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Running head: OCCUPATIONAL ANALYSIS AND INTERVENTION PLAN

Occupational Analysis and Intervention Plan


Touro University Nevada
Leslie Ramos

OCCUPATIONAL ANALYSIS AND INTERVENTION PLAN

Occupational Profile
1. Client name: Kristin Caroza
2. Age: 23
3. Sex: Female
4. Who is the client?
Kristin is a first year graduate student in the occupational therapy program at Touro
University Nevada. She moved from San Jose, California to Henderson, Nevada and has
made a smooth transition over the past three months. She is a hard working student who
spends the majority of her time going to school and studying for exams. She is currently
doing well in all her classes.
5. Why is the client seeking services and/or what are the clients concerns relative to engaging
in occupations and in daily life activities?
Kristin has concerns in regards to time management because of her busy academic
schedule. On a typical day, she spends about eight hours at school and at least four hours
outside of school studying. She explains how hard it can be to make time for leisure
activities that she has done prior to the program. Because of her busy schedule, she tends to
put off activities such as laundry, grocery shopping, working out, and cleaning.
6. In what occupations does the client feel successful and what barriers are affecting his or her
success?
She finds success in her academic performance; however, her time commitments
towards school related activities has reduced her time for leisure. She doesnt want to reduce
the amount of time she spends studying for classes because she is afraid her grades will slip
away. In addition, she feels burnt out from not having time to herself to pursue activities she
usually does on a weekly basis. When she was living at home, she use to go indoor rock
climbing at least three times a week. Since she has been living in Henderson, she has only
gone twice. She needs to overcome the fear of having her grades slipping so that she can
take time out of her week to engage in her favorite leisure activities. She is doing very well
in all her classes and there seems to be more free time in her schedule now that all the big
exams have passed.
7. What aspects of his or her environments or contexts does the client see as supporting
engagement in desired occupations and what aspects are inhibiting engagement?
Her social environments support and inhibit her desire of engaging in more leisure
activities. Some of her classmates are more than willing to spend time outside of class to
enjoy an activity unrelated to school and some dedicate most of their time studying school
material. She can make a choice in who she wants to study with as well as who she wants to
spend her leisure time with. There needs to be a balance between the two and there is
nothing wrong with having different friends for specific activities. Her physical

OCCUPATIONAL ANALYSIS AND INTERVENTION PLAN

environment is mainly the school classroom and her apartment which is only a few minutes
away from school. Her proximity allows her to spend less time commuting to school. This
time can support the engagement of leisure activities if she plans her daily schedule.
8. What is the clients occupational history?
Her present daily occupations consists of her managing her self-care, cooking and
preparing food for each day of the week, driving to school and back, being a student in an
accelerated program, and walking to get around school and within the apartment complex.
9. What are the clients values and interests?
Kristin values her family in which she tries to keep in contact with on a weekly
basis. In addition, she values her academics as she is highly motivated to become an
occupational therapist. She displays interest in watching her favorite movies and shows on
Netflix. She also loves to rock climb and work out to help her unwind from a stressful week.
10. What are the clients daily life roles?
Kristins main role is a graduate student at Touro University Nevada. She is also a
daughter, sister, roommate, and friend towards the people she typically interacts with daily.
11. What are the clients patterns of engagement in occupations?
On a typical school day, Kristin wakes up every morning and starts her day off with a
cup of coffee. She prepares her lunch in the morning and then gets herself ready for school.
She usually has some extra time to study for one of her classes. She drives to school and
spend the rest of the day in class until dinner time. She goes home and eats dinner then
continues to study for classes. Some days when she has more time, she will spend an hour at
the gym. After, she would shower then and go to bed.
12. What are the clients priorities and desired targeted outcomes related to occupational
performance?
Kristins targeted outcome is to be able to perform well in school and pass all of her
classes. Her main goal and reason for living in Henderson, Nevada is to graduate with her
masters degree in occupational therapy. In addition, she would like to find balance in her
schedule to do activites she enjoys. She wants to learn how to manage her time by creating a
schedule that will allow her to fit designated times to study as well as time in the week to
rock climb. She always wants to find time to finish up her weekly to do list such as grocery
shopping, laundry, making time to talk to her family, and cleaning her room.
Occupational Analysis
1. Occupation: Driving from Kristins apartment at Remington Canyon to Touro University
Nevada
Categorization of occupation for the client:
Subcategory:
1. Activities of daily living

