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2

Order of
Battle
Credits

Contents
2

New Rules

Motor Torpedo Boats

Admirals

11

Advanced Aircraft Operations

15

Editor

Scenarios

22

Hunting the Beast

27

Cover

Expanded Fleet List

34

Royal Navy

35

Kriegsmarine

58

United States Navy

64

Japan

74

Italian

88

French

95

Soviet Union

100

Civilian Ships

110

Counters

112

Erik Nicely

Developers

Richard L. Bax, Agis Neugebauer, Erik Nicely


Wulf Corbett, David Manley

Nick Robinson

Chris Quilliams

Interior Illustrations

Sherard Jackson, Danilo Moretti, Mike Mumah

Miniatures Gaming Manager


Ian Barstow

Print Manager
Ed Russell

Special Thanks

Adam Gulwell, Peter Swarbrick of www.shipspictures.co.uk


and David Page of www.navyphotos.co.uk

Contents

Introduction

Lead Developer

Order of Battle (C) 2007 Mongoose Publishing. All rights reserved. Reproduction of this work by any means
without the written permission of the publisher is expressly forbidden. All significant art and text herein
are copyrighted by Mongoose Publishing. No portion of this work may be reproduced in any form without
written permission. This material is copyrighted under the copyright laws of the UK. Printed in the UK.

Introduction
Victory at Sea had a humble beginning as a bare-bones set of free rules in Mongoose Publishings Signs and Portents online
magazine. That initial free rules set proved to be popular and led to the development of the core rulebook, which was an
immediate success. A loyal international fan base developed as Victory at Sea quickly earned itself a place as one of the standards
of World War II naval wargaming. The rulebook covered the basics of naval warfare in all theatres, but only so much would fit
within its pages.
This supplement is an expansion for Victory at Sea. Changes for some of the rules and stat blocks from the original rulebook
have been made in an attempt to increase historical accuracy. Player concerns that have come up on Mongoose Publishings
online forum have been addressed as well. New rules are introduced to cover many aspects of WWII naval combat that were not
addressed in the core rulebook and air combat has been expanded and, of course, there are new ships. With the expanded fleet
lists, players have the resources to play any historical battle as well as the option to build better fleets for what if games.

Introduction

This book was a collaborative effort that couldnt have been done without the input of the original Salty Seadogs playtest group.
Many thanks to David Manley and Rich Bax, whose fleet lists form a large portion of this book. I would be remiss not to thank
Agis Neubauer as well for his excellent work on the German Z-Plan ships. The newer playtesters proved their worth; Dan Martz
and Darell Phillips gave many suggestions and often acted as my conscience when I wanted to blow through a rule in order to
get to the next one, and I received good feedback from the other new guys. My personal gaming group at Game Towne in San
Diego deserves mention - thanks dudes. Thanks to Matthew Sprange for giving me the opportunity to work on this project, and
to my wife Amber for putting up with my occasional loud rants while putting it all together.

New Rules
This chapter details some changes to the main Victory at Sea rulebook, and adds many new options for budding admirals to try
in their games. These additional rules are by no means necessary to enjoy a good battle, but you will find they add a degree of
realism and will provide you with many new tactical choices within a game.

Official Rules Changes for Victory at Sea

These are official changes to the Victory at Sea rulebook, adding a little more realism to the game and streamlining play.
Moving: A ship must move half of its current Speed (not maximum Speed) before it can execute a turn.

Flank Speed!: This Special Action increases a ships movement by 1. There is no modifier to Attack Dice on ships that have
executed a Flank Speed! Special Action.
Attacking: There is a +1 bonus to all Attack Dice for all turret and secondary weapons to any target within 10 unless the target
is obscured by smoke. Secondary Armaments ignore the -1 Attack Dice penalties when attacking vessels moving 7 or more.
Torpedo Belts: Torpedo Belts only give protection to side hits - hits to fore and aft score damage normally. For every hit a
Torpedo scores on the side of a ship with the Torpedo Belt trait, roll one dice. On a 4 or more, the Belt itself has been hit and
the Attack Dice be re-rolled.

Torpedo Attacks, Tubes and Reloads: No torpedo attacks may be made by a ship in the same turn that it executes an Evasive!
Special Action.

New Rules

Weak: Weak weapons incur a -1 modifier to all Damage Dice rolls, and only inflict Critical Hits on targets with an Armour score
of 3 or less. Critical effects remain the same, but only one extra point of Crew and/or Damage may be lost due to a Critical Hit
from a Weak weapon.

Torpedo reloads for submarines in all navies are limited to one extra salvo (two shots total). Cruisers of the Imperial Japanese Navy with
Slow Loading torpedoes have reloads for two extra salvoes (three shots total) while Japanese destroyers with Slow Loading torpedoes
are limited to one extra salvo (two shots). The Slow Loading Special trait as described in Victory at Sea remains unaffected.
Torpedo tubes will be treated as turrets when applying damage results due to being Crippled. They may never be fired through
smoke.
In addition, all damage scored on civilian vessels by torpedoes is automatically doubled.
Observation Aircraft: Observation Aircraft are no longer represented on the tabletop during games, unless being used in an ASW
capacity, and do not affect combat or Initiative. The Aircraft Special Trait may not be eliminated when a ship becomes Crippled (it
is assumed that the ship has its planes in the air at the start of the battle).
Observation Aircraft do not affect the launching/owning ships Attack Dice and
do not provide an Initiative bonus. They may be outfitted for Anti Submarine
Warfare as detailed on page 16. For further uses of Observation Aircraft see the
Hunting the Beast chapter, page 29.
Smoke: Ships may fire through Smoke created by friendly vessels with the following restrictions: the ships firing must have the
Radar trait, normal range penalties apply to the friendly firing ships, no AD bonus is given to ships within 10, anti-aircraft fire
from friendly ships is subject to a -1 penalty to AAA Attack Dice, and torpedoes may not be fired through smoke. The rules
for the automatic Command Check, placing and removing Smoke Counters, and enemy targeting through Smoke as stated in
Victory at Sea remain the same.

New Advanced Rules

The Victory at Sea rulebook presents the basic rules for playing the naval battles of World War II. The following offer an
added level of realism (and lethality) to games, and players should consider them to be Advanced Rules to be used after they are
comfortable with the basics.

Shorelines, Islands and Shallow Water

Dry land on the Victory at Sea gaming table can be denoted by table edges, lines drawn on the table or artistically produced
terrain pieces. Dry land, however represented, will take the form of shorelines and islands. Whether land obstructs line of sight
or not should be determined before play begins via common agreement or a scenario-specific rule.
No ship with a starting Damage score of 6 or more can come within 1 of Land without running aground. The exception to this
are any areas designated as being a harbour, where all ships are permitted to move.
Ships running aground may not fire any weapons or execute any Special Actions, launch or recover aircraft, and their Speed is
reduced to 0 for the rest of the game. Attack Dice gain a +2 bonus against beached ships.

Shore Batteries

Shore batteries in Victory at Sea represent artillery pieces employed against naval vessels. The size and number of shore batteries
used against ships varied greatly and the rules below will allow players to include them in scenarios.

New Rules

Shore batteries are considered immobile ships for game purposes. They can vary greatly in their capabilities but all can be
expressed in game terms using the following guidelines:
Main Guns: All shore batteries are equipped with these. All have a range and AD based on size and number of guns, DD, and
some will have the Weak, AP, or Super AP traits.
Guns
Less than 6 guns
6-8 guns
10 guns
12 guns
14 guns
15 guns
16 guns

Range
12
26
22
26
28
30
40

AD
1 per 4 barrels
1 per 2 barrels
1 per barrel
1 per barrel
1 per barrel
1 per barrel
1 per barrel

DD
1
1
1
1
2
2
2

Traits
Weak

AP
AP
Super AP

Target Score: As Shore Batteries are hard to detect and hit, they all have a Target value of 5+.
Armour: Open Gun: 4+, Shielded Gun: 5+, Hardened Gun (such as the Atlantic Wall batteries): 6+. The default armour for
all shore batteries is 5+.
Damage: 5 per Gun AD. -1 if the guns are weak, +1 if they are AP or Super AP.
Priority Level:
Guns
4 AD or Less
5-8 AD
9-12 AD
13+ AD
Hardened Gun
10-12 Guns
14-15 Guns
16 Guns

Priority Level
Patrol
Skirmish
Raid
Battle
Raise Priority Level by one
Raise Priority Level by one
Raise Priority Level by two
Raise Priority Level by three

Crew: Coastal batteries have no Crew score.


Critical Hits: Critical Hits are determined normally but the results are determined on the following table;
D6
1
2
3
4
5
6

Damage
+1
+3
+3
+4
+4
-

Effect
All guns suffer -1 penalty on Attack Dice
One random Gun is destroyed
Each Gun can only fire on a 4+
No weapons can fire for 1D3 turns
Roll for each Gun, on a 4+ it is destroyed
Damage score to zero, entire battery destroyed

Example Batteries
Open 6 Coastal Defence Battery
Armour: 4+

Target: 5+

Weapon
8x 6 Guns

Patrol

Damage: 20

Range
26

AD
4

DD
1

Special

Hardened 15 Coastal Battery with 4 Guns


Armour: 6+

Target: 5+

Range
30
30
30
30

AD
1
1
1
1

DD
2
2
2
2

Special
AP
AP
AP
AP

New Rules

Weapon
Gun #1 (15)
Gun #2 (15)
Gun #3 (15)
Gun #4 (15)

Battle

Damage: 24

Night Fighting

In the battles for supremacy of the oceans in World War II, conflicts happened night and day. Some of those battles, such as the
Japanese attack on Savor Island, were an exercise in superior night fighting tactics. Whether a sneak attack or a brave defence
of coastal assets, night-time battles were an aspect of war at sea that tested the worth of many naval commanders. In games of
Victory at Sea target acquisition, whether by radar or other means, is the most important factor for engaging enemy ships.

Illuminated Targets: Ships that are Illuminated are automatically spotted by all ships within 20. Any fire at an Illuminated
ship ignores Attack Dice modifiers for night; the target is treated as if it were being engaged in daylight. However, the maximum
range of 20 remains.
Secondary Armament: Secondary Armament fired during night battles Illuminates the firing vessel. All ships within 10 of a
ship firing Secondary Armament at night will automatically detect it.
Searchlights: Any ship may Illuminate one enemy ship within 10. Ships actively using searchlights are also considered to be
Illuminated and become legal targets for enemy fire. Searchlights are used at the start of the Attack Phase, before any shooting
takes place. The player who lost the Initiative declares all of his searchlights first, followed by his opponent.
Starshells: Starshells are fired by guns from the ships Secondary Armament, using 1AD (so ships with only 1 AD of Secondary
Armament must choose between starshell use and a normal attack).
Starshells can be fired to any point within range of the ships secondary armament (place an Starshell marker at the desired
location) with no Attack Dice rolls needed. All ships within 3 of a starshell marker are Illuminated. Starshell markers are
removed in the End Phase.

Radar (1943 or earlier): Ships with radar firing at night must shoot at the largest enemy ship within range (the ship with the
greatest number of starting Damage) . If two vessels with the same starting Damage are present, the nearest will be attacked.
Fire control systems had advanced after 1943 to allow more effective direction of fire, so there are no limitations on radar in night
games set in that year or later.

Minefields

The use of mines against ocean going vessels was an effective means of hemming in enemy ships or denying them passage. Besides
being able to cripple or sink ships (both civilian and military), valuable naval assets could be tied up for long periods of time in
minesweeping operations.
Placement and Density
Minefields are placed before play begins, paid for using the table below.
Minefield Density
10
11
12
13
14

Fleet Allocation Point Cost


1 Patrol point
2 Patrol points
1 Skirmish point
2 Skirmish points
1 Raid point

New Rules

The player deploying the minefields must then divide the playing area into 12x12 squares. The player using mines must then
record which squares contain mines.
Before play begins, the opposing player rolls 1 dice for each square. On a 4 or more, the minelaying player must declare whether
he has placed mines in that square or not.
Navigating a Minefield
Any ship in a square designated as a Minefield must roll one dice at the beginning of its movement. On a 5 or 6 the ship
encounters a mine. Roll another dice, this time adding the ships Crew Quality and Target score. If this equals or exceeds the
Minefield Density, it avoids the mine and may move normally. If the roll is lower than the Minefield Density, a mine has struck,
and the ship suffers a 3DD AP hit that is treated as a torpedo for damage purposes however, Torpedo Belts are ineffective
against mines.
Minesweeping
Mine squares may be cleared by minesweeping vessels. To do so, a minesweeper must begin its movement within the square. A
Command Check with a target number of 8+ must be made and, if successful, the Minefield Density in that square is reduced
by one (to a minimum Minefield Density of 10). This change to Minefield Density is immediate and any ships moving after the
minesweeper in the same Movement Phase benefit from the reduction.
If the Command Check is failed, the minesweeper immediately encounters
a mine and must immediately try to avoid it as detailed above.
Any friendly ship within 6 behind a minesweeper gains a +1 bonus when
trying to avoid a mine.
No Special Actions may be used by a minesweeper while it is engaged in
minesweeping, and any ship following the minesweeper loses its +1 bonus
to avoid mines if it does so.

Generic Minesweeper
Speed: 4
Turning: 3
Target: 6+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 3/1
Crew: 4/2

Weapon
AA
Length: 150 ft.

Patrol
Special Traits: Agile, Minesweeper
In Service: 1939

Range
5
Displacement: 750 tons

AD
1

DD

Speed: 20 kts.

Special

Crew: 100

Suicide Attacks

The suicide attacks of Japanese Special Attack Units (called tokubetsu kgeki tai) became known as kamikaze (divine wind) due
to inaccurate translation by the Allies. Japanese kamikaze attacks sunk 81 American ships and damaged another 195. Thousands
of Japanese pilots died doing this.
Suicide attacks may be attempted only by four specific aircraft and one submersible of the Imperial Japanese Navy. Additionally
they are restricted to games set in 1944 and later.
If a battle is not specified as being set in any particular year kamikaze use will follow scenario guidelines for submersibles and
aircraft. The one-way missions of the Imperial Japanese Navys surface vessels (such as Yamatos last engagement) made as Allied
fleets came closer and closer to the Japanese home islands are outside the scope of these rules.

Aircraft listed as kamikaze on the Aircraft roster count as being suicide attackers as soon as the force using them is deployed.
Aircraft performing suicide attacks may only defend in a dogfight and may never initiate one.

New Rules

The four aircraft useable with these rules are the Yokosuka D4Y -Judy dive bombers, the Mitsubishi A6M Zero, the Nakajima
Ki-115 Tsurgi, and the Yokosuka MXY7 Okha. There was one kamikaze submersible used in the war, the Kaiten manned
torpedo.

Zero and Judy flights used for kamikaze attacks must be designated and declared as such before the Initiative Phase of the first
turn of the game. Kamikaze pilots gave up their lives by the thousands; no Command check is required for suicide attacks but
the plane or submersible may not make the attack unless it is declared in the Movement Phase.
Movement
Flights designated as Kamikaze move as normal. The Kaiten submersible moves up to 7 in the turn it was launched but may
make no Special Actions until the Movement Phase in the turn after it was launched.
Attacking
Craft making suicide attacks must move into base contact with their targets. The suicide
attack is resolved before other attacks but after all AA fire, subjecting aircraft to intense
defensive firing. The defending ship gains a +1 bonus to AA Attack Dice when firing at
aircraft making suicide attacks.
The Kaiten resolves its first attack in the End Phase in which it was launched or as normal
for suicide attacks in consecutive turns.
Craft listed as Kamikaze may use their AD and DD in suicide attacks only - the Ki-115, Okha, and Kaiten have no other means
of attacking besides suicide attacks. A Zero or Judy flight making a suicide attack is treated as having a 3 AD, 2 DD, Weak
attack.
If any suicide attack by an aircraft successfully causes damage, roll one dice. On a 4 or more, a fire will be started.
Once a suicide attack is made, the flight is destroyed whether it was successful in damaging the target or not. The Kaiten will
not be automatically destroyed by a suicide attack if it misses its target.

Motor Torpedo Boats


One of the most romantic, dashing and potentially hazardous duties in the navies of the Second World War was to serve in within
the Coastal Forces (abbreviated here to CF). Many navies showed a passing interest in motor torpedo boats during the 1930s,
with designs offered by Britain and Germany being exported to several European countries and further afield. The US developed
a later interest, eventually settling on standard designs from indigenous design houses and from the UK.

Motor Torpedo Boats

When war broke out the utility of small craft to take the fight to the enemy in the narrow seas was quickly realised; Germany
built up considerable numbers of their famous Lurrsen-designed Schnellboote, or S-Boats (although these were often known to
the Allies as E-Boats, or Enemy Boats. After a few false starts, the Royal Navy built hundreds of Motor Torpedo Boats (MTBs)
and Motor Gun Boats (MGBs), with the most prevalent designs coming from Vospers, Camper & Nicholson and Fairmile.
The US standard PT Boats were to become a familiar sight in the Mediterranean and the Pacific, while the Italians built many
fast, light and successful MAS craft. The main fighting units were supported by a myriad of gunboats, defence launches, motor
minesweepers, minelayers and coastal transports.
Coastal Forces actions tended to be fought at night so as to avoid enemy aircraft (to which they were horribly vulnerable), against
enemy convoys. Flotillas or squadrons would lie silently in wait (lying doggo as the British would have it) or creep up quietly in
the darkness before unleashing their torpedoes at the closest possible point, then opening up the throttles to tear through or away
from the enemy. Duels would be fought between the coastal boats and convoy escorts, often consisting of converted trawlers and
destroyer escorts. Coastal boats also fought several battles against enemy fleet units and other heavies. Notable successes (and
failures) include British MTBs attacking the German raider Stier (the raider escaped but two of her destroyer escorts were sunk),
US PT Boats at the battle of Leyte Gulf, and Italian MAS boats operating against British convoys in the Mediterranean, during
which MAS boats hit and crippled HMS Manchester (she was later scuttled).
These boats were heavily armed with rapid firing guns, from light machine guns up to 40mm cannon. Some even carried
automatic 6pdr and 4.5 guns. This array of weaponry could put out devastating weights of firepower which posed a real threat to
other CF craft and to smaller escorts. Their armament was not much of a threat to larger vessels as they were more concerned by
the heavy torpedo armament that was often embarked; torpedo boats packed two, sometimes four heavyweight fish. Later in the
war, more unusual weapons began to be fitted, with German and US boats in particular sporting various rocket-based weaponry.
The Royal Navy did not use these, favouring the development of high explosive shells fired from automatic guns.
CF boats were also not lacking in technical development. Small radar sets were developed for use in boats of the US Navy and
Royal Navy which proved to be extremely useful in visualising and controlling night-time battles. In the early days of the CF use
of radar, it was common for a radar-equipped boat or escort to accompany a force of radar-blind vessels in order to vector them
in for a successful attack, and then to guide them out to safety. German use of radar was limited to a few S-Boats; other navies
did not deploy radar on their small craft until after the war.

CF Vessels in Victory at Sea

Coastal forces vessels are represented in Victory at Sea in a similar manner to


aircraft. A CF counter represents a section of two boats. They manoeuvre like
aircraft, so have no Turn score (unless indicated). A flotilla or squadron will
comprise 2-4 stands of boats. The exceptions are larger coastal vessels such as
armed trawlers (and the German equivalent, the VP Boat) and large landing
craft. These are represented individually, and are identified in the data tables
as having numerical Armour scores rather than the entry Sp. They also have
a Target score of 6.

Coastal Forces craft can only be engaged by a ships Secondary Armament and AA weapons. Larger guns cannot train effectively
on these small targets. Attacking CF vessels follows the same basic principles as firing at other targets, with the following
exceptions.

Armour and Target Scores

These are combined in the following special rule. A hit represents


effective fire hitting within the formation rather than hits on the
vessels themselves. The effect of this fire may be to damage the boats,
force them to break off an engagement, or both. For each hit scored,
roll a dice and consult the table below.
1-3 The stand is driven off. It cannot fire torpedoes this turn and
must make its next move at maximum speed directly away from the
attacker.
4 As above, plus the stand takes 1 point of Damage
5-6 The stand takes 1 point of Damage, but it may still fire
torpedoes (coolness under fire!)
Stands are removed from play once their Damage is reduced to 0. For simplicity, stands do not have thresholds or Crew to worry
about.

Depth Charge Attacks

British Coastal Forces developed a tactic whereby they dropped depth charges close to enemy vessels in the hope the underwater
explosions would damage the ship.

Smoke Screens

All British MTBs and MGBs, US PT Boats, German S Boats and R Boats carried smoke dischargers or smoke floats. These allow
a stand to deploy a smoke screen using the standard smoke rules. Each section can do this only once per game.

Coastal Forces Data Tables

The following table summarises the statistics for costal forces vessels and other ships that fought in the Narrow Seas. All use the
special Armour and Target rules above unless there is a value in the Armour column, in which case they use the normal rules.

Motor Torpedo Boats

To conduct a Depth Charge attack, the stand must be moved into contact with the target vessel. It may then conduct an attack in the
Attack Phase - roll a dice. On a 4 or more the attack is successful. Treat the target as if it has been hit by a 6DD, AP attack.

Torpedoes: AD/DD/X/Y : X = A if AP, otherwise -, Y = R if 1 reload, O if One-Shot


Example: 2/4/A/R = 2 Attack Dice, 4 Damage Dice, AP trait, 1 Reload
Sec X: Secondary Armament, range X. All Secondary Armament is 1 AD, 1 DD, Weak
Roc X: Rocket Armament instead of torpedoes may be carried. Range X, 1 AD, 2 DD, One-Shot
DC: Carried Depth Charges. Range 0. All are One-Shot
Priority Level: The Fleet Allocation Point cost shows how many stands are available for each Patrol point. For example Patrol/2
means one Patrol point will buy two stands.

