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LEADERSHIP

DEVELOPMENT
Outcomes & Evidence
Progress Inventory*
MINOR IN LEADERSHIP STUDIES
Center for Student Leadership Development
Memorial Union
University of Rhode Island
Name: Santino Famiglietti
Date Enrolled: Fall 2013
Date of Graduation: Spring 2017

Leadership Inventory Revised 8/30/2013

*The Outcomes & Evidence Progress Inventory is the intellectual property of the Center for Student Leadership Development (CSLD) at
the University of Rhode Island and cannot be reproduced in part, or in its entirety, without the written permission of the acting
Assistant Director of the CSLD.

CONTENTS

ABOUT THE MINOR & CENTER FOR STUDENT LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT (information included)
Center for Student Leadership Development Information
Minor Information
Developmental Model
ADVISING INFORMATION (students will include own documentation)
Tracking Sheet / Advising Updates
Syllabi of Minor Classes (Core and Electives)
Internship
o Guidelines
o Syllabus
o Mid-term
o Final
OUTCOMES
Outcomes (Self-Leadership, Interpersonal and Organizational, Leadership Theories, Inclusive Leadership, Critical
Thinking)
Targeted Classes
Experiences
Evidence

Leadership Inventory Revised 8/30/2013

CENTER FOR STUDENT LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT


Office: Memorial Union Room 210

Phone: (401) 874-2726

Fax: (401) 874-5317

CSLD Mission Statement


To enhance the mission of the University of Rhode Island, The Center for Student Leadership Development aims to:
Provide developmental opportunities for all students to become informed, inclusive, effective, and ethical leaders in the global marketplace through the implementation of
learner-centered academic, experiential, and co-curricular programming.
Engage in research, assessment, and advancement in order to positively impact the expanding field of leadership studies.
CSLD Vision Statement
The URI Center for Student Leadership Development will promote dynamic strengths-based leadership development through multiple delivery methods to prepare students to be
competitive in the work place and global marketplace. The CSLD seeks to progress as innovators for experiential engagement and enriching assessment.
CSLD Values Statement
Grounded in the Social Change Model of Leadership Development (Higher Education Research Institute), Relational Leadership Model (Komivies, Lucas, & McMahon), and Servant
Leadership (Greenleaf), the URI Center for Student Leadership Development values:
Engaged and experiential learning through a constructivist approach
Inclusion, Social Justice, and Civic Engagement
Ethical and Value-based Leadership & Relationship Building
Innovative Assessment and Presentation Models

MINOR IN LEADERSHIP STUDIES


At URI, we are among only a handful of colleges and universities across the country that offers a Minor in Leadership Studies and one that is customized for each student. We utilize
a cross-disciplinary approach to leadership education designed to complement your academic studies. All courses utilize a variety of teaching methods but ultimately include some
form of experiential learning, practical application, and reflective learning. Employers, now more than ever, are seeking candidates with exceptional skills in the areas of
interpersonal and group management, problem solving, critical thinking and effective communication. We can help with all of the above.

GENERAL INFORMATION

Regardless of your major, you can minor in Leadership Studies.


Leadership Inventory Revised 8/30/2013

Requirements may be satisfied by completing 18 or more credits related to leadership and offered by more than one department.
Twelve (12) of the 18 credits must be at the 200 level of instruction or above. A course grade of C or better must be earned in each graded course. At least 12 of the credits
must be earned at URI.
No course may be used to apply to both the major and minor fields of study. Courses in General Education or for other minors may be used for the minor* (*this does not
apply to students in the College of Business). With the exception of internship credit, all courses for the minor must be taken for a grade. The Introductory class must be taken
before the internship and the capstone course.
Application for the minor must be filed in your academic deans office no later than the beginning of the final semester or term.
Approval of the minor does not guarantee that the suggested courses will be available to you on a schedule correlated with your graduation plans nor guarantee space in any
required course.

