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Appendix

K: Sample Course Syllabi


There are many opportunities for academic collaboration with the [farm] Pilot Program.
Appendix J: Sample Course Syllabi provides examples of three specific courses available on
campus that will be modified to include hands-on learning at [the farm].

Below are the following syllabi:

PLSC433: Technology of Fruit and Vegetable Production
INAG213: Crop Production Practices
INAG123: Introduction to Sustainable Agriculture

PLSC 433 Technology of Fruit and Vegetable Production (4 credits)

Fall 2012 Syllabus


INSTRUCTOR
[redacted]
Office: [redacted]
Phone: [redacted]
CATALOG LISTING
A critical analysis of research work and application of the principles of plant physiology,
chemistry and botany to practical problems in the commercial production of fruit and vegetable
crops.
This is an upper-division course intended for juniors, seniors and interested graduate students.
The University Catalog lists PLSC 201, 202, and 271 as prerequisites for the course. BSCI 442
(Plant Physiology) is also listed as a co-requisite for the course. ENST 200 (Soils) is also listed
as a suggested prerequisite course.
Many of these courses have not been offered lately, so you probably have not taken all these prerequisites. Not to worry; if you have taken equivalent course material and are interested in the
class, you are encouraged to be here.
Any particular questions about your preparation for the course can be discussed with [redacted]
during the first meeting of the class.
LABORATORY FEE = $100
This fee covers a portion of the expenses of travel on weekly field trips and the materials used in
laboratory projects.
LEARNING OUTCOMES
During lecture, you will learn the unique aspects of woody plant growth and development
through an in-depth presentation of the biology of temperate zone fruit species.
In laboratory, you will learn up-to-date production methods for fresh fruit and vegetable crops
through active learning. This learning will occur during field trips, hands on handling of fruits
and vegetables and through student presentations.

LECTURE
Class is scheduled to meet on Monday and Wednesday 11:00 - 12:50 pm in [redacted]. During
September and October, [redacted] will be out of town on Mondays, so class will not meet on
Mondays during the first two months of the semester. Instead there will be readings from the
Grubinger text (see the calendar at the end of the syllabus for details). Once field trips end in
October, we will meet both days of the semester.
Monday meetings will be lecture format. At the beginning of the semester we will use
Wednesdays lecture period to allow additional time for our field trip.
Lectures will focus on the following scientific and technological aspects of these topics:
o
o
o
o
o
o

Temperate Zone Fruit Production


Soil, Water and Mineral Nutrition
Flowering and Fruiting
Canopy Architecture and Photosynthetic Efficiency
Cold Temperature Stresses
Food Safety of Fresh Fruits and Vegetables

Each of these broad topics will be discussed for two to three weeks as listed on the syllabus.
DISCUSSION AND LABORATORY
The laboratory follows immediately after lecture, from 1 pm to 3:50 pm.
During September and October we will take a series of field trips visiting agricultural research
centers and commercial farms. For most of these trips, we will return to campus at the end of lab
period, but some trips will take longer due to travel distances and/or problems with traffic. If it
is likely that we will return late, you will be notified in advance.
Field trips and laboratory work are the backbone of this course. As such you will be expected to
critically evaluate the trips and the information that is covered. Information discussed on field
trips will be included on your exams.
If you wish to drive your own personal vehicle for field trips, you may. If you do plan to drive,
bring your vehicle to [redacted] Garage on Wednesday. That way you will be able to follow our
vans. Finding these sites on your own can be very difficult, and is not recommended.
Please wear proper attire to the laboratory. Shoes with a closed toe are required for your safety
(please--no sandals).
You may receive handouts on some of the field trips. Please bring a folder with you to organize
and retain these handouts for discussions and studying.

ATTENDANCE
Attendance in lectures is strongly suggested.
A major component of this courses learning takes place during the laboratory period. While we
cannot require your attendance in laboratories, participation will be graded.
Laboratory work must be completed during the time period allotted. There is no way to make-up
this information if you miss the laboratory.
TEXTBOOKS
Westwood, M. 1993. Temperate Zone Pomology (Third edition). Timber Press. 523 p.
Portland, OR. ISBN 978-1-60469-070-5.
This book is currently out of print, and not available at the campus bookstore. Please
buy a copy from Amazon, or another used-book vendor.
Grubinger, V. Sustainable Vegetable Production (Edition 99). NRAES, Ithaca, NY.
ISBN 978-0935817454.
This book is currently stocked at the campus bookstore. If they sell out, you can probably
order on-line from NRAES.
EXAM POLICIES
We will have three written exams during the semester; two hour tests midterm and the final
exam. Each will ask broad ranging-questions that require in-depth essays and/or mathematical
solutions.
KEYS TO A SUCCESSFUL SEMESTER
Attend class and take notes.
Ask questions if you dont understand.
Be engaged. Participate in laboratory and class discussions.
Keep up with the readings.
Dont wait until the exam is handed out to read and study.
Enjoy the course! I will!
REPORT and ORAL PRESENTATION

