Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 13

6.

Foldable
Basics

Time needed: 10-20 minutes


Grade appropriate level: K-3
Materials: Paper (with dotted fold lines if possible), writing utensils, and a teacher
example (either large enough to be visible to whole class or projector is needed)
Classroom Arrangement: No specific set-up necessary, but students can work at
small table groups or individual desks for individual work as long as a flat space is
available.

Process Directions

The teacher will pass out at the beginning of the lesson either plain
paper or paper that has dashed lines on it dividing the paper into
thirds.
The teacher will have the students fold the paper so that two flaps of
paper are at the front and they can be opened as if they are double
doors to the content inside.
The students will then be instructed to write the content subject on
the front of the foldable before beginning the lesson.
During the lesson, the students will be instructed by the teacher to
fill the inside with specific facts or items that need to be recalled at
a later time.
The teacher would allow this to be an aide to certain other items in
the future.

When/Example

Used during lessons that have a lot of content which needs


summarized for the students
Could be used for multiple subjects, most commonly used for social
studies content. An example would be that of a lesson covering a war.
Allowing students to write on a foldable could help summarize their
thoughts.
Could be used as a study aide once completed.

SourceZike, D. (2002). American journey reading and study skills foldables . McGraw-Hill
Education.

7. Story Map
Basics

Time needed: 10-20 minutes


Grade appropriate level: K-3
Materials: Story Mapping sheets (can be made by students if necessary) and story
for each individual student.
Classroom Arrangement: No specific set-up necessary, but students can work at
small table groups or individual desks with a flat surface, for group work or
individual work.

Process Directions

The teacher will first cover the basic components of a story and the
sequence in which they fall (beginning, middle, and end) before
beginning a first lesson with story mapping.
The teacher will hand out a story mapping sheet and will model how to
use and fill out this sheet.
Have students complete the story map during the story reading.
Students may also fill out the sheet after the lesson depending on the
objectives. The students will be allowed to use both pictures and
drawings.
At the end of the lesson the teacher will have the students fill in any
information they may have missed during the read and finish the story
map.

When/Example

This strategy can be used before, during, or after a story depending


on the intention of the teacher. To best use it within the category of
summarizing or note taking, I would either have students fill it out
during or after the reading.
This would be largely a language arts strategy, but could also be used
in content such as with telling a history story or any type of narrative
to help the students learn.
See lesson section for additional example

SourceOriginated from:

Bartlett, F.C. (1932). Remembering: A study in experimental and social psychology.


Cambridge University Press.

Kearson, W. (2014, September). Beginning, middle, and end. [Image]. Retrieved from
http://kearsonsclassroomblog.blogspot.com/2014/09/beginning-middle-end.html

8. Think- Pair-Share
Basics
Time needed: 0-5 minutes
Grade appropriate level: K-3
Materials: No materials required.
Classroom Arrangement: No specific set-up necessary.

Process Directions

The teacher will have posed a question or gone over content for the
students in the classroom.
Allow a few seconds to think before having students turn to a partner.
The students will be instructed to turn to a partner and share their
thoughts on the instruction subject or questions at hand, with that
partner. The idea is to give the students a few seconds to quickly
summarize their learning.
The teacher will give 30 seconds to 1 minute for the students to talk
to their partner about this summary of information.
The teacher will then bring the students back together and will
choose a few students to summarize their thoughts. Taking different
views to give students a well-rounded opinion.

When/Example

This can be used when students need to talk and be more actively
engaged in the lesson, when a change of pace is needed, or a bit of
collaborative learning should be implemented.
This may be used within any subject area with any content.
An example could be during a math lesson on addition , having the
students share with their partner what the next step could be.

SourceLyman, F. (1981). The responsive classroom discussion: The inclusion of all

students .Mainstreaming Digest. University of Maryland, College Park,


MD.

9. Webbing

Basics
Time needed: 10-25 minutes
Grade appropriate level: 2-3
Materials: Paper, writing utensils, and colored pencils.
Classroom Arrangement: Small group, partner, or whole group exercise. Adaptable
for room.

Process Directions

The teacher will pass out blank pieces of paper either before or after
the lesson depending on whether the students are summarizing or
taking notes. Each student would be instructed to draw a medium to
large size circle in the center of the paper. The teacher could also
hand out a formatted sheet, but often the hands-on experiences are
beneficial.

