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Hailey Swanson

Professor Deborah Weaver


ENC3315-0M01
30 January 2015
Living Sustainably in Ormond Beach- First Draft
I am a student at the University of Central Florida, located in Orlando, Florida. However,
I commute from Ormond Beach, Florida, where I currently reside. Ormond Beach is a coastal
beach town, located approximately an hour and fifteen minutes northeast of the University of
Central Florida. I have lived in Ormond Beach since second grade, so it is the place I am most
familiar with on the conditions surrounding sustainability. As far as sustainability in Ormond
Beach goes, there are a number of ways that I look at it.
Ormond Beach has two sides to it- the mainland side and the beach side. I have always
lived on the mainland side, even though when Im not at home Ive always been more likely to
be doing something on the beachside. Even though both sides are still technically the same town,
they both have their own unique aspects. From the perspective of someone living on the
mainland, I have noticed most everyone on the mainland uses a car as the main method of
transportation. This is a result of the lack of sidewalks on some major highways and roads, which
poses a safety issue. Hence, the demand for cars is higher; meaning, while cheaper gas prices can
be found on the mainland, the tradeoff is that more CO2 emissions are being released from
vehicles into the air. Therefore, more people on the mainland are breathing in carbon dioxide and
the fumes, which correlate with the issues of climate change as well as personal health.
Meanwhile, while many people who live on the beachside drive, I notice more people use
other modes of transportation more frequently than those on the mainland, including biking and
skateboarding. One reason is because, contrary to the lack of sidewalks on the mainland side, the

beachside has more sidewalks and it is easier to get around than the more crowded mainland
side. Additionally, the more laid back lifestyle on the beachside is another reason why residents
there choose to use alternative modes of transportation, in addition to cars. They feel more
connected to the beach and its tranquility, so they cruise around to go surfing, do yoga, run, eat at
nearby quick-service food establishments, go to the grocery store, etc. As a result, less CO2
emissions are being released into the air.
Personally, I try to be conscious of my carbon footprint. As far as driving goes, I pay for
my own gas. However, gas prices are what I am least concerned about when it comes to driving
around town. While I am not as eco-friendly as I could be, I do try to cut down on driving
whenever possible. I surf and most of my friends live on the beachside, so living on the opposite
side of town often requires me to drive. However, I usually keep my longboard in my car.
Therefore, whenever I am already on the beachside and need to go from one location to another I
will use my longboard instead of driving.

Hailey Swanson
Professor Deborah Weaver
ENC3315-0M01
30 January 2015
Living Sustainably in Ormond Beach- Second Draft
I am a student at the University of Central Florida, located in Orlando, Florida. However,
I commute from Ormond Beach, Florida, where I currently reside. Ormond Beach is a coastal
beach town, located approximately an hour and fifteen minutes northeast of the University of
Central Florida. I have lived in Ormond Beach since second grade, so it is the place I am most
familiar with on the conditions surrounding sustainability. As far as sustainability in Ormond
Beach goes, there are a number of ways that I look at it.
Ormond Beach has two sides to it- the mainland side and the beach side. I have always
lived on the mainland side, even though when Im not at home Ive always been more likely to
be doing something on the beachside. Even though both sides are still technically the same town,
they both have their own unique aspects. From the perspective of someone living on the
mainland, I have noticed most everyone on the mainland uses a car as the main method of
transportation. This is a result of the lack of sidewalks on some major highways and roads, which
poses a safety issue. Hence, the demand for cars is higher; meaning, while cheaper gas prices can
be found on the mainland, the tradeoff is that more CO2 emissions are being released from
vehicles into the air. Therefore, more people on the mainland are breathing in carbon dioxide and
the fumes, which correlate with the issues of climate change as well as personal health.
Meanwhile, while many people who live on the beachside drive, I notice more people use
other modes of transportation more frequently than those on the mainland, including biking and

