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Design for Learning

Instructor: Miss Abby Johnson


Lesson Title: Vocabulary and Leaves
Curriculum Area: ELA

Grade Level/Cooperating Teacher: 1st Grade/Mrs. Bowen


Date: October 20, 2015
Estimated Time: 45 minutes

Standards Connection: Identify real-life connections between words and their use. [L.1.5c]
Learning Objective(s): Students will recognize the vocabulary word needed to complete four sentences,
applying the vocabulary words to objects found in nature, with 100% accuracy.
Learning Objective(s) stated in kid-friendly language: Today boys and girls, we are going to learn
the words blew, travel, rustle, and pile.
Evaluation of Learning Objective(s): Students will be given a worksheet with four sentences. They will
fill in the appropriate vocabulary word in each blank space. Students will complete the passage with
100% accuracy.
Engagement: The teacher will gather the students together to discuss the fall season. Boys and girls, I
want you to quietly come sit down. I need your ears to be listening and your brains ready to learn.
Remember when someone else is talking, you are listening. Lets remember to be respectful to each other.
Are you ready to learn? Teacher waits for student response. Today, we are going to learn the words blew,
travel, rustle, and pile. Before we learn them, can any of you tell me what season it is? Teacher waits for a
student to say fall. Great job! It is fall. What is one of your favorite things about fall? Think for just a
moment, and then we will each share one of our favorite things. Teacher waits five seconds. She calls on
the first student. What is one of your favorite things about fall? Student responds. Oh, that is a great one!
Teacher calls on the next student. That is one of my favorite things, too! The teacher calls on the last
student. Great job, guys! You have such good answers. One of my favorite things about fall is sitting
outside and watching the leaves fall from the trees to the ground. Have any of you done that? Teacher
waits for student response and then transitions into the lesson.
Learning Design:

I. Teaching: The teacher will introduce the four words to the students. She will read Leaf Man by
Lois Ehlert and give students the opportunity to interact with each word to develop a deeper
understanding. Today, we are going to learn the words blew, travel, rustle, and pile. Lets say
them together. The teacher has each word written on a piece of paper and holds one up at a time.
Blew. Travel. Rustle. Pile. Today, we are going to read Leaf Man by Lois Ehlert. As we read, I
want you to pay very close attention. If I come across one of our vocabulary words, I want you to
raise your hand. Lets say them one more time together. Blew. Travel. Rustle. Pile. The teacher
posts the words in a clear place in the front of the classroom. She reads Leaf Man and pauses
each time a vocabulary work is encountered. The first word that is read is pile. Very good! I
am going to read this sentence one more time and all of you listen for the word pile. The
teacher has the word pile on a notecard. Lets say the word pile together. Pile. One more
time. Pile. Very good! Raise your hand if you have heard the word pile before. Can one person
tell me what they think the word pile means? The teacher listens to the students response and
responds accordingly. A pile is a group of objects laying on top of each other. The teacher has