The teacher will instruct the students to fill in the center bubble with
the content topic that the students are either taking notes on or are
summarizing.
After the center circle is filled in the students should be instructed
to draw arrows coming out of the center circle with the main points on
these arrows. If this is being used as a note taking strategy that
teacher will stop throughout the lesson and ask clarifying questions to
further note taking
The students will continue to format notes in a web formation until
the student feels as though they have completely covered the content
This will be used in later activities or as a study aide.

When/Example

This can be used for many subject and content areas, but may be most
useful in the area of social studies. Social studies often has complex
ideas that can easily be broken down into main ideas and have many
different types of facts underneath those main ideas. Could be used
with President facts.
This would be best used when the students of the class need a handson and visual representation of what they are thinking.

Source-

Buzan, T., Buzan, B. (1995, April 6). The mind map book. London: BBC Books.

10. Shaping Up
Basics
Time needed: 5-10 minutes
Grade appropriate level: 2-3
Materials: Shaping-Up Review sheets (can be created by students) and writing
utensils for each individual
Classroom Arrangement: No specific set-up necessary. Students can work
anywhere with a flat surface for individual work.

Process Directions

The teacher will make sure that the students are aware that this is an
individual activity to know how they are thinking at that point in time.
The teacher will either hand out blank pieces of paper or a precreated shaping up review sheet at the end of a lesson or learning
time.
If a blank sheet is being used the teacher will instruct the students
to draw a heart, a square, a triangle, and a circle.
The teacher will instruct the students to write or draw in the heart
one thing they loved learning about in the lesson.
From there the teacher will have the students finish filling in the rest
of the shapes with the following information: square- 4 important
concepts, triangle-three important facts, and circle- summary of
todays lesson.

When/Example
This strategy would be beneficial to use within a unit. It could allow
the students to have review sheets for each lesson of the unit. Being
in Elementary this may make it easier for students to remember the
content.
This could be used within any content to see the summary as the
students are understanding it.

Source-

UsDigitalliteracy. (2007). Literacy strategies. Retrieved from


http://digitalliteracy.us/literacy-strategies/ Bishop, K. (2012, May 15).
Teaching tip tuesday-shaping up review. [Image]. Retrieved from
https://msbinstructionalcoach.wordpress.com/tag/shaping-up-review/

11. Combination Notes


Basics

Time needed: 25-35 minutes


Grade appropriate level: 2-3
Materials: Note Template (Can be made by students on normal paper) and writing
utensils.
Classroom Arrangement: No specific set-up necessary but students can work at
small table groups or individual desks for group work, whole group work, or
individual work.

Process Directions

The teacher will hand out either the note template or have the
student create the template themselves on a blank piece of paper
before the lesson content begins.
The teacher will instruct students to fill in this note template during
instruction.
The teacher will instruct the students to take informal notes on the
left-hand side of the page. The right-hand side of the page is used
for visual representations such as webbing. The bottom section of the
page is used for the big concepts of the lesson or material. This could
be used as a summary section for the students (Summarizing would
either be done after completing the top portion of the notes or
throughout the lesson).
In order for the students to have quality work, the teacher will stop
throughout the lesson or material to allow students to catch up in
their notes or to make visual representations.

When/Example
This is most effectively used when a concept can benefit from being

covered in multiple ways. This strategy gives three times and ways to
process information.
Could be used within any content. More effective when it is a large
amount of content.
Would be great in a math lesson about the economy or a similar
difficult subject.

Source-

Chamo, A. U., & OMalley, J. M. (1994). The calla handbook: Implementing the

cognitive language learning approach. Reading, MA: Addison Wesley.

Davis, K. (2014). Summarizing and note taking. [Image]. Retrieved from


http://effectiveinstructionalstrategies.weebly.com/summarizing-and-notetaking.html

12. 3-2-1
Basics

Time needed: 5-10 minutes + Reading time


Grade appropriate level: 1-3
Materials: Reading, paper, and writing utensils for each individual student
Classroom Arrangement: No specific set-up necessary but students need table
space to work.

Process Directions

The teacher will have the students read a text individually, in a group,
or as a class.
The teacher will then instruct students to work individually and
record three main facts, 2 things that were personally interesting,
and one question they have.
If students want to use pictorial representations with their writing
this will be allowed.
When they are finished, the students will have additional time to take
this strategy into questioning where the students can work in
collaboration or they can have a question time with the teacher.

When/Example

This strategy would be best used in a language arts lesson when


reading a new book or text.
This is a summarizing strategy, but it can easily be adapted to fit
other strategy areas or classroom needs.

Source-

Zygouris-Coe, V., Wiggins, M. B., & Smith, L. H. (2004). Engaging students with
text: The 3-2-1 strategy. The Reading Teacher, 58(4), 381-384.