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Unit Overview

Declarative Knowledge (DK)

Syllabus
Inquiry

The learner will know:


Phenomenon: Adolf Hitler & The Nazi State - Power defined as authority and control (30 hours)
1. Background context of Germany in 1918
2. Causes of the Nazi Partys rise to power; Treaty of Versailles, the Great Depression and failure of the
democratic Weimar republic
3. The nature and effects of Nazi ideology, authoritarianism and control
4. The effects of Nazi power and the Nazi Partys ability to utilise fear, propaganda, and tactical skills to
acquire and maintain power
5. The nature and effects of key aspects of the Nazi state, including military mobilisation, Lebensraum, terror
and repression (SA and SS), the Hitler Youth, and policy on religion
6. Nazi policies of anti-Semitism and the promotion of the Aryan race resulting in concentrations camps and
death camps Holocaust
7. Germanys aggressive foreign policy and subsequent war effort
8. The role and impact of significant individuals in Weimar and Nazi Germany, for example Gustav
Stresemann, President von Hindenburg, Joseph Goebbels & Hermann Gring

Procedural Knowledge (PK)


The learner will be able to:
1. identifying the information that is explicit in sources and analysing what is explicit and implicit in sources,
including themes, values and interrelationships within and among sources
2. evaluating the worth of sources: assessing the reliability, authenticity, representativeness, relevance and
accuracy of the sources
3. synthesise evidence, draw conclusions about a question or hypothesis
4. communicate knowledge and understanding of historical information, concepts, change and continuity,
cause and effect, events developments
5. producing written responses; short and extended stimulus response
6. produce logically developed and fluent historical arguments, with claims substantiated by sources of
evidence
7. meet the requirements for language conventions, referencing, length, scale and scope of responses.
(QSA 2004, p. 48)

(Criterion 2 &
3)

Definitions

Sources

Background
changes and
continuities,
motives and
causes
Effects, interests
and arguments
Reflections and
Responses

Orientating

Wee
k

DK &
PK

Learning Experience Overview

Learning Focus: Introduction into


the course
LEP 1

LEP 2

Learning Focus: Germany at the


end of WW1

LEP 3

LEP 4

The Big Three


Provisions, Response and
effects

Learning Focus: Role of German


Military

LEP 5

Germanys role in WW1


The armistice

Learning Focus: Treaty of


Versailles

Semester outline
Glossary words
Textbooks
Goal setting
Profiling prior knowledge /
skills
Defining power

Defeat in World War I


The Groener-Ebert Pact
The Frei Corps

Learning Focus: German political


parties

Left wing & Right wing parties


Political Instability
The Berlin Incident

Resources

Semester outline
Glossary words
SMART goals h/o
Modern history
timeline h/o
activity

Power
Throughout
History ppt.

Nelson Textbook
Weimar Republic

Syllabus Guiding Questions

What is power?
What types of power have historians and
theorists identified?
What is the key question that will guide
this inquiry topic?

Syllabus
Link

Definitions

Nelson Textbook
Weimar Republic

What historical factors allowed this


exercise of power?
Nelson Textbook
Weimar Republic

Nelson Textbook
Weimar Republic

Backgroun
ds
changes &
continuitie
s
motives &
causes

LEP 6

Learning Focus: Counterrevolution


The Sparticist uprising
Using the Free Corps

Nelson Textbook
Weimar Republic

Learning Focus : Modernism

Nelson Textbook
Weimar Republic

LEP 7

LEP 8
3

LEP 9

Learning Focus: Political Instability

The Kapp Putsch


Right-wing problems

Learning Focus: Economic


Instability

LEP 10

Literature and art


Freedom of Speech

War reparations
Hyperinflation

Learning Focus: Fall of the Republic

Failure of policies

Learning Focus: Early Nazism


LEP 11
4

Enhancing

LEP 12

LEP 13

Adolf Hitler - the early years


The origins of the Nazi Party
(NSDAP)
Munich Putsch

Learning Focus: Elections

Why the NAZI vote increased


The balance of power

Learning Focus: Chancellor Hitler

Results and their explanation


Who voted for the Nazis?

Nelson Textbook
Weimar Republic
Kapp Putsch clip

What were the philosophical and


ideological contexts for the emergence of
the form of power?

Nelson Textbook
Source Analysis:
German perspective

Nelson Textbook
Weimar Republic

Hatred and
Charisma Handout

What roles did individuals or groups play


in this case of power?

Rise of Hitler PPt.


Rise of Hitler
Handout
Rise of Hitler Time
line
Election Sources

Effects,
interests
and
arguments

LEP 15

Learning Focus: Chancellor to


Fuhrer

The Enabling Act


Consolidation of power
SA / SS

Learning Focus: Social Control


LEP 16

Youth education
Workers
Women

Learning Focus: Anti-Semitism


LEP 17

Nazi Ideology on religion and


culture

SS Source Analysis
Nelson Text Book
Under Hitlers spell
clip

What tactics were used to consolidate


power?

Social Control
Worksheet
Holocaust Museum
Themes
Laptops

Racial Theory
Hand/out
Nazi Ideology clip
Butcher Paper
Hate Pyramid

Were there challenges to the growth of


power?