skateboarding. Contrary to the lack of sidewalks on the mainland side, one reason is because the
beachside has more sidewalks and it is easier to get around than the more crowded mainland
side. Additionally, the more laid back lifestyle on the beachside is another reason why residents
there choose to use alternative modes of transportation, in addition to cars. They feel more
connected to the beach and its tranquility, so they cruise around to go surfing, do yoga, run, eat at
nearby quick-service food establishments, go to the grocery store, etc. As a result, while gas
prices are slightly higher because of the smaller demand, less CO2 emissions are being released
into the air.
Personally, I try to be conscious of my carbon footprint. As far as driving goes, I pay for
my own gas. However, gas prices are what I am least concerned about when it comes to driving
around town. I surf and most of my friends live on the beachside, so living on the opposite side
of town often requires me to drive. Therefore, while I am not as eco-friendly as I could be, I do
try to cut down on driving whenever possible. I usually keep my longboard in my car, so
whenever I am already on the beachside and need to go from one location to another, I will just
use it as my mode of transportation.
In addition to trying to cut down my carbon footprint when it comes to my mode of
transportation, I try to be just as conscious about living sustainably in my own house. About a
year ago my parents, brother, and I moved across town into a new home, which I would consider
technologically updated. We have lights in every room, and use electricity, air conditioning,
heating, water, cable, and high-speed internet. Everything that is connected with a utility in our
house is modern, including our televisions, stove, refrigerator, shower, etc. I am cautious when it
comes to my usage of all of these utilities. For example, I do not take long showers and I turn off
lights whenever I leave a room or whenever lights are unnecessary, I do not watch television

often but whenever I am watching and stop, I make sure to turn it off. Additionally, my family
only turns on the heat when we all feel it is necessary, we use energy-efficient lightbulbs, recycle
plastic and paper goods, and cut down from having an outside and inside refrigerator to only
having an inside refrigerator.
In regards to the location of my home and its surroundings, I am comfortable with where
I live. My family and I live in a neighborhood, located in the suburbs. It is on the outskirts of
town, which sounds rural, though where I particularly live is grassy and has multiple lakes. My
house itself is right on a lake, which aside from my short drive to the ocean, I consider a valuable
neighbor. I often fish in my backyard, and I will go on bike rides or jogs around my
neighborhood. Also, I try to watch the sunset from my backyard every evening, and it has a
calming effect on me.
Overall, I do not consider Ormond Beach to be a crowded city. It is a relatively small
town, to the point where almost every time I go out I will run into at least one person I know.
When I think of crowded cities in Florida, I think about Jacksonville, Orlando, Tampa, and
Miami as having more hustle and bustle. They have more lanes on their highways, downtown
areas, larger businesses, and more attractions and things to do for both residents and tourists. I
briefly lived in Orlando, but I will say that I am more of a coastal beach person than a city
person. Primarily, I enjoy the laid back lifestyle and living by the beach.
As far as driving goes though, I am definitely a city drive. I am from Southern California
and I still visit yearly or bi-yearly, so I have experienced the crazy freeway driving. This past
summer I recall driving back from a day spent in Santa Monica with a friend. While it should
have taken us about an hour and a half to get back to his house, it ended up taking us two
additional hours. Traffic is not only crazy there because accidents occur, but because of the

number of people on the roads. My aunt and uncle live there, and they taught me that I should
not only be a defensive driver, but a defensive driver as well. Some freeways have six or seven
lanes, and there were times when I would be in the carpool lane and I would have to exit and
directly merge over five or six lanes. When it came to merging there, the only way to get across
quickly was to put on my signal and merge. It was even more difficult when traffic caused cars
to stop and we were bumper to bumper. I would have to basically cut in front of cars just to
move over a lane. It was scary at first, but that is how everyone there has to drive to be a
successful driver there, and I eventually became comfortable after a month of driving there.

