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SETON HILL UNIVERSITY

The Great Sentence Caper: Grammar Lesson Plan

Pre-Planning
TOPIC
Name
Subject
Grade Level
Date/Duration
Standards/
anchors/
competencies
PA/Common
Core/Standards
(Plus any others
as may be
required)

Formative
AND/OR
Summative
Assessment
Evidence
Objectives
A-B-C-D
Bloom's Taxonomy
Webb's Depth of
Knowledge (DOK)

DETAILS
Emily Maeder
Language Arts- Grammar
6
2 45 min periods
E06.C.1.2.4: Use precise language and domainspecific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.
E06.D.1.1.6: Produce complete sentences, recognizing
and correcting inappropriate fragments and run-on
sentences.
E06.D.1.2.1: Use punctuation (e.g., commas,
parentheses, dashes) to set off
nonrestrictive/parenthetical elements.
E06.D.1.2.2: Spell correctly.
Formal Evaluation
Presentation of play
Informal Evaluation
Question and answer
Observation
Worksheet

CK

I can create four different types of sentences and use


them in an original script
I can use my speaking, listening, and performance skills
to present an original play
I can effectively collaborate with my peers.
I can work with a partner to identify the types of
sentences used in a paragraph.

Step-by-Step Procedures
RATIONALE for the
Learning Plan
DETAILS
Introduction
Activating Prior Knowledge
We will begin class by the instructor passing out
worksheet to the students for a warm up.
Students will work with their partner to complete the
worksheet. The instructor will inform the students that in
the paragraph they were given on their worksheet, each
of the four types of sentences is represented. The
students are to identify the type of sentences used in
the paragraph by marking them with a D for
declarative, E for exclamatory, In for interrogative,
and Im for imperative.

CK

Explicit
Instructions
Big Ideas
Essential
Questions

Lesson Procedure
Must include
adaptations &
accommodations
for students with
special needs
Accommodations,
Modifications

After the students have completed the activity, the


instructor will go over the answers with the groups on
the overhead projector, asking students
Hook/Lead-In/Anticipatory Set
The students will be told that they will be creating and
performing original scripts personifying the four different
types of sentences.
The scripts will be mini-mysteries. Using the overhead
projector, the students and the teacher will brainstorm
different topics for crimes and list them.
Ex. Case of the Chocolate Burgular
Big Idea Statement
Using appropriate punctuation and sentence structure is
imperative to developing a personal writing style and
crafting essays, creative pieces, and other writings
throughout ones life.
Essential Questions
Why is it important to know the difference between
sentence types?
What punctuation is appropriate for each type of
sentence?
What will I need to do to work effectively with my group
and collaborate on an original script?
Key Vocabulary
Declarative, imperative, interrogative, exclamatory,
script, dialogue, brainstorm
Pre-Assessment of Students
The review will be used to assess student knowledge of
our topic from the past week: sentence types.
Modeling of the Concept
The instructor will model the assignment by showing a
completed mystery script on the projector, The Case of
the Missing Dentures. The students will also get a copy
for their own reference.
The instructor will ask for volunteers to read the script.
The instructor will play a character and students will play
the other three.
Before reading the script out loud, the instructor will
lead a discussion on voice intonation and inflection. This
will be modeled when reading the script.
What makes a sentence interesting?
How will we know when a sentence is exclamatory?
How do the characters from The Case of the Missing
Dentures represent the four types of sentences?
Transition
The students will be each be given a copy of the
directions and dialogue guide
The instructor will divide the students into groups of four
for the activity and label them with team numbers. The

students must write their team number at the top of


their directions page.
Guiding the Practice
The instructor will go over the directions with the
students before they begin their independent work.
Students will be given turns by team to go to the back of
the room and peruse the prop box for ideas. Teams will
have a limited amount of time at the prop table but may
go back during the independent practice.
Students will be told to write their scripts together,
practice their lines, and prepare for the performance in
the next class period. Scripts may be used during their
performance.
Providing the Independent Practice
The students will work in groups of four to decide who
will play what characters, what types of sentences that
character will be allowed to use, and what the dialogue
for the play will be
The directions and dialogue guide will be used to set up
the scenes with each character talking at least once.