several pictures of piles. Here are some examples of piles. She allows the students a few
moments to look at the pictures and then gathers them back together. Alright, a pile is a group of
objects laying on top of each other. Lets remember our words as we keep reading blew, travel,
rustle, and pile. The teacher reads the page with the vocabulary word one more time and then
continues with the story. The next word that is read is blew. Very good! I am going to read this
sentence one more time and all of you listen for the word blew. The teacher has the word
blew on a notecard. Lets say the word blew together. Blew. One more time. Blew. Very
good! Raise your hand if you have heard the word blew before. Can one person tell me what they
think the word blew means? The teacher listens to the students response and responds
accordingly. The word blew means that wind moved something with power. The teacher has
several pictures of objects being blown in the air. Here are some examples of things that are
blown. She allows the students a few moments to look at the pictures and then gathers them back
together. Alright, the word blew means that wind moved something with power. Lets remember
our words as we keep reading blew, travel, rustle, and pile. The teacher reads the page with the
vocabulary word one more time and then continues with the story. The next word that is read is
travel. Very good! I am going to read this sentence one more time and all of you listen for the
word travel. The teacher has the word travel on a notecard. Lets say the word travel
together. Travel. One more time. Travel. Very good! Raise your hand if you have heard the word
travel before. Can one person tell me what they think the word travel means? The teacher
listens to the students response and responds accordingly. Travel is the trip from one place to
another. The teacher has several pictures of travel. Here are some examples of travel. She allows
the students a few moments to look at the pictures and then gathers them back together. Alright,
travel is the trip from one place to another. Lets remember our words as we keep reading blew,
travel, rustle, and pile. These words may come up again in the story so keep remembering all of
them. The teacher reads the page with the vocabulary word one more time and then continues
with the story. The word blew is in another sentence. Very good! Can one of you remember the
definition we gave for the word blew? Very good! The word blew means that wind moved
something with power. The teacher reads the page with the vocabulary word one more time and
then continues with the story. The word blew is in another sentence. Wow! There is the word
again. Can anyone remind me what the definition for blew is? Great job! The teacher reads
the page with the vocabulary word one more time and then continues with the story. The word
traveling is in another sentence. What is one of our vocabulary words that is in the word
traveling? Very good! Can one of you remember the definition we gave for the word travel?
Very good! Travel is a trip from one place to another. What words are we looking for? The
teacher allows the students to name each vocabulary word. She reads the page with the
vocabulary word one more time and then continues with the story. The next word is rustle.
Very good! I am going to read this sentence one more time and all of you listen for the word
rustle. The teacher has the word rustle on a notecard. Lets say the word rustle together.
Rustle. One more time. Rustle. Very good! Raise your hand if you have heard the word rustle
before. Can one person tell me what they think the word rustle means? The teacher listens to
the students response and responds accordingly. Rustle is a soft, crackling sound. The teacher
has a video with the sound of leaves rustling. This is what it sounds like when leaves rustle. She
allows the students a few moments listen. Alright, the word rustle means a soft, crackling sound.
Lets keep reading. The teacher reads the page with the vocabulary word one more time and then
continues with the rest of the story.

II. Opportunity for Practice: Now that we have learned about the words blew, rustle, travel, and
pile, we are going to practice using those vocabulary words. Today, I brought with me something
very special to help us do this. The teacher has brought a bag of leaves and shows it to them.
Before I give them to you, you have to listen to my instructions of how we are going to use them.
You will each get two leaves. I am going to give you a vocabulary word, and you must show me
what the word means using your leaves. Do you think you can do that? Great! The teacher gives
each student two leaves. Our first word is pile. Pile. Before you begin, think about what the
word pile means. The teacher gives the students ten seconds to think about the definition. Okay,
now I want you to use your leaves to make a pile. The students make a pile of leaves. Great job!
What does the word pile mean? Teacher waits for student response. Good! A pile is a group of
objects laying on top of each other. Our next word is blew. Before you begin, think about what
the word blew means. The teacher gives the students ten seconds to think about the definition.
Okay, now I want each of you to show me what it means if the wind blew the leaf. Teacher guides
students to blow the leaf into the air. Great job! What does the word blew mean? Teacher
waits for student response. Good! Blew means that the wind moved something with power. Our
next word is travel. Before you begin, think about what the word travel means. The teacher
gives the students ten seconds to think about the definition. Okay, now I want each of you to
show me what it means for a leaf to travel from where you are standing to where I am standing.
Great job! What does the word travel mean? Teacher waits for student response. Good! Travel
is a trip from one place to another. Our next word is rustle. Before you begin, think about
what the word pile means. The teacher gives the students ten seconds to think about the
definition. Okay, now I want each of you to show me what it sounds like for leaves to rustle.
Great job! What does the word rustle mean? Teacher waits for student response. Good! Rustle
means a soft, crackling sound. The teacher will transition to the assessment.
III. Assessment: The teacher will give each student a worksheet with four sentences on it. The
students will complete it independently. Okay, now that you all have practiced demonstrating
what your vocabulary words mean, I am going to pass out a worksheet. On this paper, you will
find four incomplete sentences. You must choose the vocabulary word that best completes the
sentence and write it in the blank. If you need help reading a word, raise your hand quietly, and I
will come to you. When you finish, you may hand it to me. The teacher will pass out the
worksheet.
IV. Closure: The teacher will review the definitions of the words one more time. She will have
the students share some examples of the words. Ok boys and girls, put your pencils down, and
look at me. Lets review these words one more time. What does pile mean? Awesome! It can
mean a group of objects laying on top of each other. What are some examples of things that can
be found in a pile? Allow students to share examples. Wow! Those are great examples. What
does blew mean? Right again! Blew means that the wind moved something with power. What
were some examples for this word? Great examples, friends! What does travel mean? That is
right! Travel is a trip from one place to another. I want to hear the examples you came up with
for this word as well. What does our last word rustle mean? That is right! Rustle means a soft,
crackling sound. What are examples of things that rustle? Wow! You guys are awesome thinkers.
You did a great job learning about the words pile, blew, travel, and rustle!