Hailey Swanson
Professor Deborah Weaver
ENC3315-0M01
30 January 2015
Living Sustainably in Ormond Beach- Final Draft
I am a student at the University of Central Florida, located in Orlando, Florida. However,
I commute from Ormond Beach, Florida, where I currently reside. Ormond Beach is a coastal
beach town, located approximately an hour and fifteen minutes northeast of the University of
Central Florida. I have lived in Ormond Beach since second grade, so it is the place I am most
familiar with on the conditions surrounding sustainability. As far as sustainability in Ormond
Beach goes, there are a number of ways that I look at it.
Ormond Beach has two sides to it- the mainland side and the beach side. I have always
lived on the mainland side, even though when Im not at home Ive always been more likely to
be doing something on the beachside. Even though both sides are still technically the same town,
they both have their own unique aspects. From the perspective of someone living on the
mainland, I have noticed most everyone on the mainland uses a car as the main method of
transportation. This is a result of the lack of sidewalks on some major highways and roads, which
poses a safety issue. Hence, the demand for cars is higher; meaning, while cheaper gas prices can
be found on the mainland, the tradeoff is that more CO2 emissions are being released from
vehicles into the air. Therefore, more people on the mainland are breathing in carbon dioxide and
the fumes, which correlate with the issues of climate change as well as personal health.
Meanwhile, while many people who live on the beachside drive, I notice more people use
other modes of transportation more frequently than those on the mainland, including biking and

skateboarding. Contrary to the lack of sidewalks on the mainland side, one reason is because the
beachside has more sidewalks and it is easier to get around than the more crowded mainland
side. Additionally, the more laid back lifestyle on the beachside is another reason why residents
there choose to use alternative modes of transportation, in addition to cars. They feel more
connected to the beach and its tranquility, so they cruise around to go surfing, do yoga, run, eat at
nearby quick-service food establishments, go to the grocery store, etc. As a result, while gas
prices are slightly higher because of the smaller demand, less CO2 emissions are being released
into the air.
Personally, I try to be conscious of my carbon footprint. As far as driving goes, I pay for
my own gas. However, gas prices are what I am least concerned about when it comes to driving
around town. I surf and most of my friends live on the beachside, so living on the opposite side
of town often requires me to drive. Therefore, while I am not as eco-friendly as I could be, I do
try to cut down on driving whenever possible. I usually keep my longboard in my car, so
whenever I am already on the beachside and need to go from one location to another, I will just
use it as my mode of transportation.
In addition to trying to cut down my carbon footprint when it comes to my mode of
transportation, I try to be just as conscious about living sustainably in my own house. About a
year ago my parents, brother, and I moved across town into a new home, which I would consider
technologically updated. We have lights in every room, and use electricity, air conditioning,
heating, water, cable, and high-speed internet. Everything that is connected with a utility in our
house is modern, including our televisions, stove, refrigerator, shower, etc. I am cautious when it
comes to my usage of all of these utilities. For example, I do not take long showers and I turn off
lights whenever I leave a room or whenever lights are unnecessary, I do not watch television

often but whenever I am watching and stop, I make sure to turn it off. Additionally, my family
only turns on the heat when we all feel it is necessary, we use energy-efficient light bulbs,
recycle plastic and paper goods, and cut down from having an outside and inside refrigerator to
only having an inside refrigerator.
In regards to the location of my home and its surroundings, I am comfortable with where
I live. My family and I live in a neighborhood, located in the suburbs. It is on the outskirts of
town, which sounds rural, though where I particularly live is grassy and has multiple lakes. My
house itself is right on a lake, which aside from my short drive to the ocean, I consider a valuable
neighbor. I often fish in my backyard, and I will go on bike rides or jogs around my
neighborhood. Also, I try to watch the sunset from my backyard every evening, and it has a
calming effect on me.
Overall, I do not consider Ormond Beach to be a crowded city. It is a relatively small
town, to the point where almost every time I go out I will run into at least one person I know.
When I think of crowded cities in Florida, I think about Jacksonville, Orlando, Tampa, and
Miami as having more hustle and bustle. They have more lanes on their highways, downtown
areas, larger businesses, and more attractions and things to do for both residents and tourists. I
briefly lived in Orlando, but I will say that I am more of a coastal beach person than a city
person. Primarily, I enjoy the laid back lifestyle and living by the beach.
As far as driving goes though, I am definitely a city driver. I am from Southern California
and I still visit yearly or bi-yearly, so I have experienced the crazy freeway driving. This past
summer I recall driving back from a day spent in Santa Monica with a friend. While it should
have taken us about an hour and a half to get back to his house, it ended up taking us two
additional hours. Traffic is not only crazy there because of the number of accidents that occur,