Materials
(reading,
technology,
equipment,
supplies, etc.)
Closure

Adaptations/Accommodations for Students with Special Needs


The instructor will provide a list of instructions for the
worksheet and group play activity.
Pencils
Worksheets
Projector
Prop Box
Summary & Review of the Learning
At the end of the period, the students will be asked to
put back any props they borrowed from the box.
They will save the worksheets and dialogue guide in the
grammar section of their language arts binders.
At the close of day 1, the instructor will ask students to
raise their hand if they are playing a character that can
only ask questions. These students will be asked what
type of sentence they represent and what makes their
sentences unique.
Students will be asked to raise their hands if they are
playing an imperative character, exclamatory character,
and declarative character. Each group will have to
answer questions about those types of sentences and
what makes them unique.
After each performance on day 2, ask the audience
which kind of sentence each student represents in their
skit. Students must give a reason for their response.
Homework/Assignments
Students are to complete scripts and perform play

during next class period.


Other(This area
is to be
determined by
instructor OR
student as
needed)
Supervising
teacher
comments and
signature
Teacher
Self-reflection
What
worked?
What would
you
change?

Name_____________________________________
Date________________________
Period_________________

Reading Exercise: Identifying Sentence Types


Directions:
Read the following paragraph with your partner. After reading, go through each
sentence to decide whether the sentence is declarative, imperative, interrogative,
or exclamatory. Underneath the sentence, write what type of sentence it is and
why. For sentence type you can write the following:
D for Declarative
Im for Imperative
In for Interrogative
E for Exclamatory
For your explanation of why you think it is a certain sentence type, you must
mention the job of the sentence and the punctuation. What is this sentence doing?
How is this sentence punctuated?
Ex. The dog ate a large jar of peanut butter.
D- It is declarative because the sentence ends in a period and makes a statement.

Paragraph:

Do you have a favorite food? I do and it is chocolate. It is so


delicious! Go and eat some chocolate right now if you are not
allergic. Do you know that white chocolate is not actually
chocolate? This is because it does not have any cacao solids in it.
Nothing is better than chocolate chip cookies! The inventor of
chocolate chip cookies sold his idea to Nestle Toll House for a
lifetime supply of chocolate. Wouldnt that be amazing? Bring me
some chocolate now!
Name________________________________________
Date__________________________
Period______________________

The Great Sentence Caper: Directions


For this project, you and your group will be creating a short skit. In this
skit, each person must play a character, and that character must represent
one of the four different types of sentences- Declarative, Imperative,
Interrogative, and Exclamatory. You will collaborate with your group to write
two scenes for your characters.

Directions:
1. Choose a crime. This can be done by completing the
sentence, The Case of ______________.
2. Write the script. You may use the dialogue guide on the
back. Write the name of the person that is speaking in the
blank space after Person, and their lines after the colon.
3. List the props you will be using for your skit. You may use
anything from the prop box or items you have brought with
you to class.

4. Each character must speak at least twice in the skit, but


you may add lines if more are needed than are listed in the
dialogue guide.
5. Write all directions for characters on dialogue sheet
Ex. If character is on phone, write in margin that
character must remember to act like they are on phone.
6. Practice your lines. Use emotion and tone to make the
words more interesting.
7. Once all groups have had time to practice their lines, each
one will perform their skit for the class with their props.
Rules:
1. If a character is representing one type of sentence, that
character can only speak using those sentences.
i. Ex. Interrogative character can only ask questions.
2. Crimes must be funny, not violent
3. Skit must use at least eight lines of dialogue, minimum of
two lines per character. More can be used if necessary.
4. Scripts can be used in performance.

The Case of
_____________________________________________________
Scene 1
Location:______________________________________
Character_______________:
Character_______________:
Character_______________:
Character_______________:

Character_______________:
Character_______________:
Scene 2
Location:_______________________________________
Character_______________:
Character_______________:
Character_______________:
Character_______________:
Character_______________:
Character_______________: