Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 2

Psychology of Love: Sternberg’s Triangle

The Triangular Theory of Love was developed by Robert J. Sternberg, a psychologist at Tufts University. 
According to his theory, three elements comprise any given instance of an interpersonal relationship.

One element is intimacy, by which is meant emotional intimacy, which involves a high level of trust between two 
individuals. A second element is passion, which is driven by sexual attraction. The third element is known as 
commitment, which is a conscious effort to maintain the relationship.
As the name of the theory suggests, each of these three elements is pictured as a point on a triangle. Now 
imagine that each of the three points was pulling away from the other two, constantly attempting to warp the 
perfectly formed isosceles (equal­sided) triangle. If all three points are equally strong, then the equilibrium will 
hold, but if there is an inequality in strength, the triangle will be stretched. This is how Sternberg viewed love. He 
categorized seven different possibilities based on which point or points predominated (in fact, there is an eighth 
possibility: if none of the three elements is present at all, then there is no love; imagine the triangle collapsing in 
on itself).
A relationship with all three elements in equal strength is what Sternberg termed “consummate love.” This is 
generally the ideal after which people strive. The other six forms of love all feature one or two of the points on 
the triangle predominating. These can be divided into simple or complex permutations: in the simple category, 
one element reigns supreme over the other two, while in the complex, two elements crowd out the weaker third.
When intimacy exists without passion or commitment, the result is friendship, mere “liking” rather than 
“loving.” When passion alone dominates, infatuation, an almost mindless physical desire, results. When only 
commitment is present with no underlying physical or emotional desire, in a loveless marriage for instance, there 
appears what Sternberg calls “empty love.”
When the dominant forces are intimacy and passion, the result is romantic love, which feels physically and 
emotionally powerful but is also fleeting. When intimacy and commitment overshadow passion, the love is 
known as “companionate” (imagine an old married couple who are happy together but no longer feel sexual 
desire for each other). Finally, when there is passion and commitment but no intimacy, the love is “fatuous”; 
consider two people who meet in Las Vegas, have a night of wild passion, and then get married in a drive­thru 
chapel without ever getting to know each other!
Although consummate love serves as an ideal, that is not to say there is no value in  the other forms of love. 
Friendship, for instance, is valuable in itself, and certainly, companionate affection is more acceptable between 
two siblings than the consummate type.
It should also be kept in mind that the triangle is not static, but dynamic; it might change over time with new 
circumstances. Even once consummate love is achieved, it cannot be taken for granted, but constantly reinforced 
by positive actions and dedication.