While this course will cover a number of areas, many things are not covered due to time
constraints of the course.
To broaden the class, each student is expected to identify and research a topic in one aspect of
fruit and vegetable production NOT specifically covered in this class or another course.
You will also be required to make an oral presentation during lab period at the end of the
semester. That presentation should take about 20 minutes, with an additional 5 to 10 minutes
allotted for questions.
Your oral presentation will be evaluated on the following points:

Appropriateness of the topic selected for this course


Quality of the written materials presented
Quality of the oral presentation
Depth of understanding demonstrated by the presenter
Ability to knowledgeably answer questions from the audience

GRADING
Mid-term Exams
Final Exam

200 points
100 points

Oral Presentation

60 points

TOTAL

360 points (100%)

Course grades will be assigned as follows:


90 - 100 % = A

60 - 69 %

80 - 89 %

= B

Below 60 % = F

70 - 79 %

= C

Plus and minus grades will not be given

= D

Academic Integrity: You are expected to do your own work for this class. As a [university]
student you have agreed to the following honor pledge for all assignments, quizzes, and
examinations, I pledge on my honor that I have not given or received any unauthorized
assistance on this assignment/examination. The pledge was adopted by the University Senate
on April 9, 2001, and approved by the President on May 10, 2001. Cases of academic
dishonesty will be referred promptly to the [university] Student Honor Council and may result in
a grade of XF.
Violations of academic integrity include:
a. Academic Dishonesty: Intentionally or knowing helping or attempting to help another
violate a provision of the Code.
b. Cheating: Intentionally using or attempting to use unauthorized materials,
information or study aides in any academic exercise.
c. Plagiarism: Intentionally or knowingly representing the works or ideas of another as
ones own in any academic exercise.
d. Fabrication: Intentional and unauthorized falsification or invention of any
information or citation in an academic exercise.
Disability Support Services: The [university] is committed to making reasonable
accommodations to individuals with disabilities that have been documented by Disability
Support Services (0126 Shoemaker Hall). Any student seeking accommodations must register
with Disability Support Services. If you wish to discuss academic accommodations for this class,
please contact the professor as soon as possible.
Procedures for Inclement Weather: Official closures and delays are announced on the campus
website (http://www.umd.edu/) and snow phone line (301.405.SNOW) as well as local radio and
TV stations.
Course Evaluations: Your participation in the evaluation of courses through [website] is a
responsibility you hold as a student member of our academic community. Your feedback is
confidential and important to the improvement of teaching and learning at the University as well
as to the tenure and promotion process. By completing all of your evaluations each semester
you will have the privilege of accessing the summary report for thousands of courses online at
[website].

Week

Date

Lecture

Laboratory
Field Trip: Upper Marlboro

8/29

Introduction and Overview of the Course

9/3

LABOR DAY -- HOLIDAY -- NO CLASS

9/5

Soil and Site Adaptation (Westwood 1-3)

9/10

Read Grubinger: Chap 5-7

9/12

Fruit Species for the Mid-Atlantic (Westwood 4)

9/17

Read Grubinger: Chap 8-10

9/19

Fruit Species for the Mid-Atlantic Contd

9/26

Read Grubinger: Chap 11-13

9/28

Mineral Nutrition and Irrigation (Westwood 7)

10/1

EXAM 1

10/3

Fruit Tree Rootstocks (Westwood 5)

10/8

Read Grubinger: Chap 14-17

10/10

Plant Efficiency (Westwood 11)

10/15

Optimizing the Fruit Farm (Westwood 19)

10/17

Flowering and Fruit Set

10/22

Flowering and Fruit Set (Westwood 8, 9)

10/24

Physiology of Biennial Bearing (Westwood 10)

10/29

Fruit Growth and Thinning

10/31

Crop Load, Irrigation, and Regulated Deficits

11/05

EXAM 1

11/07

Hormones and Growth Regulators (Westwood 15)

11/12

Dormancy and Hardiness (Westwood 16)

