Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 9

Gail Wingate

March 23, 2014


OMDE 610 Section 9040
Assignment 3

Case Study of State-Mandated Policy

This lesson is geared towards freshman college students and is intended to teach critical
thinking and collaboration skills. Students will work in assigned groups to interpret, analyze,
evaluate, and infer the facts of a state-mandated policy, negotiate with the group to define an
argument either for or against the policy, debate their argument with opposing groups, and
document their personal opinion about the policy. This is an instructor-led, online asynchronous
lesson with one final phase to take place online, synchronously.

Key Objectives

At the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

Analyze a state-mandated policy given by the instructor.

Collaborate and negotiate with group members to reach a common understanding by


analyzing, evaluating, inferring, and explaining the policy.

Collaborate and negotiate with peers to prepare and present an argument for or against
the policy, and present the argument in a debate-style discussion.

Write a personal opinion informed by the results of the debate-style discussion.

Lesson Outline

This lesson follows the Online Collaborative Learning (OCL) pedagogy as defined in
Harasim (2012).

Idea Generating

Gail Wingate
March 23, 2014
OMDE 610 Section 9040
Assignment 3

During this phase, the instructor will give the students a state-mandated policy forcing all
public high school students to eat broccoli every day during lunch. Students will be divided into
two groups: one arguing for the policy and one arguing against the policy. The purpose of this
phase is for the students to critically interpret and analyze the policy, formulate their own views,
and understand the views of their peers. Harasim (2012) describes this phase as a democratic
and engaging process where the team will define a range of divergent perspectives (p. 96).
Students work asynchronously online using the Discussion Board to collaborate and the Google
Drive to share files. Students will:

Review the given facts of the policy.

Document and present to the group their initial views of the policy based on their own
personal experiences and observations.

Discuss the aspects of each others views that are in disagreement.

The instructor presents the guidelines under which the group discussion occurs, creates
the thread on the Discussion Board, and asynchronously moderates the discussion. The instructor
must ensure the group members are participating according to the guidelines.

Idea Organizing

During this phase, students continue to work in groups to organize their ideas, and narrow
and refine them in preparation for writing their argument. Each group works towards becoming a
knowledge community that speaks the same language and has the same goals (Harasim, 2012).

Gail Wingate
March 23, 2014
OMDE 610 Section 9040
Assignment 3

This phase occurs asynchronously online using the Discussion Board to collaborate and the
Google Drive to share files. Students will:

Search the internet to find three relevant sources of information to support the groups
argument.

Review all resources posted by members of the group and provided by the instructor.

Participate in group discussions to compare and contrast each others ideas and
organize similar ideas into categories relevant to the policy.

Refine and choose the strongest ideas to become part of their argument.

The instructor posts additional sources of information and poses questions that facilitate
the discussion. The instructor must ensure that group members are participating according to the
guidelines.

Intellectual Convergence

During this phase, each group will define their final argument. They will agree upon
which ideas should be included in the argument, and how they will present the argument during
the debate. If necessary, members of the group may have to agree to disagree which is a common
result when working in groups (Harasim, 2012). This phase occurs asynchronously online using
the Discussion Board to collaborate and the Google Drive to share files. Students will:

Choose which ideas to include in the argument.

Define an outline for the argument, and assign each team member a section to write.
Using scholarly references to back arguments.

Gail Wingate
March 23, 2014
OMDE 610 Section 9040
Assignment 3

Once written, combine the sections into one cohesive document. The document will
be no longer than 1200 words.

The instructor continues to facilitate the discussion and guide the students to becoming
one knowledge community that collaborates to produce a cohesive opinion (Harasim, 2012, p.
94). The instructor must ensure that group members are participating according to the guidelines.

The Debate
During this phase each group will prepare for and present their argument in the form of a
debate-like discussion. The debate will take place synchronously online using Video
Conferencing. Students will:

Choose one member of the group to present the argument during the debate.

Prepare and present a five minute presentation of their argument that explains the
facts of the policy and the groups position towards the policy.

Participate in a three minute rebuttal with questions.

The instructor moderates the debate, manages the time, and chooses questions from the
students.

Final Position

During this phase, students will write their own opinion about the policy. They must take
into consideration the arguments given by both groups, reference resources provided by both
groups, and describe how their opinions would affect them personally. The paper must be no

Gail Wingate
March 23, 2014
OMDE 610 Section 9040
Assignment 3

longer than 1200 words. During this phase, students may have to repeat aspects of the prior
phases, but at an intellectually deeper or more advanced level (Harasim, 2012, p. 96).

Technology to Support This Lesson

This lesson integrates several Web 2.0 technological tools that Lee & McLoughlin (2010)
say promote collaboration and sharing of knowledge and content among users (p. 61).

Google Drive

Students will use Google Drive to document their notes and write their final arguments.
Google Drive allows more than one person to share and update documents in real time. Users are
given security rights to access the documents that are placed on the Drive.

Group Discussion Board

Throughout this less, students will use an online Discussion Board. Harasim (2012)
explains that discussion boards promote collaboration and social discourse between students. The
Discussion Board provides a shared space within which the students can asynchronously post
their views, read the views of others, debate and agree upon how to proceed.