Materials and Resources:


Leaf Man by Lois Ehlert
Notecards with vocabulary words and definitions
Paper with vocabulary words
Leaves
Worksheets
Pencils
Differentiation Strategies (including plans for individual learners):
Green: Students create and write their own sentences using the four vocabulary words.
Red: Students will match each vocabulary word to the correct definition.
Data Analysis:
After collecting their worksheets, I compiled the data for the lesson. All three students completed
the sheet with 100% accuracy, filling in the appropriate vocabulary words in each blank. Each of those
students would be placed in the green area. I felt that two of the students completed the assessment with
great ease. They would be placed in the green. Looking back, I could have had them create their own
sentences. For one student, she got all of them correct, but it took her a lot longer to complete. As she was
reading her sentences, she realized that two of them were wrong, and she swapped her answers. I would
place her in the yellow. She had a hard time paying attention and sitting still so that could have impacted
the amount she learned.
Reflection:
Overall, I think this lesson went well for being my first one. The students had learned the
vocabulary words by the end of the lesson. They got distracted by one another when they were not
actively participating in something. I can do a much better job on behavior management. I think the time I
spent redirecting their focus and correcting behavior negatively impacted their learning experience. As I
read the book, I think it got repetitive, and they disengaged quickly. Next time, I could give them a
graphic organizer to fill out as we read the book. I think incorporating more technology would be useful
and engaging. If I could do this lesson again, I would be firmer in the way I addressed them. I would also
incorporate more evidence-based strategies. I constructed the lesson based on my teachers suggestions
before we had learned about vocabulary instruction in class. I think my assessment could have been more
challenging for two of the students. As I continue to teach lessons, I will use TLAC strategies concerning
behavior management. I think the visuals really helped them connecting with the words. I also think they
enjoyed using the leaves to illustrate the words. I think the transitions between sections in the lesson were
smooth because I had prepared everything in advance. After completing this lesson, I would revisit the
words throughout the week, but I would not need to reteach these vocabulary words.

Samford University
Design for Learning

Name _________
Leaf Man Vocabulary

blew

rustle

travel

pile

1. The wind ___________________ the


leaf over the field of corn.
2. I saw the leaf _______________ from
the tree to the ground.
3. The leaves were in a __________ on
the ground.
4. I heard a _________________ in the
leaves.

Pil

Ble
w

Trave
l

Rustl
e

Design for Learning


Instructor: Miss Johnson
Lesson Title: Phonemic Awareness
Curriculum Area: ELA

Grade Level/Cooperating Teacher: 1st/Bowen


Date: October 24, 2015
Estimated Time: 30 minutes

Standards Connection: Isolate and pronounce final sounds (phonemes) in spoken single-syllable