MTB Table
Type
USA
PT Boat
Elco MGB
LCP/LCVP
LCM

Speed

Turn

Target

Armour

Damage Traits

Torps

AA

Other

FAP cost

8
8
3
3

AA
AA
AA
AA

5+
5+
5+
5+

Sp
Sp
Sp
Sp

3
3
2
2

4/4/A/O

5/1
5/2

Roc 6

Patrol/2
Patrol/3
Patrol/4
Patrol/4

SC-1
SC-497 (fast)
SC-497 (slow)

4
5
3

AA
AA
AA

5+
5+
5+

Sp
Sp
Sp

3
3
3

5/1
5/1
5/1

Sec 8
Roc 6
Roc 6

Patrol/2
Patrol/2
Patrol/2

Motor Torpedo Boats

Type
UK
Vosper 72 MTB
Vosper 61 MTB
Vosper 73 MGB
Vosper 73 MTB
Elco MTB
Fairmile A ML
Fairmile B ML
Fairmile C MGB
Fairmile D MTB
Denny SGB
70 MGB
70 MA/SB
BPB MTB
C & N MTB
Thorneycroft MTB
White 72 MTB
Landing Craft Gun
Armed Trawler
Germany
S-Boat (S1-S25)
S-Boat (S26+)
R1
R17/R25/R41
VP Boat
Italy
MAS boat
MAS 438
MAS 427
MS boat
Japan
PT1
PT10
PT101
T35
Hayabusa
Daihatsu
France
VTB 8
CH.1
CH.5
Soviet Union
D3
G5
MO-4

Speed Turn Target

Armour

Damage Traits

Torps

AA

Other

FAP cost

8
8
8
8
8
5
4
4
8
7
8
7
8
7
8
8
3
3

AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
2
2

5+
5+
5+
5+
5+
5+
5+
5+
5+
5+
5+
5+
5+
5+
5+
5+
5+
4+

Sp
Sp
Sp
Sp
Sp
Sp
Sp
Sp
Sp
Sp
Sp
Sp
Sp
Sp
Sp
Sp
4+
4+

3
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
3
3
3
3
2
2

-------------------

2/4/A/O
2/3/-/O
-4/3/-/O
2/4/A/O
---2/4/A/O
2/4/A/O
--2/3/-/O
4/3/-/O
2/3/-/O
2/3/-/O
---

5/1
5/1
5/1
5/1
5/1
5/1
5/1
5/2
5/1
5/1
5/1
5/1
5/1
5/1
5/1
5/1
5/2
5/1

DC

Sec 4
Sec 4
Sec 6
Sec 4
DC
DC
DC
DC
DC
Sec 10
Sec 6

Patrol/2
Patrol/2
Patrol/3
Patrol/2
Patrol/2
Patrol/3
Patrol/3
Patrol/3
Patrol/2
Patrol/2
Patrol/3
Patrol/3
Patrol/2
Patrol/2
Patrol/2
Patrol/2
Patrol/3
Patrol/3

7
8
4
4
3

AA
AA
AA
AA
2

5+
5+
5+
5+
4+

Sp
Sp
Sp
Sp
4+

3
3
3
3
2

------

2/4/A/O
2/4/A/R
----

5/1
5/1
5/1
5/1
5/1

Roc 4**
DC
DC
Sec 6, DC

Patrol/2
Patrol/1
Patrol/3
Patrol/3
Patrol/3

9
7
6
8

AA
AA
AA
AA

5+
5+
5+
5+

Sp
Sp
Sp
Sp

3
2
2
3

-----

2/3/-/O
2/3/-/O
2/3/-/O
2/4/A/R

5/1
5/1
5/1
5/1

Sec 8
Sec 8
DC

Patrol/2
Patrol/2
Patrol/2
Patrol/1

8
6
8
7
7
3

AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA

5+
5+
5+
5+
5+
5+

Sp
Sp
Sp
Sp
Sp
Sp

2
2
2
3
3
3

-----

2/3/-/O
2/3/-/O
2/3/-/O
2/3/-/O
---

5/1
5/1
5/1
5/1
5/1
5/1

8
4
3

AA
AA
AA

5+
5+
5+

Sp
Sp
Sp

3
3
3

----

2/3/-/O
---

5/1
5/1
5/1

DC
Sec 8
Sec 8

8
8
5

AA
AA
AA

5+
5+
5+

Sp
Sp
Sp

2
3
3

----

2/3/-/O
2/4/A/O
--

4/1
5/1
5/2

Patrol/2
Roc 4, DC ** Patrol/1
Sec 6
Patrol/3

Sec 6

Patrol/2
Patrol/2
Patrol/2
Patrol/2
Patrol/3
Patrol/4
Patrol/2
Patrol/3
Patrol/3

Notes
** S Boats may carry rockets in scenarios set in 1945 only.
** G5 can only carry Depth Charges if torpedoes are removed.

10

Admirals
Throughout the history of naval warfare, individuals given command have distinguished themselves in combat. Every fleet needs
a commanding officer and many have risen above and beyond the call of duty to sail into victory. World War II was no exception,
and battles at sea were driven by men that will go down in history as heroes of their respective nations.
In Victory at Sea, Admirals are defined as officers commanding a group
of vessels whether they held the rank of admiral or not. Players may either
use one of the profiles of the selected historic commanders below or create
their own for campaigns and one-off battles. Only one Admiral per fleet is
allowed, even in campaigns.
Admirals may be purchased for any fleet of five or more Fleet Allocation
Points, and will be assigned to one vessel. They raise the Priority Level of
this flagship by one. A Raid level ship with an Admiral on board therefore
becomes a Battle level ship, for example. All Admirals provide +2 bonus to
all Initiative rolls for their fleet, until the flagships Crew score is reduced
zero or it is destroyed.
The flagships listed for the historic Admirals are guidelines only and players
may place them on different ships if they wish, though they may only serve
in their native fleets.

Three traits from the following list may be given to an Admiral and are chosen before play begins. The effects of the Admiral
traits remain in play until the flagship is destroyed or reduced to zero Crew.

Night Fighter: This Admiral has drilled and fought extensively using specialised night fighting tactics. In night battles any ship
in this Admirals fleet attempting to spot enemy vessels gains a +2 bonus.

Admirals

Admiral Traits

Fearless: There is a rare breed of men that seize the moment and effectively turn overwhelming odds into a fighting chance for
victory. A Fearless Admiral grants a +1 bonus to the Attack Dice of all ships in his fleet if the opposing fleet is larger by 3 or more
Fleet Allocation Points. The Fleet Allocation Point difference is calculated at the beginning of a battle and may not be gained
due to losses in combat.
Torpedo School Graduate: Well-trained in the use of torpedoes, this Admiral can use them with deadly efficiency. Any ship in
a fleet with a Torpedo School graduate will never re-roll successful torpedo hits.
Hunter of the Deep: This Admiral is a seasoned veteran of submarine warfare, venerated by his compatriots and feared by his
enemies. Once a game, the Admiral may declare a combined attack at the start of a turn throughout this turn, all submarines
in his fleet may re-roll any Attack Dice that fail to cause damage.
Tactical Genius: Endowed with superior training, combat experience, and an uncanny ability to guess an opponents next move,
the Tactical Genius bestows a +3 to Initiative instead of the normal +2.
Defensive Tactician: An Admiral that knows when to avoid a battle to win a war can be a blessing to the navy of any nation.
Special missions may be given to skilled commanders as well. All ships in a Defensive Tacticians fleet may use the Evasive! Special
Action, not counting it towards the one Special Action per turn limit, once per battle.

11

Carrier Commander: This Admiral knows the value of the aircraft under his command and realises that they will change the face
of naval warfare. Friendly ships with the Carrier trait may launch or recover four flights per turn rather than the normal two.
Strike Commander: A skilled fleet Admiral that can exploit stealth, surprise, and knowledge of ground defenses may go down in
history as a butcher or a hero. Once a game, the Admiral may declare a combined attack at the start of a turn throughout this
turn, all aircraft in his fleet may re-roll any Attack Dice that fail to cause damage.
Invulnerable: Having trained the men under his command to keep their ships afloat at
all costs, the invulnerable Admiral can fight on when he should by all rights be at the
bottom of the ocean. All ships in this Admirals fleet receive a +1 bonus to all Command
checks for Damage Control and Firefighting.
Master of the High Seas: Born to wind and water, this Admirals orders result in
maneuvering that can leave enemy captains exposed and outmaneuvered. All ships in
the fleet may use Come About or Flank Speed Special Actions, not counting them
toward the one Special Action per turn limit, once per battle.
Commerce Raider: Though viewed as a heartless killer by his targets, the Commerce
Raider is an effective component in a nations war machine. Once a game, the Admiral
may declare a combined attack at the start of a turn throughout this turn, all ships
of 5 points of Damage or less in his fleet may re-roll any Attack Dice that fail to cause
damage.

Admirals

Historic Admirals
Commander Ernest Evans
United States Navy

Commander Evans was a full-blooded Cherokee Indian who


entered service with the US Navy in 1931. He commanded both
the Clemson-class destroyer Alden (earning the Bronze Star while
commanding) and the Fletcher-class Johnston. At the Battle off
Samar (Leyte Gulf ) as a part of the unit Taffy 3, Evans heroically
charged an oncoming Japanese fleet in an attempted diversion so
the valuable carriers in his group could escape. His tiny destroyer
crippled the Japanese cruisers Kumano and Suzuya and then fought
on after his ship took heavy fire, inspiring the other commanders
in Taffy 3. His actions led in part to the successful withdrawal
of the aircraft carriers in his force. Though not an admiral, he
inspired the ships in his group to fight against impossible odds.
Commander Evans paid the ultimate price at Leyte, and his body
was never recovered. He was posthumously awarded the Medal of
Honor and shared in the Presidential Unit Citation awarded to
Taffy 3.
Traits: Fearless, Tactical Genius, Invulnerable
Flagship: Fletcher-class destroyer Johnston

12

Rear Admiral Sir Henry Harwood


Royal Navy

Entering the Royal Navy in 1903, Sir Henry had a long and distinguished career.
The HMS Warwick was his first command. He served as captain of two other
vessels before having a flag command on HMS Ajax. While commanding Force
G, Harwood fought at the Battle of the River Plate. Brilliant tactics executed by
Admiral Harwood and his fellow captains led to the pursuit and eventual scuttling
of the pocket battleship Admiral Graf Spee. Harwood was knighted and appointed
Commander-in-Chief, Mediterranean Station in 1942. His decorations included the
Order of the British Empire and Knight Commander of the Order of the Bath.
Admiral Harwood retired in 1945.
Traits: Tactical Genius, Master of the High Seas, Defensive Tactician
Flagship: Leander class cruiser HMS Ajax

Vice Admiral Otto Ciliax


Kriegsmarine

Otto Ciliax was one of the more capable (and unsung) commanders in the Kriegsmarine who, like many other officers, began his
career in the First World War. He rose through the ranks as a torpedo boat commandant and later was the commanding officer
of both the Admiral Scheer and Scharnhorst. Ciliaxs most notable naval action was Operation Cerberus, in which he was the
commanding officer. Admiral Ciliaxs fleet successfully made the Channel Dash across the English Channel (escaping detection
for twelve hours) to repair and resupply in Germany. Ciliax later became commander in Chief of the Supreme Naval Command
Norway.

Vice Admiral Gunichi Mikawa

Admirals

Traits: Commerce Raider, Master of the High Seas, Defensive Tactician


Flagship: Scharnhorst-class battlecruiser Scharnhorst

Imperial Japanese Navy

Admiral Mikama served on many different vessels of the Imperial Japanese Navy
and was an instructor at the Naval Torpedo School. He later commanded the
cruisers Aoba and Chokai as well as the battlecruiser Kirishima. Mikawa was
considered to be the victor of Savo Island where aboard his flagship (the Chokai)
he led a makeshift fleet in a surprise attack on Allied forces. Several Allied cruisers
were sunk and over a thousand Allied servicemen were killed. Admiral Mikawa
fought with distinction in the battles at Guadalcanal and later served as flag
commander for the 2nd Southern Expeditionary Fleet in the Philippines, the
Southwestern Area Fleet, and 13th Air Fleet before being assigned to shore duties
where he would remain until the end of the war.
Traits: Night Fighter, Torpedo School Graduate, Strike Commander
Flagship: Takao-class cruiser Chokai

13

Vice Admiral Alberto De Zara


Regia Marina

Alberto De Zara was an Italian naval officer that led his squadron to victory by thwarting Operation Harpoon in the Mediterranean.
An allied fleet charged with resupplying Malta was mauled in June 1942 with two ships surviving. De Zara commanded the
Italian squadron from the Light Cruiser Eugenio Di Savoia. His victory is considered to be the only squadron-level victory of the
Italian Navy in World War II.
Traits: Master of the High Seas, Commerce Raider, Tactical Genius
Flagship: Condottieri-class light cruiser Eugenio di Savoia

Rear Admiral Robert Jaujard


Free French Navy

Admiral Jaujard was a distinguished French officer who aboard his flagship, La Galissonnire-class light cruiser Montcalm,
participated in Operation Neptune during the Normandy Invasion. Jaujards ship along with the hundreds of other vessels
involved with the operation were the naval side of Operation Overlord, providing support for the landing forces that stormed
the French shore.
Traits: Defensive Tactician, Fearless, Master of the High Seas
Flagship: La Galissonniere-class cruiser Montcalm

Captain 1st Grade N.I. Vinogradov


Admirals

Soviet Navy

Commander of the Artic Submarine Brigade of the Northern Fleet, Vinogradov was a capable commander. The twenty submarines
under his command were the main striking force of the northern sea routes and were responsible for sinking over twenty
warships and nearly eighty transport vessels. The submarines under Captain Vinogradovs command employed minelaying as
well as traditional submarine weapons in their fight against Axis vessels. Vinogradov survived the war and was promoted to rear
admiral.
Traits: Hunter of the Deep, Commerce Raider, Master of the High Seas
Flagship: Any Russian submersible

14

Advanced Aircraft
Operations
Aircraft in World War II changed naval warfare forever. As the aircraft carrier evolved into an asset that rivaled battleships in
importance, the tactics and deployment of combat aircraft changed significantly. Aircraft became much more than the eyes of a
military force, and dogfights changed from honorable duels into ruthless airborne battles. Massed aircraft attacking enemy fleets
or ground targets cost thousands of personnel their lives. Combat aircraft became an admirals valued asset or his worst fear.
The main rulebook remains the basis of using aircraft in games of Victory at Sea. The rules presented here are intended to add a
new level of realism and combat effectiveness to aircraft.

Dogfighting and Defence

Instead, to reflect the toughness of some aircraft a Defence score has been added to some flights. Any time an aircraft flight takes
a hit from any source, it may use its Defence score, rolling the indicated number or higher on one dice to avoid all damage. This
must be rolled separately for each hit or failed dogfight. Aircraft with no Defence score are destroyed immediately upon taking
a hit.

Ammunition

As fighters fought for supremacy of the skies, millions of rounds of ammunition were expended. To reflect finite supplies of
fighter ammunition, all aircraft carry enough ammunition to last for two turns of dogfighting.
This can be easily recorded by flipping an aircraft counter or rotating a miniatures base after the first turn of ammo is expended.
After ammunition has been expended, a flight may still use its Dogfight score, but if it succeeds in beating its enemy, it will only
survive it will not destroy its enemy.

Advanced Aircraft Operations

To better reflect the capabilities of fighters and bombers, the following changes are used for dogfighting. Only fighters may
initiate a dogfight, while other aircraft types may only defend, using their Dogfight score. The resolution of dogfights remains
the same except for that aircraft Damage scores are no longer used.

AA Fire, Dual-Purpose Secondaries, and Attacking Bombers

AA fire now uses a new method for resolving attacks from ships targeting aircraft. Only AA guns (and Dual-purpose Secondary
Armament, which is explained below) may fire at aircraft. In addition the +1 Attack Dice bonus for AA fire targeting torpedo-and
dive-bombers no longer applies.

Halfway through the war, new aerial tactics were used against naval targets and new weapons were employed to deal with them.
Dual-purpose secondary weapons and proximity fuses became an effective means of air defence. Whether a ships Secondary
Armament will be used against aircraft or ships must be declared by the firing player when it fires during the Attack Phase - it
may not split its Secondary Armament between aircraft and surface vessels, and the range for anti-aircraft attacks made by dualpurpose Secondary Armament is the same as the ships AA guns.
The following ships are equipped with Dual-purpose guns: All British and US cruisers and aircraft carriers, all US battleships,
Fletcher-class destroyers, and the Queen Elizabeth, Renown, and King George V-class ships.

15

Fighter Escorts

In addition to air superiority duties, fighters had another vital purpose - escorting bombers to their targets. To simulate this in
Victory at Sea, any fighter flight may be designated as an Escort at the beginning of its movement. In order to Escort, the flight
must move to within 1 of any type of bomber flight and must be kept within 1 on subsequent turns to maintain its Escorting
status. Fighter counters or miniatures may never overlap or be stacked.
Any time an enemy flight moves to within 2 of the Escorting fighter, the Escort may immediately move to intercept it,
interrupting and ending the opposing aircrafts movement. The Escort must initiate a dogfight in the Attack Phase. Treat the
flight that has been intercepted by the Escort as being locked in a dogfight.

Carrier Operations

Carriers revolutionised warfare but required specific military doctrine and deployment. Aircraft carriers, while being a platform
that extends a fleets striking range greatly, have strengths and weaknesses that are unique to them alone. These rules define the
carriers roles of rearming and resupply as well as simulating the effects of damage on the effectiveness of carrier operations.

Reload and Refuel

Advanced Aircraft Operations

Bombers of all types expend their bomb loads and need resupply before their next mission. Fighters expend their ammunition
and need to be rearmed, while all planes require fuel. The process of rearming and refueling requires a flight spends two full turns
on a carrier (after the turn in which it lands), and replaces all bombs, fighter ammunition, and fuel used in combat.

Outfit for Anti-Ship Operations

A fighter flight may be equipped with bombs to drop on enemy surface ships. This is done either during Reload and Refuel or
before play begins (in which case fighter flights carrying bombs are designated as such before the first turn). Fighters carrying
bombs have their Dogfight scores reduced by -2 and their Speed reduced by 4. These modifiers remain in effect throughout
the mission, until it lands and reloads/refuels on board a carrier. The Attack Dice, Damage Dice, and traits of the bombs or
torpedoes are listed in the entry for each individual aircraft type later in this chapter. Only bombs or torpedoes may be carried,
never both.

Night Operations

No carrier may launch or recover aircraft at night, except for Royal Navy Albacore and Swordfish flights in games set in 1942 or
later, or Hellcat flights off the Independence-class light carriers in games set in 1944 or later..

Carrier Operations in Bad Weather

Launching and recovering aircraft in bad weather was a risky proposition. In games with Bad Weather conditions, a dice must be
rolled for every flight that is launched or recovered. On the roll of a 1, that flight is destroyed.

Fire

Shipboard fires are a carrier captains nightmare. No carrier may launch or recover any planes while fires are burning. In addition,
if three or more fires are burning after attempts to extinguish them in the End Phase fail, an additional 1D6 points of Damage
are inflicted upon the burning carrier. In addition, one flight of planes still onboard (determined randomly) will be destroyed
automatically.

Anti-Submarine Warfare

Some aircraft could detect and attack submarines with aerial depth charges. Aircraft listed as ASW under Type (see page 19) are
considered to be long-range maritime patrol craft. Their Bomb scores are treated as depth charges.
An ASW aircraft can be moved into contact with a submerged enemy submersible and attempt detection in preparation to
attack.
If attempting to detect a submarine that has fired torpedoes this turn, the detection roll is 4+. If the submarine has not fired
torpedoes yet the detection roll is 6+. Submarines that have surfaced will be automatically detected as normal. Attacking aircraft
can make a single attack using the Attack Dice and Damage Dice listed below.

16

Aircraft
Observation
Non-ASW

AD
1
2

DD
3
3

Aerial depth charges are expendable munitions and One Shot. Airplanes from the aircraft rosters list (see page 19) may use their
listed Depth Charge Attack Dice as an ammunition score, with each Attack Dice used being subtracted from the total Depth
Charge Attack Dice listed.
Example: A flight of French Latecoere 298 aircraft detect a German U-boat threatening an allied task force. It dives to attack, using two
of its four attack dice to target the submarine. Having scored a hit and sinking the vessel the flight continues its anot-submarine duties, now
having just two attack dice left to target any new enemy submersibles.
Ships with the Aircraft trait may assign their observation aircraft to ASW duties before the first turn, and will have one depth
charge-equipped plane to use against submersibles. Small aircraft include all US Navy and Royal Navy carrier-borne flights that
are capable of carrying bombs and torpedoes (though not fighters that Outfit for Anti-Ship Operations). Small aircraft may be
designated as having ASW loads only before play begins.

Variant Air Groups

To use the list, track down the columns for each type to see the aircraft available. Refer to the original air group for the carrier
to determine the number of flights carried of each type, and then select a new aircraft of the same type for the year in question.
The quantity of aircraft types as they are listed for each specific carrier must remain the same.
For example, if a carrier is listed as having three fighter flights, three torpedo-bomber flights, and four dive bomber flights in its
fleet list entry, a player may not change the complement to five torpedo-bomber flights and five fighter flights, though the class
of aircraft may be changed (swapping three Seafire flights to three Corsair flights, for instance).
As a general rule, Variant Air Groups should be used in any game set in a specific year when In Service Dates are being used.