OCCUPATIONAL ANALYSIS AND INTERVENTION PLAN


2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

Instrumental activities of daily living


Education
Work
Play
Leisure
Social participation

Driving and community mobility

2. Values, beliefs, spirituality associated with participation:


Values: Kristin is committed to the occupational therapy programs attendance for all classes
Beliefs: She must drive to school and be present every day to get a good education and grade
in all her classes.
3. Contexts:
Context
Physical/space
demands

Social
Cultural

Personal

Temporal

Supports
Kristin drives a reliable car
that allows her to make a safe
commute to school. The car
is spacious for her to put all
of her school materials in the
trunk. She comfortably sits
in the drivers seat.
X
During the summer in
Henderson, Nevada it is
common for people to drive
to where they need to go
instead of walk. This
supports her need to drive to
school as it is part of the
citys culture.
It is Kristins personal
preference to drive to school
instead of any other form of
transportation because of the
convenience. She saves
more time when she drives to
school and does not have to
stress herself to wake up
earlier to walk to school.
Kristin knows what time to
leave her apartment to be on
time for class. Since her
school is only a few blocks
away, it is highly unlikely to
experience traffic throughout
the day.

Inhibits
All cars have the risk of blind
spots. She must make sure to
look at her mirrors frequently
and look over her shoulder
before changing lanes and
when she is looking for
parking.
X
She feels the need to leave
early for school despite how
close she lives to campus. It
is typical for the school
parking lot to be full by a
specific time because most
students like to go to school
earlier than their class time.
Kristin likes to drive fast
which can put her at risk for
getting into an accident.

If she leaves at a certain time,


she knows that she would
have a hard time finding
parking. Difficulty finding
parking will only stress her
experience while driving as

OCCUPATIONAL ANALYSIS AND INTERVENTION PLAN

Virtual

Her phone is a good way to


navigate her to where she
needs to go. It also serves as
her clock because she does
not wear a watch.

5
she scans and searches around
school for a parking spot.
Texting or talking to someone
on the phone while driving
would hinder her driving
ability to get to school. Social
media on the phone would
also distract her from paying
attention to what is going on
around her while driving.

4. Objects and their properties used:


Tools: Car keys, contacts for clear vision
Materials: Gasoline (holds 10 gallons)
Equipment: Car, mirrors
Properties: Tread on the tires of the car, clear windows to see through the glass
5. Social demands:
Size: Sufficient space to sit comfortably in the car seat. There should be enough
space for her to reach the gas and brake pedals as well as have a clear view of all her
mirrors.
Arrangement: The mirrors should be aligned in order to see her blind spots.
Surface: The tread on her tires should be intact to prevent the car from sliding on the
pavement.
Lighting: She does not need to turn on her headlights while driving in the morning.
There is plenty of light from the sun.
Temperature: Preferable a comfortable temperature so that she can hold the steering
wheel without getting burned.
Humidity: The humidity can ruin the air in the tires or paint on her car. She needs to
frequently check her tires because of the extremely hot weather in Henderson,
Nevada.
Noise: The background noise is typically her favorite music station.
Ventilation: She prefers to have some ventilation because of the harsh smells from
her air conditioner.
6. Sequence and timing:
1. Walks towards her car in the Remington Canyon parking lot
2. Unlocks her car with her key
3. Opens the back of her trunk
4. Places her backpack and lunch bag in her trunk
5. Closes the trunk
6. Walks towards the drivers side