CORE REQUIREMENTS- 9 Credits


Required Element
Introductory Course
3 credits
Internship
3 credits

Class options
HDF 190: FLITE

Only offered in spring for first-year students

HDF 290: Modern Leadership Issues

Offered Fall and Spring for sophomores & juniors

HDF 417: Leadership Internship

Requires 40 hours/credit with a min. of 80 hours & a max. of 120 hours of documented
internship experience for graded credit

or

or

Experience through Office of Experiential Learning & Community Engagement


or

Capstone
3 credits

Internship Class in Academic Major

The only time the major and minor can overlap

HDF 412: Historical, Multi-ethnic & Alternative Leadership

Offered only in the fall with preference given to seniors

COM 402: Leadership & Motivation

Offered in the spring and summer with Dr. Leatham

or
or

BUS 441: Leadership Skills Development


or

HPR 411/412: Honors Senior Seminar


Portfolio
1 credit

Notes

HDF 492: Leadership Minor Portfolio

Offered in the fall and spring with Dr. Cooper


Must be in Honors or have GPA of 3.3
Taken last spring semester of enrollment (some exceptions)

MINOR ELECTIVES-9 credits


*Additional classes may be appropriate and therefore added to the list; see CSLD for the most updated list or bring a class that you think should be an elective
AAF 300: Civil Rights Movement in the US
BUS 341: Organizational Behavior
BUS 342: Human Resource Management
BUS 441: Leadership & Motivation (capstone option)
BUS 443: Organizational Design & Change
BUS 448: International Dimensions of Business
BUS 449: Entrepreneurship
COM 100: Communication Fundamentals
COM 202: Public Speaking

COM 402: Leadership and Motivation (capstone option)


COM 407: Political Communication
COM 415: The Ethics of Persuasion
COM 421: Advanced Interpersonal Communication
COM 422: Communication and Conflict
COM 441: Race, Politics and the Media
COM 450: Organizational Communication
COM 461/462: Managing Cultural Differences in Organizations
CSV 302: URI Community Service

HDF 416: Leadership in Organizations


HDF 417: Leadership Minor Internship
HDF 437: Law & Families in the U.S.
HDF 450: Introduction to Counseling
HPR 118: Honors Course in Speech Communications
HPR 203: The Prepared Mind
HPR 412: Honors Seminar (capstone option)
MSL 101: Introduction to Military Leadership
MSL 201: Leadership & Military History
Leadership Inventory Revised 8/30/2013

COM 208: Argumentation and Debate


COM 210: Persuasion: The Rhetoric of Influence
COM 221: Interpersonal Communication
COM 250: Small Group Communication
COM 302: Advanced Public Speaking
COM 308: Advanced Argumentation
COM 322: Gender & Communication
COM 351: Oral Comm. in Business & the Professions
COM 361: Intercultural Communication
COM 383: Rhetorical Theory
COM 385: Communication and Social Influence

GWS 150: Introduction to Womens Studies


GWS 310: Race, Class, Sexuality in Womens Lives
GWS 350: International Womens Issues
HDF 190: FirstYear Leaders Inspired to Excellence (FLITE)
(introductory course option)
HDF 290: Modern Leadership Issues (introductory course option)
HDF 291: Rose Butler Browne Program Peer Mentoring Program
HDF 412: Historical, MultiEthnic, & Alternative Leadership
(capstone option)
HDF 413: Student Organization Leadership Consulting
HDF 414: Leadership for Activism and Social Change
HDF 415: FLITE Peer Leadership

MSL 201: Military Skills and History of Warfare


MSL 202: Leadership & Team Building
MSL 301: Leadership & Management
PEX 375: Women in Sport Contemporary Perspectives
PHL 212: Ethics
PSC 304: Introduction to Public Administration
PSC 369: Legislative Process and Public Policy
PSC 504: Ethics in Public Administration
SOC300/WMS350: Women and Work
THE 221: Stage Management
THE 341: Theater Management

Leadership Inventory Revised 8/30/2013

BECOMING A POSITIVE LEADER THROUGH DEVELOPMENT & INVOLVEMENT


Wilson, 1998 (URI Memorial Union / Center for Student Leadership Development)
Revised after the publication of Exploring Leadership: for College Students Who Want to Make a Difference by Komives, McMahon and Lucas, 1998.