but because of the number of people on the roads as well. My aunt and uncle live in Southern
California, and they taught me that I should not only be a defensive driver, but an aggressive
driver as well. Some freeways have six or seven lanes, and there were times when I would be in
the carpool lane and I would have to exit and directly merge over five or six lanes. When it came
to switching lanes, the only way to get across quickly was to put on my signal and start merging.
It was even more difficult when traffic caused cars to stop and become bumper to bumper. I
would have to turn my wheel and cut closely in front of cars just to move over a lane. It was
scary at first, but that is how everyone there has to drive to be a successful driver there, and I
eventually became comfortable after a month of driving there.
On the other hand, when it comes to navigation, I rely heavily on my GPS. I have a
limited sense of direction and easily get lost. Even in my small town where I was basically raised
and still currently live, I do not even know major street names. I may know where I am, but I
will not be able to relay those directions to anyone else if they asked. On the contrary, I may
know of a street name, but not its exact location. I am fortunate that I grew up when GPS
navigation systems were invented, because if I had to rely on a map or compass, the chances of
me making it to my final destination would be significantly slimmer.
Overall, I believe sustainability is about being accountable for your lifestyle and your
surroundings, as well as the level of human activity involved with it. Everything that humans do
has a cause and an effect. Based on the way we choose to live our lives and interact with
ourselves and the environment, we each have a different impact on the world. Some people
choose to live with total disregard to sustainability. They do not consider our changing Earth,
and how it is impacting future generations. Others dedicate their lives to living sustainably, using
solar power energy, driving electric cars, eating organic foods, etc. When I hear the word

sustainability, I think about needs, including Maslows Hierarchy of Needs. However, I do think
beyond that, and think not only about our needs as human beings, but about how those needs
shape our lives and affect the people, environment, and things around us. For example,
deforestation clears space and creates land to be built upon and its wood has countless uses. On
the other hand, it is affecting the air which we breathe in, it is destroying natural habitats and
affecting plants and wildlife, and it is leaving a carbon footprint on our Earth. If we are
conscious of the way in which we live, we can preserve this Earth in an effort to protect its
natural resources and way of life. There have been steps towards this, for instance, California
enforcing a state law that bans plastic bags. However, steps have also been taken back, for
instance the creation of super highways in large cities such as Dallas, Texas, where I have family
and have seen the construction myself. Overall, sustainability will ultimately come down to how
humans choose to live as a people, and what kind of mark they want to leave on this world. I
personally will continue to live as conservatively as possible, so that my family in future
generations will be able to live as sustainably as I have on this Earth.

Hailey Swanson
Professor Deborah Weaver
ENC3315-0M01
1 May 2015
Revision of Living Sustainably in Ormond Beach
At the beginning of the semester, I discussed living sustainably in my town, Ormond
Beach, Florida. I still have the same thoughts regarding its current state of sustainability, making
only a few changes to my personal definition itself. More specifically, however, I have details to
add regarding my personal thoughts on accountability. Before learning much about this subject, I
thought living sustainably just meant picking up my trash and riding my bike whenever possible.
However, sustainability is more than just performing small actions every now and then to keep
the Earth clean. Sustainability means being accountable for every choice you make, encouraging
change, and empowering others to live more sustainably. It means looking at the bigger picture,
and not only what can happen in the short-run, but the long-term effects of living sustainably.
Without being conscious of how ones actions are affecting the Earth, the Earth will continue to
deplete until there are no natural resources left. As humans, we require food, water, and oxygen,
which the Earth supplies. Hence, it is essential that we educate ourselves and others on the topic
of sustainability, and make a proactive change to make the Earth a more sustainable place to live,
not only for the assurance of our survival, but the survival of the planet itself.
Ormond Beach is a small town with two sides to it- the mainland side and the beach side.
I have always lived on the mainland side, even though I spend most of my time on the beach
side. Even though both sides are part of the same town, they have different aspects which make
them unique. From the perspective of someone who lives on the mainland, I have noticed nearly