11/14

Food Safety An overview of the problem

11/19

Food Safety GAPs for producers

11/21

Food Safety GMPs for handlers

11/26

Food Safety Plan writing and SSOPs

11/28

Food Safety Developing a plan

12/03

Food Safety Plan writing and auditing

12/05

Food Safety Metrics and the Future

12/10

Summary and Conclusions

12/12

READING DAY

12/15

FINAL EXAM Saturday day Morning 8 to 10 am

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

xxx
Field Trip: Dukes, Fulton
xxx
Field Trip: E. Shore
xxx
Lab: Maturity Indices
xxx
Field Trip: TBA
xxx
Lab: Postharvest 2
xxx
Field Trip: TBA
xxx
Field Trip: TBA
xxx
Fermentation Lab 1
xxx
Fermentation Lab 2
xxx
Plant Propagation
xxx
Fermentation Lab 3
xxx
Thanksgiving Eve- No Lab
xxx
Student presentations
xxx
Student presentations
xxx

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND
INSTITUTE OF APPLIED AGRICULTURE
INAG 213: Crop Production Practices

Instructor:
Phone:
E-mail:
Office:
Office Hours:

Ellen Polishuk
301-405-4690
epolishu@umd.edu
2115 Jull Hall
Tuesdays 11-5:30 and Thursdays 10-2

Course Description


Crop Production Practices course is concerned with the applied methods of producing various vegetable and
agronomic crops in Maryland. This course focuses on commercial scale production, where economics impact
production decisions. Principles discussed: crop rotation, cropping systems, nutrient management, integrated pest
control strategies. Throughout the course the question of the economic, social and ecological sustainability of
production practices will be addressed.

Course Objectives


When a student completes this course, he/she should be able to:
1. Understand the historical development of agriculture and its impact on our current culture
2. Define and describe the structural organization and processes of agricultural ecosystems
3. Describe the principles and strategies that may be used in the design and management of agronomic
farming systems
4. Explain the major preventative strategies for select arthropods, weeds, plant pathogens and vertebrate
pests in row crop production
5. Explain the principles of crop rotation and demonstrate the ability to develop a simple crop rotation
plan, including cover crops and green manures

Required Materials

Introduction to Agronomy: Food, Crops, and Environment Craig C. Sheaffer, 2009.



Grading

Grades are determined using the following scale: 98-100 A+, 94-97 A, 90-93 A-; 87-89-80 B+, 84-86 B, 80-83 B-; 77-
79 C+, 74-76 C, 70-73 C-; 67-69 D+, 64-66 D, 60-63 D-; 59 and below: F.



Class participation and Homework and quizzes 25%
Crop or Farm Case Study 25% written report and leading one class on the subject/crop
Exam 1 15%
Exam 2 15%
Final exam 20%


Attendance

Regular attendance is necessary in order to pass the course. You are responsible for all materials presented in
class when you are absent. Please make arrangements to obtain notes, handouts, and assignments from a
classmate. Since in-class participation is an integral part of the course, absences can affect your grade.


Late and Make-up Work

All work is due as assigned. Late papers will be accepted up to one week after the due date, but they will be
penalized by one letter grade. Students will receive a zero for all work not submitted within the one-week grace
period.

In-class assignments may not be made up. Students who are absent will receive a zero for that day's class work.

The mid-term and final exams must be taken on the designated days; no late tests will be given.

Academic Integrity

The University's policy on academic integrity will be enforced in this class. The Code of Academic Integrity is
available on the web at http://www.studenthonorcouncil.umd.edu/code.html. The Code prohibits students from
cheating on exams, plagiarizing papers, submitting the same paper for credit in two courses without authorization,
buying papers, submitting fraudulent documents, and forging signatures. As students, you are responsible for
upholding these standards for this course.
I pledge on my honor that I have not given or received any unauthorized assistance on this
examination (or assignment).


Unless you are specifically advised to the contrary, the Pledge statement should be handwritten and signed on the
front cover of all speeches/outlines and examinations in this class. Students who fail to write and sign the Pledge
will be asked to confer with the instructor.

Disabilities

If you have a documented disability that requires accommodations, please present the appropriate forms to me
and make an appointment to discuss the arrangements.
Course Topics

History of Agriculture
Agriculture Today US Food System
Human Populations and Food Production
Plant Science Overview Anatomy, physiology
Improving Plants Breeding
Environment impacts on agriculture, and agricultures impacts on it
Soils Overview
Cropping Systems
Production Factors Tillage, weeds, pests and diseases
Harvest and Storage
Crops of Importance: Corn, soybeans, wheat, hay
Other Crops: grains, fiber, energy