Advanced Aircraft Operations

The fleet lists include recommended aircraft types for each carrier, generally using a typical 1942 air group or one deployed in
the year the carrier was commissioned. However, aircraft that made up carrier air groups varied considerably, especially as the war
progressed. The following is a list of common aircraft types in use on board carriers during World War II. This list can be used
to amend carrier air groups in subsequent years and are intended to be used with the In Service dates and chosen year of each
Victory at Sea battle.

Royal Navy Air Groups


Year
1939
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945

Fighter
Skua, Sea Gladiator
Fulmar
Fulmar
Martlet, Fulmar, Seafire, Sea Hurricane
Martlet, Seafire, Sea Hurricane
Corsair, Firefly, Seafire, Hellcat
Corsair, Firefly, Seafire, Hellcat

Torpedo-Bomber
Swordfish
Swordfish
Swordfish, Albacore
Swordfish, Albacore
Avenger, Barracuda
Avenger, Barracuda
Avenger, Barracuda

Dive-Bomber
Skua
Swordfish, Skua
Swordfish, Albacore
Swordfish, Albacore
Avenger, Barracuda
Avenger, Barracuda
Avenger, Barracuda

17

United States Navy Air Groups


Year
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945

Fighter
Wildcat
Wildcat
Wildcat
Wildcat, Hellcat
Wildcat, Hellcat, Corsair
Wildcat, Hellcat, Corsair

Torpedo-Bomber
Devastator, Vindicator
Devastator, Vindicator
Devastator, Vindicator
Avenger
Avenger
Avenger

Dive-Bomber
Dauntless
Dauntless
Dauntless
Dauntless, Helldiver
Dauntless, Helldiver
Helldiver

Imperial Japanese Navy Air Groups

Advanced Aircraft Operations

Year
1939
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945

Fighter
Claude
Zero
Zero
Zero
Zero
Zero
Zero

Torpedo-Bomber
Kate
Kate
Kate
Kate
Kate
Jill
Jill

Dive-Bomber
Val
Val
Val
Val
Val, Paul
Val, Paul, Judy
Val, Paul, Judy

Revised Aircraft

To accommodate these new rules, the following list of aircraft combines the aircraft found in the Victory at Sea main rulebook
with new aircraft types found in Order of Battle. All changes to aircraft are official, replacing previously published material.

Pl/Flights indicates how many flights are available for one Fleet Allocation Point of the indicated Priority Level.

Italicized Bomb or Torpedo scores denote optional loadouts. Full penalties listed for fighters on page 16 will apply to aircraft
with optional loadouts, Attack aircraft craft may switch to optional loadouts with no penalty to their performance.

Italicized In Service dates denote a projected year for deployment.

Defence scores are explained on page 15.

Planes listed as ASW represent a single plane, not an entire flight, and are further explained on page 16.

Planes listed as Kamikaze are explained on page 7.

18

Royal Navy Master Aircraft Roster


In
PL/Flights Service Type
Patrol/4
1938
Fighter
Patrol/2

1938

Patrol/2

Bomb Bomb Bomb


Speed Target Dodge Defence Dogfight AD
DD
Traits
15
4+
4+

+0

Torp. Torp. Torp.


AD
DD Traits

4+

4+

6+

+1

AP

1940

Dive
15
Bomber
Attack 21

5+

3+

5+

+2

AP

Patrol/2

1936

Attack

11

5+

2+

+0

Patrol/2

1942

Attack

17

4+

4+

6+

+1

AP

AP

Skirmish/3 1944

Fighter

26

5+

3+

6+

+4

AP

Patrol/4
Patrol/3

1940
1936

Fighter
Attack

19
10

4+
5+

4+
2+

+2
+0

3
6

2
2

AP

Patrol/3

1937

Fighter

17

6+

2+

+1

Patrol/2

1940

Fighter

21

5+

3+

+3

Patrol/2

1937

Fighter

21

5+

3+

+2

Skirmish/3 1941

Fighter

27

5+

3+

6+

+4

AP

Patrol/3

14

3+

5+

4+

+1

AP

Skirmish/3 1938

Patrol,
ASW
Fighter

25

5+

3+

+4

AP

Patrol/2

Fighter

26

5+

3+

6+

+3

AP

1937

1943

Kriegsmarine Master Aircraft Roster


Aircraft
Focke-Wulf
Fw-190
FW-200
Condor
He 177

In
PL/Flights Service Type
Patrol/2
1941
Fighter

Bomb Bomb Bomb Torp. Torp. Torp.


Speed Target Dodge Defence Dogfight AD
DD
Traits AD
DD Traits
27
5+
3+

+3
1
4
AP

Patrol/3

15

3+

5+

4+

+1

AP

20

3+

5+

4+

+1

12

AP

17

3+

5+

5+

+0

AP

AP

12

4+

4+

6+

+1

SAP

23

5+

3+

+3

AP

23

4+

4+

6+

+2

AP

1941

HE-111 H2

Skirmish/4 1936

Junkers Ju-87

Patrol/2

1938

Messerschmitt Patrol/3
Me-109 G
Messerschmitt Patrol/3
Me-110

1942

Patrol,
ASW
Level
Bomber
Level
Bomber
Dive
Bomber
Fighter

1937

Fighter

Skirmish/2 1936

Advanced Aircraft Operations

Aircraft
Blackburn
Roc
Blackburn Sea
Skua
Bristol
Beaufighter
TFX
Fairey
Albacore
Fairey
Barracuda
Fairey Firefly
V
Fairey Fulmar
Fairey
Swordfish
Gloster
Gladiator
Grumman
F4F Martlet
Hawker
Hurricane I
Hawker
Typhoon
Short
Sunderland V
Supermarine
Seafire LF
MkIII
Vought
Corsair

19

US Navy Master Aircraft Roster


In
PL/Flights Service Type
Skirmish/2 1938
Level
Bomber
Douglas
Patrol/2
1937
Level
Devastator
Bomber
F4-U1A Corsair Patrol/2
1943
Fighter
Grumman F4F Patrol/2
1940
Fighter
Wildcat
Grumman F6F Skirmish/3 1943
Fighter
Hellcat
Grumman
Skirmish/3 1942
Attack
TBM3 Avenger
Skirmish/4 1939
Level
Lockheed
Bomber
Hudson
P39 Aircobra
Patrol/2
1942
Fighter
P40N Warhawk Patrol/2
1941
Fighter
P51D Mustang Patrol/2
1941
Fighter
PBY5 Catalina Patrol/3
1936
Patrol,
ASW
SB2C Helldiver Skirmish/3 1942
Dive
Bomber
SBD5
Skirmish/3 1940
Dive
Dauntless
Bomber
Vought
Patrol/2
1937
Dive
Vindicator
Bomber

Advanced Aircraft Operations

Aircraft
Boeing B-17

Bomb Bomb Bomb Torp. Torp. Torp.


Speed Target Dodge Defence Dogfight AD
DD
Traits AD DD Traits
20
3+
5+
4+
+1
12
4
AP

14

4+

4+

+0

AP

AP

26
21

5+
5+

3+
3+

6+

+3
+3

3
3

4
2

AP

25

6+

2+

6+

+4

AP

18

4+

4+

6+

+1

AP

AP

17

3+

5+

4+

+1

AP

AP

26
24
26
12

5+
5+
6+
3+

3+
3+
2+
5+

5+

+2
+3
+4
+1

3
2
3
1

3
3
4
3

AP
AP
AP
AP

AP

19

4+

4+

6+

+1

SAP

SAP

17

4+

4+

+1

SAP

17

4+

4+

+0

SAP

Imperial Japanese Navy Master Aircraft Roster


Aircraft
Aichi D3A
Val
Aichi E16A
Paul
Kawanishi
H82K Emily
Kawanishi
N1K1-J
George
Ki-115 Tsurgi
Mitsubishi
A5M4
Claude
Mitsubishi
A6M Zero
Mitsubishi
G4M1 Betty
MXY Ohka
Nakajima
B5N2 Kate
Nakajima
B6N Jill
Yokosuka
B4Y1 Jean
Yokosuka
D4Y2 Judy

In
PL/Flights Service Type
Skirmish/3 1939
Attack

Bomb Bomb Bomb Torp. Torp. Torp.


Speed Target Dodge Defence Dogfight AD
DD
Traits AD
DD Traits
16
5+
3+

+1
3
4
SAP

Patrol/2

1943

Attack

15

5+

3+

+1

Patrol/2

1941

19

3+

5+

4+

+1

AP

AP

Patrol/2

1945

Patrol,
ASW
Fighter

24

5+

3+

+5

AP

Patrol/ 2
Patrol/3

1945
1935

Kamikaze
Fighter

21
18

3+
6+

3+
2+

+0
+1

1
3

7
1

SAP

Patrol/2

1940

Fighter

23

6+

2+

+3

19

3+

5+

6+

+0

AP

AP

Skirmish/2 1945
Patrol/2
1935

Level
Bomber
Kamikaze
Attack

43
16

4+
5+

4+
3+

6+

+0
+1

1
4

7
3

SAP
AP

AP

Skirmish/3 1944

Attack

19

5+

3+

+1

AP

Patrol/2

Attack

11

5+

3+

+1

AP

Dive
Bomber

23

5+

3+

+1

SAP

Skirmish/3 1941

1936

Skirmish/3 1944

20

Italian Navy Master Aircraft Roster


Aircraft
Breda Ba
201
Fiat G50
Freccia
Junkers JU
87
Macchi MC
202 Folgore
Reggiane
Re 2001
Falco II
Sparviero
SM.79

In
PL/Flights Service Type
Patrol/2
1943
Attack

Bomb Bomb Bomb Torp. Torp. Torp.


Speed Target Dodge Defence Dogfight AD
DD
Traits AD
DD Traits
14
5+
3+

+1
3
3
AP

Patrol/3

1939

Fighter 19

5+

3+

+2

Patrol/2

1941

4+

5+

6+

+1

SAP

Patrol/3

1941

Dive
12
Bomber
Fighter 24

5+

3+

+2

Patrol/2

1941

Fighter 22

5+

3+

+3

AP

Skirmish/3

1936

Attack

3+

5+

5+

AP

AP

18

French Navy Master Aircraft Roster


In
PL/Flights Service Type
Patrol/3
1939
Fighter

Bomb Bomb Bomb Torp. Torp.


Speed Target Dodge Defence Dogfight AD
DD
Traits AD
DD
22
5+
3+

+2

Torp.
Traits

Patrol/3

1938

11

5+

3+

+1

AP

AP

Patrol/2

1939

Attack,
ASW
Dive
Bomber

16

5+

3+

+1

SAP

Patrol/3
Patrol/2

1938
1937

Fighter
Attack

20
17

5+
4+

3+
4+

+2
+0

Russian Navy Master Aircraft Roster


Aircraft
Ilyshuin Il-4
Ilyshuin Il-10
Polikaporov
I-16
Sukhoi Su-2
Ivanov
Tupolev SB 2
Yak 9

In
PL/Flights Service Type
Skirmish/2 1942
Level
Bomber
Skirmish/3 1943
Attack
Patrol/2
1937
Fighter

Bomb Bomb Bomb Torp. Torp. Torp.


Speed Target Dodge Defence Dogfight AD
DD
Traits AD
DD Traits
3
3
AP
17
3+
5+
6+
0
10
3

22
19

5+
6+

3+
2+

5+

+2
+2

3
3

3
1

AP

Patrol/2

1937

Attack

17

5+

3+

+2

AP

AP

Skirmish/2

1936

17

3+

5+

6+

+0

Patrol/3

1937

Level
Bomber
Fighter

24

4+

4+

+3

Advanced Aircraft Operations

Aircraft
Dewtoine
D520
Latecoere
298
Loire
Nieuport
LN 401
MS 406
Potez 63.11

21

Scenarios
The following pages introduce a range of new scenarios, both historical and otherwise, designed to challenge the tactical abilities
of Victory at Sea players.

June, 1942.

Bait

As the combined fleets of Admiral Yamamoto prepared to attack the Midway Atoll another Japanese fleet was sent to the North
Pacific, a force that was perceived to be little more than a feint. A diversion, meant to draw attention and American naval assets
from Midway. The actual mission of the Northern Area Force was sent to the Aleutian Islands under the command of Vice
Admiral Boshiro Hosogaya to establish an anchor for a Japanese defensive perimeter; the anchor was to be the Aleutian Islands.

It was perceived as bait by the United States Navy, the ships of the Northern Area Force was never engaged by American ships at
the time of the Battle of Midway, more due to weather than anything else. Unknown to the Japanese admiralty the United States
was aware of enemy fleet movements in the North Pacific. Rear Admiral Robert Theobold sent elements from his under-strength
fleet to look for the Japanese fleet on June 5, 1942. He took the Bait. Visual contact was made by U.S. aircraft but the warships
on both sides did not engage each other, The Northern Area Force was lost in the fog.

Scenarios

But what if things had been different


Bait is a scenario for Victory at Sea that features a hypothetical battle between elements of Imperial Japans Northern Area Force
and part of Admiral Theobolds Task Force 8. Events in this scenario diverge from actual history on June 4, 1942. The American
admiral sends his fleet to look for the Japanese ships a day earlier. While steaming south at night the fog lifts and contact is made
with the Northern Force 800 miles from Dutch Harbor. Both sides engage as blasts from shipboard guns light up the night
Fleets: The Japanese force consists of two cruisers (Kitikami-class cruisers Kitikami and Oi), Destroyer Division 24 (the Shiratsuyuclass destroyers Umikaze, Yamakaze, Kawakaze, Suzukaze), and the battleship Fuso. Problems with the unfamiliar radar systems
and heavy fog have cut these ships off from their fleet. The United States player has the Portland-class Cruiser Indianapolis, the
Northampton-class cruiser Louisville, the Brooklyn-class cruisers Honolulu, Nashville, and St. Louis. U.S destroyers are the Mahanclass ship Case (treat as a Fletcher-class) and the Clemson-class ships Sands, Kane, and Humphreys.
Pre-Battle Preparation: The opposing fleets are positioned as shown on the diagram below. The 4x6 area is broken down into
2x2 squares, with both players placing the ships designated on the deployment chart anywhere within their assigned squares.
Scenario Rules: Full Night Battles rules are in effect.
Game Length: The battle lasts until one side is victorious.
Victory and Defeat: Send all enemy ships to the bottom or force surrender. Neither side can claim victory until the opposing
fleet is completely destroyed or concedes.

22

Scenarios

23

Bombardment
During World War II the guns of naval vessels were sometimes called upon to bombard well-defended land targets, often in
conjunction with landing operations. Mines and fortified positions could make this a formidable and deadly undertaking.
Bombardment allows players to use the Minefield, Terrain, and Shore Batteries rules included in this supplement.
The Fleets: The Attacker gets 5 Fleet Allocation Points for his fleet. The Defender also receives 5 FAP with at least 1 point being
spent on Shore Batteries and 1 point on Minefields.
Aircraft: The attacker is restricted to flights aboard his carriers (if any), the defender may purchase land-based aircraft.
Pre-Battle Preparation: The Attacker begins play in the Attacker Deployment Area. The defender chooses an appropriate marker
for his shore batteries. This is placed at the table edge inside the Defender Deployment Area with the entire edge representing the
shoreline with its shallows extending 1 from the table edge. Minefields are placed as per the Minefield rules anywhere outside
of the Attacker Deployment Area. Defending ships are placed within the Defender Deployment Area. Determine first turn
initiative normally.
Game Length: Twelve turns or when victory conditions are met.

Scenarios

Victory and Defeat: The attacker wins when all shore batteries are destroyed. The defender is victorious when 75% of the
attackers ships (round down) are destroyed or the attacker is driven off.

24

Flat Top
As naval warfare changed from one of opposing battleships to one of carrier-based warfare tactics and objectives changed as a new
way of waging war was born. Carrier groups traversed the oceans trying to avoid detection to get close enough to land targets or
enemy fleets to unleash their aircraft. Flat top is a scenario that depicts the detection of a carrier group by an opposing fleet that
is determined to take the enemy carriers out of the war permanently.
Fleets: The attacking player (seeking out the enemy carriers) has 5 Fleet Allocation Points but must spend at least one full point
on aircraft. These could be considered to land-based or carrier based but there are no restrictions on the type or quantity of aircraft
taken. No aircraft carriers may be included in the attacking force. The defending player Gets 5 Fleet Allocation Points but must have
at least two aircraft carriers included in his force, with no additional ground-based aircraft (just the planes from the carriers).
Pre-Battle Preparation: The attacker divides his fleet into 2 groups; one consisting of all of his aircraft, one consisting of all
surface ships. The defender divides his fleet as follows; one group of one half of his carriers aircraft (players choice as to which
planes are aloft though carriers will have their standard compliment of planes), one group for all ships that are not carriers (the
escort group), one group of all of that fleets carriers. The attacker begins with his aircraft in the Attacker Deployment Area. The
defender has none of his force on the table at the beginning of turn one.

Game Length: 12 turns or when victory conditions are met.


Victory and Defeat: The Attacking player wins when two carriers are destroyed. The defender achieves victory if two carriers remain
in play at the end of turn twelve. If neither side meets its victory condition calculate Victory Points to determine the winner.

Scenarios

Scenario Rules: The game takes place during the daytime in perfect weather. The attacking planes may move normally in the first
turn. At the beginning of turn two the attacker places his ships in the Attacker Deployment Area. At the beginning of turn two
(before Initiative) the defender places his group of aircraft in the Defender Deployment Area, but only those that were designated
as being aloft. At the beginning of each successive turn the defender rolls a die, on a 5+ he places his escort group in the Defender
Deployment Area. The die roll is modified by +2 for each turn after the third. The turn after the escorts are deployed the defending
carriers are placed in the Defender Deployment Area and only then may the remainder of their aircraft be launched.

25

For the Motherland!


In the later years of WWII portions of the navy of the Soviet Union were rendered useless as they sat in port, not able to push
through the axis navies that controlled the seas in northwestern Russia. Wave after wave of air Luftwaffe attacks pounded Leningrad.
Joseph Stalin did not commit his navy to what would have been a costly battle to break out into the Gulf of Finland.
What if Stalin HAD committed his ships to battle?
For the Motherland! is a scenario that simulates what could have happened if Stalin had ordered his ships that were trapped in the
Gulf of Finland to break through the Axis line. The Russian leader comes to the conclusion that it would be better for his warships
to be confined in a neutral port so that they may survive to protect the Motherland after the fascist invaders are defeated and driven
from Mother Russia. The Germans learn of Stalins plans and have a task force waiting to intercept the Soviet vessels.
The Fleets: The Soviet fleet consists of the Sovietski-Soyuz-class battleship Sovietski Ukrania, the Sevestapol (Gangut-class
battleship), the cruiser Maxim Gorky (Maxim Gorky-class), the Novik-class destroyers Lenin, Desna, Zinoviev, and Korfu. The
aircraft in the land-based Soviet air group are 8 flights of Yak-9 fighters, 8 flights of Su-2 Ivanov attack planes with full bomb
loads, and 3 flights of Il 10 attack planes.

Scenarios

The Kriegsmarine fleet is comprised of the battleship Tirpitz (Bismarck-class), the heavy cruisers Admiral Hipper and Prinz Eugen
(Admiral Hipper-class), the pocket battleship Admiral Scheer (Deutschland-class), the light cruiser Emden (Emden-class), the Kclass light cruisers Koln and Nurnberg, the destroyers Z 24, Z25, Z31, Z32 (Zerstorer 1936-class) and the Type 93 torpedo boats
T 22, T 23, T 27, and T 28. The German air patrol consists of 4 flights of Me-109s and 6 flights of Ju-87 dive bombers.
Pre-Battle Preparation: Deploy both forces as desired inside their deployment zones. The German aircraft are not placed on the
board in the initial set up.
Scenario Rules: To determine when the German air patrol enters the battle roll one die at the beginning of turn 3. The aircraft
deploy 1 from the long table edge on the German side of the table on a roll of 6. Each following turn add 2 to the die roll until
the aircraft become available. The goal of the Soviet navy is to break through the German line.
Victory and Defeat: The
scenario has duration of 12
turns or until all Soviet ships
are destroyed or escape. The
Kriegsmarine player gains full
victory points for Soviet ships
that are destroyed, crippled,
or reduced to a skeleton crew.
Each Soviet flight of aircraft
destroyed earns the German
player 1 victory point. The
Soviet player only receives onehalf the normal victory points
but will receive victory points
equal to one-half the value of
each of his ships (not aircraft)
that are able to move off the
Kriegsmarine end of the table.
Full victory points value will be
awarded to Sovietski Ukrania
and Sevestapol if they are able
to escape via the opposing table
edge.

26

Hunting the Beast


Operations with the Tirpitz in the North Atlantic, November 1941

The campaign rules in Victory at Sea are necessarily simplified and allow several opposing fleets to engage in long term warfare.
The aim of this campaign is to present a set of rules that give more detail in a specific operation.
The setting for this campaign is the projected breakout of the German battleship Tirpitz and heavy cruiser Scheer into the North
Atlantic in November 1941, although they could be easily adapted to other periods. At this stage of the war the United States
was still officially neutral, although US battleships were actively patrolling in the Denmark Straits, and several American ships
had already been sunk by German U-boats, most notably the destroyer Reuben James.
The problem with most naval campaigns of this sort is reconciling hidden movement with the need to perform detection attempts.
Without an umpire to help out this is problematical when there are only two players involved. The system suggested below works
because some particular circumstances are in play. First, the weather in the North Atlantic in November is particularly bad. This
could, easily mean that ships of opposing sides could be in close proximity yet not see each other. Radar was also in its infancy
and could not be counted upon to make a detection. Both sides made extensive use of ELINT (electronic intelligence), which
was quite effective at revealing the location (or at least the presence) of searching aircraft, or of communications between ships
or with land based operation centres. This is the rationale behind the rules requiring disclosure of searching units.