words. [RF.1.2c]
Learning Objective(s): Students will identify rhyming words ending in an through pictures and hearing
the words with 90% accuracy.
Learning Objective(s) stated in kid-friendly language: Today, we will learn rhyming words that end
in the letters -an.
Evaluation of Learning Objective(s): Students will be given 10 pictures. The teacher will identify the
picture and repeat the name, and the student will decide if it rhymes with the word tan. Students should
complete this with at least 90% accuracy.
Engagement: The teacher will gather the students together to share objects and pictures that represent
various words ending in an. Okay boys and girls, I want you to quietly come sit down. I need your ears
to be listening and your brains ready to learn. Lets remember to be respectful to each other. When
someone else is talking, you are listening. Are you ready to learn? Teacher waits for student response.
Today, we are going to learn rhyming words that end in the letters an. Before we begin, I have a mystery
bag with some very special items inside. I need you to all be quiet when I pull an item out. Dont shout out
what it is. Wait for me to call on you. Do you want to see what I have inside? Teacher lets students
respond. Great! Heres the first item. Teacher pulls out a can. Raise your hand if you know what this is
called. Teacher calls on one of the students with his or her hand raised. What is this? Teacher waits for
student response. Great job! It is a can! Teacher sets it out in front of the students and places a notecard
with the name of the item on top. Who is ready for the second item? Remember we are quiet boys and
girls until I call on you. Teacher pulls out a fan. Raise your hand if you know what this is called. Teacher
calls on one of the students with his or her hand raised. What is this? Teacher waits for student response.
Great job! It is a fan! Teacher sets it out in front of the students and places a notecard with the name of
the item on top. Who is ready for the next item? Remember we are quiet boys and girls until I call on you.
Teacher pulls out a pan. Raise your hand if you know what this is called. Teacher calls on one of the
students with his or her hand raised. What is this? Teacher waits for student response. Great job! It is a
pan! Teacher sets it out in front of the students and places a notecard with the name of the item on top.
Who is ready for the last item? Remember we are quiet boys and girls until I call on you. Teacher pulls
out a picture of a man. Raise your hand if you know what this is called. Teacher calls on one of the
students with his or her hand raised. What is this? Teacher waits for student response. Great job! It is a
man! Teacher sets it out in front of the students and places a notecard with the name of the item on top.
You all did an awesome job! Can anybody tell me something that all of these words have in common?
Think for just a moment before you speak. When you know, place your thumb over your heart. Teacher
gives the students 10 seconds to think. What do you think is the same? Teacher listens to student response.
Do you think they sound the same? Teacher waits for student response. Great job! Teacher transitions into
the lesson.
Learning Design:

I. Teaching: The teacher will introduce the students to words than end in an. She will give the
students opportunities to interact with words ending in an so that they recognize similar ending
sounds and that the words rhyme. Today, we are going to learn rhyming words that end in the
letters an. Raise your hand if you have heard the word rhyme before. Teacher waits for students
to raise their hands. Very good! Can any of you tell me what it means when two words rhyme?
Teacher calls on one of the students to answer. Great job! When two words rhyme, it means the
ending of the word sounds the same, and most of the time the letters at the end are the same.
Today, I have some booklets with me. Notice the first word is the word can. Can you say that with
me? Can. Now, the first letter can be moved like a flap. Each time you move the flap to a new
letter, it shows a new word. Teacher passes out the booklets to each student. Lets read them
together. Can, Fan, Man, Pan, Ran, Tan, Van What do you notice about these words? Teacher
waits for student response. Right! They all have the same ending sounds, which makes them
rhyming words! Teacher collects the rhyming booklets. Lets try something a little different. I
have some notecards with words on them. I want you to listen to the word, and then look at the
word to decide if they are rhyming words. Teacher has a stack of notecards to hold up two at a
time. I want everyone to close their eyes and listen closely to these words. Ready? Teacher makes
sure the students eyes are closed. Listen closely. Can. Ran Im going to say them two more
times. Listen closely to the way the ending sounds. Can. Ran. Can. Ran. Okay, open your
eyes. Here are how the words are spelled. Teacher holds up the two cards. Can. Ran. Raise
your hand if they think they sound the same. Good job! Can you tell me what that makes those
two words? Teacher calls on one student. Very good! Rhyming words! I have another set for you.
Close your eyes again and listen closely. Van. Not Im going to say them two more times.
Listen closely to the way the ending sounds. Van. Not. Van. Not. Okay, open your eyes.
Here are how the words are spelled. Teacher holds up the two cards. Van. Not. Raise your
hand if they think they sound the same. Teacher waits for student response. They dont sound the
same, do they? So are they a rhyme? I have one more set for you. Close your eyes again and
listen closely. Man. Tan Im going to say them two more times. Listen closely to the way the
ending sounds. Man. Tan. Man. Tan. Okay, open your eyes. Here are how the words are
spelled. Teacher holds up the two cards. Man. Tan. Raise your hand if they think they sound
the same. Teacher waits for student response. Very good! Can you tell me what that makes those
two words? Teacher calls on one student. Very good! Rhyming words! The teacher transitions to
the practice.
II. Opportunity for Practice: Now that we know what these rhyming words are, we are going to
practice finding them in a sentence! I have some sentences with me. As I read them, every time
you hear one of our rhyming words, I want you to jump. Everybody stand up, and walk over here
with me. Stand in a circle. Lets practice with a list of words before we read them in a sentence.
Ready? These words will rhyme with can. Man. Van. Pot. Fan. Bad. Ran. Plan. Mom. Great
job! Now I am going to read a sentence. When you hear a word that ends in an and makes the
an sound, jump. Lets practice with the first sentence. Listen to it first and dont move. Close
your eyes. Ready? I ran after the man. Okay, now open your eyes. I am going to read the
sentence again. This time jump when you hear the words that rhyme with can. I ran after the
man. Good job! You should jump on ran and man. Lets do that one more time. I ran after the
man. Great! Are you ready for the next sentence? Listen to it first and dont move. Close your
eyes. Ready? I can find a van. Okay, now open your eyes. I am going to read the sentence
again. This time jump when you hear the words that rhyme with can. I can find a van. Great!

