning the game/competition, what kind of things do you do?
8. How do you strengthen the bonding of a team?
Do you create activities that enhance team work?
How often and for what purpose you conduct team building?
9. In scenarios where conflicts or fights arise in the team, how do you resolve it?
10. How do you handle situations like when a player injures himself?
How do you motivate him?
How will you encourage him to bring his self-confidence back?
11. Do you give advices to your players that arent related to sports?
12. Are finances still a major problem to the players despite of being a scholar?
13. How well do you manage your players with regards to their academic performance?
Do you encourage them to prioritize studies first before sports?
Do you prefer them to do well on sports, academics, or both?
14. What do you advise them to do for them to manage their stress?
15. Why do you think they need to manage those stress?
How will it affect their sports performance?

55

CURRICULUM
VITAE

56

Curriculum Vitae

I.

Personal Information

Name: Christine Carol L. Biagtan


Date of Birth: September 30, 1992
Gender: Female
Civil Status: Single
Nationality: Filipino
Current Address: 10224 Centennial 2-B, Pinagbuhatan, Pasig
Contact number:
Email Address: ccbiagtan@gmail.com

II.

Academic Information

Primary: Sta. Rosa Catholic School


Secondary: Sta. Rosa Catholic School
Tertiary: Centro Escolar University 2013 Present

57

Curriculum Vitae

I.

Personal Information

Name: Krizelle Raine V. Mangandi


Date of Birth: September 22, 1997
Gender: Female
Civil Status: Single
Nationality: Filipino
Current Address: 017 J. Basig St. Cainta, Rizal
Contact number: 09178256686
Email Address: krizelle.mangandi@gmail.com

II.

Academic Information

Primary: Greenland Academy


Secondary: Greenland Academy
Tertiary: Centro Escolar University 2013 - Present

58

Curriculum Vitae
I.

Personal Information

Name: Lance Gabrielle C. Manuel


Date of Birth: April 10, 1997
Gender: Male
Civil Status: Single
Nationality: Filipino
Current Address: 113 E. Rodriguez Ave. Taytay, Rizal
Contact number: 09328662151
Email Address: manuellancegabrielle@yahoo.com

II.

II.

Academic Information

Primary: Amazing Grace Christian Learning Centre 2003-2009


Secondary: Siena College of Taytay 2009-2013
Tertiary: Centro Escolar University 2013 - Present

59

Curriculum Vitae

I.

Personal Information

Name: Quiara Vhae V. Mata


Date of Birth: May 22, 1997
Gender: Female
Civil Status: Single
Nationality: Filipino
Current Address: 911 Algeciras St., Sampaloc, Manila
Contact number: 0916779530
Email Address: quiarav@yahoo.com

II.

Academic Information

Primary: Little Smarties Learning Center and Darwin International School


Secondary: Darwin International School and Le Athenaeum Montessori of Bulacan
Tertiary: Centro Escolar University 2013 - Present

60

Curriculum Vitae

I.

Personal Information

Name: Ma. Sovietskaya T. Oringo


Date of Birth: November 16, 1996
Gender: Female
Civil Status: Single
Nationality: Filipino
Current Address: 862 Leyte del surst.Sampaloc, Manila
Contact number: 09062238108
Email Address: Sovietskayatongoringo@gmail.com

II.

Academic Information

Primary: Padre Burgos Elementary School


Secondary: Victorino Mapa Highschool
Tertiary: Centro Escolar University 2013 - Present

61

Curriculum Vitae

I.

Personal Information

Name: Fritz Sigrid T. Payawal


Date of Birth: March 25, 1997
Gender: Female
Civil Status: Single
Nationality: Filipino
Current Address: #255 McKinley St., Paralaya, Candaba, Pampanga
Contact number: 09057202597
Email Address: fritzsigridpayawal@yahoo.com

II.

Academic Information

Primary: Candaba Ecumenical Learning Center


Secondary: Pampanga High School
Tertiary: Centro Escolar University 2013 - Present

62

Curriculum Vitae

I.

Personal Information

Name: Li-ann Pauline F. Sabusap


Date of Birth: September 12, 1997
Gender: Female
Civil Status: Single
Nationality: Filipino
Current Address: Vizione Dormitory, Tolentino St. Samapaloc, Manila
Contact number: 0946184633
Email Address: liannpauline12@yahoo.com

II.

Academic Information

Primary: San Rafael Natividad Elementary School


Secondary: Magsaysay Memorial College
Tertiary: Centro Escolar University 2013 Present

63

Curriculum Vitae

I.

Personal Information

Name: Marie Anthonette D. Virina


Date of Birth: March 6, 1996
Gender: Female
Civil Status: Single
Nationality: Filipino
Current Address: 1321 Sta. Clara St. Samapaloc, Manila
Contact number: 09266380406
Email Address: marie_anthonette@yahoo.com

II.

Academic Information

Primary: Cornerstone Christian Academy of Nagcarlan


Secondary: St. Marys Academy of Nagcarlan
Tertiary: Centro Escolar University 2013 - Present