Background

November 1941 Tensions between the USA and Germany are running high. In Germany, Hitler publicly warns: Let there be no
mistake - whoever believes that he can help Britain must realize one thing above all: Every ship, with or without convoy, that comes
within range of our torpedo tubes, will be torpedoed. Privately, the Fuehrer says to Admiral Raeder, I will never call a submarine
commander to account if he torpedoes an American ship by mistake. After the Eastern campaign I reserve the right to take severe
action against the USA... In September 1941 Roosevelt issues orders to shoot on sight any ship interfering with American shipping.

Hunting the Beast

Whilst these conditions are fairly specific to this campaign similar circumstances exist in other periods that would allow a similar
method to be used (an easy example would be the Bismarck chase, but obvious parallels exist in modern naval campaigns where
disclosure of searching units would imply the use of active sensors)

Having recovered from the Bismarck debacle earlier in the year, the German high command decided that, once more, its
battleships should strike in the North Atlantic. This time the Tirpitz was to sortie, accompanied initially by the Admiral Scheer
(which may be detached to sortie independently). At least two Allied convoys are believed to be at sea, and information on
their progress should be available via shadowing U-boats. The British patrols in the Denmark Straits are being supplemented
by so-called neutrality patrols conducted by the US Navy These are believed to be anything but neutral - the US Navy has been
escorting merchant ships, including those of any nationality which may join, between Iceland and America. The US Navy has
also developed a base at Hvalfjord to support these tasks. The British and American naval fleets can be split into smaller task
forces, improving their chances of finding the German raiders but weakening their ability to destroy the raiders once they have
been found.
Note this scenario is based on actual German plans for November 1941. In the event the operation was cancelled due to
mechanical failure, but the possibility of a clash between German and US battleships in the wastes of the North Atlantic is too
good an opportunity to pass up!

Scales
Each campaign Turn is 6 hours long. Each hex on the campaign map is 100 miles across

27

Axis Forces

Start at Trondheim (G35)


Tirpitz, Admiral Scheer, Uckermark

Allied Naval Forces and Convoys


US Task Group 1.3 (RAdm Giffen) Starts at Reykjavik (F22)
Idaho (BB) New Mexico-class
Mississippi (BB) New Mexico-class
Tuscaloosa (CA) New Orleans-class
Wichita (CA) Portland-class
Gwin (DD) Fletcher-class
Meredith (DD) Fletcher-class
Monssen (DD) Fletcher-class

RN Home Fleet (Admiral Tovey) Starts at Scapa Flow (K30)


King George V (BB) King George V-class
Victorious (CV) Illustrious-class
Norfolk (CA) Norfolk-class
Berwick (CA) Kent-class
Nigeria (CL) Fiji-class
Sheffield (CL) Southampton-class
Cossack (DD) Tribal-class
Zulu (DD) Tribal-class
Sikh (DD) Tribal-class
Piorun (DD) Tribal-class

Hunting the Beast

Allied Convoys
Convoy HX 158 Starts at hex V2
40 transports
Escort Group EG 4.14.4 (RCN)
Ottawa (DD) JKN-class
Dauphin (DE) Flower-class
Arvida (DE) Flower-class
Algoma (DE) Flower-class
Support Group (RN)
Burnham (DD) JKN-class
Chambley (DE) Flower-class
Matapedia (DD) JKN-class
Napanee (DE) Flower-class

Convoy SC53 Starts at hex R8


35 transports
Escort Group TU 4.1.8 (USN)
Greer (DD) Fletcher-class
Ludlow (DD) Clemson-class
McCormick (DD) Clemson-class
Buck (DD) Clemson-class
Woolsey (DD) Clemson-class
Wilkes (DD) Clemson-class

Objectives

The German player must attempt to sink as many transports as possible.


The allied player must try to get the convoys to Liverpool (O30)

Turn sequence
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.

Determine formation.
Roll for weather
Move convoys
Roll for convoy location if successful declare locations to German player
Initiate refuelling
Roll for at sea refuelling location - if successful reveal location to Allied player
Check shadowing vessels
a. Check for evasion or engagement of shadowing vessels
b. Shadowed and shadowing vessels move together
c. Shadowing player informed of location of shadowed vessels
Move other vessels
Announce and resolve searches
Announce vessels in enemys Land Based Air (LBA) areas
Execute air strikes if in range or if in enemy LBA area, and if weather/daylight permits
Surface actions roll for encounter, surprise etc.
Check vessel endurance.

28

Formations

At the start of each turn players must decide what formation their ships are cruising in. If they are encountered by the enemy then
this formation determines their starting positions (unless they have achieved surprise, in which case they may set up as desired).

Weather

Each turn the Allied player rolls to determine the weather conditions. On a roll of 1-4 the weather is Good, otherwise the weather
is Bad. If on the previous turn the weather was Bad add 1 to the die roll.

Movement and Endurance

The table below gives movement rates per turn in hexes depending on the speed of the fastest ship in the group. Convoys are
assumed to have a speed of 8 knots (VAS speed = 2).
Ship Speed
VaS Speed
Movement
Fuel Points Used

8 or less
1
1 hex on odd turns
1

9-17
2-3
1 hex per turn
2

18-27
4-5
1 hex on odd turns, 2 hexes on even turns
3

28+
6+
2 hexes per turn
4

Detection
Convoys
The convoys are being observed by U boats and Condor aircraft. Every turn roll a d6 for each convoy. The allied player must
reveal the location of the convoy on a score of 4+. If the weather is bad subtract 1 from the die roll.

Hunting the Beast

All ships (except the convoy and the German auxiliary Uckermark, which ignore these Endurance rules) have a fuel capacity of 60
units. Each turn that a ship moves it uses the number of fuel points listed above. When a ship expends all of its fuel units it may
only move at a maximum speed of 10 knots (but expends no fuel) it may not conduct searches and it must head for the nearest
friendly port to refuel. German ships may refuel from the Uckermark. Refuelling at a base takes 24 hours (4 turns). Refuelling
at sea takes 1 turn to complete, during which the auxiliary and the fuelled ship(s) may not move. There is a chance that ULTRA
intercepts may reveal the location of the refuelling. Roll a d6 on the turn that refuelling takes place, and each turn thereafter until
a successful roll is made. On a roll of 1-2 the location of the refuelling point is revealed (note: the allied player may learn of this
many hours after the event!)

Warship Searches
Each player now declares whether they are searching. Surface ships can search the hex they are in. Ships with operable observation
aircraft can search as many adjacent hexes as they have observation aircraft. Carrier aircraft can search 6 additional hexes per flight
committed to the search and can search up to two hexes away. Players must declare which hexes they are searching in (but need
not declare what is searching). Thus searching reveals some information on the likely locations of enemy forces. The ability to
use aircraft depends on the time of day and weather:
Type
Daylight
Twilight
Night, Bad Weather

Carrier Aircraft
Yes (out to 2 hexes)
Yes (out to 1 hex)
No

Seaplane
Yes (out to 1 hex)
No
No

Finally, roll a single d6 for each observation aircraft used for searching. On a roll of a 1, the aircraft has been lost (either due to a
crash, mechanical failure or simply disappearing) and is unavailable for the remainder of the operation.
Search Results
If a search is declared in a hex occupied by an enemy surface force roll a d6. The force is located on a roll of 3+ in daylight, 4+
in twilight or 5+ at night or in bad weather. Convoys are always detected, regardless of weather and daylight. The roll is made by
the player who owns the surface force (this should be a hidden roll and should be made whether or not there are any ships there).
If a successful roll is made those ships present are declared, as is the scouting unit that conducted the search.

29

Land Based Air Searches and Attacks

Both sides are assumed to have regular air patrols in sea areas along their coast. If enemy shipping appears in these hexes they
are automatically detected (whether during the day or night, or in bad weather) and their presence is immediately declared. If
the ships are detected during either daylight or twilight and the weather is good they may be attacked by land based aircraft.
This is the only condition in which land based air strikes take part in the game. Allied air attacks take place anywhere within the
perimeter of hexes marked B, I or U on the map (flying from Britain, Iceland or the USA respectively). Luftwaffe attacks
take place anywhere within the perimeter marked G. Both Allied and German aircraft can attack in hexes marked BG.
To determine the number of flights in land based air strikes roll a d6:
Die Roll
1
2
3
4
5
6*

Allied (B Hexes)
Beaufighter x 3
Beaufighter x 2
Swordfish x 2
Swordfish x 3
Albacore x 3
Albacore x 3

Allied (I Hexes)
Beaufighter x 2
Beaufighter x 2
Hudson x 2
Hudson x 3
Hudson x 3
Hudson x 3

Allied (U Hexes)
B17 x 3
B17 x 3
Hudson x 3
Hudson x 3
B17 x 3
Hudson x 4

German
He111x2, Ju87 x 2
Ju87 x 3
Ju87 x 3
Ju88 x 3
He111 x 3
He111 x 3

Carrier Air Strikes

Hunting the Beast

If a player has a carrier in range of an enemy ship (within 2 hexes) they may launch an air strike. This is resolved immediately.
Note that the Victorious has enough ordnance to allow each Swordfish flight to make 2 torpedo attacks, and all aircraft to make
4 bombing attacks.

Surface Actions

If a surface force detects another in the same hex the two forces may fight a surface action (unless both opt to withdraw). Run
through the following procedure to determine whether an action ensues, and whether one side achieves surprise over the other.
Has one side achieved Surprise?
Each player rolls a d6, adding 2 if they have active radar, +2 if they have radar, and+2 if they have observation or carrier borne
aircraft in the hex. If one sides score exceeds the enemy score by 6 or more then they have achieved surprise.
If one side has achieved surprise they have the option of withdrawing (hiding in the gloom and avoiding detection by the enemy)
or shadowing (remaining in contact to report the enemys position). If they take this option they remain in the hex, but they stay
far enough away to stay out of contact (it is assumed that they make optimum use of poor visibility to remain undetected whilst
keeping their opponents under observation). If they achieve surprise but decide not to withdraw or shadow they may attack the
enemy. They set up in any desired formation at the extreme limit of visibility (or greater if using radar) - the opposition must be
in fleet formation - and the surprising side gets one free round of gunnery before the opposition can return fire.

Desire for Action?


Determine if either side wants an action. If neither does, both forces remain in the same hex but no combat occurs. If both sides
wish to engage, set up in their respective formations at the limit of visibility at the longest maximum range of any ship in either
force, or extreme radar range (whichever is longer). If the action is in bad weather or at night set up at the maximum spotting and
engagement distances as in the rules (30 in bad weather, 20 at night). If one side wishes to disengage it may do so automatically
if its speed exceeds that of the fastest enemy vessel. It may begin shadowing if desired.
Fighting the Action
The surface action is played out using whatever scenario is decided upon. Ships may be declared as disengaged if they remain out
of contact with the enemy for more thanthree turns.

30

Avoided Contact
If a force avoids contact because it managed to disengage (as described on the previous page) it must vacate the hex in the next
turn. However that force may not do so across any hex sides through which enemy warships intend to exit. The enemy player
announces which hex sides are deemed closed, it is not possible to split a force so that all hex sides are closed, at least one hex
side must remain open.

Shadowing

Shadowing vessels move with the vessels they are shadowing and report their location. Shadowed vessels and their shadowers are
moved before unshadowed ships so that the latter may take advantage of the information received However, before movement
a shadowed vessel may attempt to shake off their shadower. Repeat the process for determining if the groups are aware of each
other, but apply a +2 modifier to the search die roll. If the search result roll is failed the shadowed vessels are lost; the shadowing
vessel is moved as normal; if the shadower remains in contact roll again for surprise; if the shadowing vessel is surprised the
shadowed vessels can either slip away as above, or can engage their shadower.
Example: Tirpitz and Admiral Scheer enter a hex containing the British heavy cruiser Norfolk. It is night and foggy (bad weather), but
the British cruiser has radar. Each player rolls a d6 to determine surprise, the British adding 2 to their score as they have radar. Both
sides roll a 3, so no surprise is achieved. The Germans want to engage the cruiser, but it is faster than both the Tirpitz and the Admiral
Scheer, so no action occurs.
In subsequent turns the British cruiser shadows the Germans, whilst King George V and Victorious close the distance. However, in a
subsequent turn, Tirpitz attempts to shake off her shadower. Again it is night. The detection roll is 2; even with the +2 modifier for
shadowing the final score is only 4 not enough to retain detection, so Tirpitz steels away from her shadower.

Every turn that a convoy location is declared roll a d10. On a score of 10 a ship has been torpedoed and sunk. If there are enemy
heavy units (cruisers or larger) in the same hex roll a d6 - on a 5+ the ship torpedoed is a warship. Choose which heavy unit is hit
randomly and resolve the attack normally. Assume that the heavy unit has been attacked by a Type VII U-boat with its forward
torpedoes, attacking the targets beam. However, if a 1 is rolled, a submarine has been attacked and sunk. Subtract 1 from the
observation roll for that convoy the following turn, and do not make a d10 roll. Convoy detection and the d10 roll then return
to normal on subsequent turns.

Ending the game

Hunting the Beast

U-Boat attacks

The game ends when any of the following occur:

All German ships are sunk or return to Trondheim (G35) or Brest (S29).

All transport ships in both convoys are sunk.

The convoys reach Liverpool (O30) (although the Allied player may opt to continue the game in order to catch the
Germans on their way back to port).

Victory Conditions

Real warfare often does not have the benefit of niceties such as victory conditions (it leaves little for the historians to argue about
later!), so there are none for this campaign. Obviously, the Germans will lose if Tirpitz is sunk, the Allies if either convoy suffers
heavy casualties. However, if the results fall between these extremes the players are advised to retire to the bar and to continue
the propaganda war there!

Uckermark and Allied Transports

For the Uckermark, use a Victory-class cargo ship. For Allied transports, use Liberty-class ships.

31

Hunting the Beast

Turn Record
Date
1st November
2nd November
3rd November
4th November
5th November
6th November
7th November
8th November
9th November
10th November
11th November
12th November
13th November
14th November
15th November
16th November
17th November
18th November
19th November
20th November

00:00-06:00 (Night)

06:00-12:00 (Twilight)

12:00 18:00

18:00 24:00 (Night)

32

Hunting the Beast Campaign Map

Hunting the Beast

33

Expanded Fleet Lists


The following chapters detail many new ships for use in Victory at Sea. All are considered to be official and with the expanded
fleet lists players will be able to recreate many historical battles. Also included are lists of errata for ships presented in the Victory
at Sea main rulebook. Again, threes changes should be considered official.

Mixing Ships from Different Fleets

When building fleets, players must choose one fleet list to choose their ships from. Adding ships from other fleet lists is not
permissable unless outlined in a specific historical scenario. Having the Sharnhorst fight in a game alongside Hood or having
Pensacola in the same squadron as Chokai, for example, simply will not do. Historically, Allied or Axis nations did fight alongside
one another but mixing of ships, even from friendly nations, will be restricted to specific historical scenarios and not allowed
for build-your-own fleets.

In Service Dates

Many players already adhere to In Service Dates in their games, but with the addition of Kamikaze units, Z-Plan ships, and Air
Group Variants, the year in which a battle takes place becomes very important. In Service Dates must be observed in each battle,
and players should agree in what year of the war each battle or campaign will take place, before beginning fleet selection.

Expanded Fleet Lists

Splitting Fleet Allocation Points

Thousands of ships sailed the worlds oceans in World War II. The combination of ships deployed together in a nations fleets
were varied and many. From a squadron of escorts in the North Atlantic to the deadly carrier force that attacked Pearl Harbour,
Victory at Sea uses Priority Levels and Fleet Allocation Points to simulate the composition of those forces. With the addition of
new vessels to the game, players will now have greater flexibility in building their fleets.
Players wishing to break down Fleet Allocation Points beyond the values and ship quantities in the Fleet Allocation table may do
so. The following guidelines must be observed when splitting Fleet Allocation Points to maintain the balance of the game. This
will allow players to use a single Fleet Allocation Point to buy ships of different levels rather than of one Priority Level only.
A Fleet Allocation Point may be split to buy two ships of the next lowest Priority level just as stated in the main rules. However,
one of those picks at the next lowest level (one-half of a Fleet Allocation Point) may be used to buy two ships of the lower level
after that. A point may only be split downwards two priority levels. Only one-half of the point may be split, so using one Battle
point to buy four Skirmish level ships is not allowed.
For example;
One Battle Fleet Allocation Point = one Raid-level ship and two Skirmish-level ships
Or
One Raid Fleet Allocation Point = one Skirmish-level ship and two Patrol-level ships
To summarise, a Fleet Allocation Point can be split in half, then split again. This system may be used on War, Battle, and Raidlevel points - the split on Skirmish and Patrol points is limited to that shown on the standard Fleet Allocation table. The number
of aircraft flights in a wing will remain the same, as will number of boats in an MTB group.

34

The Royal Navy


The Royal Navy was one of the key developers of naval radar in World War II, transferring many advances and technologies to
the US where they were developed and then fed back into Royal Navy designs. Practically every Royal Navy warship towards the
end of the war was fitted with some form of radar.
The entries here represent the state of ships as they were either in 1942 or at the time of their sinking if this took place in 1941
or earlier. For scenarios set in 1943 or later it can be assumed that all ships except aircraft carriers carry radar, including ships that
were historically sunk by that time but which have been resurrected for what if games or tournaments.

Errata

The following official changes should be made to ships in the Victory at Sea main rulebook.
Queen Elizabeth-class battleship: Target score should be 5+, add the Radar trait

Illustrious-class carrier: Priority Level should be Raid not Skirmish


J/K/N-class destroyer: Secondary Armament AD should be 1, add the Radar trait
Hood-class battlecruiser: Add the Radar trait, Priority Level should be Battle not War

Renown-class battlecruiser: Add the Radar trait


Edinburgh-class cruiser: Priority Level should be Skirmish not Raid
Fiji-class cruiser: Priority Level should be Skirmish not Raid

The Royal Navy

Nelson-class battleship: Priority Level should be Battle not War, Armour score should be 6+ not 5+, add the Radar trait

Gloucester-class cruiser: Add the Radar trait, Priority Level should be Skirmish not Raid
Leander-class cruiser: Add the Radar trait
Tribal-class destroyer: Add the Radar trait

The Royal Navy Expanded Fleet List

The following forms the expanded fleet list for the Royal Navy.
Priority Level: Patrol
Activity-class aircraft carrier
Coventry-class cruiser
Hunt-class destroyer escort
Merchant aircraft carrier
Tribal-class destroyer

Archer-class escort carrier


Curacoa-class cruiser
J, K and N-class destroyer
S-class submersible
Vindex-class aircraft carrier

Audacity-class aircraft carrier


Delhi-class AA cruiser
Loch-class frigate
U class submersible

35

The Royal Navy

Priority Level: Skirmish


Ameer-class aircraft carrier
Attacker-class aircraft carrier
C class cruiser
Dido-class cruiser (1st, 2nd, and 3rd group)
Emerald-class cruiser
Fiji/Ceylon (mod) class cruiser
Hermes-class aircraft carrier
London-class cruiser
Roberts-class monitor
Tiger-class cruiser

Arethusa-class cruiser
Avenger-class aircraft carrier
Campania-class aircraft carrier
Edinburgh-class cruiser
Erebus-class monitor
Gloucester-class cruiser
Kent-class cruiser (excluding HMS Kent)
Perth-class cruiser
Swiftsure-class cruiser
York-class cruiser

Argus-class aircraft carrier


Bellona-class cruiser
Danae-class cruiser
Effingham-class cruiser
Fiji-class cruiser
Hawkins-class cruiser
Leander-class cruiser
Pretoria castle-class aircraft carrier
T-class submersible

Priority Level: Raid


Ark Royal-class aircraft carrier
Eagle-class aircraft carrier
Illustrious-class aircraft carrier
Southampton-class cruiser
Unicorn-class aircraft carrier

Colossus-class aircraft carrier


Furious-class aircraft carrier
Indomitable-class aircraft carrier
Surrey-class cruiser
Yorkshire-class cruiser

Courageous-class aircraft carrier


HMS Kent (not the Kent-class)
Norfolk-class cruiser
Swiftsure-class cruiser

Priority Level: Battle


Audacious-class fleet aircraft carrier
Hood-class battlecruiser (refit)
Queen Elizabeth-class battleship
Renown-class battlecruiser (refit)
HMS Warspite battleship

G3 class battlecruiser
Implacable-class aircraft carrier
Queen Elizabeth/Barham-class battleship
Resolution-class battleship

Hood-class battlecruiser
Nelson-class battleship
Renown-class battlecruiser
Vanguard-class battlecruiser

Priority Level: War


King George V-class battleship
N3 class Battleship

Lion-class battleship

Malta-class aircraft carrier

Special Rules

The additional special rule is applied to fleets of the Royal Navy.

Hedgehog/Double Squid: As the war continued the continual threat of U-boats led to the development of new weapons being
deployed. The Hedgehog and Double Squid were both highly effective and use the same rules as depth charges, but are fired into
a ships forward firing arc only.

Activity-class Escort Carrier

Patrol

Ships of this class: Activity

Whereas Audacity was essentially nothing more than a transport with a flat deck, Activity was
in many ways the prototype for the later CVE carriers, with a hangar and lift added as well as
a flight deck. Aircraft capacity was as high as 18 depending on type. She survived the war and
reverted to mercantile status in 1946.
Speed: 4
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 15/5
Crew: 28/9

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 512 ft.