Are you ready for the next sentence? Listen to it first and dont move. Close your eyes. Ready?
The man turned on the fan. Okay, now open your eyes. I am going to read the sentence again.
This time jump when you hear the words that rhyme with can. The man turned on the fan.
Great! Are you ready for the next sentence? Listen to it first and dont move. Close your eyes.
Ready? Jan sees a pan. Okay, now open your eyes. I am going to read the sentence again.
This time jump when you hear the words that rhyme with can. Jan sees a pan. Great! Are you
ready for the next sentence? Listen to it first and dont move. Close your eyes. Ready? The van
is tan. Okay, now open your eyes. I am going to read the sentence again. This time jump when
you hear the words that rhyme with can. The van is tan. Great! The teacher will transition to
the assessment.
III. Assessment: Students will be given 10 pictures. The teacher will identify the picture and repeat the
name, and the student will decide if it rhymes with the word tan. Students should complete this with at
least 90% accuracy. Okay, boys and girls, now that we have our rhyming words, I want you to show me
what you know! I am going to give each of you a group of ten pictures. It is your job to decide if the
picture rhymes with tan or if it does not. I will give you two pieces of construction paper. One piece of
paper is for words that rhyme with tan, and the other is for words that do not rhyme with tan. We are
going to pick up the pictures one at a time and say them together. Then you may decide which piece of
paper to place it on. Do you understand? Great! The teacher will have a sheet of paper to check whether
or not the students placed the picture in the correct category. Our first picture is can. Can. When everyone
has placed their picture, the teacher will continue. Our next word is man. Man. When everyone has placed
their picture, the teacher will continue. Our next word is dot. Dot. When everyone has placed their
picture, the teacher will continue. Our next word is ran. Ran. When everyone has placed their picture, the
teacher will continue. Our next word is mop. Mop. When everyone has placed their picture, the teacher
will continue. Our next word is bed. Bed. When everyone has placed their picture, the teacher will
continue. Our next word is fan. Fan. When everyone has placed their picture, the teacher will continue.
Our next word is pan. Pan. When everyone has placed their picture, the teacher will continue. Our next
word is sad. Sad. When everyone has placed their picture, the teacher will continue. Our next word is
van. Van.

IV. Closure: The teacher will give each student an iPad with Educreations. Each student should
write down two words that rhyme with tan, and draw a picture to illustrate the word. Okay boys
and girls, now that you have finished it is time to write and illustrate some of the words! You will
each get an iPad, and we will get on the Educreations app. You will write two words that rhyme
with the word tan and draw a picture of the word. Make sure you only write and illustrate one
word on each page. At the end, you are going to share your pictures with your friends. Teacher
passes out iPads. When students are finished, the teacher will gather the students back together.
Each student will take a turn in presenting their project to their peers.
Materials and Resources:
Can
Pan
Picture of a Man
Fan
Notecards with each items name: can, pan, man, fan
Notecards with words: Can Ran, Van Not, and Man Tan
Rhyming booklets
Sentence strips