You need to have your own act together before you can lead others:
2. Lead Yourself

1. Know Yourself
Lead Others

P
R
O
G
R
E
S
S

Strengths
Weaknesses
Values
Needs
Styles
Learning
Teaching
Personality
Membership
Leadership

PROGRESS

Time management
Organization
Self care
Self discipline
Perseverance
Develop and maintain family,
interpersonal, and intimate relationships
Academic, social, personal goals and
objectives

P
R
O
G
R
E
S
S

RE-EVALUATE
former stages as you
progress

4. Develop and Refine


Skills

Leadership theory and


practice
Communication
Group Development
Inclusion
Citizen Activist Skills
Critical Thinking
Teaching and Programming

3. Broaden Your Perspectives


Understand others
PROGRESS

Hierarchy of needs
Racial, cultural, gender, sexual orientation,
religious, class, ability, etc. diversity and
commonalities
Power, privilege, oppression, liberation;
individual and institutional discrimination

OUTCOMES
In this section, you will track your progress toward the outcomes. Each class in the minor targets different outcomes; all of the classes list these
outcomes on the syllabi (the words goals or curriculum areas may be used instead). In many of our classes, the assignments can serve as your
evidence. Periodically, and not less than at the end of each semester, you should update your outcomes progress. In the additional experiences
column, name additional classes or experiences that contributed to you becoming proficient in that outcome. As the semesters pass, you will think of
things from recent semesters and semesters further in the past, or people or jobs, etc. in your past that also influenced your progress on that outcome.
Do not let that ambiguity upset you. Reflecting on development is not a linear process, but it does help to reflect often. In the descriptive notes
column, share insights about your growth, lack of progress, successes, stumbling blocks, etc. At the end of each section, you need to include evidence
that supports your development toward the outcomes. Copies of papers, grading sheets, evaluation lettersanything that shows that someone has
determined that you have demonstrated proficiency (or not, or are making progress). Make sure to keep electronic copies of all of your evidence to
include in your Portfolio.

Outcome Category: Self-Leadership


Outcome

Target class
HDF 290

Additional Experiences
Writing an Rhetoric
Production Lab

1.

Student will demonstrate autonomy and a


minimized need for approval

2.

Student will demonstrate personal,


organizational, and academic examples
of self-discipline

HDF 290

Junior Year

3.

Student will demonstrate the ability to


manage emotions

HDF 290

Freshman Year

4.

Student will demonstrate knowledge of


stress management methods

HDF 290

5.

Student will demonstrate the ability to


manage stress

HDF 290

IsportsWeb Internship

6.

Student will express a personal code of


leadership / membership ethics

HDF 290

Special Olympics

Descriptive notes regarding learning and practice


Part of being a leader is having the ability to make decisions based upon what is best for the group, not
necessarily each individual involved. Many leaders struggle with making decisions that may not be
popular amongst the group, but are necessary in the long run. I too have experienced such instances
in my job at the Writing and Rhetoric Production Lab. As recently as two weeks ago I was tasked with
the duty of creating a work schedule for the week(s) of reading and exam days. Considering that all of
the labs employees are students, it was difficult to coordinate each employees work and exam
schedules. I often had to schedule people to work during times in which they would have been studying
or preparing for their exams. Although these decisions werent popular amongst my fellow employees,
they were decisions I had to make to ensure that the lab remained open during exam week.
As Ive grown older I have learned which organization and discipline tactics work best for me. Since
beginning my Junior year at URI, I have found myself to be busier than ever before, forcing me to
constantly remain organized. Along with my double major, I have also added a minor in Leadership
Studies. Along with my studies, I am also very involved in activities both within and our of URI. I work at
the schools Writing and Rhetoric Production Lab and host a radio show with the RIU2 club. I also
currently hold an internship with an online sports website called IsportsWeb where I am required to
publish a minimum of two articles per week. I also volunteer my time with the RI Special Olympics on
Wednesday nights and Saturday mornings. I have found myself having a very demanding schedule this
semester and am forced to practice strict organization and discipline.
As a child, I grew up in a house with my mother, father, biological brother and sister and two adopted
sisters. We were a close family throughout my childhood all the way up until my senior year of high
school when my parents got divorced As the oldest of the 5 children I assumed many of the
responsibilities my dad had before he moved out. This was extremely difficult, considering that I had
just been accepted to college and planned to move to school the following fall. I was emotionally torn
between living at home to help my mother with my younger siblings or pursuing my dreams of gaining a
college experience. I managed my emotions by putting myself first and understanding that I needed to
first take care of myself. I hope to graduate and be in a position to help my mom care for my younger
siblings and eventually help them make it through college as well.
As I stated previously, I have a very demanding, high-stress schedule. With so much going on it is
often easy to become stressed and discouraged. I find that doing something constructive that you are
interested in is a great way to release stress in a productive manner. Allowing your mind to settle down
and refocus by temporarily escaping stressful thoughts is a healthy way to manage stress. From there,
you can return to your tasks with a clear head and successfully orchestrate a plan to get what you need
to get done.
As I become stressed I find that taking a break and doing something Im interested in truly recharges
my mind. As an avid writer, I have learned that writing is my vehicle to escape reality for a short time. I
am fortunate enough to hold a sports writing internship, two things I am very interested in that help me
cope with stress. I find this to be a very productive way to deal with stress considering that I would
have to write sports articles weekly anyways to fulfill the requirements of my internship. I am therefore
killing two birds with one stone by doing something I like to do and getting my responsibilities done at
the same time. As I write, my mind is put at ease and I am able to resume the tasks that stressed me in
the first place. I believe everyone needs a mental break at some point to allow them to step out of
stressful situations. You need to always manage your mental health in order to be successful.
As a leader, ethical considerations are a huge point of emphasis when leading a group of people. As a
registered Rhode Island Special Olympics Head Coach, I often have to consider ethics in my decision
making. For me, it is important to keep in mind that I am working with an ethnically diverse group who