Special Traits: Carrier, Radar


In Service: 1942
Aircraft: 2 flight of Fairey Swordfish, 1 flight of Martlets
Range
14
5

AD
1
2

DD
1

Displacement: 14,250 tons

Speed: 18 kts.

Special
Slow-Loading, Weak

Crew: 700

36

Ameer-class Escort Carrier

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Ameer, Emperor, Khedive, Nabob, Queen, Ranee, Ruler, Smiter, Thane

These ships were an improvement of the Attacker-class, and they proved to be tough little
ships. Nabob was torpedoed by U-354, a hit which blew a 150 foot hole in the side of the ship.
Despite this, she sailed over 1,000 miles to safety under her own power.
Speed: 4
Turning: 2
Target: 6+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 16/5
Crew: 26/8

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 496 ft.

Special Traits: Carrier, Radar


In Service: 1943
Aircraft: 3 flights of Fairey Swordfish or 4 flights of Grumman Avengers, 1 flight of Martlets
Range
12
5

AD
1
7

DD
1

Displacement: 15,646 tons

Special
Slow-Loading, Weak

Speed: 18 kts.

Crew: 646

Archer-class Escort Carrier

Patrol

Ships of this class: Archer

Archer was yet another mercantile conversion. She was plagued with mechanical problems
and was taken into reserve and used only as an accommodation vessel in Scottish waters.
Armour: 2+
Damage: 13/4
Crew: 23/7

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 492 ft.

Special Traits: Carrier, Radar


In Service: 1942
Aircraft: 2 flights of Swordfish, 1 flight of Martlets
Range
12
5

AD
1
2

DD
1

Displacement: 12,860 tons

Speed: 16.5 kts.

The Royal Navy

Speed: 3
Turning: 2
Target: 6+

Special
Weak

Crew: 555

Arethusa-class Cruiser

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Arethusa, Aurora, Galatea, Penelope


Based upon the Perth-class, the Arethusa-class was designed to be the smallest possible
useful cruiser. Design flaws meant they were vulnerable to torpedo hits in the machinery
spaces but otherwise they were a successful class.

Speed: 7
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 8/2
Crew: 20/6

Weapon
A Turret (2 x 6 in)
B Turret (2 x 6 in)
X Turret (2 x 6 in)
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Length: 506 ft.

Special Traits: Agile, Aircraft 1, Radar


In Service: 1935

Range
26
26
26
14
5
10
10
Displacement: 7,400 tons

AD
1
1
1
2
3
2
2

DD
1
1
1
1

4
4
Speed: 32.7 kts.

Special
Weak
Weak
Weak
Weak

AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot
Crew: 500

37

Argus-class Fleet Carrier

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Argus

Converted from the Italian liner Conte Rosso in 1917, she sported a famous zebra stripe
camouflage scheme in the First World War. She went into reserve, but was recalled to front
line service as British carrier as losses mounted during the first full year of World War II.
Speed: 4
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 16/5
Crew: 17/5

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 576 ft.

Special Traits: Carrier


In Service: 1918 (1942 as shown)
Aircraft: 2 flight of Fairey Swordfish, 1 flight of Fairey Fulmars
Range
14
5

AD
1
2

DD
1

Displacement: 15,750 tons

Special
Slow-Loading, Weak

Speed: 21 kts.

Crew: 401

Attacker-class Escort Carrier

Skirmish

The Royal Navy

Ships of this class: Attacker, Chaser, Fencer, Hunter, Pursuer, Stalker, Tracker
These were US-built CVEs, supplied under the Lend Lease agreement. Their entry into
service was delayed as a result of the explosion that sank HMS Dasher their fuel systems
were redesigned and refitted along British lines for improved fuel handling safety. These
carriers served in three major roles: trade protection carrier (ASW-equipped ships), assault
carrier (strike/CAP for invasion support), and transport.

Speed: 4
Turning: 2
Target: 6+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 15/5
Crew: 26/8

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 496 ft.

Special Traits: Carrier, Radar


In Service: 1942
Aircraft: 3 flights of Fairey Swordfish or Avengers, 1 flight of Martlets
Range
14
5

AD
1
2

DD
1

Displacement: 14,630 tons

Speed: 18.5 kts.

Special
Slow-Loading, Weak

Crew: 646

Audacious-class Fleet Aircraft Carrier

Battle

Ships of this class: Ark Royal, Audacious, Eagle

The Audacious-class (more correctly referred to as the Eagle-class, but using the alternate
term to avoid confusion with the earlier carrier of the same name) were the last armoured
deck carriers designed for the Royal Navy. The end of the war saw Audacious being cancelled
while Ark Royal and Eagle formed the core of the post war Royal Navy carrier fleet.
Speed: 6
Turning: 1
Target: 4+

Armour: 3+
Special Traits: Armoured Deck, Carrier, Radar
Damage: 44/14 In Service: 1947
Crew: 110/36 Aircraft: 4 flights of Fairey Barracuda, 4 Flights of Grumman Avenger, 6 flights of
Supermarine Seafire Mk47

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 804 ft.

Range
14
8

AD
4
12

DD
1

Displacement: 49,950tons

Speed: 32 kts.

Special
Slow-Loading, Weak

Crew: 2,740

38

Audacity-class Escort Carrier

Patrol

Ships of this class: Audacity

Audacity was the prototype escort carrier. Formerly (and ironically) the ex-German transport Hannover, she was fitted with a
flight deck on which her aircraft sat (there were no hangars of lifts). She was sunk on December 21st 1942 by three torpedoes
fired from U-751.
Speed: 3
Turning: 2
Target: 6+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 11/3
Crew: 12/4

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 467 ft.

Special Traits: Carrier


In Service: 1941
Aircraft: 1 flight of Grumman Martlets
Range
14
5

AD
1
2

DD
1

Displacement: 11,000 tons

Special
Slow-Loading, Weak

Speed: 15 kts.

Crew: 300

Avenger-class Escort Carrier

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Avenger, Biter, Dasher

Speed: 3
Turning: 2
Target: 6+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 16/5
Crew: 23/7

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 492 ft.

The Royal Navy

These three ships were converted from US transports. Avenger was torpedoed and sunk
by U-155, while Dasher exploded and sank in controversial circumstances in 1943
(attributed to poor design of the aircraft fuelling systems). Biter was transferred to Free
French command in April 1945 and served as the Dixmude.
Special Traits: Carrier, Radar
In Service: 1942
Aircraft: 2 flights of Fairey Swordfish, 1 flight of Hawker Sea Hurricanes
Range
14
5

AD
1
2

DD
1

Displacement: 15,125 tons

Speed: 16.5 kts.

Special
Weak

Crew: 555

Bellona-class Cruiser

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Bellona, Black Prince, Diadem, Royalist, Spartan

The Bellonas were a development of the Dido-class (and are often confused with them).
They were designed from the outset with only four 5.25 turrets and, by the time of their
construction, the delivery of guns was no longer an issue. Spartan was sunk by a German
Hs-293 guided bomb in January 1944, sinking after an 11 hour effort to save her.
Speed: 6
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 8/2
Crew: 22/7

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Length: 512 ft.

Special Traits: Agile, Radar


In Service: 1943

Range
24
5
10
10
Displacement: 7,410 tons

AD
4
5
2
2

DD
1

4
4
Speed: 32 kts.

Special
Weak

AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot
Crew: 530

39

C class Cruiser

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Calypso, Capetown, Caradoc, Cardiff, Ceres


The entry here covers the as designed C class cruisers that were not updated to
anti-aircraft cruisers. There were several distinct groups, but all shared the same basic
characteristics with only minor changes in dimensions.

Speed: 6
Turning: 2
Target: 6+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 5/1
Crew: 14/4

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Length: 450 ft.

Special Traits: Radar


In Service: 1916

Range
22
5
10
10

AD
2
3
2
2

DD
1

4
4

Displacement: 4,950 tons

Speed: 29 kts.

Special
Weak

AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot
Crew: 334

Campania-class Escort Carrier

Skirmish

The Royal Navy

Ships of this class: Campania

Campania was similar to the Vindex-class escort carriers. Her Swordfish aircraft sank
U-365 in December 1944, and after the war she served in an unusual role as a mobile
exhibition in the Festival of Britain. She also served as the UK command ship for
atomic bomb tests in the Pacific.
Speed: 3
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 16/5
Crew: 28/9

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 524 ft.

Special Traits: Carrier, Radar


In Service: 1944
Aircraft: 2 flight of Fairey Swordfish, 1 flight of Martlets
Range
14
5

AD
1
3

DD
1

Displacement: 15,970 tons

Special
Slow-Loading, Weak

Speed: 16 kts.

Crew: 700

Colossus-class Light Aircraft Carrier

Ships of this class: Colossus, Glory, Ocean, Venerable, Vengeance, Theseus, Triumph, Warrior, Perseus, Pioneer

Raid

This class of light fleet carriers had an almost fragile appearance, and resembled smaller
versions of the Illustrious-class. They were based on mercantile construction techniques,
and thus were quick to build (the first of class went from concept to completion in
about a year).
Speed: 5
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Weapon
AA
Length: 695 ft.

Armour: 2+
Damage: 19/6
Crew: 52/17

Special Traits: Carrier, Radar


In Service: 1944
Aircraft: 3 flights of Fairey Barracudas, 3 flights
of Vought Corsairs
Range
5

AD
4

DD

Displacement: 18,300 tons

Speed: 25 kts.

Special

Crew: 1,300

40

Courageous-class Aircraft Carrier

Raid

Ships of this class: Courageous, Glorious

Courageous and Glorious were half sisters to Furious, and began their lives as 15
armed Large Light Cruisers. Courageous formed the centrepiece of a carrier anti
submarine force but was herself torpedoed and sunk by U-29 in 1939. Glorious
was sunk by gunfire from Scharnhorst and Gneisenau, while ferrying RAF aircraft
back from Norway in 1940
Speed: 6
Turning: 1
Target: 4+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 28/9
Crew: 49/16

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 786 ft.

Special Traits: Carrier


In Service: 1928 (1940 as shown)
Aircraft: 5 flights of Fairey Swordfish, 3 flights of Sea Gladiators
Range
12
5

AD
3
6

Displacement: 27,560 tons

DD
1

Speed: 30.5 kts.

Special
Weak

Crew: 1,216

Coventry-class AA Cruiser

Patrol

Ships of this class: Coventry, Curlew

Speed: 6
Turning: 2
Target: 6+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 5/1
Crew: 14/4

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 452 ft.

The Royal Navy

Coventry and Curlew were refitted as AA cruisers, changing their cruiser armament for
ten 4 AA guns and numerous smaller weapons. Coventry and Curlew both fell victim
to an air attacks.
Special Traits: Radar
In Service: 1916

Range
20
5

AD
3
6

Displacement: 4,950 tons

DD
1

Speed: 29 kts.

Special
Weak

Crew: 330

Curacoa-class AA Cruiser

Patrol

Ships of this class: Cairo, Calcutta, Carlisle, Curacoa

Another anti-aircraft cruiser conversion of the C-class cruiser, only eight 4 AA guns were
shipped instead of the ten for the others. Carlisle served in the Mediterranean and took part
in the battle of Cape Matapan. Curacoa was engaged in convoy escort work in the North
Atlantic. She was sunk in a night-time collision with the liner Queen Mary in 1942, being
sliced in half. The crew of the liner were unaware of the incident until some time later.
Speed: 6
Turning: 2
Target: 6+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 5/1
Crew: 14/4

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 452 ft.

Special Traits: Radar


In Service: 1916

Range
20
5
Displacement: 4,950 tons

AD
2
5

DD
1

Speed: 29 kts.

Special
Weak

Crew: 330

41

Danae-class Cruiser

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Danae, Dauntless, Delhi, Despatch, Diomede, Dunedin, Durban

The ships of the Danae-class were based on the preceding C class design, but lengthened to include
an additional 6 gun. They were generally given less glamorous, but nonetheless important,
assignments, often freeing the bigger and more capable ships for more stressing duties.
Speed: 6
Turning: 2
Target: 6+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 6/2
Crew: 19/6

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Length: 472 ft.

Special Traits: Radar


In Service: 1916

Range
20
5
10
10

AD
3
3
3
3

DD
1

4
4

Displacement: 5,925 tons

Speed: 29 kts.

Special
Weak

AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot
Crew: 469

Delhi-class AA Cruiser

Patrol

The Royal Navy

Ships of this class: Delhi

Delhi was a Danae-class vessel converted into an AA cruiser while in refit in the USA. It was
planned to refit other ships in this manner but the conversion was quite expensive, so Delhi
became a one off. She served mainly in the Atlantic and Mediterranean
Speed: 6
Turning: 2
Target: 6+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 6/2
Crew: 19/6

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 472 ft.

Special Traits: Radar


In Service: 1916

Range
22
5

AD
12
3

DD
1

Displacement: 5,925 tons

Speed: 29 kts.

Special
Weak

Crew: 469

Dido-class Cruiser (1st Group)

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Argonaut, Cleopatra, Euralyus, Hermione, Naiad, Sirius

The Dido-class was intended to be the Royal Navys equivalent of the US Atlanta-class antiaircraft cruiser. They were designed around five 5.25 dual purpose turrets of the same type used
on the KGV class battleships as secondary armament.
Speed: 6
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 8/2
Crew: 22/7

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Length: 512 ft.

Special Traits: Agile, Radar


In Service: 1940

Range
24
5
10
10

AD
5
5
2
2

DD
1

4
4

Displacement: 7,575 tons

Speed: 32.2 kts.

Special
Weak

AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot
Crew: 530

42

Dido-class Cruiser (2nd Group)

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Bonaventure, Dido, Phoebe


These three ships of the Dido-class were affected by the shortages of available 5.25 guns. They only shipped
four turrets instead of five and carried additional light armament as compensation. Dido received her 5th
5.25 turret in 1942.

Speed: 6
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 8/2
Crew: 22/7

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Length: 512 ft.

Special Traits: Agile, Radar


In Service: 1940

Range
24
5
10
10

AD
4
5
2
2

Displacement: 7,575 tons

DD
1

4
4
Speed: 32.2 kts.

Special
Weak

AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot
Crew: 530

Dido-class Cruiser (3rd Group)

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Charybdis, Scylla

Speed: 6
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 8/2
Crew: 22/7

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Length: 512 ft.

The Royal Navy

This third batch of Dido-class cruisers were completed with 4.5 dual purpose guns instead of 5.25
guns. Nicknamed the toothless terrors by their crews, they actually proved to be better anti-aircraft
cruisers than their 5.25 equipped siblings.
Special Traits: Agile, Radar
In Service: 1940

Range
21
5
10
10

AD
2
6
2
2

Displacement: 7,575 tons

DD
1

4
4
Speed: 32.2 kts.

Special
Weak

AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot
Crew: 530

Eagle-class Aircraft Carrier

Raid

Ships of this class: Eagle

Eagle was a conversion of the ex-Chilean battleship Almirante Cochrane. She served in the hunt
for the Graf Spee and then continued operating mainly in the South Atlantic and later in the
Mediterranean. Damaged several times, her aircraft often cross-decked to other Royal Navy
carriers for operations. She was finally sunk by U-73 off Cape Salinas on August 11th 1942.
Speed: 5
Turning: 1
Target: 5+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 28/9
Crew: 34/11

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 667 ft.

Special Traits: Carrier, Radar, Torpedo Belt


In Service: 1924 (1942 as shown)
Aircraft: 3 flight of Fairey Swordfish, 2 flights of Hawker Sea Hurricanes
Range
15
5

AD
4
2

DD
1

Displacement: 27,229 tons

Speed: 24 kts.

Special
Weak

Crew: 1,087

43

Effingham-class Cruiser

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Effingham

Effingham served in the North Atlantic at the outbreak of World War II, taking part in several hunts
for German surface raiders. She took an active role in the Norwegian campaign, bombarding shore
positions and escorting convoys. She ran aground near Bodo and she was abandoned and sunk.
Speed: 6
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 13/4
Crew: 29/9

Weapon
Secondary Armament (6)
Secondary Armament (4)
AA
Length: 605 ft.

Special Traits:
In Service: 1919

Range
20
14
5

AD
4
2
3

DD
1
1

Displacement: 12,800 tons

Special
Weak
Weak

Speed: 30 kts.

Crew: 712

Erebus-class Monitor

Skirmish

The Royal Navy

Ships of this class: Erebus, Terror

Erebus and Terror were earlier World War One era monitors. Apart from their age they were
similar in design and operation to the later Roberts class. In February 1941,HMS Terror was
damaged by Luftwaffe Stukas off Benghazi and sank while under tow to Alexandria.
Speed: 3
Turning: 2
Target: 6+

Armour: 5+
Damage: 9/3
Crew: 13/4

Weapon
A Turret (2 x 15 in)
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 405 ft.

Special Traits: Armoured Deck, Radar, Torpedo Belt


In Service: 1916

Range
26
12
5

AD
2
2
3

DD
3
1

Displacement: 8,450 tons

Speed: 13 kts.

Special
AP
Weak

Crew: 315

Emerald-class Cruiser

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Emerald, Enterprise

Emerald served in the Indian Ocean until commencing a long refit in 1942. On completion she rejoined
the Eastern Fleet and supported the Normandy landings. Enterprise, along with the cruiser Glasgow, sank
three German destroyers and damaged four more in the Bay of Biscay during December 1943.
Speed: 7
Turning: 2
Target: 6+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 10/3
Crew: 23/7

Weapon
Secondary Armament (6)
Secondary Armament (4)
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Length: 570 ft.

Special Traits: Aircraft 1, Radar (1943)


In Service: 1926

Range
22
14
5
10
10

AD
3
1
2
4
4

DD
1
1

4
4

Displacement: 9,435 tons

Speed: 33 kts.

Special
Weak
Weak

AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot
Crew: 572

44

Fiji-class Cruiser (Ceylon Group)

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Ceylon, Newfoundland, Uganda


As the war progressed, the threat from enemy surface forces declined, while the air threat increased greatly.
Three ships of the Fiji-class swapped one of their triple 6 gun turrets for more anti aircraft armament.

Speed: 6
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 11/3
Crew: 39/13

Weapon
A Turret (3 x 6 in)
B Turret (3 x 6 in)
Y Turret (3 x 6 in)
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Length: 555 ft.

Special Traits: Aircraft 2, Radar


In Service: 1940

Range
26
26
26
12
5
10
10

AD
1
1
1
2
4
2
2

DD
1
1
1
1

4
4

Displacement: 10,450 tons

Special
Twin-Linked, Weak
Twin-Linked, Weak
Twin-Linked, Weak
Weak

AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot

Speed: 31.5 kts.

Crew: 980

Flower-class Corvette

Patrol

Speed: 4
Turning: 3
Target: 6+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 3/1
Crew: 4/1

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Hedgehog
Depth Charges
Length: 205 ft.

Special Traits: Agile, Radar, Sub Hunter


In Service: 1941+

Range
8
5
4
3

AD
1
1
4
3

Displacement: 950 tons

DD
1

4
3

Special
Weak

Slow Loading, Super AP


Slow-Loading

Speed: 16 kts.

The Royal Navy

The short, stubby Flower-class corvette served all over the world. The combination of asdic and radar, combined with depth
charges and a good hull form made them excellent U boat hunters during the worst battles of the North Atlantic campaign.

Crew: 85

Furious-class Aircraft Carrier

Raid

Ships of this class: Furious

Furious began life as a large Light Cruiser armed but was converted into an aircraft carrier.
Despite her age she saw extensive service in the Atlantic, Mediterranean and the Norwegian
Sea where she took part in air strikes against the Tirpitz.
Speed: 6
Turning: 1
Target: 4+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 29/9
Crew: 49/16

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 786 ft.

Special Traits: Carrier, Radar, Torpedo Belt


In Service: 1917 (1942 as shown)
Aircraft: 3 flights of Fairey Swordfish, 3 flights of Fairey Fulmars
Range
14
5

AD
3
7

DD
1

Displacement: 28,500 tons

Special
Weak

Speed: 29.35 kts.

Crew: 1,218

45

G3 class Battlecruiser

Battle

Ships of this class: Invincible, Indomitable, Inflexible, Indefatigable

The G3 battlecruisers were a victim of the Washington Treaty (earning them the nickname the Cherrytrees). Their arrangement
was similar to the N3 design, substituting 16 guns for 18 and enjoying a significant increase in maximum speed. The turret
designs eventually saw service in the Nelson-class.
Speed: 6
Turning: 1
Target: 4+

Armour: 6+
Special Traits: Aircraft 2, Armoured Deck, Radar after 1941, Torpedo Belt
Damage: 43/14 In Service: Not Completed
Crew: 67/22

Weapon
A Turret (3 x 16 in)
B Turret (3 x 16 in)
P Turret (3 x 16 in)
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 862 ft.

Range
36
36
36
16
5

AD
3
3
3
6
12

DD
3
3
3
1

Displacement: 48,400 tons

Special
AP
AP
AP
Weak

Speed: 32 kts.

Crew: 1,680

Hawkins-class Cruiser

Skirmish

The Royal Navy

Ships of this class: Frobisher, Hawkins,

The Hawkins-class was based on the earlier Birmingham-class cruiser. Hawkins served
mainly in the Indian Ocean, and Frobisher worked in Home waters and supported the
Normandy landings. They were relegated to the reserve fleet in 1945.
Speed: 6
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 13/4
Crew: 29/9

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Length: 605 ft.

Special Traits: Radar


In Service: 1919

Range
22
5
10
10

AD
4
6
2
2

DD
1

4
4

Displacement: 12,800 tons

Speed: 30 kts.