1 set of 10 pictures for each student


2 pieces of labeled construction paper per student
1 iPad per student with the Educreations app
Scoring sheet
Differentiation Strategies (including plans for individual learners):
Green: Students will say the words to themselves without the teacher and place pictures in the correct
area. During closure, the students will write a sentence with at least two words that rhyme instead of
writing a word.
Red: Students will listen to words and tell the teacher if it rhymes or not instead of using pictures.
Data Analysis:
During the assessment activity, I was monitoring and recording their data. After they completed
their assessment, I collected their sheets with the answers. Each student completed the assessment with
100% accuracy. However, they were all sitting beside each other during the assessment so they could
have been looking at the persons answers next to them. I realize they should have been sitting in different
places throughout the room. I dont think I got an accurate assessment of their learning. They also had a
50/50 chance of getting the correct answer when guessing. Based on the results, they would be placed in
the green category. I think the repetition of the words from the engagement to the teaching to the practice
greatly impacted their understanding and ability to answer correctly.
Reflection:
Overall, I think the lesson went really well. I had organized my materials before the lesson started
which provided smooth transitions between activities. The students stayed engaged and were very
respectful. They fully participated in every aspect of the lesson, which influenced the amount of
knowledge they gained. This was something I wanted to change from my previous lesson. I knew I
needed to keep the lesson moving and the students actively participating in order for it to be effective. The
engagement accessed prior knowledge and made the words something they could understand. I think all
of the different tools and strategies kept their focus. The variety of modes of learning including
kinesthetic, oral, aural, and visual kept their attention and allowed them to experience the information in
multiple ways. I think the weakest part of this lesson was the assessment. The students were not
separated so they looked at one anothers papers. If I did this lesson again, I would go over the picture
names with the students as a whole group, and then send them to work independently on their assessment.
I would also incorporate a way for them to show me why they chose that answer. This would give a much
clearer indication of their understanding of the concept. As a next step, I would teach a lesson where the
students have to match words to make rhymes. For example, if the students have the words tan, pot, man,
and not, they would be able to match man and tan and match pot and not.

Samford University
Design for Learning

Student Assessment Scoring Sheet

Can
Pan
Man
Ran
Van
Fan
Mop
Dot
Sad
Bed

Design for Learning


Instructor: Abby Johnson
Lesson Title: Phonemic Awareness
Curriculum Area: ELA

Grade Level/Cooperating Teacher: 1st Grade/Bowen


Date: November 19, 2015
Estimated Time: 30 minutes

Standards Connection:
21.) Demonstrate understanding of spoken words, syllables, and sounds. [RF.K.2]
d. Isolate and pronounce the initial, medial vowel, and final sounds in three-phoneme words.
[RF.K.2d]
Learning Objective(s):
When given letters and a pocket chart, students will identify the beginning, middle, and ending sounds in
five words the teacher says with 80% accuracy.
Learning Objective(s) stated in kid-friendly language:
Today, we will listen to words and decide which letters are in the word based on the sounds we hear.
Evaluation of Learning Objective(s): Students will be given a pocket chart with three pockets for the
beginning, middle, and ending sounds. The teacher will say five words aloud. The students will then
segment the words and identify the beginning, middle, and ending sounds using their letters and pocket
chart. Students should complete this with at least 80% accuracy.
Engagement: Okay boys and girls, I want you to quietly come sit down. I need your ears to be listening
and your brains ready to learn. Lets remember to be respectful to each other. When someone else is
talking, you are listening. Are you ready to learn? Teacher waits for student response. Today, we are
going to listen to words and decide which letters are in the word based on the sounds we hear. The
teacher posts the objective in a place that the students can easily see. Before we begin though, I want to
share a song with you. The teacher plays the YouTube video Phonics Song: Break It Down. Wasnt that
a fun song? At the end of this lesson, you will be able to do the same thing with your words!
Learning Design:

I. Teaching: The teacher will introduce students to segmenting CVC words. She will give each
student a mat with Elkonin squares and a set of letters to use as they sound out the words. Today,
we are going to listen to words and decide which letters are in the word based on the sounds we hear. The
words we hear are made up of sounds. When you read a book, do you sound have words you have to
stretch? Good! Well, today, we are going to practice hearing the sound with the letter! Lets say the word
cat together. Ready? One, two, three . . . cat. Very good! One more time. Listen carefully. Cat. I am going
to stretch the word. Listen carefully. C-a-t. Cat. The letters in the word cat are c-a-t. The teacher gets a
mat with Elkonin boxes. I am going to put each letter in a box so I have c in the first box, a in the middle
box, and t in the last box. When I say the word this time, I am going to push the letter up when I hear the
sound it makes. C-a-t. Cat. Teacher demonstrates moving the letters from the bottom of the box to the top
of the box. Now, I have one for each one of you. When I give you the mat and the bag of letters, I want
you to open the bag with the letters and spread them out so that you can see all the letters. Teacher passes
out the mats and letters. The first word we will do together is big. Can you say it with me? One, two,