OCCUPATIONAL ANALYSIS AND INTERVENTION PLAN

7. Opens the drivers side door


8. Sits inside the drivers seat
9. Closes the drivers side door
10. Puts on her seat belt
11. Pushes her key into the ignition
12. Twist the key in the ignition to start the car
13. Checks all her mirrors
14. Puts the car in reverse
15. Unlocks the brake
16. Turns her head to look behind the vehicle as she pulls out of her parking space
17. Turns the steering wheel to the left as she reverses from the parking space
18. Puts the car in drive
19. Drives forward until the end of the street
20. Looks both ways
21. Turns right
22. Drives forward until the end of the street
23. Looks both ways
24. Turns right
25. Drives forward towards the gate
26. Look both ways
27. Turns left at the gate
28. Looks both ways to make sure the road is clear
29. Makes a left onto American Pacific Drive
30. Stops at the stop light when its red
31. Drives forward
32. Looks both ways to make sure it is safe to make a left
33. Makes a left into the school parking lot
34. Scans the parking lot for an empty parking space
35. Parks into an empty parking space
36. Puts the car in park
37. Pulls the break up
38. Pulls the key out of the ignition
39. Releases her seatbelt
40. Steps out of the car
41. Closes the door
42. Locks the car
7. Body functions required:
Function

How It Is Used

None

Minimally Greatly
Challenged Challenged

OCCUPATIONAL ANALYSIS AND INTERVENTION PLAN


Judgment

Concept formation

Metacognition

Cognitive flexibility

Insight/awareness

Concentration

Sustained attention

Selective attention

Divided attention

Short-term memory

Working memory

Knowing when it is safe to turn into


a busy street after looking both
ways.
Choosing a parking spot and being
able to pursue parking in that spot.
She would turn the wheel at the
precise moment to fit inside the
parking spot without hitting another
car or structure.
She kept thinking about an old song
that was playing on the radio and
she couldnt recall the artist even
though she knew it in the back of
her mind.
If there are no parking spaces at the
school parking lot, she would need
to scan and drive around for a new
parking spot to pursue.
She is aware of how close she is to
other cars while driving to prevent
getting into an accident.
She pays a great deal of attention
while waiting for the traffic light to
turn green so that she can drive
forward.
When she is at a stop light, she
maintains her foot on the brake
until the light turns green and it is
clear to drive forward.
When she heard someone honking
their horn at another car in the
background, she makes sure to
check all of her mirrors just in case
the honk was referring to her
driving.
She pays attention while driving to
school as she sings her favorite
song on the radio.
After parking the car, sometimes
she immediately forgets if she
locked her car or not. She goes
back to the car to double check.
Throughout the drive to school she
is making conscious decisions on
which area to park in. She
automatically drives to the parking
lot in the back of the school.

7
X

OCCUPATIONAL ANALYSIS AND INTERVENTION PLAN


Long-term memory

Discrimination of
senses: Auditory

Discrimination of
senses: Tactile
Discrimination of
senses: Visual

Discrimination of
senses: Olfactory
Discrimination of
senses: Vestibularproprioception
Multisensory processing

Sensory Memory

Spatial relationships

Temporal relationships

Recognition

Categorization

Generalization

She remembers how to get to


school without having to look up
any directions.
She is able to pick up sounds of
faster cars driving past her which
makes her more aware of her
driving.
She is able to pick up her water
bottle from the cup holder by only
using her sense of touch.
She is able to see the different
colors on the traffic light. She
knows to stop when it is red, slow
down when it is yellow, and go
when it is green.
When she turns on her air
conditioner, she complains of how
bad the air initially smells.
When she turns the wheel one
direction, one arm lengthens and
the other shortens.
As she is driving to school, she is
listening to music, getting feedback
from the car during a speed bump,
and makes sure she is driving on
her lane without hitting other cars.
When she hears a new song on the
radio, she is able to briefly store the
tune in her head without
remembering the lyrics.
She know which way is up in order
to correctly push her keys into the
ignition.
She has an idea of how long it takes
to get to school which usually takes
her around five minutes.
When she scans the parking lot, she
understands which parking spaces
are designated for students.
While driving, she notices there are
many students that drive the same
car as her. She is able to group
them together under the car brand
of a Hyundai Elantra.
If she was asked to drive a different
car, she would be able to perform
the activity because of knowledge
based on how to drive a car.