Special

AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot
Crew: 712

Hermes-class Fleet Carrier

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Hermes

Hermes was the first ship designed from the outset as an aircraft carrier. She was obsolete by the start of World War II and mostly
served in the South Atlantic. She was sunk north of Ceylon by over 70 Japanese carrier aircraft on April 9th, 1942 .
Speed: 5
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 14/4
Crew: 28/8

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 600 ft.

Special Traits: Carrier


In Service: 1923 (1942 as shown)
Aircraft: 2 flights of Fairey Swordfish
Range
14
5

AD
3
1

DD
1

Displacement: 13,208 tons

Speed: 25 kts.

Special
Weak

Crew: 700

46

Hood-class Battlecruiser (Refit)

Battle

Ships of this class: Hood

The shortcomings of Hoods design were readily apparent by the end of the Great War.
It was intended to reconstruct her during the inter war period, however her role as fleet
flagship meant she saw almost continuous service during that period. As a result her rebuild
was continually postponed until the eve of the Second World War, by which point it was
too late. Had her refit gone through, the entire secondary battery would have been replaced
with that similar to the KGVs, the anti-aircraft capability would have been significantly
improved, and additional deck armour provided.
Speed: 6
Turning: 1
Target: 4+

Armour: 5+
Special Traits: Armoured Deck, Radar, Torpedo Belt
Damage: 42/14 In Service: 1942
Crew: 76/25

Weapon
A Turret (2 x 15 in)
B Turret (2 x 15 in)
X Turret (2 x 15 in)
Y Turret (2 x 15 in)
Secondary Armament
AA

AD
2
2
2
2
5
11

DD
3
3
3
3
1

Displacement: 46,680 tons

Speed: 31 kts.

Special
AP
AP
AP
AP
Weak

Crew: 1,900

Hunt-class Destroyer Escort

Patrol

Ships of this Class: Atherstone, Berkeley, Cattistock, Cleveland, Cotswold


The Hunt-class was designed to fulfil the role of heavy convoy escort, optimised for AA and
ASW defence. As such, they were smaller and slower than their fleet cousins and initially carried
no torpedoes. The Type 1 vessels were the victims of a design error that saw a third of their
main armament landed to compensate for errors in the calculation of stability. They were used
extensively to cover convoys in Home waters and the Mediterranean, and were also called in to
act in more traditional destroyer roles.

Speed: 5
Turning: 2
Target: 6+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 3/1
Crew: 7/2

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Depth Charges
Length: 264 ft.

The Royal Navy

Length: 860 ft.

Range
33
33
33
33
16
5

Special Traits: Agile, Radar, Sub Hunter


In Service: 1941+

Range
12
5
3
Displacement: 1,625 tons

AD
1
2
4

DD
1

2
Speed: 27 kts.

Special
Weak

Slow-Loading
Crew: 168

47

Implacable-class Aircraft Carrier

Battle

Ships of this class: Implacable, Indefatigable

The Implacables were a further extension of the Illustrious design which again attempted to increase
aircraft capacity. Initial operating groups were less than 60 aircraft, though a year later would see
air groups rising to over 80 aircraft. Limitations on hangar height meant that they were unable
to operate Corsairs and would ultimately lead to short service lives. Indefatigable was one of the
success stories of the armoured deck. On 1st April 1945 she was hit at the base of the superstructure
by a bomb carrying kamikaze aircraft. The armoured deck withstood the damage and she was
cleared for air operations a few hours later after the debris had been swept over the side.
Speed: 6
Turning: 1
Target: 4+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 32/10
Crew: 92/30

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 766 ft.

Special Traits: Armoured Deck, Carrier, Radar


In Service: 1944
Aircraft: 4 flights of Fairey Barracuda, 4 Flights of Supermarine Seafires, 2 flights of Fairey Firefly
Range
14
5

AD
4
10

DD
1

Displacement: 32,110 tons

Special
Weak

Speed: 32 kts.

Crew: 2,250

Indomitable-class Aircraft Carrier

Raid

The Royal Navy

Ships of this class: Indomitable

Indomitable was planned as the 4th ship of the Illustrious-class, but her design was altered to increase aircraft storage
space. Less armour was carried and her flight deck was raised by 14 feet to accommodate a second hangar deck. This
allowed her to carry 45 aircraft initially, increased to over 60 once revised aircraft handling practices and more space
efficient aircraft were put in place.
Speed: 6
Turning: 1
Target: 4+

Armour: 3+
Special Traits: Armoured Deck, Carrier, Radar
Damage: 30/10 In Service: 1941 (1942 as shown)
Crew: 64/21
Aircraft: 4 flights of Fairey Albacore, 6 flights of Grumman Martlets

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 754 ft.

Range
14
5

AD
4
9

DD
1

Displacement: 29,730 tons

Speed: 31 kts.

Special
Weak

Crew: 1,600

Kent-class Cruiser

Ships of this class: Australia, Berwick, Canberra, Cornwall, Cumberland, Kent, Suffolk

Skirmish

The Kent-class was the Royal Navys first group of County class heavy cruisers. Five were built for
the Royal Navy, and two for the Royal Australian Navy. They experienced mixed careers; Cornwall
was sunk by Japanese dive bombers off Ceylon, and Suffolk suffered heavy bomb damage during the
Norway campaign (she was repaired and took part in the hunt for the Bismarck). Australia was hit by
six kamikazes but survived, while Canberra was scuttled after the battle of Savo Island in 1942.
Kent was less extensively altered then the others of her class and her statistics, where different, are
shown in parenthesis.
Speed: 6
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 15/5
Crew: 31/10

Special Traits: Aircraft 3 (1), Radar


In Service: 1928 (1942 as shown)

48

Weapon
A Turret (2 x 8 in)
B Turret (2 x 8 in)
X Turret (2 x 8 in)
Y Turret (2 x 8 in)
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes (Kent Only)
Starboard Torpedoes (Kent Only)
Length: 633 ft.

Range
31
31
31
31
14
5
10
10

AD
1
1
1
1
2 (1)
3 (2)
2
2

DD
1
1
1
1
1

4
4

Displacement: 14,910 tons

Special

Weak

AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot

Speed: 31.5 kts.

Crew: 784

Lion-class Battleship

War

Ships of this class: Lion, Temeraire, Conqueror, Thunderer

The Lions were essentially a repeat of the King George V-class design, substituting the twin/quad 14 gun arrangement for triple
16 turrets and incorporating some other improvements. Four vessels were planned and the first two were under construction at
the start of the war. However, the priority for construction was for cruisers, carriers and smaller warships so all four were cancelled
in October 1940. Some studies were conducted examining the possibility of using the incomplete hulls for aircraft carriers and
even at hybrid battleship/carriers but these were abandoned when it was realised that new construction was a more efficient route
to follow.
Armour: 6+
Special Traits: Aircraft 2, Armoured Deck, Radar, Torpedo Belt
Damage: 40/13 In Service: Not Completed
Crew: 67/22

Weapon
A Turret (3 x 16 in)
B Turret (3 x 16 in)
X Turret (3 x 16 in)
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 785 ft.

Range
41
41
41
16
5

AD
3
3
3
5
12

DD
3
3
3
1

Displacement: 46,300 tons

The Royal Navy

Speed: 6
Turning: 1
Target: 4+

Special
Super AP
Super AP
Super AP
Weak

Speed: 30 kts.

Crew: 1,680

Loch-class Frigate

Patrol

The Loch Class was the Royal Navys ultimate sub hunter in World War II and was also used by
the Canadian, South African and New Zealand navies. Armed with two Squid launchers, advanced
sonar and a powerful short range radar the Loch was a formidable enemy for U boats.
Speed: 4
Turning: 2
Target: 6+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 3/1
Crew: 5/1

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Double Squid
Depth Charges
Length: 307 ft.

Special Traits: Agile, Radar, Sub Hunter


In Service: 1943+

Range
8
5
4
3
Displacement: 1,433 tons

AD
1
1
6
4

DD
1

4
2
Speed: 20 kts.

Special
Weak

Super AP
Slow-Loading
Crew: 114

49

London-class Cruiser

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Devonshire, London, Shropshire, Sussex

The London-class was a repeat of the Kents but had no bulges. London was
extensively refitted just prior to the war and resembled a Fiji-class cruiser on
completion. Unfortunately the reconstruction was not a great success; despite
being a handsome ship with a similar appearance to the Royal Navys later light
cruisers, as the additional structure overstressed the hull and she leaked badly.
All four ships survived the war.
Speed: 6
Armour: 3+
Special Traits: Aircraft 3, Radar
Turning: 2
Damage: 15/5 In Service: 1929
Target: 5+
Crew: 28/9
Weapon
A Turret (2 x 8 in)
B Turret (2 x 8 in)
X Turret (2 x 8 in)*
Y Turret (2 x 8 in)
Secondary Armament
AA*

Range
31
31
31
31
14
5

AD
1
1
1
1
2
4

DD
1
1
1
1
1

Special

Weak

The Royal Navy

* In 1944 Devonshire has X Turret removed and AA AD increased to 5.


Length: 633 ft.

Displacement: 14,580 tons

Speed: 32.5 kts.

Crew: 700

Malta-class Aircraft Carrier

War

Ships of this class: Africa, Gibraltar, Malta, New Zealand

The Malta-class would have been the Royal Navys equivalent of the US Navys Midway-class. They were a departure from
previous Royal Navy design practice with open hangars, regular use of deck parks and reduced armour, reflecting a shift from
operations in Atlantic and Mediterranean waters to a more world-wide approach, and recognition that AA and CAP would
provide the main line of defence against the principal air threat. All four ships were cancelled after the end of World War 2.
Speed: 7
Turning: 1
Target: 4+

Armour: 3+
Special Traits: Armoured Deck, Carrier, Radar
Damage: 48/16 In Service: 1951 (planned)
Crew: 142/47 Aircraft: 5 flights of Fairey Barracuda, 5 Flights of Avenger, 6 flights of Seafire Mk47

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 804 ft.

Range
12
5

AD
4
15

DD
1

Displacement: 46,000 tons

Speed: 32 kts.

Merchant Aircraft Carrier

Special
Weak

Crew: 2,740

Patrol

Ships of this class: Empire MacAlpine, Empire MacCallum, Empire MacCabe, Acavus, Alexia, Gadila, Macoma, Rapana
The famous MAC ships were even more basic conversions than the CVEs. Essentially nothing
more than the minimum amount of flight deck required to carry their small embarked flight
(generally four aircraft), they also carried supplies in their holds. Gadila and Macoma were
operated by the Dutch merchant marine and embarked Dutch operated Swordfish aircraft.

Speed: 2
Turning: 1
Target: 6+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 12/4
Crew: 4/1

Special Traits: Carrier


In Service: 1943
Aircraft: 1 flight of Fairey Swordfish

50

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 459 ft.

Range
14
5

AD
4
2

DD
1

Displacement: 12,000 tons

Special
Weak, Slow-Loading

Speed: 13 kts.

Crew: 107

N3 class Battleship

War

Ships of this class: St George, St David, St Andrew, St Patrick

The N3 battleships were Britains first post-war capital ship designs and incorporated the lessons learnt from the Great War. Horizontal
protection (up to 9 thick) was testament to the increasing ranges that gunnery duels were fought, as well as an early acceptance of
the risk posed by bombs from high flying aircraft. The N3s would also mount the biggest guns ever mounted on a British warship.
Resource constraints led to an unusual arrangement where the third turret sat between the forward and aft superstructures. In the end
the design was killed off by the Washington Naval Treaty, but elements of the design lived on in the Nelson-class battleships.
Speed: 5
Turning: 1
Target: 4+

Armour: 6+
Special Traits: Aircraft 2, Armoured Deck, Radar after 1941, Torpedo Belt
Damage: 42/14 In Service: Not Completed
Crew: 67/22

Length: 815 ft.

Range
42
42
42
16
10
10
5

AD
3
3
3
6
1
1
12

DD
4
4
4
1
4
4

Displacement: 48,000 tons

Special
Super AP
Super AP
Super AP
Weak
AP, Slow-Loading
AP, Slow-Loading

Speed: 23.5 kts.

The Royal Navy

Weapon
A Turret (3 x 18 in)
B Turret (3 x 18 in)
P Turret (3 x 18 in)
Secondary Armament
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
AA

Crew: 1,680

Queen Elizabeth-class Battleship (Barham)

Battle

Ships of this class: Barham, Malaya

HMS Barham and HMS Malaya saw the least amount of refit activity of the five Queen Elizabethclass battleship. Both ships were active in the North Sea hunting and defending against German
surface raiders and in the Mediterranean. It was during a mission near Crete, in 1941 that
Barham was sunk by German submarine torpedoes
Speed: 5
Turning: 1
Target: 5+

Armour: 5+
Special Traits: Radar, Torpedo Belt
Damage: 34/11 In Service: 1915 (1942 as shown)
Crew: 38/12

Weapon
A Turret (2 x 15 in)
B Turret (2 x 15 in)
X Turret (2 x 15 in)
Y Turret (2 x 15 in)
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 645 ft.

Range
42
42
42
42
15
5

AD
2
2
2
2
8
7

DD
3
3
3
3
1

Displacement: 35,710 tons

Speed: 24 kts.

Special
AP
AP
AP
AP
Weak

Crew: 950

51

Queen Elizabeth-class Battleship (Warspite)

Battle

Ships of this class: Warspite

HMS Warspite saw a less extensive refit than her sister ships HMS Queen Elizabeth and HMS
Valiant and uses the statistics here. Nevertheless, Warspite was an active member of the war effort.
The longest hit ever scored by a naval gun on an enemy ship was made by Warspite when she
struck the Italian battleship Guilio Cesare at approximately 26,000 yards and she made a vital
contribution to the Royal Navys victories at the Second Battle of Navik and Cape Matapan.
Speed: 5
Turning: 1
Target: 5+

Armour: 5+
Special Traits: Aircraft 2, Armoured Deck, Radar, Torpedo Belt
Damage: 34/11 In Service: 1915 (1942 as shown)
Crew: 42/14

Weapon
A Turret (2 x 15 in)
B Turret (2 x 15 in)
X Turret (2 x 15 in)
Y Turret (2 x 15 in)
Secondary Armament
AA

The Royal Navy

Length: 645 ft.

Range
42
42
42
42
15
5

AD
2
2
2
2
6
4

DD
3
3
3
3
1

Displacement: 36,450 tons

Special
AP
AP
AP
AP
Weak

Speed: 24 kts.

Crew: 1,050

Pretoria Castle-class Escort Carrier

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Pretoria Castle

Pretoria Castle started life as a Union Castle liner. She was requisitioned in 1939 and became an
armed merchant cruiser (essentially a liner with 6 guns added) but was purchased outright in 1942
and converted to full escort carrier status, with a hangar, flight deck, lift and catapult. She never saw
a combat deployment, but was employed as a training and trials carrier during World War II.
Speed: 4
Turning: 1
Target: 5+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 24/8
Crew: 23/7

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 592 ft.

Special Traits: Carrier, Radar


In Service: 1943
Aircraft: 2 flights of Martlets, 1 flight of Fairey Swordfish
Range
14
5

AD
1
2

DD
1

Displacement: 23,450 tons

Speed: 18 kts.

Special
Weak

Crew: 580

Renown-class Battlecruiser (Refit)

Battle

Ships of this class: Renown

Renown and Repulse were laid down during the First World War. Renown was lucky enough to be
extensively refitted in a similar style to that of Queen Elizabeth and Valiant. Like many British
battleships, the catapult and aircraft were removed in 1943 when the role of aerial reconnaissance
was fulfilled by carrier aircraft.
Speed: 6
Turning: 1
Target: 4+

Armour: 4+
Special Traits: Aircraft 2, Radar , Torpedo Belt
Damage: 38/12 In Service: 1916 (1942 as shown)
Crew: 50/16

52

Weapon
A Turret (2 x 15 in)
B Turret (2 x 15 in)
Y Turret (2 x 15 in)
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Length: 794 ft.

Range
34
34
34
14
5
10
10

AD
2
2
2
6
7
2
2

DD
3
3
3
1

4
4

Displacement: 36,750 tons

Special
AP
AP
AP
Weak

AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot

Speed: 30.75 kts.

Crew: 1,250

Resolution-class Battleship

Battle

Ships of this class: Resolution, Revenge, Royal Sovereign, Ramillies, Royal Oak
The R class battleships were regarded as the finest ships of their type when they joined the fleet in 1916.
However, their size (smaller than the Queen Elizabeth) worked against them post war as they proved harder
to modernise effectively. They received some updates but not to the extent of the QEs and were regarded as
second class. Royal Oak was an early war casualty, sunk by Gunter Priens U-47 in Scapa Flow in 1939.

Speed: 4
Turning: 1
Target: 5+

Armour: 5+
Special Traits: Aircraft 1 (Resolution only), Radar, Torpedo Belt
Damage: 34/11 In Service: 1915 (1942 as shown)
Crew: 46/15

Length: 624 ft.

Range
26
26
26
26
18
5

AD
2
2
2
2
6
3

Displacement: 35,390 tons

DD
3
3
3
3
1

Speed: 21 kts.

The Royal Navy

Weapon
A Turret (2 x 15 in)
B Turret (2 x 15 in)
X Turret (2 x 15 in)
Y Turret (2 x 15 in)
Secondary Armament
AA

Special
AP
AP
AP
AP
Weak

Crew: 1,146

Roberts-class Monitor

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Abercrombie, Roberts

Monitors armed with battleship calibre guns were an almost exclusively British feature of
World War 2 navies. The Royal Navy had experience of monitors in the First World War and
found them ideal for shore bombardment along the coast of Europe. Abercrombie and Roberts
were the most modern types in the Royal Navy during World War 2 and saw extensive service
in the Channel, often supporting or being supported by Coastal Forces craft in attacks on
German coastal shipping and invasion transports in the early years of the war. They were
small, tough vessels with excellent subdivision and proved quite resistant to damage.
Speed: 3
Turning: 2
Target: 6+

Armour: 5+
Damage: 10/3
Crew: 19/6

Weapon
A Turret (2 x 15 in)
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 373 ft.

Special Traits: Armoured Deck, Radar, Torpedo Belt


In Service: 1941

Range
26
12
5
Displacement: 9,717 tons

AD
2
2
4

DD
3
1

Speed: 13 kts.

Special
AP
Weak

Crew: 460

53

Surrey-class Cruiser

Raid

Ships of this class: Northumberland, Surrey

The Surrey-class was an expanded York-class design with an additional 8 gun turret aft. They were built within the various treaty
constraints of the time but were cancelled in favour of newer light cruiser designs which were seen as more useful. They drew on
the experience of the preceding Norfolk-class and would have been fine heavy cruisers if completed.
Speed: 6
Armour: 4+
Turning: 2
Damage: 13/4
Target: 5+
Crew: 27/9
Weapon
A Turret (2 x 8 in)
B Turret (2 x 8 in)
X Turret (2 x 8 in)
Y Turret (2 x 8 in)
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 600 ft.

Special Traits: Aircraft 2, Radar


In Service: 1930 (cancelled)
Range
31
31
31
31
14
5

AD
1
1
1
1
2
4

DD
1
1
1
1
1

Displacement: 12,664 tons

Speed: 30 kts.

Special

Weak

Crew: 653

Swiftsure-class Cruiser

Skirmish

The Royal Navy

Ships of this class: Swiftsure, Ontario

The Swiftsures were a development of the Fiji-class, designed from the outset with only three 6 turrets, heavier AA armament and
increased beam for improved stability. Swiftsure was the only ship of the class to see active service in World War II. Ontario was
transferred to the Royal Canadian Navy
Speed: 6
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 12/4
Crew: 39/13

Weapon
A Turret (3 x 6 in)
B Turret (3 x 6 in)
X Turret (3 x 6 in)
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Length: 557 ft.

Special Traits: Radar


In Service: 1944

Range
26
26
26
14
5
10
10

AD
1
1
1
3
6
2
2

DD
1
1
1
1

4
4

Displacement: 11,480 tons

Speed: 31.5 kts.

Tiger-class Cruiser

Ships of this class: Bellerophon, Blake, Defence, Hawke, Superb, Tiger

Special
Twin-Linked, Weak
Twin-Linked, Weak
Twin-Linked, Weak
Weak

AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot
Crew: 960

Skirmish

As originally designed, the Tigers would have resembled the earlier Swiftsures (indeed Tiger herself began construction as a ship of
that class, and was converted whilst in build). Only three were completed; Lion, Tiger and Blake, and they replaced the original
triple 6 turrets with new twin automatic DP 6 turrets, with rates of fire three times that of the originals.
Speed: 6
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 12/4
Crew: 35/11

Special Traits: Radar


In Service: 1945

54

Weapon
A Turret (3 x 6 in)
B Turret (3 x 6 in)
X Turret (3 x 6 in)
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Length: 557 ft.

Range
24
24
24
12
5
10
10

AD
1
1
1
3
5
2
2

DD
1
1
1
1

4
4

Displacement: 11,560 tons

Special
Twin-Linked, Weak
Twin-Linked, Weak
Twin-Linked, Weak
Weak

AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot

Speed: 31.5 kts.

Crew: 867

U Class Submersible

Patrol

The U class submarine was in many ways the Royal Navy equivalent of the German Type VII. Small
and manoeuvrable, they earned a fearsome reputation in the Mediterranean where U Class boats
operating from Malta took a heavy toll on Axis convoys heading to North Africa.
Speed: 2/2
Turning: 3
Target: 6+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 3/1
Crew: 3/1

Length: 196 ft.

