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DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC

COURSE INFORMATION:
Course #/Name: MUS 380 Introduction to Music Teaching

Term: Fall 2015

Days and Times: MWF 9:00 9:50 AM, MB 2

Credit Hours: 3 (lecture/lab)

INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION:
Name: Dr. Sidney T. Hearn

Email: shearn@marian.edu

Office Hours: MWF 10:00 11:00 AM

Phone: 317-955-6174

Course Description: This course is an overview of a profession that can reward and fundamentally
challenge you, both here at Marian University and for the rest of your life. In this class, we will explore
together:
The profession of music education through the lens of a teacher as well as student
Our unique musical experiences and personality traits
Traits of successful leaders and teachers
The professional characteristics, expectations, sensitivity, and interpersonal skills required of
music educators
Why music is important, valuable, and meaningful
The music educator roles of creating a positive learning environment, planning, teaching,
assessing, reflecting, and managing
The current landscape of music education, climate, and trends
The joys and challenges of teaching
The journey toward our own philosophies of music education
Conceptual Framework: The class will survey a new topic each week throughout the semester. Each
week there will be assignments/projects that require you to locate resources, do research, and present a
15 minute mini-lesson on your assigned part of the weeks topic. Each mini-lesson will be evaluated
using the Mini-Lesson Grading Rubric attached to this syllabus.
Topics to be surveyed will include (but are not limited to):
Week 1 Communication in the classroom.
Week 2 Introduction to teaching methods: Orff-Schulwerk, Kodaly, Dalcroze, Suzuki, Gordon MLT
Week 3 The Music Educator as a Professional
Week 4 The Nature of Teaching Music
Week 5 Developing a Personal Philosophy of Music Education
Week 6 Preparing to Become a Music Educator
Week 7 Curriculum in Music Education
Week 8 Midterm Exam
Week 9 Early Childhood and General
Week 11 Instrumental Programs: Strings
Week 12 Instrumental Programs: Band
Week 13 Choral Programs
1

Week 14 Multicultural Music Education


Week 15 Special Learners in the Music Classroom
Week 16 Integration Music With Other Areas of the School Curriculum
Week 17 Final Exam
Portfolio Requirement: Students in this course will create a web portfolio using the weebly.com
resource. All materials for use with mini-lessons must be posted to your web portfolio site and
accessible by other students in the class at the time of your mini-lesson. Your portfolio will continue to
be developed throughout the rest of your undergraduate curriculum, and will document your growth
and development as a classroom music teacher. It will be used to assess your progress in the music
education curriculum at designated points.
Mid-term Project: In your mid-term project (500 points), you will create an annotated webliography
of library and web resources for music educators. What sources have you used in the first half of the
course to research and prepare your mini-lessons? You will publish your webliography to your web site
so it can be shared with your classmates.
Your webliography will contain the following information for at least 30 online resources:

Name/title of the resource


Complete URL of the resource
Name(s) of author(s) or organization(s) that produced the resource
Summary of how the resource can benefit music educators

Final Project: Your final project for the course will be a review of research literature on a topic of
interest for music educators. What questions have you developed or problems have you observed over
the semester that you would like to address? Your review of literature will begin with a statement of the
problem or research question and a brief summary of why the problem is important. You will read at
least 10 journal articles and/or research articles written within the last 10 years on the topic then use the
articles to develop an understanding of the problem. After reading, you will write a thorough account of
the condition of the problem in 2015. There is no minimum length for the paper, but your paper should
give the reader an understanding of the literature about this problem.
Vision Statements: The vision of Marian University is to provide an education that profoundly
transforms lives, society, and the world. The vision of the School of Education and Exercise Science is
to prepare graduates who can transform the lives of their students, families, and the wider community.
The focus of the Department of Music is music teacher education.
Required Texts: Course materials will be provided by instructor and derived from student research on
topics covered in this course.
Recommended: Collegiate membership to NAFME, called CNAfME: www.nafme.org/ Includes oneyear subscription to Music Educators Journal and Teaching Music, two of the most essential
professional publications in the field of music education.