8
X

OCCUPATIONAL ANALYSIS AND INTERVENTION PLAN


Awareness of reality

Logical/coherent
thought
Appropriate thought
content

Mental functions of
sequencing complex
movement
Regulation and range of
emotion
Appropriateness of
emotion

Coping
Behavioral regulation

Body image
Self-concept

Self-esteem

Arousal

Consciousness

Orientation to self

Orientation to place

Orientation to time

She must realize that she is driving


a car on the road and not a race car
on a race track.
When she sees a stop sign, she
understand that she must stop.
As she gets into her car, she
understands that she needs to put on
her seatbelt and check her mirrors
before reversing her car.
While waiting at a stop light, she
tends to tap the steering wheel until
the light turns green.
She has a hard time regulating her
emotions when a driver cuts her off.
She displays feelings of anger and
panic when there are no more
parking spaces in the typical area
she parks in.
She eventually copes with having to
park far away from school.
She tends to have road rage when
another car drives reckless near her
car.
She likes to check her make up in
the mirror when the car is stopped.
She understands that she is the
driver and needs to safely bring
herself to school.
She displays confidence in her
driving when she merges in with
traffic.
She immediately responds and
becomes alert when she hears
sounds of honking.
After drinking a cup of coffee in the
morning, she is very alert as she is
drives to school.
She is able to respond when she
hears a car honk. She makes sure
that the honk is not referring to her
driving skills.
She is aware of the location she is
headed towards which is Touro
University Nevada.
She is aware of what day of the
week it is as she needs to leave at a

9
X

X
X

X
X

X
X

X
X

OCCUPATIONAL ANALYSIS AND INTERVENTION PLAN

Orientation to others

Energy level

Function
Motivation
Impulse control
Appetite

Sleep

Detection/registration

Visual modulation

Integration of senses

Awareness at distances

Tolerance of ambient
sounds

Location and distance of


sounds
Moving against gravity

Taste
Smell

specific time each day depending


on the school schedule.
She understands that she must wait
the other cars to pass before turning
into a busy street.
Her energy level is high in the
morning which keeps her very alert
as she drives to school.
How It Is Used
She is motivated to get to school
early for a parking spot.
She tries to resist the urge to yell at
people from the inside of her car.
She has no desire to eat while
driving because she usually eats
before leaving the apartment.
She got a good night sleep and was
able to safely drive to school.

She needs to identify where she is


in relation to other cars as well as
within the lane she is driving in.
She must focus on the movements
of the cars around her as well as
how she is steering her own car.
She is able to listen to music while
paying attention to the road in front
of her.
She must maintain a safe distance
away from the car in front of her to
prevent driving too close to the car.
As she exits the apartment
complex, she is able to ignore the
loud sounds of the man with the
leaf blower.
She is able to detect the sound of
where the car honks are coming
from.
She is sitting up straight while
holding onto the steering wheel as
she resist against gravity.
She taste water as she drinks it in
the car.
She complains of the bad odor from
the air conditioner that fills her car.