Range
4
4
10

AD
1
1
2

Displacement: 732 tons

DD
1

5
Speed: 12/10 kts.

Special
Slow-Loading, Weak

AP, One-Shot
Crew: 33

Unicorn-class Light Aircraft Carrier

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Unicorn

The Royal Navy

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Forward Torpedoes

Special Traits: Agile, Silent, Submersible


In Service: 1940

Unicorn was a singleton design, built as a maintenance carrier rather than a front line warship, and
intended to service the aircraft of other carriers. She had extensive hangars for a ship of her size,
although much of this space was devoted to workshops. Despite her less warlike origins she also
served as a light fleet carrier and served for some time off Korea.
Speed: 5
Turning: 1
Target: 5+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 21/7
Crew: 48/16

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 646 ft.

Special Traits: Carrier, Radar


In Service: 1943
Aircraft: 1 flight of Fairey Swordfish, 2 flights of Supermarine Seafires
Range
14
5

Displacement: 20,300 tons

AD
2
4

DD
1

Speed: 24 kts.

Special
Weak

Crew: 1,200

55

Vanguard-class Battleship

Battle

Ships of this class: Vanguard

Having built the worlds first modern battleship in HMS Dreadnought, it was perhaps
fitting that the Royal Navy should complete the last of their kind, HMS Vanguard. The
ship appeared as a slightly enlarged King George V with improved bows and far better sea
keeping performance (she was probably the best sea boat of all the battleship designs). Her
main armament utilised turrets from the World War I large light cruisers Courageous and
Glorious, but the 15 guns were fully modernised and probably better than the 14 weapons
in the King George Vs. Vanguard was completed in 1946, too late to see action.
Speed: 6
Turning: 1
Target: 4+

Armour: 5+
Special Traits: Armoured Deck, Radar, Torpedo Belt
Damage: 44/14 In Service: 1946
Crew: 76/25

The Royal Navy

Weapon
A Turret (2 x 15 in)
B Turret (2 x 15 in)
X Turret (2 x 15 in)
Y Turret (2 x 15 in)
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 760 ft.

Range
33
33
33
33
16
8

AD
2
2
2
2
5
14

DD
3
3
3
3
1

Displacement: 51,420 tons

Speed: 30 kts.

Special
AP
AP
AP
AP
Weak

Crew: 1,893

Vindex-class Escort Carrier

Patrol

Ships of this class: Nairana, Vindex

These ships were originally built as fast cargo ships. Like their near sisters, they were converted with hangars, lifts
and flight decks added. Both survived the war. Nairana was lent to the Royal Netherlands navy and served as the
Karel Doorman from 1946 to 1948.
Speed: 3
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 17/5
Crew: 22/7

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 524 ft.

Special Traits: Carrier, Radar


In Service: 1943
Aircraft: 3 flights of Fairey Swordfish, 1 flight of Martlets
Range
14
5

AD
1
3

DD
1

Displacement: 17,210 tons

Speed: 17 kts.

Special
Slow-Loading, Weak

Crew: 558

56

Aircraft

The following describes new air support for the Royal Navy. The full details of each flight can be found on page 19.
Bristol Beaufighter: Based on the Beaufort, this aircraft was used as a long-ranged heavy
fighter. However, it was also to see service as a night fighter, torpedo bomber, anti-shipping
and ground attack aircraft by both the Fleet Air Arm and the RAF. The Beaufighter may carry
a torpedo or bombs, not both.
Blackburn Roc: The Roc was a pure fighter version of the Skua, but carried its armament of four
machine guns in a powered dorsal turret. This made it heavier and slower than the Skua. Generally
regarded as unsuccessful the Roc was withdrawn early in the war as better fighters became available.
Blackburn Skua: The Skua was a radical development for the RN when it was introduced in 1938.
A Skua was the first British aircraft to shoot down an enemy aircraft in the Second World War, when
a Dornier Do 18 flying boat was downed over the North Sea on September 26. On April 10, 1940
16 Skuas sank the German cruiser Knigsberg in Bergen harbour during the German invasion of
Norway. This was the first large warship to be sunk by Allied forces in the war. Skuas served both in
the fighter and dive bomber role, but were withdrawn in 1941 after heavy losses, and replaced with
more effective fighters such as the Fulmar and Seafire.
Fairey Albacore: The Albacore was the successor to the Swordfish. Its most notable improvement
was the addition of a fully enclosed cockpit.

Fairey Firefly: The Fairey Firefly was a heavy fighter and reconnaissance aircraft derived form the earlier Fulmar. It was both
fast and powerful, quite manoeuvrable and heavily armed. Fireflys later served as dedicated anti submarine aircraft (carrying
sonobuoys and depth charges), and performed very well as ground attack aircraft during the Korean War.

The Royal Navy

Fairey Barracuda II: An all metal construction monoplane, the Barracuda was the replacement
for the Swordfish and Albacore. Initial models were underpowered but this changed with the
introduction of Merlin and Griffon engines. Barracudas served in the Atlantic and Pacific
theatres. Their most famous action was against the battleship Tirpitz.

Gloster Gladiator: The Gloster Gladiator represented the final generation of biplane fighters before
made obsolete by the appearance of the Hurricane, Spitfire and Bf 109. In 1937, the Fleet Air Arm
decided there was a need for single seat fighters and the Gladiator was chosen to fill the gap. The
resulting Sea Gladiator variant was used to protect Scapa Flow, in the Norwegian campaign, in the
defence of Malta, and on carrier operations against Greek forces in the eastern Mediterranean. It was
largely phased out by the end of 1940 and was outclassed in air battles.
Hawker Typhoon: Designed as a successor to the Hurricane, the Typhoon first flew in 1939.
Production was suspended at the outbreak of war to allow more Hurricanes to be constructed, and
resumed in 1940. Armed with twelve .303 machineguns or four 20mm cannon, the Typhoons thick
wing reduced performance at altitude, but closer to the ground it was a formidable aircraft. Not the
worlds best fighter, the Typhoon was normally used in a strike role with bombs or rockets. Its usual
arena was on land, but Typhoons were sometimes used for anti-shipping strikes.
Short Sunderland V: The Sunderland was a flying boat, developed for general reconnaissance from
the S.23 Empire or C-class flying boat, the flagship of Imperial Airways. When British shipping came
under constant attack by German U-boats, the aircraft patrolled the approaches, or flew convoy protection
missions. When a U-boat was sighted, the Sunderlands tried to attack it before it submerged.
Supermarine Seafire Mk47: The Mk47 was the ultimate carrier-borne version of the Spitfire. It
featured a more powerful Griffon engine, better protection and a heavier armament. Mk47s continued
in Royal Navy service well into the 1950s.

57

The Kriegsmarine
This fleet list contains new ships for Kriegsmarine players, including ship designs that were part of the Z-Plan program; ships that
were part of a planned powerful new German surface fleet that was proposed in the early 1930s. All construction ceased when
Germany invaded Poland in 1939 and the allotted resources were instead used in the construction of new submarines.

Errata

The following official changes should be made to ships in the Victory at Sea main rulebook.
Deutschland-class Pocket Battleship: AA Attack Dice should be 3.

K-class Cruiser: Add the Radar trait.

The Kriegsmarine Expanded Fleet List

The following forms the expanded fleet list for the Kriegsmarine. The fleet special rules found in the Victory at Sea main
rulebook apply as normal.

The Kreigsmarine

Priority Level: Patrol


Type 39 torpedo boat
Zerstrer 1936-class destroyer

Type-IX U-boat
ZH-1 class destroyer

Type-VII U-boat

K-class cruiser
Schleswig Holstein Pre-Dreadnought

M-class cruiser (Z-Plan)


Sphkreuzer scout cruiser (Z-Plan)

Priority Level: Raid


Deutschland-class pocket battleship

P-class cruiser (Z-Plan)

Prinz Eugen-class heavy cruiser

Priority Level: Battle


Graf Zeppelin-class aircraft carrier

O-class battlecruiser (Z-Plan)

Scharnhorst-class battlecruiser

Priority Level: War


H-39-class battleship (Z-Plan)

Bismarck-class battleship

Priority Level: Skirmish


Emden-class light cruiser
Project Jade aircraft carrier (Z-Plan)
Type-XXI U-boat

Emden-class Light Cruiser

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Emden

Emden was the first new warship built in Germany after World War I. She was the first German warship to be damaged in World War II,
hit by a Bristol Blenheim that crashed into her (ironically the pilots name was Flying Officer Emden!). Emden took part in the invasion of
Norway (she was the only major warship in her group not to be sunk or seriously damaged) and thereafter spent her war in the Baltic.
Speed: 6
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 8/2
Crew: 27/9

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Length: 511 ft.

Special Traits: Aircraft 2


In Service: 1925

Range
18
5
10
10

AD
4
3
1
1

DD
1

3
3

Displacement: 7,100 tons

Speed: 29.5 kts.

Special
Weak

AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot
Crew: 685

58

H-39-class Battleship

War

Possible ship names of this class: Hindenburg

In keeping with the decision to have heavy German warships resemble one another, the H Class design was to appear as an
enlarged Bismarck at first glance. However, the design of the H Class varied in many important points from the earlier battleship.
The most noticeable difference was the two-stack arrangement of the H Class - the large volume required for intakes and uptakes
for twelve propulsion diesels, providing a top speed of 30-knots, necessitated two stacks. Long range was desired for these
battleships and the diesel powered design had significantly greater range than those based on steam plants. The H-39 design
gave the ship a range of 16,000 nm at 19-knots, compared to the range of Bismarck of 9,500 nm at 19 knots. At first glance,
the turrets of the H Class ships appeared the same as those on Bismarck but they were larger in order to mount a new class of
16-inch guns.
Speed: 6
Turning: 1
Target: 4+

Armour: 6+
Special Traits: Aircraft 4, Armoured Deck, Radar, Torpedo Belt
Damage: 51/17 In Service: 1944 (planned)
Crew: 92/30

Length: 872 ft.

Range
41
41
41
41
17
8
10
10

AD
2
2
2
2
5
6
2
2

Displacement: 62.496 tons

DD
3
3
3
3
1

3
3
Speed: 30 kts.

Special
AP
AP
AP
AP
Weak

AP, Slow-Loading
AP, Slow-Loading
Crew: 2.300

M-class Cruiser

Skirmish

The planned M-class light cruisers (leichte kreuzer) were long range escorts intended for detached open-ocean battle groups.
They were to accompany O and P-class battlecruisers and then proceed on missions independently. At least two of each would
screen the main hunting groups.
Speed: 7
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 11/3
Crew: 37/12

Weapon
A Turret (2 x 5.9 in)
B Turret (2 x 5.9 in)
X Turret (2 x 5.9 in)
Y Turret (2 x 5.9 in)
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Length: 584 ft.

The Kreigsmarine

Weapon
A Turret (2 x 16 in)
B Turret (2 x 16 in)
X Turret (2 x 16 in)
Y Turret (2 x 16 in)
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes

Special Traits: Aircraft 2, Radar


In Service: 1943 (planned)

Range
26
26
26
26
13
8
10
10
Displacement: 10.400 tons

AD
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2

DD
1
1
1
1
1

3
3
Speed: 35.5 kts.

Special
Weak
Weak
Weak
Weak
Weak

AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot
Crew: 920

59

O-class Battlecruiser (Schlachtkreuzer)

Battle

In addition to the battleships of the H-Class, a group of 12 new armoured ships, successors to the famous Admiral Graf Spee,
Admiral Scheer and Ltzow, were part of the Z-Plan. The design studies for the three battlecruisers of the O-class (Schlachtkreuzer
O, Schlachtkreuzer P, Schlachtkreuzer Q) were simultaneously started to those of the new Panzerschiff design in 1937. In 1939,
an option was explored to replace the three existing Panzerschiffe with the same number of new battlecruisers. Construction
orders were given in the same year, but none of the ships were started. These ships were planned with the idea of commerce war in
mind. Therefore, they would get a mixed propulsion system, diesel engines for long range medium speed cruising, and additional
turbines for high speed combat action. The main role of these battlecruisers was to engage enemy convoys, and destroy transports
and cargo ships. Unlike the heavily protected H-class battleships, these battlecruisers had armour protection only slightly better
than that of a cruiser.
Speed: 7
Turning: 1
Target: 4+

Armour: 4+
Special Traits: Aircraft 4, Radar
Damage: 33/11 In Service: 1944 (planned)
Crew: 78/26

The Kreigsmarine

Weapon
A Turret (2 x 15 in)
B Turret (2 x 15 in)
X Turret (2 x 15 in)
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Length: 814 ft.

Range
40
40
40
17
8
10
10

AD
2
2
2
2
3
2
2

Displacement: 35.720 t

DD
3
3
3
1

3
3

Special
AP
AP
AP
Weak

AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot

Speed: 33.4 kts.

Crew: 1.950

P-class Cruiser (Panzerschiff)

Raid

In 1938, the first design studies for a Panzerschiff successor were made. The new Panzerschiff was called Kreuzer P, its specifications
showed a bigger, faster and better protected version of the original design. In many respects it was a modification of the design
of the Panzerschiff D and Panzerschiff E, the planned successors of the Deutschland-class which was later modified to Scharnhorst
and Gneisenau. As these ships were intended to be used for commerce war, they were designed to be superior to a heavy cruiser,
in terms of artillery, and faster than existing battleships. The original plan was to lay down four of these ships per year, starting
in 1939 so that the complete Z-Plan battle fleet would be operational by 1947. The first three of these ships would receive the
28cm (11) turrets removed from the Scharnhorst and Gneisenau during their conversion to 38 cm (15) guns but, by 1939, it
was obvious that the Scharnhorst and Gneisenau conversion could not be completed by in time. Therefore, three of the planed
Kreuzer P would be modified to receive 38 cm turrets which were already in production, resulting in the battlecruiser O-class.
Although the ships were already assigned to shipyards, none of the Kreuzer P were ordered because of the start of World War II.
Speed: 7
Turning: 1
Target: 4+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 26/8
Crew: 48/16

Weapon
A Turret (3 x 11 in)
X Turret (3 x 11 in)
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Length: 732 ft.

Special Traits: Aircraft 2, Radar


In Service: 1942 (planned)

Range
45
45
17
8
10
10

AD
3
3
2
2
2
2

DD
1
1
1

3
3

Displacement: 25.689 t

Speed: 33 kts.

Special

Weak

AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot
Crew: 1.200

60

Project Jade Aircraft Carrier

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Jade

The passenger ship Gneisenau (not to be confused with the battlecruiser Gneisenau ) of the North German Lloyd line was one of
three passenger ships selected to be converted to auxiliary carriers. She was originally used for passenger cruises to the Far East,
but following start of World War II was used as a troop transport. Like the Europa, her poor stability and high fuel consumption
forced the project to be halted prior to any modifications being done. Interestingly, her sister, the passenger ship Scharnhorst, was
converted into a aircraft carrier - by the Japanese. At the outbreak of the war, the Scharnhorst was in Japan where, in July 1942,
she was sold to Japan and modified into an aircraft carrier. Now named Jinyo, the ship entered service in December 1943 and
wassunk by the US submarine Spadefish northeast of Shanghai in 1944.
Speed: 4
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 19/6
Crew: 35/11

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 627 ft.

Special Traits: Carrier


In Service: 1943 (Planned)
Aircraft: 2 flights of Me-109 and 2 flights of Ju-87
Range
13
8

AD
2
3

Displacement: 18.160 t

DD
1

Special
Weak

Speed: 21 kts.

Crew: 880

Schleswig Holstein-class Pre-Dreadnought

Skirmish
The Kreigsmarine

Schelswig Holstein enjoyed the dubious privilege of firing the opening shots of World
War II. Her barrage of the Westerplatte in Gdansk heralded the start of the German
attack on the city. She was scuttled in March 1945, and some of her armour was taken
to the Westerplatte to be used in sculptures commemorating the defence of the city
of Gdansk in 1939.
Speed: 4
Turning: 2
Target: 6+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 15/5
Crew: 30/10

Weapon
A Turret (2 x 11 in)
X Turret (2 x 11 in)
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Length: 418 ft.

Special Traits: None


In Service: 1908 (refitted 1936)

Range
21
21
12
5
10
10

Displacement: 14,218 tons

AD
2
2
4
1
1
1

DD
1
1
1

3
3

Speed: 22 kts.

Special

Weak

AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot
Crew: 743

61

Sphkreuzer Scout Cruiser

Skirmish

During the design process for the M-class light cruiser, the construction office proposed a scheme for a super destroyer suitable
for Atlantic deployment. This became the Sphkreuzer, (literally scout cruiser) designed to have superior armament to a fleet
destroyer, and able to outrun any enemy cruiser. They would probably have scouted for the heavy units in North Atlantic. In
action the Sphkreuzer would likely have screened the heavy units of the hunting group against the destroyers escorting the
convoy.
Speed: 7
Armour: 2+
Turning: 2
Damage: 6/2
Target: 6+
Crew: 23/7
Weapon
A Turret (2 x 5.9 in)
X Turret (2 x 5.9 in)
Y Turret (2 x 5.9 in)
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Length: 476 ft.

Special Traits: Radar


In Service: 1943 (planned)
Range
26
26
26
8
10
10

AD
1
1
1
1
3
3

DD
1
1
1

3
3

Displacement: 5.713 t

Speed: 35.5 kts.

Special
Weak
Weak
Weak

AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot
Crew: 583

The Kreigsmarine

Type 39 Torpedo Boat

Patrol

Ships of this class: T22 to T36

The Type 39 Flottentorpedoboot was a marked improvement over the earlier Type 37 and Type 39 classes. The ship was more
akin to a pre-war British destroyer, with a heavier gun armament, and better sea-keeping and structural performance. Type 39s
served in the Baltic, North Sea and the English Channel, and fought a number of actions with Royal Navy surface ships. T25 and
T26 were sunk in action by the cruisers Glasgow and Enterprise in December 1943, while ships of the 4th Flotilla (T22, T23, T25
and T26) sank the cruiser Charybdis earlier in the same year.
Speed: 7
Turning: 3
Target: 6+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 3/1
Crew: 8/3

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Depth Charges
Length: 336 ft.

Special Traits: Agile


In Service: 1930+

Range
8
4
10
10
3

AD
1
1
3
3
4

DD
1

3
3
2

Displacement: 1,775 tons

Speed: 32.5 kts.

Special
Weak

AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot
Slow-Loading
Crew: 205

62

ZH1-class Destroyer

Patrol

Ships of this class: ZH1, ZH2

ZH1 and ZH2 were the ex-Dutch Callenbergh and Tjerk Hiddes which were
scuttled but salvaged by the Germans. ZH1 was restored to service in the
Kriegsmarine, but ZH2 was not completed. Like her sisters, ZH1 was an excellent
sea boat. She was sunk just after D Day in action with British, Canadian and
Polish destroyers near Ile de Bas.
Speed: 7
Turning: 2
Target: 6+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 3/1
Crew: 7/3

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Depth Charges
Length: 307 ft.

Special Traits: Agile


In Service: 1939

Range
12
5
10
10
3
Displacement: 2,228 tons

AD
1
2
3
3
4

DD
1

4
4
2
Speed: 37.5 kts.

Crew: 158

The following describes new air support for the Kriegsmarine. The full details of each flight can be found on page 19.

Fw-200 Condor : The Focke-Wulf Condor began its operational life as an airliner,
and was the first aircraft to fly non-stop between Berlin and New York. Though used
in a variety of roles, the version presented in Victory at Sea is a maritime patrol aircraft
that saw use as a long-range and anti-shipping bomber. These planes searched for Allied
convoys, and could perform anti-submarine warfare duties.
Heinkel He-111: Built as a bomber, the He-111 was first announced to the world
as an airliner. However, the design was rooted in the 1930s and by the time the He111 was used in the Battle of Britain, its poor armament and relatively slow speed,
both of which were assumed to make it almost inviolate, proved sadly wanting. It
proved a versatile aircraft, however, with a great many variants produced.

The Kreigsmarine

Aircraft

Special
Weak

AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot
Slow-Loading

Heinkel He-177: The He-177 was an unusual 4-enginned aircraft with


two engines in each nacelle. Despite its size the requirements stipulated the
ability to act as a dive bomber, a role for which it was unsuited, but the one
which drove the twin-nacelle design. The engine design was also unreliable
at best, dangerous at worst with a marked tendency to burst into flames.
Messerschmitt Me-110: The Me-110 was the twin engine counterpart of the smaller
Me-109. It was designed as a long range fighter but was also used as a reconnaissance and
light strike aircraft, and a highly successful night fighter. Its size put it at a disadvantage
against smaller, more manoeuvrable single engine fighters.

63

The United States


Navy
Emerging from the Second World War ahead of the other navies of the world, the US fleets had instigated developments learned
from both enemies and allies, resulting in some remarkable ships. The changing emphasis from big battleships to capacious
carriers was well-learned in the US Navy, and its air power became dominant.

Errata

The following official changes should be made to ships in the Victory at Sea main rulebook.

Atlanta-class Light Cruiser: Anti-Aircraft AD should be 6, Anti-Aircraft range should be 7, range of the Secondary Armament
should be 17.

The United States Navy

Brooklyn-class Light Cruiser: Priority Level should be Skirmish, Anti-Aircraft AD should be 4, Anti-Aircraft range should be 7.
Colorado-class Battleship: Priority Level should be Battle, Target score should be 5+, Anti-Aircraft AD should be 4, AntiAircraft range should be 7.
Fletcher-class Destroyer: Should have Radar Special Trait.
New Orleans-class Heavy Cruiser: Anti-Aircraft AD should be 4.
New York-class Battleship: Target score should be 5+.
North Carolina-class Battleship: Anti-Aircraft AD should be 11.
Pensacola-class Heavy Cruiser: Secondary Weapons AD should be 2, Anti-Aircraft AD should be 3.
South Dakota-class Battleship: Target score should be 5+, Anti-Aircraft AD should be 12.
Yorktown-class Carrier: Anti-Aircraft AD should be 6, Anti-Aircraft Range should be 8.