also suffers from developmental disabilities. As their leader I must ensure that there is no discrimination
based upon demographics or disabilities. I strive to keep an open mind when taking into consideration
the 12 men and women I coach to ensure they all receive equal opportunities.

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11.
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Student will demonstrate practice of the


personal code of ethics
Student will express a personal values
statement
Student will demonstrate practice of the
personal values statement
Student will demonstrate the ability to
lead a project from start to finish (followthrough)

HDF 290

Political Science 369

For my political science class we were instructed to participate in a mock debate between our class.
The class was divided into democrats and republican as each student was assigned a member of
congress to represent. The democrat and republican parties were then divided into caucuses to narrow
the debate. I was voted as the leader of my caucuses and was required to facilitate teamwork amongst
myself and my two other group members. We started off by selecting current event issues to debate
and over the course of the semester were required to develop timely arguments to present during our
debate. I was responsible for documenting and organizing our progress and placing it into an organized
agenda for the final debate. We finally completed the debate and were given successful feedback for
our research and organization.

Student will describe goals and objective


statements regarding personal issues,
career issues, and community issues
Student will show evidence of goals and
objectives that were planned and
achieved
Student will show knowledge of the
Hierarchy of Needs theory by Maslow
Student will show application of Maslows
theory to own life
Student will describe personal leadership
style and/or personality style including
strengths and weaknesses and examples
of application (Sources = Leadership style
inventories, the L.P.I., StrengthsQuest,
Type Focus (MBTI), LAMP, and other
career inventories, etc.)
Student will show knowledge of the theory
of Superleadership by Manz & Sims
Student will show application of Manz &
Sims theory to own life

Outcome Category: Leadership Theories


Outcome

18
.

Student will show knowledge of the


Authority and Bureaucracy theory of
leadership Weber

Target class
HDF 290

Additional Experiences

Descriptive notes regarding learning and practice


According to Weber, the theory of Authority and Bureaucracy features 3 categorical theories
surrounding authority and bureaucratic leadership. The first categorical belief is traditional authority.
This is the belief that authoritative figures govern by the beliefs of traditional and legitimacy. The

second is rational, legal authority which discusses the patter of rules and the authority to implement
said rules. The final is charismatic authority for the devotion of sanctity, heroism and character of a
person along with the normative rules practiced by the authoritative figure. Weber goes on to break
down bureaucracy into seven components: (a formal hierarchical system, management by rules,
organization by function specialty, up-focused or in-focused mission, purposely impersonal,
employment based on technical qualifications and predispositional growth of staff.

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Student will describe personal application


of the above theory (Weber)

21
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.

Student will describe personal application


of the above theory (Taylor)

Student will show knowledge of the


Scientific Management theory of
leadership by Taylor

HDF 290

Taylors theory of Scientific Management describes responsibilities of management and their task of
creating a unified work environment. Taylor has narrowed the theory into 4 principles that are intended
to maximize productivity. The principles are scientific organization of a systematic structure and the
establishment of a management team. It must also be enforced that cohesion must exist between
management and subordinates to maximize productivity. Finally equal division of work and
responsibility, emphasizing equality.

