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IEP Data Collection

Allan S. Blume
Special Educator
Associate Professor (retired)
Educational Consultant
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Data Collection
What

What is the focus of data that needs to be


collected
How

How will data be collected? What


mechanisms will be used
When

With what frequency does data need to be


collected?
Who

Who can collect the data?


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What
1. None of the other things (How, When or
Who) matter if you dont have solid
understanding of what is the focus of data
2. First place to begin is with observable and
measureable goals and objectives
3. Is the key word in the goal or objective a
measureable skill? (The verb or verb
phrase in the sentence)
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Determine the goal focus


areas
1. The focus of goal areas for the IEP
should be directly influenced by the
impact of the disability statements from
earlier in the document what are the
needs or challenges that arise out of the
disability that are keeping the student
from accessing the curriculum or the
community of the school? these will
likely become the names of the goal
focus areas merely look to the PLEP
statements

Steps in Writing a CPL


1. Identify the period over which data was collected that
allowed you to determine the data in the CPL (# of
sessions, # of weeks, across a month, over the
quarter)
2. Write every sentence in the CPL and be sure that it
contains data, most likely averages from across the
period that the data was collected

Data: frequency, duration, amount, number, accuracy,


latency, size,

3. Begin each sentence from a strengths perspective


Allan is able to answer as many as five wh fact
questions, yet has difficulty answering up to 3
inferential questions in the absence of at least 1 visual
prompt from the teacher.
4. Write as many sentences as necessary to provide data
and detail regarding the skills/challenges that a
student has within a specific skill area.
5. Upon completion of the CPL review it to determine the
main idea that flows through the paragraph.

Determining goal and


objectives
1. Review the CPL to determine the
main idea that flows through it this
will form the focus of the subsequent
goal.
2. Review the CPL and determine the
number of details that exist within it
this will help to determine the
number and focus of the subsequent
objectives.

Writing Objectives
1. Identify a skill/behavior or
performance from the CPL (This will be
a verb)
2. Identify a condition upon which it
would be necessary for the skill to occur
3. Use data from the CPL to determine the
criteria measure for the objective
4. Use the time that data was gathered as
the factor for determining the mastery
level for the various objectives

Objective order
Write the objective in this order:
Condition, student name, skill, criteria,
mastery.
EX: When in a small group (fewer than 5)
(CONDITION), Allan (STUDENT NAME) will
remain seated (SKILL), for at least 5 minutes
(CRITERIA), in 8 out of 10 occasions across a
one month period. (MASTERY)

Writing Objectives
1. Identify a skill/behavior or
performance from the CPL (This will be
a verb)
2. Identify a condition upon which it
would be necessary for the skill to occur
3. Use data from the CPL to determine the
criteria measure for the objective
4. Use the time that data was gathered as
the factor for determining the mastery
level for the various objectives

Objective order
Write the objective in this order:
Condition, student name, skill, criteria,
mastery.
EX: When in a small group (fewer than 5)
(CONDITION), Allan (STUDENT NAME) will
remain seated (SKILL), for at least 5 minutes
(CRITERIA), in 8 out of 10 occasions across a
one month period. (MASTERY)

SMART Goals

Specific
Measureable
Action Words
Realistic
Time-limited

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SMART Goals or SMART


Objectives?

34 CFR 300.320 (a) (2)


(i) A statement of measurable annual goals, including
academic and functional goals designed to-(A) Meet the childs needs that result from the childs
disability to enable the child to be involved in and make
progress in the general education curriculum; and
(B) Meet each of the childs other educational needs that
result from the childs disability;
(ii) For children with disabilities who take alternate
assessments aligned to alternate achievement standards, a
description of benchmarks or short-term objectives;

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Write Benchmarks/Objectives

Benchmark/objectives can come from the


details in the current performance level.

Objectives must be observable and


measureable

To be observable it must be visible, audible


or tangible

If it cant be observed, it cant be measured!

Objectives/benchmarks describe what you


intend the student to achieve.

Make it SMART
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The Five Parts of an


Objective
Condition - what an adult will do to
have the skill occur
Learners name - do not write in the
student
Skill/ performance or behavior what the learner is expected to do (the
verb in the sentence)
Criteria - how the skill will be measured
Mastery - when we know that the
learner has achieved or surpassed the
expectation
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#1 - Objectives
Examples part 1
1.

2.

3.

After a conflict situation (IDENTIFY THE POTENTIAL


SITUATIONS HERE), Allan will identify at least 3
learned strategies for conflict resolution he could
have used in x occasions across a two month period.
When in a real or mock situation of conflict (IDENTIFY
THE POTENTIAL SITUATIONS HERE) Allan will use up
one of the 8 learned strategies in the absence of a
verbal cue in x sessions across two months.
When in a real conflict situation outside the
parameters of the social skills group, Allan will
independently use at least one of the learned
strategies to resolve the situation in x situations
across two months.

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How

Multiple methods for gathering data


If it isnt documented it didnt happen!
Various methods:

Task Analysis, Behavior Checklists, Weekly Checklists


(http://sped.sbcsc.k12.in.us/IEPForms.html)
Samples of student work
Spreadsheet (objectives on the vertical, dates along the horizontal)
Clipboard
Google Docs, Google Drive
Rubrics (http://www.rcampus.com/rubricshowc.cfm?code=Z2XCX9&sp=yes)
Apps (http://www.appolicious.com/curated-apps/1111-special-education-datacollection-tools)
Tally Counter(Free)
D.A.T.A (Free)
Percentally ($2.99)
Behavior Tracker Pro ($29.99)
Yacker Tracker ($.99)

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When
The frequency of data collection should be
directly linked to either the CRITERIA or
MASTERY elements within the objective
The goal (or more likely the objective)
should be SMART this will also influence
frequency
When?
Daily, Weekly, Monthly, Consecutive Weeks,
During the grading (progress report) period

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Who?
Who is responsible for data
collection?
The special educator
But that does not mean that you have
to collect all of the data
You will likely have to synthesize it, but you
dont have to collect all of it

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Who can assist the special


educator?
Anyone!
Other special educators
We can help each other out
Para educators/instructional assistants
They must be trained on the specifics of data collection
Related Service Providers, Counselors
Ideally related service providers are looking at the SAME
goals that you are, but may have their own specific
objectives
If they have their own objectives, then the related service
provider is responsible for the data collection
General Educators
As long as they have received consultation on how to
gather or maintain data
Student
In some cases the student can be the gatherer of the data

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