three. Big. Now, I am going to stretch the word. Close your eyes and listen carefully. Big. B-i-g. Big. The
letters in this word are b-i-g. Find the letter b and place it in your first box. Put the letter I in the middle
box. Put the letter g in the last box. Now, as I stretch the word, move the letter up as you hear the sound.
The teacher will be modeling it also with the students. Great job! This time, I want us to stretch the word
together. As you say the sounds, slide the letters up. B-i-g. Great job! Our next word is can. Can you say
it with me? One, two, three. Can. Now, I am going to stretch the word. Close your eyes and listen
carefully. Can. C-a-n. Can. The letters in this word are c-a-n. Find the letter c and place it in your first
box. Put the letter a in the middle box. Put the letter n in the last box. Now, as I stretch the word, move the
letter up as you hear the sound. The teacher will be modeling it also with the students. C-a-n Great job!
This time, I want us to stretch the word together. As you say the sounds, slide the letters up. C-a-n. Great
job! Ready for the next word? The word is mat. Can you say it with me? One, two, three. Mat. Now, I am
going to stretch the word. Close your eyes and listen carefully. Mat. M-a-t. Mat. This time instead of me
telling you the letters I want you to help me decide. The first sound in the word mat is m. What would the
first letter be that makes the m sound? Great! The letter is m. Find the letter m and place it in your first
box. Listen to the word again for the second sound. M-a-t. The a sound is next so what letter would that
be? Good! Put the letter a in the middle box. I am going to say the word one more time. Listen for the last
sound. M-a-t. What is the last sound? Great! It is t so what letter is that? Yes, it is the letter t! Put the
letter t in the last box. Now, as I stretch the word, move the letter up as you hear the sound. Lets see if we
got it correct. The teacher will be modeling it also with the students. M-a-t. Do the letters match the
sounds? They do! Great job! Ready for our last word? The word is top. Can you say it with me? One, two,
three. Top. Now, I am going to stretch the word. Close your eyes and listen carefully. Top. T-o-p. This time
instead of me telling you the letters, I want you to help me decide. T-o-p. The first sound in the word top is
t. What would the first letter be that makes the t sound? Great! The letter is t. Find the letter t and place it
in your first box. Listen to the word again for the second sound. T-o-p. The o sound is next so what letter
would that be? Good! Put the letter o in the middle box. I am going to say the word one more time. Listen
for the last sound. T-o-p. What is the last sound? Great! It is t so what letter is that? Yes, it is the letter p!
Put the letter p in the last box. Now, as I stretch the word, move the letter up as you hear the sound. Lets
see if we got it correct. The teacher will be modeling it also with the students. T-o-p. Do the letters match
the sounds? They do! Great job! Teacher transitions to practice.

II. Opportunity for Practice:


Now that you know how to stretch words to find the letters and sounds, we are going to look at
these pictures and stretch the words to find the letters. The teacher passes out the word mats. Our
first picture is the sun. Sun. S-u-n Lets say the word and stretch it together. Sun. S-u-n. Think
about the sounds and find the letters that match the sound. The teacher will sound out the word
one letter at a time. She will make sure each student has completed it correctly before moving on
to the next one. Great job! The next word is bag. Bag. B-a-g. Lets say the word and stretch it
together. Bag. B-a-g. Our next word is dog. Dog. D-o-g. Lets say the word and stretch it
together. Dog. D-o-g. Great job! The teacher will monitor student progress. She will have
additional words for the students if they need continued reinforcement. The teacher will
transition to assessment.
III. Assessment:
Students will be given a pocket chart with three pockets for the beginning, middle, and ending
sounds. The teacher will say five words aloud. The students will then segment the words and
identify the beginning, middle, and ending sounds using their letters and pocket chart. Students
should complete this with at least 80% accuracy. Okay, boys and girls, now that we have
practiced stretching our words, I want you to show me what you know. I have a pocket chart for
each of you. You are going to use your letters. I will say a word and you will listen to the sounds.