Student will show knowledge of the


Management by Objectives theory of
leadership by Drucker

HDF 290

23
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Student will describe personal application


of the above theory (Drucker)

HDF 290

24
.

Student will show knowledge of Theory


X and Theory Y theory of leadership by
MacGregor

HDF 290

Drucker describes management by objectives as a process of defining objectives within an


organization with the purpose of establishing a general consensus between management and
employees in order to determine the necessary process to achieve said objectives. Drucker highlights
this theory with 5 steps. The first is to review objectives to gain a clear understating. The second is to
set objectives for subordinates by management. Next is to monitor the progress of the employees to
ensure objectives are being worked towards. After progress is recorded, Drucker then describes the
need to evaluate the employees performance to look for points to improve upon. Finally, Drucker
proclaims the importance of incentivizing workers by rewarding them for good work.
Upon taking on my internship with IsportsWeb, their coordination Joe White explained the process of
publishing an article. I would have to select a topic that he or a member of his team pre-approved
before I could start writing. I would then do all of my writing on IsportsWebs writers page where an
editor could watch my progression live. After completing a series of drafts I would remain in constant
contact with the editors, revising my work and preparing for publication. By staying in constant contact
with my superiors and setting objective goals, I was able to successfully publish a series of articles.
According to MacGregor the Theory of X and Y explains managers perceptions of their employees and
how those perceptions govern their management style. MacGregor classifies individuals to be either
theory X or theory Y. Theory X individuals are said to be lazy and uninterested in their work,
commanding constant supervision. These individuals are found to perform better in incentivized
programs, giving them motivation to strive in their work. Theory Y people are self-motivating and
ambitious. These people find satisfaction in doing a good job and often find success in situations where
they are required to hold responsibility.

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Student will describe personal application


of the above theory (MacGregor)

IsportsWeb Internship

Student will show knowledge of the


Servant Leadership theory of leadership
by Greenleaf
Student will describe personal application
of the above theory (Greenleaf)

HDF 290

According to Greenleaf, Servant Leadership is a persons desire to serve others. Greenleaf describes
10 characteristics servant leaders possess. They are: listening, empathy, healing, awareness,
persuasion, conceptualization and foresight, stewardship, commitment and building a community.

Student will show knowledge of the


Principle Centered Leadership theory
by Covey

HDF 290

Stephen Covey defines Principle Centered Leadership as the utilization of a leaders core values that
drive their decision making. Covey divided these values into four principles: Security, Wisdom,
Guidance and Power. Covey further narrowed this theory into 8 characteristics each Principle Centered
Leader possesses. They are: continual learning, service-oriented, radiate positive energy, believe in

others, lead balanced lives, see life as an adventure synergistic and exercise self- renewal strategies.

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Student will describe personal application


of the above theory (Covey)
Student will show knowledge of the 14
Points / TQM theory of leadership by
Deming
Student will describe personal application
of the above theory (Deming)
Student will show knowledge of the
Visionary Leadership (now often cited
as Transformational Leadership) theory
by Sashkin
Student will describe personal application
of the above theory (Sashkin)
Student will show knowledge of the
Individuals in Organizations leadership
theory by Argyris

HDF 290

35
.

Student will describe personal application


of the above theory (Argyris)

HDF 290

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Students will demonstrate knowledge of


the 4 Vs theory of leadership by Grace
(Center for Ethical Leadership)
Student will describe personal application
of the above theory (Grace)

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Student will describe personal application


of the above theory (Hersey & Blanchard)

Student will show knowledge of the


Situational Leadership theory by Hersey
& Blanchard

Student will show knowledge of the


Relational Leadership model by
Komives, McMahon & Lucas

High School Hockey

Argyris main claim to the Individuals in Organizations Theory is that both organizations and the
individuals a part of them thrive when the organization is in full support of the individuals. When
thinking of Argyris theory, it is easier understood when thought of as a sports team. If the players know
they have the full support of the organization, they will possess all of the motivation to play to the best
of their ability. If each player is playing to their best, the team will therefore be successful as everyones
potential has been maximized. The individuals in organization theory allows individuals to govern
themselves.
When playing hockey throughout my high school career, I can see where Individuals in Organizations
Theory had been used in my experience. For my first two years on the team we had a head coach who
was not very popular amongst the players. He would often show up late to practice or not at all, once
forgot to get us a bus to a road game and didnt even pay our buy in fee for a New England
Tournament. It was clear to myself and my teammates that our coach wasnt interested in coaching us
and thus had a negative impact on our play. My junior year, we got a new head coach who truly
showed a vested interest in our play. By giving myself and my teammates the support we needed, we
were far more motivated to get out and play. We ended up winning the division championship that year
as we finally ha the motivation and support we needed.

HDF 290

Situational Leadership according to Hersey and Blanchard claims that leaders should change their
style based upon the maturity of level of their subordinates. The theory is broken down into four types
of people, M1, M2, M3 and M4. M1- lack of knowledge and needs to be pushed, M2- might be willing
but lacks skills, M3- ready but not confident and M4- able to work and highly confident. The four
leadership styles one can use when working with these types of people are telling (telling people what
to do), selling (provide information and direction), participating (focus on relationships) and delegating
(passing responsibility on to others).

HDF 290

Komives, McMahon and Lucas describe the Relational Leadership theory as a process of people
unifying to achieve a common goal. They theorists narrow the theory into 5 descriptive elements. This
first, inclusion, is where all participants influence the group with their personal behaviors. The second,
empowerment is when leadership is shared amongst the group where everyone is held equally

responsible. The third, purposefulness is where everyone is equally committed and adds to the group
with their own visions. The first is ethical behaviors here leadership is driven by positive values. The
fifth and final is process orientation where the group must be alert to the possibility that the process
could overshadow the group mission.

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Student will describe personal application


of the above theory (Komives et al)

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Student will demonstrate knowledge of


experiential learning in leadership
development (Kolb)
Student will describe personal application
of experiential learning in leadership
development (Kolb)

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Student will show knowledge of the


Social Change Model of Leadership
Development by Astin et al
Student will describe personal application
of the above theory (Astin et al)

Student will show knowledge of the


concept of constructivism
Students will describe personal examples
of implementing constructivism

HDF 290

Writing 201

In my writing 201 class we were required to write four papers through out the semester. After writing
each paper, our classmates would edit our drafts and give us feedback to improve our writing. Our
professor would then grade the papers and give us constructivism to build off of in the future. Our final
project for the class was to compile all of our constructive criticism and edit our papers into a final
portfolio. By doing so we were able to build off of our constructive criticism from throughout the year
and improve our writing.

HDF 290

IsportsWeb Internship

I was able to account for experiential learning through my internship with IsportsWeb. With IsportsWeb
I have been granted on inside look at what being a professional sports journalist truly entails. With the
website I have learned how to properly research, site and publish an article that commands a large
audience. This type of hands on experience wouldnt be feasible in a class room setting and can only
be learned through experiential learning. I have identified myself as a hands on learned and therefore
work well through experience and example. Had I not had my internship I would have never been able
to practice the requirements that sports journalism entails and never gained the feedback of
professionals in the field.

Students will demonstrate knowledge of


the Leadership Identity Development
Model by Komives et al
Students will describe personal
application of the above theory. (Komives
et al)
Students will demonstrate knowledge of
the Strengths-Development Model by
Hulme et al
Student will describe personal application
of the above theory (Hulme et al)
Student will demonstrate knowledge of
behavior theories of leadership from
Michigan and Ohio State
Student will describe personal application
of the above theories (Michigan & Ohio
State)
Student will demonstrate knowledge of

HDF 290

Charismatic Leadership is the theory of leadership through personality and personal relationship. In

Charismatic leadership

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Student will describe personal application


of the above theory

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Student will demonstrate knowledge of


contingency approach to leadership by
Fiedler
Student will describe personal application
of the above theory (Fiedler)
Student will demonstrate knowledge of
Path-Goal theory by House
Student will describe personal application
of the above theory (House)
Student will demonstrate knowledge of
Leader Member Exchange (LMX) theory
Student will describe personal application
of the above theory
Student will demonstrate knowledge of
Leadership Substitutes Theory
Student will describe personal application
of the above theory
Student will demonstrate knowledge of
Models of leader emergence
Student will describe the impact of traits
on leadership emergence and
performance
Student will demonstrate knowledge of
Chaos approach to leadership by
Wheatley
Student will describe personal application
of the above theory (Wheatley)

HDF 290

Special Olympics

this model, subordinates are more drawn to charismatic leaders in which they can relate to and feel a
sense of comfortability with. Leading through charisma is a personal way to lead as leaders look to
make a direct connection with those they are leading. By doing so, leaders often find success in their
group, as their subordinates look to strive further towards success because they feel as though they
owe it to their leader.
I practice charismatic leadership when I coach Special Olympics. When coaching Special Olympics it is
all about developing relationship and making athletes feel comfortable. By presenting myself in a
charismatic manner that draw athletes towards me, I strengthen my ability to get through to them as a
coach. This allows me to develop personal relationships with each of the participants and establish a
player to coach connection. This connection of personalities then translates to their performance as
they are now looking to make me proud and are willing to go that extra mile for their coach who they
know supports them .

Outcome Category: Inclusive Leadership / Diversity and its Application to Leadership


Outcome

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Student will demonstrate how cultural


anthropology / paradigms relate to
leadership
Student will describe personal example
of using cultural anthropology /
paradigms as a leader
Student will demonstrate knowledge of
the Cycles of Socialization (Harro)
theory and its uses in leadership
Students will demonstrate personal
application of the Cycles of
Socialization (Harro)
Student will demonstrate knowledge of
the Cycles of Liberation (Harro) theory
and its uses in leadership
Student will demonstrate personal
application of the Cycles of Liberation
(Harro)
Student will demonstrate knowledge of
the Configuration of Power (Franklin)
and its relationship to leadership
Student will demonstrate personal
application of the Configuration of
Power (Franklin)
Student will demonstrate knowledge of
racial identity development via the Cross,
Helms or other models (Ferdman &
Gallegos; Kim; Horse; Wijeyesinghe etc.)
Student will demonstrate personal
application of model(s) of racial identity
development above
Students will demonstrate knowledge of
McIntoshs theory of privilege and its
relationship to leadership
Student will demonstrate personal
application of McIntoshs theory
Student will describe the differences and
similarities of individual and institutional
oppression and relationships to
leadership
Student will show knowledge of effective
leadership as it relates to change agency
Student will describe personal examples
of being a change agent

Target class

Additional Experiences

Descriptive notes regarding learning and practice

83
.
84
.
85
.
86
.
87
.

Student will create a personal code of


inclusive leadership
Student will demonstrate knowledge of
the Model of Intercultural Sensitivity by
Bennett and its uses in leadership
Students will demonstrate personal
application of the Model of Intercultural
Sensitivity by Bennett
Student will demonstrate knowledge of
the ally Action Continuum by Griffin &
Harro
Student will demonstrate personal
application of the Action Continuum by
Griffin & Harro

Outcome Category: Critical Thinking


Outcome

88
.
89
.
90
.
91
.
92
.
93
.
94
.
95
.
96

Student will show knowledge of principles


of critical thinking (logic is used in this
minor)
Student will demonstrate proficiency of
critical thinking
Student will show knowledge of
metaphorical analysis to critically analyze
self and leadership situations
Student will demonstrate proficiency of
metaphorical analysis to critically analyze
self and leadership situations
Student will show knowledge of at least five
decision making methods
Student will describe personal examples of
having used five decision making methods
Student will show knowledge of at least five
problem solving / conflict management
methods, as well as understanding the
roots of conflicts
Student will describe personal examples of
having used five problem solving / conflict
management methods (if student has been
trained in mediation, that information goes
here)
Student will describe what it means to
analyze, criticize, synthesize and utilize

Target class

Additional Experiences

Descriptive notes regarding learning and practice

.
97
.
98
.

information as a leader
Student will demonstrate knowledge of
leadership that is used in crisis
Student will describe examples of
leadership in crisis situations

Outcome Category: Interpersonal and Organizational Concepts & Skills


Outcome

Target class

Additional Experiences

99.

Student will demonstrate knowledge of


active listening techniques

HDF 290

100
.

Student will describe examples of using


active listening skills

HDF 290

Communications 202

101
.
102
.
103
.
104
.

Student will demonstrate knowledge of


functions of group communication by
Hirokawa
Student will describe personal application
of functions of group communication
(Hirokawa)
Student will show knowledge of techniques
regarding giving and accepting of feedback
HDF 290

History 113

105
.
106
.

Student will demonstrate knowledge of


facilitation and de-briefing techniques

Student will describe examples of giving


and accepting feedback.