6
LEP 19

LEP 18
LEP 20

Learning Focus: Propaganda

Gobbles
The power of propaganda

Learning Focus: Army


SS/SA
Night of Long Knives

Learning Focus: Tactics of Power

Propaganda
Terror

Propaganda
Handout
Wordle
Holocaust Museum
USA
Night of Long Knives
clip / handout
Source Analysis
Scaffold

What were the major effects of this


exercise of power on human wellbeing, on
social, political and economic structures,
and on environments?

LEP 21

Learning Focus: Anti-Semitism

LEP 22
7

Concentration camps
The Gestapo

Learning Focus: Resistance groups

Groups and Individuals

Learning Focus: Anti-Semitism


LEP 23

Extermination Camps
Nazi Terror exposed

Learning Focus: The Holocaust


LEP 25

Survivors
Nazi Experiments

Learning Focus: Nuremburg Trials


LEP 26
8

LEP 27

Learning Focus: Official


Extermination Policy

Culminating

Guilty or Not Guilty


Scales of Justice

Challenging Perspectives

Holocaust Explained
website
Online Timer
Laptops
Resistance Group
Play cards
Perspective Scaffold

Group Work:
Presentation on
selected
Extermination Camp
Holocaust explained
website
Holocaust survivor
testimonies

Judgement and the


rules of war
Historian
Perspectives
Scaffold

Part One: Stimulus short answer response


Part Two: Extended Response

LEP 29

What historiographical issues and


perspectives come to light in studying
twentieth century Germany?

Judgement and the


rules of war

Assessment:
LEP 28

Who benefited from this exercise of power,


and who did not or was disadvantaged?

Power can be defined as authority, control, superiority,


domination, muscle and might. Use your knowledge and

What have you learnt about power and its


uses?
Do you think that this use of power is or
was a progressive one historically?

Reflection
s and
responses

understanding of Nazi Germany to discuss the impact of


power when defined as authority and control.

How is this study helping your


understanding of history as a discipline?
Has this study helped you to decide how

LEARNING EXPERIENCE PLAN (LEP)


Template for written recording of plan of learning experiences from short (one session/lesson), to medium (series of lessons/unit of work). A range of examples are on your program Moodle site. As
necessary, specific information on how to complete this LEP is provided by your lecturer in a course.
Year level(s)

Duration

11

60mins

Focus

Learning Focus: Propaganda


consolidate power?

Inquiry: What tactics were used to

Implementation date(s)

Curriculum area(s)

Lesson One in
sequence

Modern History

NOTE: Use the relevant curriculum document: Australian Curriculum (P-10); QSA Queensland Kindergarten Learning Guideline; QSA Early Years Curriculum Guidelines; QSA Essential Learnings and Standards
(Years 1 -9); QSA Learning area (Year 10); QSA Subject syllabus/SAS (Years 11 12), and other curriculum sources (school priorities, etc.)
Prior knowledge:

LMQ1 - What does the learner already know? (Links to prior knowledge & interests including diagnosis of
previous learning experiences)

Causes of the Nazi Partys rise to power; Treaty of Versailles, the Great Depression and failure of the democratic Weimar republic
Nazi policies of anti-Semitism and the promotion of the Aryan race
Source Analysis Framework TADPOLE

Learning outcomes/standards:

LMQ2 - Where does the learner need/want to be?

(Knowledge & understanding & skills to be acquired or further developed. Draw upon relevant content descriptions from curriculum document to inform specific outcomes/standards for this learning experience.
Foreground achievement standards that will inform assessment. Use descriptors appropriate for phase of learning & curriculum. QSA, 2011, defines curriculum as the sum total of the learning and development
experiences that are offered by a school, formally and informally, in class and out of class.)
Knowledge & understanding:

(declarative)

D4: The effects of Nazi power and the Nazi Partys ability to utilise
fear, propaganda, and tactical skills to acquire and maintain power

Learning processes:
DoL1 Focus - What Attitudes and Perceptions will be the focus of this LEP and how will I support individual
learners? (Including differentiated teaching for student diversity.)

Skills:

(procedural/do)

P 4: communicate knowledge and understanding of historical


information, concepts, change and continuity, cause and effect,
events developments

LMQ3 - How does the learner best learn?


DoL5 Focus - What Habits of Mind will be the focus of this LEP and how will I support their
development?

DoL 1: Classroom Tasks- Use a variety of ways for students to engage in


meaningful learning and presenting academic inquiry (Historical Inquiry)

Time

HoM: Critical Thinking: maintaining an open mind


Students are to engage in analysing different perspectives and ideas
through considering the beliefs, values and experiences of groups and
individuals throughout history. In addition, through collaboration
students will enhance their communication and acceptance of those
who have different beliefs, values, experiences and perspectives to that
of their own.

Learning procedures
LMQ5 - What will constitute the learning journey?
LMQ6 - Who will do what?

Dimensions of
Learning (DoL) focus.
including teaching
strategies to be used

(Include adjustments in the learning experiences to accommodate learner difference.)

Resources

Assessment & feedback

LMQ4 - What
resources do I
have at my
disposal?

LMQ7 - How will I check to see the


learner has achieved the learning
outcomes? (See also the QSA
Assessment Bank.)
LMQ8 - How will I inform others?