10

None

Minimally Greatly
Challenged Challenged
X
X
X

X
X

OCCUPATIONAL ANALYSIS AND INTERVENTION PLAN


Body in space

Comfort with touch

Localizing pain
Thermal awareness

Joint mobility

Joint stability/alignment

Muscle power

Muscle tone

Muscle endurance

Stretch reflex

ATNR
STNR
Righting and supporting
reflex

Eye-hand coordination

Bilateral coordination

Crossing midline

She must align her body in space to


an appropriate distance from the
steering wheel to be safe if her
airbag were to ever pop out.
She feels comfort when she holds
the steering wheel with two hands
versus one hand.
She feels no pain throughout her
X
drive to school.
Immediately entering her car, she
feels an intense heat and
immediately turns on the air
conditioning.
She is able to perform full range of
motion in her upper extremities in
order to manipulate the steering
wheel.
She aligns herself with a neutral
pelvis and straight back as she
drives to school.
She needs a fair amount of muscle
power to turn the wheel and apply
pressure on the break or gas pedal.
She shows muscle tone in her upper
extremities as she holds onto the
steering wheel.
She needs to contract her muscles
to endure a seated posture while
maintaining a grip on the steering
while.
She tends to stretch her neck by
looking left and right before driving
to school.
X
X
As she is driving, she realizes she is
drifting to one side because her
base of support is not center over
her hips.
She is able to turn the steering
wheel with both hands as she turns
into the parking lot with ease.
When she turns the steering wheel,
she coordinates both hands to turn
the wheel to one side.
When she reaches for the steering
wheel as she turns it, one hand

11
X

OCCUPATIONAL ANALYSIS AND INTERVENTION PLAN

Fine motor control

Gross motor control

Occulomotor control

Gait patterns
Blood pressure

Heart rate
Respiratory rate

Respiratory rhythm
Respiratory depth

Physical endurance,
aerobic capacity
Voice functions
Voice rhythm and
fluency
Alternative vocalization

Digestive system
Metabolic system
Endocrine system

Function

crosses midline to continue turning


the wheel.
She uses the fine motor skills when
she manipulates the key into the
ignition to start the car.
She uses gross motor control as she
continually presses her foot on the
gas or brake pedal.
She scans the parking lot to find her
car in the Remington Canyon
parking lot.
She walks towards her car from her
apartment.
Her blood pressure stays constant
because driving to school is a low
physical activity.
Her heart rate increases when she
hears a car honking.
Her respiratory rate increases when
she gets startled by the honking
vehicle nearby.
Throughout the drive her
respiratory rhythm stays normal.
Her respiratory depth stays normal
because driving does not fatigue the
body.
It does not take much physical
endurance or aerobic capacity to
drive to school.
She talks to herself as she tries to
find a parking spot.
She displays rhythm and fluency
when she carries out a song on the
radio.
She screams when a car gets very
close to her car because she was
afraid the car that cut her off was
going to hit her car.
Her digestive system is working
because she just had breakfast.
Her metabolic system is working
because she ate a good breakfast.
Her endocrine system is working
because of the food she ate in the
morning.
How It Is Used
None

12

X
X

X
X

X
X

X
X

X
X
X

Minimally Greatly
Challenged Challenged

OCCUPATIONAL ANALYSIS AND INTERVENTION PLAN


Urinary functions

She does not need to excrete waste


during the drive to school.
Genital and reproductive She does not use her genital and
function
reproductive functions; however,
they are constantly working.
Protective functions of
Her skin continues to serve as a
the skin
barrier.
Repair functions of the
She did not have any abrasions
skin
during her drive to school for skin
repair.

13
X
X

X
X

8. Muscular analysis of movements required:


Muscle

Not used

Shoulder flexion
Shoulder extension
Shoulder abduction
Shoulder adduction
Shoulder internal rotation
Shoulder external rotation
Elbow flexion
Elbow extension
Wrist supination
Wrist pronation
Wrist flexion
Wrist extension
Thumb flexion
Thumb abduction
Finger flexion
Finger extension
Trunk flexion
Trunk extension
Trunk rotation
Lower extremities

Minimally
challenged
X
X
X

Greatly
challenged

X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X

9. Performance skills required:

Skill- Motor

How It Is Used

Aligns

She sits up straight on the drivers seat


to align herself in front of the steering
wheel.