Student will demonstrate proficiency of


facilitation and de-briefing techniques

Descriptive notes regarding learning and practice


Active reaches far beyond just hearing what the speaker simply said. An active listener must be able to
truly decipher the message a speaker is trying to convey while also being mindful of the speakers
tendencies and signs. This can include nonverbal signs such as smiling, eye contact and body
expressions, as well as verbal signs such as description of detail and reflection.
In my communications 202 class we were required to listen to each of our group members
presentations throughout the semester. Unlike most classroom presentations, the students that made
up the audience would be required to take notes, writing down three positives and three points of
improvement for the speaker. At the conclusion of the speech each audience member would have to
share their notes with the speaker. Completing this assignment would have been impossible without
active listening. As an audience member it would have been impossible to pick up on certain aspects of
the speech without active listening skills.

For my history 113 class, much of our grade was accounted through 2 term papers. These papers
covered many topics we learned in class throughout the semester and were designed to be very
informative. At the beginning of the semester our professor divided us up into groups of four. In the
group we were to edit and make revisions to one anothers paper before they were due. We were then
required to submit the revisions we made to a group members paper, the revisions we received from a
group member, our rough draft and a final that has been tailored to the revisions we received. The
entire point of this was to accept feedback given to us by our classmates who were writing the same
paper so we could then implement it into our own writing.

107
.
108
.
109
.
110.
111.
112.
113.
114.
115.
116.
117.
118.
119.
120
.
121
.
122
.
123
.
124
.
125
.

Student will demonstrate knowledge of


framing and breaking the frame
Student will demonstrate proficiency of
framing and breaking the frame
Student will show knowledge of organizing
meetings / setting agendas / and leading
meetings
Student will describe personal examples of
organizing meetings / setting agendas /
leading meetings
Student will show knowledge of
Parliamentary Procedure
Student will show knowledge of techniques
for working with difficult people
Student will describe personal examples of
using techniques to work effectively with
difficult people
Student will show knowledge of the stages
of group development (Tuckman, Bennis or
others)
Student will describe personal examples of
group development in use (Tuckman,
Bennis or others).
Student will show knowledge of group
dynamics and group roles
Student will describe personal examples of
group dynamics and group roles
Student will show knowledge of effective
memberships skills in groups
Student will describe personal examples of
membership skills in use
Student will show knowledge of the
Challenge and Support theory by Sanford,
and its relationship to organizations
Student will describe personal examples of
using the theory of Challenge and Support
(Sanford)
Student will show knowledge of the
construction / elements of informative and
persuasive speeches
Student will demonstrate proficiency in
informative and persuasive public speaking
Student will show knowledge of planning
and conducting interviews (as the
interviewer)
Student will describe personal examples of
planning and conducting interviews (as the
interviewer)

126
.
127
.
128
.
129
.
130
.
131
.
132
.
133
.
134
.
135
.
136
.
137
.
138
.
139
.
140
.

Student will show knowledge of preparing


for and effective answers in interviews (as
the interviewee)
Student will describe personal examples of
preparing for and being interviewed

141
.
142
.
143

Student will describe personal examples of


mentoring and being mentored

Student will show knowledge of effective


collaboration / coalition building
Student will describe personal examples of
working in collaboratives/coalitions
Student will show knowledge of
Intercultural communication considerations
Student will demonstrate proficiency in
intercultural communication
Student will describe ways to maintain
accountability in leadership / member
relationships
Student will describe personal examples
related to maintaining accountability as a
leader
Student will describe ways to build
relationships between leaders and
members
Student will describe personal examples of
building relationships with members as a
leader
Student will describe how credibility applies
to leadership, as well as the characteristics
and skills of a credible leader
Student will describe personal examples of
building, maintaining, and repairing his/her
own credibility as a leader
Student will describe ethical standards in
influence
Student will describe influence applies to
leadership
Student will describe principles of effective
mentoring, as well as problems particular
to the mentoring relationship

Student will describe principles of effective


peer leadership, as well as problems
particular to peer leadership
Student will describe personal examples

.
144
.
145
.

related to being a peer leader and being


led by peers
Student will describe the four frames of
organizations by Bolman and Deal
Student will describe personal application
of organizational analysis using the four
frames of organizations (Bolman and Deal)