Differentiatio
n
Phase 1 Introduce, engage, focus, advance organiser, review prior knowledge, hook

Activity: Propaganda Machine


Students watch clip and complete Y diagram
Y diagram:

What did you see?


What did you hear?
What did you feel?

In examining the nature of power, we must investigate the tools the


Nazis used to consolidate power.

DoL 1:
Classroom
Tasks- Use a
variety of ways
for students to
engage in
meaningful
learning and
presenting
academic inquiry
(Historical
Inquiry)

In our previous lessons, we identified that the Nazis targeted specific


groups within society in order to assume social control.
LM and students discuss clip and link Nazi racial theory to
propaganda.
Phase 2 Develop skills & knowledge, build, practise, acquire, integrate, extend, refine

Visual learners
Breaking
concepts down

(Include moderation of teacher


judgments of standards if necessary.)

You Tube:
Propagand
a Machine
https://ww
w.youtube.
com/watch
?
v=oVurfhM
w1UU

Wordle:
http://www
.wordle.ne
t/
Y Diagram
http://www

Informal assessment:
Students blogs will be
marked and LM will leave
comments with written
feedback.

(Students will also be


required to comment on
each others blogs in a
revision activity in a later
lesson)

This lesson we will be investigating: how did the Nazi party used
propaganda to maintain power and spread anti-Semitism?
Firstly, we need to answer: What is propaganda?

utilising words
that students
have offered for
meaning

.myread.or
g/images/y
_chart.gif

Activity: Propaganda Wordle


LM goes around the room and asks students to suggest one word
they think is associated with propaganda
As students offer the words, the LM types into Wordle
LM then presents these definitions to students.
False or partly false information used by a government or political group
to sway public opinion.

Propagand
a Ppt.

Propaganda is a form of communication that is aimed at changing the


attitude of people towards something.
Propaganda is brainwashing of the public, convincing them of an
ideological viewpoint.

LM copy and Pastes into Wordle and publishes Wordle which can be
saved in student drive
LM asks students to highlight verbs in the definition

Sway
Changing
Brain washing
Convincing

LM emphasises the purpose of propaganda through drawing on the


verbs within definitions.

DoL 2: help
students
construct
meaning for
vocabulary
terms concepts

Activity Think, Pair, Share: Propaganda Reading &


Comprehension

Gobbles &
Propagand
a Handout

Instructions:
Students are to work in pairs.
Questions:

Observing and monitoring


level of prompting for
correct answers, rephrasing
or redirecting responsesverbal feedback

Handout
-Moderate level

What is propaganda?
Who was Dr Joseph Goebbels & what was his basic idea on
propaganda?
Explain how the media was used to put across Nazi Party ideas.
Why were mass rallies the most spectacular form of propaganda?
Give specific examples.
What is censorship?
Write down 3 forms of censorship that occurred in Nazi Germany.
Which do you think would have been the most successful in
getting German people to follow the Nazi Party - propaganda or
censorship? Why?

LM and students check answers and clarify understanding


Activity: Propaganda Museum

Questions
range from
lower order
thinking to
higher order
thinking

Check for understanding


questions comprehension
questions how?

DoL2:
Reciprocal
Teaching

Volunteer answers and


select people to gauge their
understanding

Summarising,
Questioning,
Clarifying,
Predicting

Peer assessment/ feedback


in group work

(Individual)
Students are to visit the website:
http://www.ushmm.org/propaganda/exhibit.html#/themes/
Students are to add a page to their blogs titles Propaganda.
They are answer the following questions using the website to guide
their learning.

What is propaganda?
How did the Nazis use propaganda?
What messages were they trying to send?
How do you think Nazi propaganda impacted the attitudes and
actions of Germans in the 1930s?
What are examples of propaganda in society today? How do you
think this propaganda impacts the attitudes and actions of
people today?

Phase 3 Conclude, culminate, draw together, review & summarise key learnings, checks for learning,
consolidation, homework/review tasks

Activity: Imagine
Students can either:

create their own piece of propaganda in the hypothetical

Website
appeals to
Multiple
Intelligences
If students are
struggling can
work in pairs
however, need
to generate
individual
response for
portfolio
Tiered group
work allowing
students to
bridge gap in
learning using
peer teaching

Holocaust
Museum
USA:
http://www
.ushmm.or
g/propaga
nda/exhibi
t.html#/th
emes/

Observing and monitoring


group responses moving
around room

situation of themselves and their friends wanting to overthrow


the Australian government and control Australia

write a journal entry from the perspective of a Jewish person


living in Nazi Germany, detailing their experiences of
propaganda

Students are to post to their blog page.

DoL 2: Create
opportunities
for students
to discover
information
for
themselves
-Inquiry /
Characteristics

Multiple
Intelligences
Creative and
linguistic

Lesson:
LEARNING EXPERIENCE PLAN (LEP)
Template for written recording of plan of learning experiences from short (one session/lesson), to medium (series of lessons/unit of work). A range of examples are on your program Moodle site. As
necessary, specific information on how to complete this LEP is provided by your lecturer in a course.
Year level(s)

Duration

Focus

Implementation date(s)

Curriculum area(s)

11

60mins

Learning Focus: Propaganda Inquiry: What tactics were used to consolidate


power?