None

Minimally Greatly
Challenged Challenged
X

OCCUPATIONAL ANALYSIS AND INTERVENTION PLAN


Stabilizes

Positions

Reaches
Bends
Grips

Manipulates

Coordinates

Moves

Lifts

Walks
Transports

Calibrates

Flows

Endures
Paces

Skill- Process
Paces

Maintains balance as she opens the


drivers side door to sit inside of her
car.
Positions herself at an appropriate
distance away from the steering wheel
and pedals.
Extends her arm and reaches for the
brake to unlock the car.
Flexes her trunk to reach for her water
bottle in the cup holder.
Grasps the steering wheel to prevent it
from slipping out of her hands while
during a left turn.
Uses dexterous finger movements to
choose the correct key to push into the
ignition.
Presses her foot on the gas as she
manipulates the steering wheel to drive
forward.
Pushes the car door hard enough to
close the drivers side before locking
the car.
Lifts the trunk door open with no effort
to place her backpack and lunch bag
inside.
Walks towards her car in the parking
lot at a steady pace.
She brings her backpack from her
apartment to the inside of her trunk in
her car.
She uses the appropriate amount of
speed while turn the steering wheel to
park.
She smoothly puts on her seat belt and
adjust her mirrors before starting the
car.
She is able to drive from her apartment
to school with no evidence of fatigue.
She maintains an effective rate while
driving to school. She does not drive
too slow or fast.
How It Is Used
She paces her time when she decides to
walk out of her apartment to be on time
for class.

14
X

X
X
X

X
X

X
X

None

Minimally Greatly
Challenged Challenged
X

OCCUPATIONAL ANALYSIS AND INTERVENTION PLAN


Attends

Heeds
Chooses
Uses

Handles

Inquires

Initiates

Continues
Sequences
Terminates

Searches/locates

Gathers

Organizes

Restores

Navigates
Notices/responds

She makes sure to pay attention to the


road in front of her to prevent any
collisions.
Follows through with the task of
driving herself to school on time.
She chooses the correct key on her key
chain to start the car.
Uses the appropriate key and puts it in
its proper place which is inside the
ignition to turn the vehicle on.
She handles her car with ease and
protects her car from getting hit by
other cars by not driving too closely or
parking at a safe distance away from
other cars.
Reads the labels on the parking spaces
and realizes specific spaces are for
employees only.
She begins to drive out of her parking
spot and moves onto putting the car
into drive without hesitation.
Performs the action of parking the car
without stopping in the middle.
She makes sure to start the car before
putting the car into reverse.
She parks the car and puts it in brake
before removing the keys from the
ignition.
As she drives into the parking lot at
school, she immediately searches for an
empty parking spot.
She gathers her keys, backpack, lunch,
and water which are needed before she
leaves for school.
Positions her water bottle in the cup
holder that allows her to reach for it
when she is thirsty.
After drinking out of her water bottle,
she puts the water bottle back into the
cup holder.
She navigates her right leg to place her
foot on either the brake or gas pedal.
She notices that she was driving too
close to one car so slightly adjusted
herself by releasing the gas pedal and
slightly pressing the brake pedal.

15
X

X
X
X

X
X
X

X
X

OCCUPATIONAL ANALYSIS AND INTERVENTION PLAN


Adjusts

Accommodates

Benefits

Skill- Social
interaction
Kristin performed
driving to school
independently
without directly
interacting with
another person.
Approaches/starts
Produces speech
Gesticulates
Speaks fluently
Turns Toward
Looks
Places self
Touches
Regulates
Questions
Replies
Discloses
Expresses emotion
Disagrees
Thanks
Transitions
Times response
Times duration
Takes turns
Matches language
Clarifies
Acknowledges and
encourages
Empathizes
Heeds
Accommodates
Benefits

She adjusts her mirrors before driving


so that shell be able to see cars behind
her.
Wears her contacts to prevent getting
into an accident and to help her see
signs clearly.
Uses two hands on the wheel versus
one hand to effectively turn into the
parking lot.
How It Is Used

10. Performance patterns:

16
X

None
X

X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X

Minimally Greatly
Challenged Challenged

OCCUPATIONAL ANALYSIS AND INTERVENTION PLAN

17

Parts of this occupation has elements of which of the following: (check all that apply)

Pattern
Useful habit

Describe
Kristin constantly scans her environment while driving to prevent
getting into a car accident.