Video Conferencing

Students will use a Video Conferencing tool, such as WebEx, to synchronously


collaborate face-to-face. The Video Conferencing tool will be used during the live debate

Gail Wingate
March 23, 2014
OMDE 610 Section 9040
Assignment 3

between both groups. Students will be able to see each of the presenters, then participate in the
rebuttal session by typing their questions into the chat feature of the tool.

The OCL Theory

This lesson is informed by the Online Collaborative Learning (OCL) theory. The
emphasis of OCL is to develop critical thinking skills through discourse, collaboration, and
knowledge building (Harasim, 2012, p. 90). Critical thinking is defined as the ability to
interpret, analyze, evaluate, infer, explain, and self-regulate to reach a judicious, purposeful
judgment (Facione, 1990; Facione & Facione, 1994, para. 1). Harasim (2012) says group
collaboration and discourse is key to stimulating critical thinking and building knowledge. Since
online learning is the basis of OCL, this theory also facilitates the use of online technologies to
collaborate asynchronously or synchronously. Finally, OCL allows the instructor to step back
and act as facilitator, moderator, and mediator so the students can construct their own knowledge
within the boundaries set by the teacher.

Lesson Rubric

To assess the skills demonstrated by students during this lesson, instructors will use the
rubric shown in Table 1. This rubric is based upon the Holistic Critical Thinking Scoring
Rubric that focuses on assessing critical thinking skills, as defined by Facione & Facione,
(1994) and Facione (1990).

Gail Wingate
March 23, 2014
OMDE 610 Section 9040
Assignment 3

Table 1

Lesson Rubric to Assess Student Skills

Consistently does
all or almost all of
the following

Does many or
most of the
following

Does more or
many of the
following

Consistently does
all or almost all of
the following

Interpretation

Deciphers, clarifies,
and categorizes key
elements of the
policy.

Deciphers, clarifies,
and categorizes key
elements of the
policy.

Analysis

Examines and
identifies the most
important reasons or
claims that support
the group argument.
Reflectively assesses
the claims and
arguments of group
members.

Examines and
identifies relevant
reasons or claims
that support the
group argument.
Assesses the more
obvious claims and
arguments of group
members.

Offers incorrect or
biased understanding
and categorizations of
the key elements of
the policy.
Examines but rejects
relevant reasons or
claims that support
the group argument.

Searches for
evidence, suggests
strong alternatives,
and defines
judicious
conclusions for the
argument.
Judiciously justifies
reasoning and
presents results to
support the
argument.
Carefully and
openly examines the
viewpoints of others
and evolves or
corrects their own
viewpoint
accordingly.

Searches for
evidence, suggests
alternatives, and
defines conclusions
for the argument.

Misunderstands and
incorrectly
categorizes key
elements of the
policy.
Examines but fails
to identify relevant
reasons or claims
that support the
group argument.
Ignores or
superficially assess
the claims and
arguments of group
members.
Searches for
evidence, but
suggests weak,
irrelevant, or
incorrect alternatives
and conclusions for
the argument.
Infrequently justifies
reasoning and
seldom presents
results to support the
argument.
Examines the
viewpoints of others,
but may disregard
these views based on
self-interest or
preconceptions.

Assessment/
Skill

Evaluation

Inference

Explanation

SelfRegulation

Justifies some
reasoning and
presents some
results to support the
argument.
Examines the
viewpoints of others
and evolves or
corrects their own
viewpoint
accordingly.

Ignores or
superficially assess
the claims and
arguments of group
members.
Does not search for
evidence and
suggests weak,
irrelevant, incorrect,
or no alternatives and
conclusions for the
argument.
Does not justify or
put forth reasoning
and results to support
the argument.
May examine the
viewpoints of others,
and disregards these
views based on closemindedness, selfinterest or
preconceptions.

Note: Adapted from Holistic critical thinking scoring rubric, by P.A. Facione and N.C Facione,
1994, Millbrae, CA: California Academic Press. Copyright 1994 by the California Academic
Press LLC.

Gail Wingate
March 23, 2014
OMDE 610 Section 9040
Assignment 3

Conclusion
This online lesson will teach critical thinking and collaboration skills using the OCL
theory to inform the activities performed by the students. The students will work in groups to
construct their knowledge and opinion of a given policy, and form their own knowledge
community, while the instructor acts as moderator and facilitator (Harasim, 2012). Students will
utilize a Discussion Board and Google Drive to asynchronously collaborate. During the debate,
students will use a Video Conferencing tool to synchronously interact. The instructor will assess
the students performance using a rubric geared towards assessing critical thinking skills.

References

Facione, P.A. (1990). Critical thinking: A statement of expert consensus for purposes of
educational assessment and instruction. Retrieved from http://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED315423

Facione, P. A., & Facione, N. C. (1994). Holistic critical thinking scoring rubric. Millbrae, CA:
California Academic Press.

Harasim, L. (2012). Learning theory and online technologies. New York, NY: Routledge.

Lee, M. & McLoughlin, C. (2010). Beyond distance and time constraints. Applying social
networking tools and Web 2.0 approaches in distance education. In G. Veletstianos
(Ed.), Emerging technologies in distance education (pp. 61-87). Edmunton, AB:
Athabasca University Press.

Gail Wingate
March 23, 2014
OMDE 610 Section 9040
Assignment 3

Peirce, W. (2006, January). Designing rubrics for assessing higher order thinking. Paper
presented at the meeting of the Association of Faculties of Community College Teaching,
Columbia, MD.