Lesson Two in
sequence

Modern History

NOTE: Use the relevant curriculum document: Australian Curriculum (P-10); QSA Queensland Kindergarten Learning Guideline; QSA Early Years Curriculum Guidelines; QSA Essential Learnings and Standards
(Years 1 -9); QSA Learning area (Year 10); QSA Subject syllabus/SAS (Years 11 12), and other curriculum sources (school priorities, etc.)
Prior knowledge:

LMQ1 - What does the learner already know? (Links to prior knowledge & interests including diagnosis of
previous learning experiences)

Causes of the Nazi Partys rise to power; Treaty of Versailles, the Great Depression and failure of the democratic Weimar republic
Nazi policies of anti-Semitism and the promotion of the Aryan race
Source Analysis Framework TADPOLE
Learning outcomes/standards:

LMQ2 - Where does the learner need/want to be?

(Knowledge & understanding & skills to be acquired or further developed. Draw upon relevant content descriptions from curriculum document to inform specific outcomes/standards for this learning experience.
Foreground achievement standards that will inform assessment. Use descriptors appropriate for phase of learning & curriculum. QSA, 2011, defines curriculum as the sum total of the learning and development
experiences that are offered by a school, formally and informally, in class and out of class.)

Knowledge & understanding:

(declarative)

The effects of Nazi power and the Nazi Partys ability to utilise fear,
propaganda, and tactical skills to acquire and maintain power
Nazi policies of anti-Semitism and the promotion of the Aryan race
Understand the characteristics of perspectives and how analysing
perspectives enhances historical inquiry

Skills:

Learning processes:

(procedural/do)
Identifying the information that is explicit in sources and
analysing what is explicit and implicit in sources, including
themes, values and interrelationships within and among sources
Communicate knowledge and understanding of historical
information, concepts, change and continuity, cause and effect,
events developments
Analysing perspectives within historical sources
LMQ3 - How does the learner best learn?

DoL1 Focus - What Attitudes and Perceptions will be the focus of this LEP and how will I support individual
learners? (Including differentiated teaching for student diversity.)

DoL5 Focus - What Habits of Mind will be the focus of this LEP and how will I support their
development?

DoL 1: Classroom Tasks- Use a variety of ways for students to engage in


meaningful learning and presenting academic inquiry (Historical Inquiry)

HoM: Critical Thinking- maintaining an open mind: Students are


to engage in analysing different perspectives and ideas through

considering the beliefs, values and experiences of groups and


individuals throughout history. In addition, through collaboration
students will enhance their communication and acceptance of those
who have different beliefs, values, experiences and perspectives to that
of their own.

Time

Learning procedures
LMQ5 - What will constitute the learning journey?
LMQ6 - Who will do what?
(Include adjustments in the learning experiences to accommodate learner difference.)

Dimensions of
Learning (DoL)
focus.
including teaching
strategies to be
used

Differentiatio
n

Resources

Assessment & feedback

LMQ4 - What
resources do I
have at my
disposal?

LMQ7 - How will I check to see the


learner has achieved the learning
outcomes? (See also the QSA
Assessment Bank.)
LMQ8 - How will I inform others?
(Include moderation of teacher
judgments of standards if
necessary.)

Phase 1 Introduce, engage, focus, advance organiser, review prior knowledge, hook

Activity: Different Perspective


Explain to students Activity:
I am going to show you a picture on the board.
You are to look at it and think about what you see but please remain
silent
Present Image on the board
Ask students to write down what they see in the picture
Select student who identifies the young women in the image
Do the same for someone who identifies the old women
Explain to students that some people see an eagle and a beaver
Did anyone see something different?
Activity Discussion / Reflection Questions:

Why did some people see a young woman while others saw an old
woman, beaver or eagle?

Is there a correct way to see the picture?

What did you feel towards those who saw the drawing the same
way you did?

What did you feel towards those who saw it differently?

What did you feel when discovered the other aspect of the picture?

Was there ever a time when you saw something one way and
someone else saw it differently?

How did you feel about the person who saw that situation
differently?

DoL 1:
Classroom
Tasks- Use a
variety of ways
for students to
engage in
meaningful
learning and
presenting
academic inquiry

Appealing to
creative /
abstract / visual
learners

What do
you see
activity?
Observing and
monitoring level of
prompting for correct
answers, rephrasing or
redirecting responses
verbal feedback

Volunteer answers and


select people to gauge
their understanding

Check for understanding


questions

Peer assessment in
group work

Observing and
monitoring group
responses moving
around room verbal
feedback through
discussion
Multiple
Intelligences Use
of visuals

So we have established that two people can see the same thing in very
different ways, without being incorrect.

What if each person sees the situation in a different way?

How can they discover a resolution if they are both right about what
they see?

Should someone compromise?

How do we decide who should compromise?

DoL2:
Importance of
using skill

Phase 2 Develop skills & knowledge, build, practise, acquire, integrate, extend, refine

Stage one
When studying History it is extremely important to analyse different
perspectives.
Imagine if we only studied history from the perspective of the Nazi
supporters, those who held the power in society at that given point in
time? (PPT)

DoL 2 Thinkaloud- LM
models showing
and talking
students through
process

Reflective questions to stimulate thought


LM uses ppt. visuals to assist with this process

What would constitute our history?

What would the consequences be for modern society?

For the first part of our lesson we are going to explore:

What are perspectives?