Instructor Policies and Expectations:


Special notes:
Students should make sure that any technological problems encountered while using public
computers in the lab, or while in class are immediately reported to the instructor, and to the
IT Helpdesk in writing. Students should report the number of the computer (found either on
the monitor or on the CPU), the time the problem occurred and a description of the problem.
This will provide the IT staff with the necessary information to quickly address and correct
the problem.
Students are encouraged to contact the instructor whenever questions arise. Students are
also strongly encouraged to contact colleagues and classmates for assistance.
Marian University email is the official communication medium between the university and
the student. Students should communicate with the instructor using only their official
university email accounts.
Unless otherwise specified, all written projects four this course will use the Publication
Manual of the American Psychological Association, Sixth Edition format (APA).
Assignment Submission:
1. All materials used in mini-lessons must be published at the beginning of the class period
noted. Failure to publish materials by the beginning of class time will result in a lower score
on your mini-lesson evaluation rubric.
2. Many assignments/projects that are due later in the semester are based on work that is
completed at the beginning of the semester. Failure to complete work in a timely manner
has a tendency to snowball and affect performance on later assignments.
3. Students are strongly encouraged to keep paper and electronic archival copies of all work
submitted. Additionally, any work that is returned to the students with a grade on it should
be retained for record-keeping purposes.
Data Maintenance:
It is the student's responsibility to maintain backup copies of assignments and to complete
the work in the time available. The student should frequently back up files to guard against
data loss. The instructor HIGHLY RECOMMENDS using DropBox to serve this purpose!!
Failure to complete assignments due to data loss is unprofessional and therefore not an
acceptable excuse.
Students are required to bring ALL files to every class meeting. This is critical for
individual progress, and in order to receive assistance when necessary.
Attendance Policy:
Attendance will be taken at the beginning of each class meeting. Students are expected to be present and
on time each class meeting. Students arriving to class extremely late will be considered absent for the day.
Success in this course is dependent upon class attendance.
The Marian University Department of Music Student Handbook states:
A record of 20% absences for any student in an academic class, lesson, or ensemble offered from the
MU Dept. of Music constitutes a required withdrawal initiated by the student. If the student neglects
appropriate withdrawal procedures, the grade becomes an F. If it is too late in the semester to
withdraw from the class, the grade becomes an F.
3

Only the following circumstances qualify as an excused absence and the student must provide
valid documentation in a timely manner in order to be excused and to make up the missed
assignments/tests:
1. An unforeseeable and extraordinary event that makes attendance impossible (i.e. death of an
immediate family member).
2. A debilitating illness (a doctors confirmation of the illness will be required).
3. Self-diagnosed illness is not excusable as an absence.
Academic Integrity:
All students must be honest and forthright in their academic studies. To falsify the results of one's
research, to steal the words or ideas of another, to cheat on an assignment, or to allow or assist another
to commit these acts corrupts the educational process. Students are expected to do their own work and
neither give nor receive unauthorized assistance. Any violation of this standard must be reported to the
appropriate academic personnel. The Code of Students Rights and Responsibilities is available for
review on under the My Marian tab on Marian Universitys website.
Academic Counseling and Support Services
Students with disabilities who have proper documentation must contact the Director of Academic
Support Services in the Learning and Counseling Center to set up a documentation review. If after the
review, accommodations are deemed appropriate, an accommodation plan will be developed. As per
the ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) no accommodations can be provided until this process is
complete. Contact Marj Batic, Director of Academic Support Services (mbatic@marian.edu ;
317.955.6150; or stop by the office in Clare Hall). Note: Students who may require assistance in
emergency evacuations should consult with the instructor as to the most appropriate procedure to
follow. If there are questions regarding such a procedure, contact Ruth Rodgers, Vice President,
Student Success and Engagement/Dean of Students @ rrodgers@marian.edu or the Director of
Academic Support Services for additional information.
All students are encouraged to make full use of peer tutoring opportunities available through the Center
for Academic Success and Engagement (CASE). You can sign-up for a tutor in the Peer Tutor
Coordinators Office, located on the first floor of Clare Hall near the Learning and Counseling Center.
You will be provided with a list of available tutors who are recommended for your class. It is your
responsibility to contact the tutor and arrange a meeting. Marian also has a Peer Tutoring Center where
you can walk-in without an appointment and meet with a tutor in certain subject areas. The Peer
Tutoring Center schedule will be posted and sent via campus communication when it is set.
Technology Policy
Distractive practices will be addressed as they arise. Distractive practices include, but not limited to
texting, off task Internet use, volume not silenced on all devices, and checking emails or text messages
during class.
Make-up/Late Work Policy:
Only in extraordinarily rare circumstances will work be accepted after it is due. If such a situation
arises with an individual student, the instructor and student will create an alternative plan of study and
grading for that student that addresses the remainder of the semester. Due to the nature of the course
(weekly teaching of mini-lesson to peers in class), there will be no make-up work. The lesson must be
delivered on the day/time specified, or someone else must teach that lesson to the class.
4

Learning Outcomes and Competencies:


The student will develop, teach, and evaluate lessons that demonstrate knowledge of:
Technology that can be used to enhance the performance and delivery of music instruction
The role of the music teacher as a resource person in integrating music into other components of
the total school curriculum
The 2014 NAfME Core Arts Standards: Creating, Performing, Responding, and Connecting
By the end of this course, the student will have:
Deepened his/her understanding of and appreciation for professional responsibility.
Established his/her professional identity.
Become a contributing member of the music education cohort and the greater musical
community.
Found connections between coursework and skills that will be needed in his/her professional
career.
Developed an understanding of lesson plans and rehearsal frames by consistently completing
peer-teaching episodes.
Begun a web-based portfolio that will continue to be developed throughout the rest of his/her
undergraduate curriculum.
Department of Music Grading Scale: Please note that a grade of C (73%) or higher must be earned
for this course or the course will need to be retaken to be considered toward the music education
degree.
A
AB+
B
BC+
C
CD+
D
F

93 100%
90 92%
88 89%
83 87%
80 82%
78 79%
73 77%
70 72%
68 69%
60 67%
0 59%

Peer-Teaching Schedule and Due Dates:


Date
9/9
9/11
9/11
9/14
9/16
9/18
9/21
9/23

Topic

Mini-lesson Presenter(s)

Characteristics of a Professional
Educational Preparation of Music Teachers
Decisiveness (Making Professional Decisions)
Qualities of an Effective Music Educator
Professional Qualities
Professional Organizations for Music Educators
What is a Philosophy of Music Education?
The Role of Values and Vision
5

Jillian/Abby
Cathy/Betsy
Austin/Glen
Cathy/Betsy
Austin/Glen
Jillian/Abby
Betsy/Austin
Cathy/Abby

Point
Value
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

Date

Topic

9/25

Environment (Why Does Music Exist in Public


Schools?)
Music Knowledge (What a Music Educator Needs
to Know)
Music Skills (What a Music Educator Needs to Do)
Making Decisions as a Music Educator
What is a Music Education Curriculum?
National and State Standards
Preparing Instruction
Mid-term Project Lab 1
Mid-term Project Lab 2
Mid-term Project Due
Historical Background of Early Childhood Music
Education
Historical Background of General Music Education
Historical Background of School Strings Programs,
Early String Programs Lesson-based
Modern String Programs Class Instruction
Components of Modern Strings Programs (String
Orchestras, Fiddle Programs, Mariachi Ensembles,
Guitar Classes)
Historical Background of Band Programs,
Gilmore/Sousa/Goldman
Modern Band Programs Class Instruction
Components of Modern Band Programs (Types of
Concert Bands, Marching Band, Pep Band, Jazz
Band)
Historical Background of School Choral Programs,
Singing Schools, Lowell Mason, and Modern
Choral Programs
Choral Music Education at the Elementary Level
Components of Modern Choral Programs (Types of
Concert Choirs, Show Choir, Other Ensembles)
Multicultural Music Education, Elementary
General Approach, and Secondary Choral and
Instrumental Approaches
Historical Background of Special Learners in the
Classroom, Individualized Education Programs
(IEP), and Section 504
Adaptations for Elementary Students, and
Adaptations for Secondary Students
Open Lab
Technology in Music Education
Management of the Music Classroom
Semester Review

9/28
9/30
10/2
10/5
10/7
10/9
10/12
10/14
10/16
10/21
10/23
10/26
10/28
10/30
11/2
11/4
11/6
11/9
11/11
11/13
11/16
11/18
11/20
11/23
11/30
12/2
12/4

Mini-lesson Presenter(s)

Glen/Jillian

Point
Value
100

Austin/Cathy

100

Betsy/Jillian
Abby/Glen
Jillian/Austin
Betsy/Glen
Abby/Cathy

100
100
100
100
100

Austin

500
100

Jillian
Glen

100
100

Abby
Cathy

100
100

Betsy

100

Jillian
Glen

100
100

Abby

100

Cathy
Betsy

100
100

Austin

100

Jillian/Abby/Betsy

100

Glen/Austin/Cathy

100

Hearn
Hearn

Date
12/7
12/9
12/11

Topic

Mini-lesson Presenter(s)

Final Project Lab 1


Final Project Lab 2
Final Project Due

Point
Value
500

Bibliography and Additional Resources:

(In order for our students to be competent musicians, to have the skills and knowledge needed to pass
their licensing exams and to be prepared to be successful music educators, please be sure to include
each of these objectives when designing your course and determine how you will assess each standard.
The fulfillment of this process is also a vital step towards obtaining NASM accreditation.
INDOE Educator Standards

Demonstrated How (Assessment)?

7.1 philosophy of music education, and research supporting


the inclusion of music taught by certified music specialists in
the school program
7.3 knowledge of methods for general music instruction,
including Dalcroze, Gordon Music Learning Theory, Kodly,
and Orff
7.8 instructional techniques for facilitating equity, access,
accommodation, and adaptation in vocal, instrumental and
general music classes
7.11 techniques for using technology to promote students'
music performance, learning, and creativity

Example: exam, homework, project, quiz, or


create a new assessment tool