everyone on the mainland uses a car as the main method of transportation. This is a result of the
lack of sidewalks on some major highways and roads, which poses a safety issue. Hence, the
demand for cars is higher; meaning, while cheaper gas prices can be found on the mainland, the
tradeoff is that more CO2 emissions are being released from vehicles into the air. Therefore,
more people on the mainland are breathing in carbon dioxide and the fumes, which correlate with
the issues of climate change as well as personal health.
Meanwhile, while many people who live on the beachside drive, I notice more people use
other modes of transportation more frequently than those on the mainland, including biking and
skateboarding. One reason is because the beachside has more sidewalks and it is easier to get
around than the more crowded mainland side. Additionally, the more laid back lifestyle on the
beachside is another reason why residents there choose to use alternative modes of
transportation, in addition to cars. They feel more connected to the beach and its tranquility, so
they cruise around to go surfing, do yoga, run, eat at nearby quick-service food establishments,
go to the grocery store, etc. They can throw on a bathing suit, grab their bike, and dont have to
worry about breathing in gas fumes and dealing with the hustle and bustle found on the
mainland.
As a result, while gas prices are slightly higher because of the lesser demand, fewer CO2
emissions are being released into the air. Thus, the citizens of beachside are more conscious of
their carbon footprint. Not only do they cut down on gas emissions, but as far as ocean
sustainability goes, they want to keep their beaches clean. Since a majority of beachside citizens
frequent the beach, they want to protect it, including guarding turtle nests, picking up trash, and
keeping off sand dunes. Local beach clean-ups occur frequently, showing the importance of
sustainability within the beachside community.

While there are a handful of factors contributing to the depleting state of the worlds
oceans, pollution, littering, and destruction of marine habitats are three relevant issues in
Ormond Beach. By tackling issues within the community, it is a step towards not only preserving
the ocean, but the local community surrounding it. Personally, I have become more conscious of
my carbon footprint. As far as driving goes, living on the opposite side of town from the beach
often requires me to drive. Therefore, while I am not as eco-friendly as I could be, I try to cut
down on driving whenever possible. I usually keep my longboard in my car, so whenever I am
already on the beachside and need to go from one location to another, I will just use it as my
mode of transportation.
In addition to trying to cut down my carbon footprint when it comes to my mode of
transportation, I try to be just as conscious about living sustainably in my own house. About a
year ago my parents, brother, and I moved across town into a new home, which I would consider
technologically updated. We have lights in every room, and use electricity, air conditioning,
heating, water, cable, and high-speed internet. Everything that is connected with a utility in our
house is modern, including our televisions, stove, refrigerator, shower, etc. I am cautious when it
comes to my usage of all of these utilities. For example, I do not take long showers and I turn off
lights whenever I leave a room or whenever lights are unnecessary, I do not watch television
often but whenever I am watching and stop, I make sure to turn it off. Additionally, my family
only turns on the heat when we all feel it is necessary, we use energy-efficient light bulbs,
recycle plastic and paper goods, and cut down from having an outside and inside refrigerator to
only having an inside refrigerator.
In regards to the location of my home and its surroundings, I am comfortable with where
I live. My family and I live in a suburban neighborhood. It is on the outskirts of town, which