How do we analyse different perspectives?

Based on our warm up activity, what do you think perspectives are?

DoL 2: help
students
construct
meaning for
vocabulary
terms

LM and students complete a mind map


I do: Analysing Perspectives
Talking through the process

The Process

DoL 2:
Organise
information-

Alternate
History Ppt.

In order to analyse perspectives


the first thing I need to do, is
make sure that I have a clear
understanding of the word
perspectives.
I go to my glossary of terms and
locate the definition
I highlight the key words

I break the definition down


So, perspectives are

These can be different because

using graphic
organiser

A persons perspective is their point


of view, the position from which they
see and understand events going on
around them. People in the past may
have had different points of view
about a particular event, depending
on their age, gender, social position
and their beliefs and values (ACARA,
2015)

Points of view
Positions
Understandings

age
gender
events
social position

events

Points of view
Positions
Understandings

beliefs
values
In history we analyse the
perspectives of:
a) groups and individuals in
society which includes our
peers, current and past

Events

Points of View
Positions

c) our own perspectives

Groups

Historia

Understandings

Modifying
questions

scaffolding so it
is clear to all
learners

Individu
als

b) historian perspectives

DoL 2 Thinkaloud- LM
models showing
and talking
students through
process

Historic
al
sources

Extension
learners can
challenge
themselves with
higher order

Historical
Analysis
Framework
TADPOLE
(DETE,
n.d.)

Observing and
monitoring level of
prompting for correct
answers, rephrasing or
redirecting responses

Verbal feedback:
paraphrasing, clarifying,
confirming

Age
Gender
Social position
Beliefs
Values

So how do we analyse perspectives?


We have already looked at how to deconstruct sources and we are
familiar with analysis through our schooling experiences.

What does analysis involve?


What do we do when we look at the sources or text? (simplified
question)

thinking
questions within
scaffold

Volunteer answers and


select people to gauge
their understanding

Dol 3: Help
students
understand the
process

Check for understanding


questions

Use of visual
source instead of
written for
learners who
struggle with
comprehension

Source
Examinati
on
Scaffold

Possible answers pull it apart, identify details, images, evidence,


reasons
We know that analysing involves thinking critically and looking at
something in detail to explain
Talking Through the Process
In order to assist me with
analysing the perspectives, I am
going to use the 5ws as a start to
form some effective questions in
order to identify specific
information to analyse
Some key questions I could ask
Who
What
When

The process

DoL 2:
Organise
informationusing graphic
organiser
Scaffolding
TADPOLE

Whose perspective am I
identifying?
Whose perspective is opposed?
What is the perspective?
What evidence Is used to support
or challenge?
What is the impact of having this
perspective?

DoL 2 Thinkaloud- LM
models showing
and talking
students through
process
Observing and
monitoring level of

Where
How
Why

Modified /
guiding
questions for
students who are
struggling

Through answering these


questions I will be able to analyse
specific information in light of the
context.

DoL 2:
Internalise
information
Mnemonic

Stage Two: Modelling Application


Talking through the process
On the board is a piece of
propaganda.
I am going to analyse the
perspectives inferred by the
source.
We have already practiced
deconstructing sources using
TADPOLE
Step One: Complete TADPOLE
Because students are familiar with
TADPOLE LM asks students to
identify information:
(Guiding questions)
What is the man holding?
Does he appear to be starving?

prompting for correct


answers, rephrasing or
redirecting responses

When was the perspective shared?


Where is this perspective shown?
How did they share the
perspective?
Why do they have this
perspective?

The Process
(Use source that students are familiar
with)

T: Type of Source
Primary
A: Author
Nazi Party
D: Date
1933
P: Purpose
To portray the Jews as evil and
greedy
O: Opinion or fact
Opinion no factual evidence
presented
L: Language
Image
Minimal words
Title: The Eternal Jew

DoL 2 Thinkaloud- LM
models showing
and talking
students through
process

DoL 2:
Organise
informationusing graphic
organiser

DoL 2:

Volunteer answers and


select people to gauge
their understanding

Verbal feedback:
paraphrasing, clarifying,
confirming

How do we know he is wealthy?


What symbols / features convey
that this is a Jewish man?

Jew greedily handling gold with


hands which resemble those of a
monstrous creature
Caricature Jewish features
Large in size
Whip symbolic of exploitation
Star of David
E: Evidence
The source shows
1: how the Nazis perceived the
Jews
2. how the Nazis wanted all
Germans to view the Jews
3. Nazis used propaganda to
manipulate the population

Internalise
information
Mnemonic

Dol 3: Provide
students with
graphic
organisers to
help them with
the process of
analysing

Whose perspective is conveyed?


Nazis
Step Two: Analysing
Perspectives

Who?
What?
When?
Where?
Why?

What is the perspective?


Jews are greedy and evil
What evidence is used to support
or challenge?
The source does not provide
factual evidence. It only implies
that Jews exploit the German
citizens through the symbolism of
the whip and the greedy handling
of gold.
What is the impact of having this
perspective?
People who were suffering
hardship grew resentful of the
Jews thus, it incited anger and

Peer assessment in
group work

Observing and
monitoring group
responses moving
around room

resentment. People started to


support the Nazis because the
Nazis promised to rid Germany of
the Jews and therefore,
exploitation, traitors and financial
hardship.