Then I want you to put the first sound you hear in the first pocket, the middle sound in the middle
pocket, and the ending sound in the last pocket. For example, the first word we used was cat. If I
said the word cat, you would think c-a-t. C is c so that goes in the first pocket. A is a so that goes
in the middle pocket. T is t so that goes in the last pocket. Then you will show it to me. Does that
make sense? I want your eyes on your own folder. The first word is bat. B-a-t. Bat. The teacher
will wait until all students have completed that word. Take your letters out of the pocket so you
can be ready for the next word. The next word is mop. M-o-p. Mop. The teacher will wait until all
students have completed that word. Take your letters out of the pocket so you can be ready for
the next word. The next word is sad. S-a-d. Sad. The teacher will wait until all students have
completed that word. Take your letters out of the pocket so you can be ready for the next word.
The next word is run. R-u-n. Run. The teacher will wait until all students have completed that
word. Take your letters out of the pocket so you can be ready for the next word. The last word is
nap. N-a-p. Nap. The teacher will wait until all students have completed that word. You all
worked very hard today! Im very proud of you!
IV. Closure: The teacher will have one of each of the students just right books with her. Each
student will find one word in his or her book to stretch and identify the sounds and letters. These
words are in the books you read, too! I am going to give you one of your just-right books and
a worksheet with the squares for your letters. You will pick out one of your words in your books
to stretch and write down the letters in the boxes. At the bottom of your paper, copy the sentence,
and draw a picture to illustrate it. Then you will each get a turn to read your word and stretch
the word for everyone. The teacher will assist students with choosing a word. After each student
has finished, they will present the words. You all have done a great job today learning to listen
to words and decide which letters are in the word based on the sounds you hear!
Materials and Resources:
Computer to play a video
Printed alphabet
Word Mats
Pocket Charts
Elkonin Box Chart
Just right books
Elkonin Box worksheet
Crayons
Differentiation Strategies (including plans for individual learners):
Green: Students will think of their own word and spell the word to identify the beginning, middle, and
ending sounds.
Red: Students will be given the middle sound and will only identify the beginning and ending sounds of
the word the teacher says.
Data Analysis:
As the students filled in their pocket charts, I filled in a chart, recording the words they got
correct and the ones they missed. Two of the students completed the assessment with 100% accuracy,
having no trouble separating the sounds in the pocket chart. The third student missed the word mop. He
placed an a in the middle instead of an o. This assessment was much more accurate on each students
individual ability than my previous lesson. The students were sitting in different spots, and the pocket

chart was a great way that hid their answers from other students. However, after thinking about this
assessment, I think it would have been much better to have the students stretch the words for the sounds
instead of me stretching the word for them. Through a different assessment, I could have gotten a clearer
indication of their ability to stretch the word on their own instead of identifying the sounds in the words.
All of the students would be placed in the green category after this assessment.
Reflection:
This was probably my weakest lesson. I feel that the students learned to identify sounds in CVC
words. However, overall, there were many factors that impacted the success of this lesson. I only taught
this lesson to three ELL students. The day I taught this lesson, my teacher was sick and having me teach
all of the class lessons. She gave me fifteen minutes to complete this lesson while the rest of the class was
reading their own books. I normally take the students to the first grade workroom when I am working
with them, but it was taken at the time I was going to teach my lesson. We had to go to the science lab.
Because it was a new environment, I think it took longer for them to get settled in. I did not get to open
with my engagement because my computer would not connect to the Wi-Fi. Because I was low on time, I
was not able to take the time to wait for it to work. During the teaching and practice portion, the students
completed the different activities, but they did not get to practice with as many words. After the
assessment, I gave the students five minutes to complete their closure activity. I think the closure was
helpful because they got to apply their new knowledge to a book they were using in the classroom. I do
not like that the students were rushed through the lesson. If I taught this again, I would like to have more
time to teach the entire lesson. It would have gone much smoother if I did not rush and gave students
more time to familiarize themselves with the materials we were using. If I could do the assessment
differently, I would probably say the words twice or give them pictures, and then allow the students to
stretch the words and identify the letters and sounds on their own. Ideally, this assessment would be given
individually so the teacher could quickly identify any problem the student has and give prompt feedback.
However, despite all of that, I think the tools and strategies I used allowed them to quickly gain an
understanding of breaking apart the sounds. They were engaged and participating in some type of activity
the entire time. After teaching this lesson, I would move to breaking apart the sounds in larger words.

Samford University
Design for Learning

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