Dominating habit

She gets easily angered while driving when she is placed in a


threating situation. For example, while she was driving, another car
merged into her lane and almost hit her car. She responded by
yelling at the car in front of her.

Routine

She likes to double check if she locked her car doors by pressing the
locked button again as she walks towards school.

Ritual

She hangs her rosary over the main back up mirror of her car. It is
her belief that it will protect her from harm while driving.

Role

As a graduate student, it is her job for getting herself to class on time


every day.

Intervention Plan
1. Identify 1 objective and measurable goal of the intervention:
Kristin will independently develop a weekly schedule to manage her time between
studying and leisure activities once a week.
a. According to OTPF what type of outcome is this?
Health and wellness
2. Intervention approach:

Approach
Create/promote

Establish/restore
Maintain
Modify
Prevent

Describe
Kristin will create a daily checklist of things to do to prioritize what
needs to be done for school and manage time for leisure activities
such as working out or going rock climbing.

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3. Activity selection
a. Activity selection: Identify 1 example of each for the intervention plan
Activity
Occupation

Describe
Kristin will designate at least 3 hours each day to study and stay up to
date with assignments for school.

Activity

Kristin will designate 1 hour each day to work out at the gym and take
a break from studying.

Preparatory
method

Kristin will wear a watch so that she is aware of the time of day to stay
on top of her daily schedule.

Preparatory task

Kristin will do an exercise video on YouTube so that she can follow


the routine instead of having to make up her own routine at the gym.

b. Discuss how activity selection relates back to occupational profile and


occupational analysis
Kristin needs to work on her time management skills in order to
accomplish some occupational balance in her life. In her occupational profile, the
focus is on wanting to be successful in school while enjoying leisure activities.
Although her occupational analysis is on her routine of driving to school, I found
out that she does not spend a large amount of time commuting to and from school.
With time management, she would be able to make good use of her time
throughout the day.
c. Discuss how activity selection will support achievement of client identified goals
and goal of the intervention plan.
The activities listed above would help Kristin be more aware of time
throughout her day. She would be able to prioritize time for school and leisure
activites by designating specific blocks for both areas. A watch would allow her
to be more aware of time throughout the day. She would be able to see if she is
being productive and making the most out of her day to day routine. In addition,
she would have another way to get a workout in her apartment by looking up
workout routines online so she does not have to drive to a gym.
4. Describe how intervention can be graded or adapted and why?
She can grade up or grade down the intervention by increasing or decreasing the
time for studying and leisure. At first, she my want to start off slow by giving her a 30
minute break of leisure so that she can get use to the idea of making time for herself.
Eventually she would be able to increase the time once she feels more comfortable with
her academic standing. The same can go for studying and assignments. However, this is

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higher priority is school so it is not recommended for her to decrease her studying habits
to an extreme.
5. Discuss any safety concerns and/or precautions.
Some precautions for time management is for her to find a balance between
school and leisure. Although leisure is important for a persons well-being, there can be
instances of spending too much time with leisure and not being productive. She must still
prioritize school to maintain her academic standing.

6. Discuss the role of the occupational therapy practitioner during the intervention.
The occupational therapist would be there to guide the client through the process
of finding out what occupations are meaningful to her. In addition, finding areas to
promote health and wellness by working on time management. The OT may want to help
her come up with ways to help prioritize her day. For instance, making a to-do list and
hanging it up on her refrigerator to remind her of what needs to get done. In the end, she
can reward herself with a leisure activity of her choice.
7. Discuss what is expected of the client during the intervention.
The client is expected to openly discuss her meaningful activities. Full
participation would be needed to help her find balance in her occupations. Open
communication between the client and OT would be most helpful when they begin to
plan out a schedule for the week. This whole process if for the clients benefit so their
input would be highly valued.