Verbal feedback:
paraphrasing, clarifying,
confirming

People who were uneducated


could still grasp the meaning
conveyed in the propaganda
without having full awareness of
the consequences.
When was the perspective
shared?
1933
Consolidation of Nazi power

Higher Order
Thinking
questions

Where is this perspective shown?


Propaganda so possibly papers,
shop windows, notice boards
particularly public forums

DoL 2:
opportunities
for practice

How did they share the


perspective?
Propaganda

DoL2: Organise
informationusing graphic
organiser

Why do they have this


perspective?

Tiered groups
complexity of
sources varies

They blamed the Jews for


Germanys economic instability.
Now we have identified the features of the perspective, lets take our
thinking one step further.
Step Three: Drawing conclusions

Monitoring and
guiding for
students who are
struggling

Questions: Analysing Perspectives helps us answer the big questions

Why is the title The Eternal Jew? What do you think this means?
What possible motives would the Nazis have for producing this
poster?
What does this film poster tell us about Nazi attitudes towards the
Jews?
What is the purpose of this poster?
What is the relationship between Nazi racial theory and
propaganda?

DoL 2:
Shaping
Process

We do: Source Circuit


Each table is given a source scaffold
When timer goes off students swap the source scaffold
Students repeat the process with the guidance of LM (monitoring)
Possible guiding questions LM could use to help students describe, Identify
and interpret sources:

What colours, images, symbols, placement, positioning is used?

Phase 3 Conclude, culminate, draw together, review & summarise key learnings, checks for learning,
consolidation, homework/review tasks

Activity: Class PMI chart


Positives
What worked?
Reflection:

Negatives
What didnt?

Improvement
What can I improve?
LMQ9 - Why has the learner (achieved/)not achieved the learning outcomes (standards)?

(Feedback to the student & teacher about what is needed to inform future learning - what worked and what didnt. Were the knowledge & understanding & skills achieved? Learning diagnosis including
individual learning issues that need to be addressed.)

Lesson:
LEARNING EXPERIENCE PLAN (LEP)

ear level(s)

Duration

Focus

Implementation date(s)

Curriculum area(s)

11

60mins

Focus: Resistance Groups Inquiry: Were there challenges to the growth of power?
What tactics were used by the Nazi Party to consolidate their power?

Lesson 3 in
sequence

Modern History

NOTE: Use the relevant curriculum document: Australian Curriculum (P-10); QSA Queensland Kindergarten Learning Guideline; QSA Early Years Curriculum Guidelines; QSA Essential Learnings and Standards
(Years 1 -9); QSA Learning area (Year 10); QSA Subject syllabus/SAS (Years 11 12), and other curriculum sources (school priorities, etc.)
Prior knowledge:

LMQ1 - What does the learner already know? (Links to prior knowledge & interests including diagnosis of
previous learning experiences)

Causes of the Nazi Partys rise to power; Treaty of Versailles, the Great Depression and failure of the democratic Weimar republic
Nazi policies of anti-Semitism and the promotion of the Aryan race
Source Analysis Framework TADPOLE

Introduction into Analysing perspectives within sources


Learning outcomes/standards:

LMQ2 - Where does the learner need/want to be?

(Knowledge & understanding & skills to be acquired or further developed. Draw upon relevant content descriptions from curriculum document to inform specific outcomes/standards for this learning experience.
Foreground achievement standards that will inform assessment. Use descriptors appropriate for phase of learning & curriculum. QSA, 2011, defines curriculum as the sum total of the learning and development
experiences that are offered by a school, formally and informally, in class and out of class.)
Knowledge & understanding:

(declarative)

The effects of Nazi power and the Nazi Partys ability to utilise fear,
propaganda, and tactical skills to acquire and maintain power
Nazi policies of anti-Semitism and the promotion of the Aryan race
Understand the importance of analysing perspectives of others
Understand the importance of challenging our perspectives in order to
enhance analysis

Skills:

Learning processes:
DoL1 Focus - What Attitudes and Perceptions will be the focus of this LEP and how will I support individual
learners? (Including differentiated teaching for student diversity)

DoL 1: Classroom Tasks- Use a variety of ways for students to engage in


meaningful learning and presenting academic inquiry (Historical Inquiry)

(procedural/do)

Identifying the information that is explicit in sources and


analysing what is explicit and implicit in sources, including
themes, values and interrelationships within and among sources
Communicate knowledge and understanding of historical
information, concepts, change and continuity, cause and effect,
events development
Analysing perspectives of groups and Individuals
Analysing our own perspectives
LMQ3 - How does the learner best learn?

DoL5 Focus - What Habits of Mind will be the focus of this LEP and how will I support their
development?

HoM: Critical Thinking: maintaining an open mind: Students are


to engage in analysing different perspectives and ideas through
considering the beliefs, values and experiences of groups and
individuals throughout history. In addition, through collaboration
students will enhance their communication and acceptance of those
who have different beliefs, values, experiences and perspectives to that

of their own.

Time

Learning procedures
LMQ5 - What will constitute the learning journey?
LMQ6 - Who will do what?

Dimensions of Learning
(DoL) focus.
including teaching strategies to
be used

Resources
LMQ4 - What resources do I
have at my disposal?