sounds rural, but where I live is grassy and has multiple lakes. My house itself is located on a
lake, which aside from my short drive to the beach, I consider a valuable neighbor. I often fish
in my backyard, and I will go on bike rides or jogs around my neighborhood. Also, I try to watch
the sunset from my backyard every evening.
Overall, I do not consider Ormond Beach to be a crowded city. It is a relatively small
town, to the point where almost every time I go out I will run into at least one person I know.
When I think of crowded cities in Florida, Jacksonville, Orlando, Tampa, and Miami come to
mind. They have more lanes on their highways, downtown areas, larger businesses, and more
attractions and things to do for both residents and tourists. Furthermore, bigger cities have more
people in them, which lead to more issues regarding sustainability. There are more people in the
community to serve when it comes to food, living, cleanup, and transportation. Therefore, there
is a larger number of people who, if change was to occur, need to be educated on the topic of
sustainability.
As far as driving goes though, I am definitely a city driver. I am from Southern California
and I visit yearly to bi-yearly, so I have experienced the crazy freeway driving. This past
summer, I recall driving back from a day spent in Santa Monica with a friend. While it should
have taken us about an hour and a half to get back to his house, it ended up taking us two
additional hours. Traffic is not only crazy there because of the number of accidents that occur,
but because of the number of people on the roads as well. My aunt and uncle live in Southern
California and they have taught me I should not only be a defensive driver, but an aggressive
driver as well. Some freeways have six or seven lanes, and there were times when I would be in
the carpool lane and I would have to exit and directly merge over five or six lanes. When it came
to switching lanes, the only way to get across quickly was to put on my signal and start merging.

It was even more difficult when traffic caused cars to stop and become bumper to bumper. I
would have to turn my wheel and cut closely in front of cars just to move over a lane. It was
scary at first, but that is how everyone there has to drive to be a successful driver there, and I
eventually became comfortable after a month of driving there.
On the other hand, when it comes to navigation, I rely heavily on my GPS. I have a
limited sense of direction and easily get lost. Even in my small town, where I was basically
raised and still currently live, I do not even know major street names. I may know where I am,
but I will not be able to relay those directions to anyone else if they asked. On the contrary, I
may know of a street name, but not its exact location. I am fortunate that I grew up when GPS
navigation systems were invented, because if I had to rely on a map or compass, the chances of
me making it to my final destination would be significantly slimmer.
Overall, I believe sustainability is about being accountable for your lifestyle, your
community, and the Earth in general. Everything humans do has a cause and an effect. Based on
the way we choose to live our lives and interact with others and the environment, we each have a
different impact on the world. Some people choose to live with total disregard to sustainability.
They are either oblivious to the damage they are causing to Earth, or just turning a blind eye to it.
Educating oneself and others on the topic of sustainability is important from an
accountability perspective. Not only are our present actions affecting Earth, but they are
preparing future generations for a less sustainable Earth. If issues are overlooked, they will only
get worse. Issues such as pollution, littering, deforestation, energy, offshore drilling, food
sustainability, ocean sustainability are in the hands of the people. We can either choose to sit
back and not care, or to be proactive and get involved within our communities. There are
countless organizations focused on a certain aspect of sustainability, providing outreach

materials and other resources to get involved. By not only talking about sustainability, but by
being a model citizen to others and educating them, it will cause a domino effect and encourage
others to get involved in protecting our Earth.
When I hear the word sustainability, I think about needs, including Maslows Hierarchy
of Needs. However, I do think beyond that, and think not only about our needs as human beings,
but about how those needs shape our lives and affect the people, animals, environment, and
things around us. For example, deforestation clears space and creates land to be built upon and
its wood has countless uses. On the other hand, it is affecting the air which we breathe in, it is
destroying natural habitats and affecting plants and wildlife, and it is leaving a carbon footprint
on our Earth. If we are conscious of the way in which we live, we can preserve this Earth in an
effort to protect its natural resources and way of life. There have been steps towards this, for
instance, California enforcing a state law that bans plastic bags. Additionally, they are facing a
serious drought, and have taken steps towards limiting water usage. However, steps have also
been taken back; for instance, the creation of super highways in large cities such as Dallas,
Texas, where I have family and have seen the construction myself. Overall, sustainability will
ultimately come down to how humans choose to live, and what kind of mark they want to leave
on this world. I personally will continue to live as conservatively as possible, so that my family
and others in future generations will be able to live as sustainably as I have on this Earth.