(Include adjustments in the learning experiences to accommodate learner difference.)

Differentiation
Phase 1 Introduce, engage, focus, advance organiser, review prior
knowledge, hook

We are investigating the phenomenon of Adolf Hitler and the Nazi


State, focussing on the apparent popularity of authoritarianism and
control as a means of gaining and exercising power.
It is often assumed by many, that the German people supported
Hitler and the Nazi Regime as he was voted into power.

DoL 1: Classroom
Tasks- Use a variety
of ways for students
to engage in
meaningful learning
and presenting
academic inquiry
(Historical Inquiry)

Show students source which features pie graph of votes on the board
1/3 German population voted for Hitler
In a prior lesson, we established through historical sources that
approximately 1/3rd of the German population voted for the Nazis in
the 1932 elections. We analysed reasons as to why people supported
Hitler and the Nazis. But what about the other 2/3rds of the
population? Who are they and what was their perspective on the
Nazis?
Last week we explored elements which contributed to Rise of the
Nazis.
Lets revise some of these elements (Leading recall questions)
What was Germany like after the war, were people happy &
prosperous?
What are some of the issues the German population were facing?

Assessment &
feedback
LMQ7 - How will I
check to see the
learner has achieved
the learning
outcomes?
LMQ8 - How will I
inform others?

Resistance Groups
Nazi Germany
Power Point
Play cards using
resources from
the following
sources:
McDonough F.
(2001) Opposition
and resistance in
Nazi Germany.
Cambridge:
Cambridge
University Press.

Modified questions

The Holocaust
Educational Trust
Resistance
Individuals

Checking
Understanding

Not only did Hitler say he was going to provide solutions to the
German people, he utilised effective means in order to gain
support.

What are examples of these?


What groups did he appeal to? Why?
What groups did he oppose? Why?
How did he oppose them?

Mind Map Example:

Treaty of Versailles
Reclaim German
land, money and
pride
Charisma and
ability to unify a
separated society

Depression
He said he will fix
the economy
Rise /
Support
Nazis

Analysing
Perspective
Scaffold
DoL 2: Organise
information- using
graphic organiser

Military Might
He was a military man
and gained the support
of war veterans &
soldiers

Visual / logical
intelligences

Propaganda
People brain washed
(indoctrinated into
Nazi ideology)
particularly, Youth

through rapid
recall questions

Observing and
monitoring
level of
prompting for
correct
answers,
rephrasing or
redirecting
responses

Volunteer
answers and
select people to
gauge their
understanding

Today we are going to continue investigating the apparent


popularity of Adolf Hitler and the Nazi state
WALT: analyse different perspectives through examining resistance
groups and individuals in Nazi Germany
WILF: completed scaffold, discussion and reflection questions
TIB: Despite popular belief, individuals and groups within Germany
resisted Nazi power and believed that Nazi ideology was oppressive.
Phase 2 Develop skills & knowledge, build, practise, acquire, integrate,
extend, refine

Dol 3: Help
students
understand the
process

We have learnt so far that Hitler was supported by various groups


within German society as he either appealed to their needs or
manipulated them through propaganda, charisma and military
strength.
Today we are going to explore groups and individuals who opposed

Checking
Understanding

the Nazi regime through analysing their perspectives.

through rapid
recall questions

Look at your glossary and read over the definition of perspectives.


LM selects students to answer the following revision questions

What is the definition of perspectives?


How can perspectives be influenced?
Why is it important that we look at different perspectives?

In a moment we are going to read about some different resistance


groups and individuals who opposed Hitler.
In front of you, I have placed a table which we are going to use in an
activity.
As you can see, in the top row of the table there are series of
questions which are very similar to the ones we used in our source
analysis process. (we have seen and used these questions before)
Just like we analysed the different perspectives within sources we are
going to use these questions to guide our analysis of different
perspectives of people and groups within history.

Dol 3: Provide
students with
graphic organisers
to help them with
the process of
analysing

DoL 3: Create
opportunities for
them to practice

I do: Model Activity


I am going to model this activity for you.
The person I will be completing is Amin Wenger.
LM reads hand out and completes scaffold.

DoL 2 Think-aloudLM models showing


and talking students
through process

In the left hand column I write his name.


The second question I am looking to answer is why did he oppose the
Nazis?
LM reads the play card which is presented on the board
LM highlights answer within the text
LM records answer in the appropriate column
LM repeats process for each question on the top tier.

DoL 2: Organise
information- using
graphic organiser
explicitly shows
students the
difference between
identifying and
analysing

Now that we have identified the perspectives, lets look at the big
questions.
It is just like we did last lesson however, now we have put them into
our graphic organiser.
LM repeats process for each question on the second tier.

Scaffold:
Who?
Groups /
Individual
s
Identifyi
ng
Analysin
g

What policy
or decision
did the
individual or
group
oppose?

How did the


individual or
group show
their
opposition?

Why did the


individual or
group oppose
the Nazis?

What impact
did their
actions have?

What were
their motives?

How effective
do you think
they were?

Why do you
think the
Nazis were
threatened by
the
individuals
and groups?

What
conclusions
can you draw
about the
nature of
power?

open letter to
Hitler
11/04/1933

Denounced
Nazi treatment
and
persecution of
the Jews in
Germany based
on his
knowledge and
experience of
the Arminian
genocide.
He knew the
large scale
consequences

arrested by the
Gestapo
imprisoned and
tortured
interned in
several
concentration
camps

What
evidence
suggests this?
Amin
Wenger

Nazi sponsored
boycott of
Jewish shops
Persecution of
the Jews
because of
Germanys
economic
problems post
WW1
Challenging &
denouncing

Although they
didnt stop
Hitler, they did
challenge him
on a public
forum
undermining
his power and
control

On his release,
Armin escaped
to Rome where
he lived in exile

Verbal
feedback:
paraphrasing,
clarifying,
confirming

Nazi prejudice
I dispute the
foolish notion
that the Jews
should be
blamed for our
misfortunes

of such policies
and the
devastation
they caused.
He was already
exposing the
ottoman
government for
their atrocities
on a global
scale and he
had
commenced
the process of
exposing the
Nazis

Recognized as
Righteous
Among the
Nations by Yad
Vashem in
Israel.
made others
question Nazi
policy
Power is
characterised
by the person
or group
actioning it.
Individuals and
people have the
power to do bad
things.
However, they
also have the
power to effect
change

DoL 3: Use
teacher-structured
and student
centred tasks

DoL 3: give
students a model
for the process of
analysing
perspectives and
create
opportunities for
them to practice

We do: Expert Activity


Stage One:
Students are to engage in a collaborative expert group activity in
order to:

identify and analyse different perspectives of resistance


groups and individuals in Nazi Germany
discuss interpretations
report their findings to peer members
assess and respond to other students thoughts

Check for understanding Task expectations

What are we doing?


How are we doing this?

scaffold
What do you think?

Tiered group work


Higher students
are allocated
political/ resistance
groups more

Checking
understanding
of task
expectations
and findings
(verbal
feedback)

How much time do we have?


Why are we doing this?

complex language
in reading

1. students are allocated a number


2. students group according to their number
3. each number is allocated one of the different resistance groups
or individuals
1= Social Democrats
2= Communists
3= Industrial Workers
4= Sophie Scholl
5= Clemens August Graf von Galen
6= Hans Litten

Peer teaching

4. students are to read and discuss their given resistant group /


individual information card
5. students are to complete the analytical perspective scaffold
6. as students present their group the other students record the
different perspective into their scaffold
7. Students and LM check / discuss answers

Modelling/ Scaffold

Stage Two: What do you think?


When investigating perspectives it is important that we analyse our
own perspectives and that of others, in order to expand our thinking.
When analysing perspectives it is important that we can explain
reasons for our viewpoint and the viewpoint of others. It enhances the
process of analysis which essentially forms our arguments. In light of
the differing perspectives we should challenge ourselves to consider
other possible perspectives.
LM explains steps in the process
Steps in the Process:
1.
On an issue of disagreement, first identify your own
perspective.
2.

Try to determine the reasons behind that perspective.

DoL 3: give
students a model
for the process of
analysing
perspectives and
create
opportunities for
them to practice

Peer
assessment in
group work

Observing and
monitoring
group
responses
moving around
room

Verbal
feedback:
paraphrasing,
clarifying,
confirming

Observing and
monitoring
group
responses
moving around
room

3.

Identify a different perspective.

4.

Try to determine the reasons or logic behind that one.

Higher order
thinking questions

LM provides scaffold questions


Questions:
1.

What is the reasoning behind this issue or perspective?

2.

What is my position on the issue, and why do I feel that way?


Student work
will be collected
for written
feedback

3.
What is an opposing position and what reasons support that
position?

(Informal
portfolio)

Students complete Think Pair, Share using the process for the
following questions
Synthesising and Evaluating Questions:
Somebody, after all, had to make a start. What we wrote and said is
also believed by many others. They just don't dare to express
themselves as we did. (Sophie Scholl)
How important are individuals in encouraging people to resist?
How should prominent public figures behave when they hear
about injustice?
Why is it important that public figures speak against prejudice?
Do you think they have a responsibility to speak out?
Would you speak out against something you did not believe in?
Phase 3 Conclude, culminate, draw together, review & summarise
key learnings, checks for learning, consolidation, homework/review
tasks
TIB: Despite popular belief, individuals and groups within Germany
resisted Nazi power and believed that Nazi ideology was oppressive.
The fact that they were unsuccessful in overthrowing the Nazi regime

Clip:
https://www.youtube.com
/watch?v=H5nzjkmtCOc

provides us significant insight into the nature of Nazi power


Clip: Why did Hitler hate the Jews? (controversy & ethics SEL)
Complete the same process as above using class discussion of
different perspectives within the room
Homework Questions

How do we let the government know when we disagree with their


policies or ideas?
Can you think of any recent examples of people challenging the
government because they dont agree with their policies or ideas?
What can the consequences be of challenging the government
about their policies or ideas?
What do these case studies reveal about the type of power used in
Nazi Germany?
What can we learn from these people about the importance of
challenging decisions and policies we think are unfair or we
disagree with?

Reflection:

LMQ9 - Why has the learner (achieved/)not achieved the learning outcomes (standards)?

(Feedback to the student & teacher about what is needed to inform future learning - what worked and what didnt. Were the knowledge & understanding & skills achieved? Learning diagnosis including
individual learning issues that need to be addressed.)