The US Navy Expanded Fleet List

The following forms the expanded fleet list for the US Navy.

Priority Level: Patrol


Clemson-class destroyer
Porter-class destroyer leader
Priority Level: Skirmish
Atlanta-class cruiser
Casablanca-class carrier
Long Island-class carrier
Omaha-class cruiser
Priority Level: Raid
Baltimore-class cruiser
Wasp-class carrier

Fletcher-class destroyer

Gridley-class destroyer

Bogue/Attacker-class carrier
Cleveland-class cruiser
New Orleans-class cruiser
Portland-class cruiser

Brooklyn-class cruiser
Gato-class submarine
Northampton-class heavy cruiser
Sangamon-class carrier

Independence-class carrier

Ranger-class carrier

64

Priority Level: Battle


Alaska-class large cruiser
Nevada-class battleship
Pennsylvania-class battleship
Yorktown-class aircraft carrier

Colorado-class battleship
New Mexico-class battleship
Tennessee-class battleship

Lexington-class carrier
New York-class battleship
Wyoming-class battleship

Priority Level: War


Essex-class aircraft carrier
South Dakota-class battleship

Iowa-class battleship

North Carolina-class battleship

Alaska Class Large Cruiser

Battle

Ships of this class: Alaska, Guam, Hawaii


The Alaska-class fell midway between a heavy cruiser and a battleship, and the United States Navy
considered these vessels large cruisers rather than battlecruisers. They were designed as cruiser-killers,
tasked with destroying post-Treaty heavy cruisers. As a result, they were given 12-inch guns, significant
armour protection, and speeds up to 33 knots. They resembled current generation battleships in
appearance, with the familiar two forward, one aft main battery turrets, massive columnar mast and a
multitude of 5/38 DP guns along the sides of the superstructure. However, they were built to cruiser
standards, lacking the armoured belt and torpedo defence of capital ships.
Armour: 5+
Special Traits: Aircraft 4, Radar
Damage: 33/11 In Service: 1944
Crew: 61/20

Weapon
A Turret (2 x 12 in)
B Turret (2 x 12 in)
Y Turret (2 x 12 in)
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 791 ft.

Range
39
39
39
12
8

AD
3
3
3
4
12

Displacement: 34,253 tons

DD
2
2
2
1

Speed: 33 kts.

The United States Navy

Speed: 7
Turning: 1
Target: 4+

Special

Weak

Crew: 1,517

Baltimore-class Heavy Cruiser

Raid

Ships of this class: Baltimore, Boston, Canberra, Quincy, Pittsburgh, St Paul


The Baltimore-class cruisers were the last US heavy cruisers to be built during World
War II. The ships were essentially enlarged Cleveland-class with 8-inch guns. Used
primarily as escorts for the aircraft carrier fleets, several were kept in service into the
1980s as refitted classes of guided missile cruisers.
Speed: 7
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 17/5
Crew: 82/27

Weapon
A Turret (3 x 8 in)
B Turret (3 x 8 in)
Y Turret (3 x 8 in)
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 664 ft.

Special Traits: Aircraft 4, Radar


In Service: 1943

Range
32
32
32
12
8
Displacement: 17,031 tons

AD
1
1
1
4
11

DD
1
1
1
1

Speed: 33 kts.

Special
Twin-Linked
Twin-Linked
Twin-Linked
Weak

Crew: 2,039

65

Bogue\Attacker-class Escort Carrier

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Bogue, Card, Copahee, Core, Nassau

Another early Liberty merchant ship conversion ordered by the British, this design
included a steam-turbine power plant, rather than the typical diesel system. The
design was an admirable success, though there were several design flaws. The
crude installation of the aft elevator made aircraft handling difficult, the ships
had only one screw (a distinct disadvantage in handling damage), and they were
not optimally suited for aircraft handling, even with their larger hangars. A
slightly improved second group of ships were subsequently built and sent in its
entirety to the Royal Navy, and was known as the Ameer-class in British service.
Speed: 4
Turning: 2
Target: 5

Armour: 2+
Damage: 17/5
Crew: 36/12

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA

The United States Navy

Length: 495 ft.

Special Traits: Carrier


In Service: 1942
Aircraft: 2 flights of Grumman Wildcats and 2 flights of Grumman Avengers
Range
12
7

AD
1
2

DD
1

Displacement: 16,620 tons

Speed: 18.5 kts.

Special
Slow Loading, Weak

Crew: 908

Casablanca-class Escort Carrier

Ships of this class: Casablanca, Liscombe Bay, Mission Bay, Natoma Bay, Wake Island, White Plains

Skirmish

The Casablanca-class of escort aircraft carriers was the most numerous class of
this type ever built. Fifty were laid down, launched and commissioned in less
than a year. Surprisingly, these ships were equipped with reciprocating engines
instead of more common turbine engines, in order to reduce bottlenecks in
turbine construction. The shining moment of the class came in the Battle
of Leyte Gulf, when a task force composed of these ships and a group of
destroyer escorts gave battle against the Japanese main force and succeeded in
turning them back. The USS St. Lo is the only aircraft carrier to ever record
a hit on an enemy warship by its own guns, when she hit a Japanese destroyer with a single round from her aft-mounted 5-inch
gun.
Speed: 4
Turning: 2
Target: 5

Armour: 2+
Damage: 11/3
Crew: 31/10

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 498 ft.

Special Traits: Carrier


In Service: 1943
Aircraft: 3 flights of Grumman Hellcats and 2 flights of Grumman Avengers
Range
12
8

AD
1
1

DD
1

Displacement: 10,902 tons

Speed: 19 kts.

Special
Slow-Loading, Weak

Crew: 764

Cleveland-class Light Cruiser

Ships of this class: Cleveland, Columbia, Denver, Mobile, Vincennes

Skirmish

The Clevelands were essentially updated pre-war Brooklyns. They sacrificed one turret of main armament,
with its three 6-inch guns, for an enhanced anti-aircraft armament. Twenty-seven were eventually
completed, the largest number of any cruiser class in history. The powerful anti-aircraft armament,
an attribute whose importance grew throughout the Pacific war, was well laid out, while the main
armament was adequate.

66

Speed: 7
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 14/4
Crew: 51/17

Weapon
A Turret (3 x 6 in)
B Turret (3 x 6 in)
X Turret (3 x 6 in)
Y Turret (3 x 6 in)
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 600 ft.

Special Traits: Aircraft 4, Radar


In Service: 1943

Range
27
27
27
27
12
8

AD
1
1
1
1
4
6

Displacement: 14,131 tons

DD
1
1
1
1

Special
Twin-Linked, Weak
Twin-Linked, Weak
Twin-Linked, Weak
Twin-Linked, Weak
Weak

Speed: 32.5 kts.

Crew: 1,285

Gridley-class Destroyer

Patrol

Ships of this class: Craven, McCall, Maury

The Gridley-class mounted 16 torpedo tubes, the heaviest battery ever among American destroyers, reflecting an increased
emphasis on torpedo tactics in vogue at the time they were designed. What set the Gridley apart from preceding classes was
their advanced power-plant, with enlarged turbines operating at greater pressure. This gave them some of the highest speeds ever
recorded for an American destroyer.
Armour: 2+
Damage: 3/1
Crew: 6/2

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Depth Charges
Length: 334 ft.

The United States Navy

Speed: 8
Turning: 2
Target: 6+

Special Traits: Agile


In Service: 1937

Range
12
5
10
10
3

AD
1
1
4
4
3

Displacement: 2,245 tons

DD
1

4
4
2

Special
Weak

AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot
Slow-Loading

Speed: 38.5 kts.

Crew: 158

Independence-class Light Carrier

Raid

Ships of this class: Belleau Wood, Cowpens, Independence, Monterey, Princeton


The Independence-class carriers were conversions of Cleveland-class light cruisers. Their
design featured a relatively short and narrow flight deck and hangar, with a small island.
The added top weight required that the cruiser hulls be widened. Despite the widening, the
Independence remained limited-capability ships, with sea keeping problems and a relatively
high aircraft accident rates. Protection was modest and some of the munitions were stowed
at the hangar level, contributing to the loss of Princeton in 1944.
Speed: 6
Turning: 2
Target: 5+
Weapon
AA

Length: 622 ft.

Armour: 3+
Damage: 15/5
Crew: 58/19

Special Traits: Carrier


In Service: 1943
Aircraft: 4 flights of Grumman Hellcats, and 2 flights of Grumman Avengers
Range
8

Displacement: 14,751 tons

AD
4

DD

Speed: 31.6 kts.

Special

Crew: 1,461

67

Lexington-class Carrier

Battle

Ships of this class: Lexington, Saratoga


The Lexington-class aircraft carriers were the first operational aircraft carriers in the United
States Navy. Originally laid down as battlecruisers, they were converted to carriers under the
rules of the Washington Conference. The success of these ships set the pattern for future
American carrier design: Very large, long ships, with a topside flight deck, starboard-side island
combining command and control spaces and the ships funnels, and a spacious hangar deck.
Speed: 7
Turning: 1
Target: 4+

Armour: 3+
Special Traits: Carrier
Damage: 39/13 In Service: 1927 (1942, as show)
Crew: 132/44 Aircraft: 5 flights of Grumman Wildcats, 5 flights of Douglas Dauntless, and 2 flights of
Douglas Devastators

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA

Range
10
7

AD
2
7

DD
1

Special
Weak

The United States Navy

Saratoga
Aircraft: 5 flights of Grumman Hellcats, 4 flights of Douglas Dauntless, and 3 flights of Grumman Avengers
Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 888 ft.

Range
12
8

AD
4
8

DD
1

Displacement: 43,054 tons

Speed: 34 kts.

Special
Weak

Crew: 3,300

Long Island-class Escort Carrier

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Long Island

In October 1940, President Roosevelt asked that the Navy design a merchant-ship conversion
aircraft carrier to escort Atlantic convoys across the northern Atlantic, where no land-based patrol
plane could reach. The obvious source for a merchant-ship conversion was the Liberty Ship. In
early January, the US Navy acquired two ships to convert, one for itself and one for the Royal Navy,
for conversion into escort carriers. The result was the USS Long Island and the HMS Archer.
Speed: 3
Turning: 2
Target: 5

Armour: 2+
Damage: 17/5
Crew: 16/5

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 492 ft.

Special Traits: Carrier


In Service: 1941
Aircraft: 1 flight of Grumman Wildcats, and 1 flight of Grumman Avengers
Range
14
4

AD
1
1

DD
1

Displacement: 16,620 tons

Speed: 17.5 kts.

Special
Slow-Loading, Weak

Crew: 408

Nevada-class Battleship

Battle

Ships of this class: Nevada, Oklahoma

The Nevada-class battleships carried the US Navys first triple gun turrets but, more significantly,
introduced the so-called all or nothing armour scheme, in which protection of vital areas was
maximized, leaving the rest of the ship essentially unprotected. These ships also marked the end
of the mid-ships turret, which had traditionally proven to be problematic. Finally, they were also
the Navys first to have oil as their primary fuel and the last to use twin-screw propulsion.

68

Speed: 4
Turning: 1
Target: 5+

Armour: 5+
Special Traits: Aircraft: 3, Armoured Deck, Radar, Torpedo Belt
Damage: 33/11 In Service: 1943
Crew: 67/22

Weapon
A Turret (3 x 14 in)
B Turret (2 x 14 in)
X Turret (2 x 14 in)
Y Turret (3 x 14 in)
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 575 ft.

Range
35
35
35
35
12
8

AD
3
2
2
3
5
11

Displacement: 33,901 tons

DD
2
2
2
2
1

Speed: 20.2 kts.

Special
AP
AP
AP
AP
Weak

Crew: 1,680

New Mexico-class Battleship

Battle

Ships of this class: Idaho, Mississippi, New Mexico


The New Mexico-class were improvements on the Nevada-class design. In order to counter the German
threat, these ships were transferred to the Atlantic and were not present during the Pearl Harbour
attack. They were active in the war with Japan until final victory was achieved in 1945.
Armour: 5+
Special Traits: Aircraft: 3, Armoured Deck, Radar, Torpedo Belt
Damage: 37/12 In Service: 1942
Crew: 77/25

Weapon
A Turret (3 x 14 in)
B Turret (3 x 14 in)
X Turret (3 x 14 in)
Y Turret (3 x 14 in)
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 600 ft.

Range
37
37
37
37
14 (10)
8

AD
3
3
3
3
3 (2)
5(9)

Displacement: 40,181 tons

DD
2
2
2
2
1

Speed: 22 kts.

The United States Navy

Speed: 4
Turning: 1
Target: 5+

Special
AP
AP
AP
AP
Weak (Idaho)
(Idaho)
Crew: 1,930

Northampton-class Heavy Cruiser

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Augusta, Chester, Chicago, Houston, Louisville, Northampton

Following the construction of the Pensacola-class of heavy cruisers, the US Navy attempted to improve
the design. Armour and sea-keeping had been sacrificed for the Pensacolas ten-gun 8-inch battery.
Accordingly, a nine-gun ship mounting three triple turrets was designed, along with other changes.
Speed: 7 in.
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 11/3
Crew: 25/8

Weapon
A Turret (2 x 8 in)
B Turret (3 x 8 in)
X Turret (3 x 8 in)
Y Turret (2 x 8 in)
Secondary Armament
AA

Length: 582 ft.

Special Traits: Aircraft 4, Radar


In Service: 1930

Range
32
32
32
32
10
7

Displacement: 11,420 tons

AD
1
1
1
1
1
2

DD
1
1
1
1
1

Speed: 32.5 kts.

Special
Twin-Linked
Twin-Linked
Weak

Crew: 617

69

Omaha-class Light Cruiser

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Omaha, Milwaukee, Raleigh, Richmond, Trenton

The Omaha-class cruiser was the oldest class of cruiser still in service with the US Navy at the
outbreak of World War II. Designed as a scout for battleships, they had sufficient speed to operate
with destroyers.
Speed: 7
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 9/3
Crew: 19/6

Weapon
A Turret (2 x 6 in)
Y Turret (2 x 6 in)
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes

The United States Navy

Length: 550 ft.

Special Traits: Aircraft 2, Radar


In Service: 1942

Range
29
29
19
7
10
10

AD
1
1
2
2
2
2

DD
1
1
1

4
4

Displacement: 9,150 tons

Speed: 34 kts.

Special
Weak
Weak
Weak

AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot
Crew: 468

Pennsylvania-class Battleship

Battle

Ships of this class: Arizona, Pennsylvania

The Pennsylvania-class battleships, of the United States Navy, were an enlargement of the Nevadaclass. Reconstructed in 1929-31, they received greater main battery gun elevation, improved gun
directors and modern aircraft catapults. The ships secondary gun batteries were updated, as was
protection against gunfire, aircraft bombs and torpedoes.
Speed: 4
Belt
Turning: 1
Target: 5+

Armour: 5+

Damage: 36/12 In Service: 1942


Crew: 69/23

Weapon
A Turret (3 x 14 in)
B Turret (3 x 14 in)
X Turret (3 x 14 in)
Y Turret (3 x 14 in)
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 600 ft.

Special Traits: Aircraft 3, Armoured Deck, Radar, Torpedo

Range
35
35
35
35
12
8

AD
3
3
3
3
3
10

DD
2
2
2
2
1

Displacement: 39,224 tons

Speed: 21 kts.

Porter-class Destroyer Leader

Special
AP
AP
AP
AP
Weak

Crew: 1,720

Patrol

Ships of this class: Porter, Selfridge, Winslow


The eight ships of the Porter-class were built in response to the large destroyers that the
Japanese Navy was building at the time. Enlarged versions of the Farraguts, they had a better
machinery arrangement and an increased main battery, consisting of super-firing 5-inch
twin mounts. The resulting layout gave them a balanced, cruiser-like look. In addition to a
heavy gun battery, the Porters also mounted eight 21-inch torpedo tubes in two centreline
mounts. However, they proved to be top heavy so during the war, the number of 5 inch
guns was reduced, and more, smaller anti-aircraft guns were installed.

70

Speed: 7
Turning: 2
Target: 6+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 3/1
Crew: 8/2

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Depth Charges
Length: 372 ft.

Special Traits: Agile, Radar


In Service: 1942

Range
12
5
10
10
3

AD
2
1
4
4
3

Displacement: 2,597 tons

DD
1

4
4
2

Special
Weak

AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot
Slow-Loading

Speed: 37 kts.

Crew: 194

Ranger-class Carrier

Raid

Ships of this class: Ranger

Speed: 6
Turning: 2
Target: 4+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 18/6
Crew: 72/24

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 769 ft.

Special Traits: Carrier


In Service: 1942
Aircraft: 9 flights of Grumman Wildcats, and 3 flights of Douglas Dauntless
Range
10
8

AD
2
6

Displacement: 17,577 tons

DD
1

Special
Weak

Speed: 29.25 kts.

Crew: 2,184

Sangamon-class Escort Carrier

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Chenango, Sangamon, Suwannee


The Sangamon-class were a group of four escort carriers that served with the United States Navy
during World War II. All four were originally constructed as Cimarron-class oilers, launched in
1939 for civilian use. They were acquired by the US Navy, decommissioned as oilers and converted
to escort carriers. The conversion had added a flight deck, elevators, a hangar deck, a catapult,
sonar gear, aircraft ordnance magazines, workshops, and stowage space for aviation spares. Their
accommodations had been enlarged to house an increased complement and embarked aviation
personnel, and armament had been changed to increase anti-aircraft defence.
Speed: 4
Turning: 1
Target: 5+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 24/8
Crew: 33/11

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 553 ft.

The United States Navy

The Ranger was the first ship of the United States Navy to be designed and built from the keel up as an
aircraft carrier. Following Americas entrance into the war, serious consideration was made to transfer Ranger
to the Pacific. However, she was smaller and slower than the rest of the US carrier fleet and could not carry
as many aircraft. In addition her ammunition storage capability was far smaller than the other carriers (thus
excluding torpedo aircraft), and she was not as well armoured as the others - all of which would have been a
serious problem in the Pacific. Instead she would spend the war in the Atlantic alternating between US and
Royal Navy fleets. By wars end, she became a training carrier, when not otherwise employed as an aircraft
transport.

Special Traits: Carrier


In Service: 1942
Aircraft: 4 flights of Grumman Hellcats, and2 flights of Grumman Avengers
Range
14
8

Displacement: 23,875 tons

AD
1
1

DD
1

Speed: 18 kts.

Special
Slow-Loading, Weak

Crew: 830

71

Tennessee-class Battleship

Battle

Ships of this class: California, Tennessee

Tennessee and California were the first American battleships built to a post-Jutland hull design. As a
result, their underwater hull protection was much greater than that of previous battleships. The Tennesseeclass, and the Colorado-class which followed, were identified by two heavy cage masts supporting large
fire-control tops. This feature was to distinguish the Big Five from the rest of the battleship force until
World War II. Since Tennessees 14 inch turret guns could be elevated to 30 degrees, the Tennessee had the
ability to shoot over the horizon.
Speed: 4
Turning: 1
Target: 5+

Armour: 5+
Special Traits: Aircraft: 3, Radar, Armoured Deck, Torpedo Belt
Damage: 37/12 In Service: 1920 (1943, as show)
Crew: 95/31

The United States Navy

Weapon
A Turret (3 x 14 in)
B Turret (3 x 14 in)
X Turret (3 x 14 in)
Y Turret (3 x 14 in)
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 600 ft.

Range
37
37
37
37
12
8

AD
3
3
3
3
5
11

DD
2
2
2
2
1

Displacement: 40,950 tons

Special
AP
AP
AP
AP
Weak

Speed: 20.5 kts.

Crew: 2,375

Wasp-class Carrier

Raid

Ships of this class: Wasp

The Wasp was a scaled down version of the Hornet-class with acceptable speed and aircraft
capacity. Following the attack on Pearl Harbour, she served escort and transport duties in
the Atlantic. Following a short refit, she was transferred to the Pacific, where she took part
in the Guadalcanal landing. She was subsequently used to shuttle valuable aircraft to the
Cactus Air Force, during which she was sunk by Japanese submarine I-19.
Speed: 6
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 19/6
Crew: 72/24

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 741 ft.

Special Traits: Carrier


In Service: 1942
Aircraft: 4 flights of Grumman Wildcats, 2 flights of Grumman Avengers, and 4 flights of
Douglas Dauntless
Range
12
8

AD
2
5

DD
1

Displacement: 19,116 tons

Speed: 29.5 kts.

Special
Weak

Crew: 2,184

72

Wyoming-class Battleship

Battle

Ships of this class: Arkansas, Wyoming


This class marked a significant growth in size over its predecessor, the Florida-class. The
added size allowed for the installation of a sixth main turret as well as increased armour. The
result was a main battery of twelve 12-inch guns in six twin mounts. Despite the class name,
Arkansas preceded Wyoming, although both were commissioned within the same month.
Both ships served in World War I but, prior to World War II, Wyoming was demilitarised
and converted to a training ship. Arkansas would receive several upgrades throughout the
war, primarily in the area of anti-aircraft and electronics. Her primary role throughout most
of the war was that of convoy escort in the Atlantic. She participated in the Normandy
invasion prior to being transferred to the Pacific in 1945. She was later expended as a target
ship during atomic bomb testing at Bikini.
Speed: 4
Turning: 1
Target: 5+

Armour: 5+
Special Traits: Aircraft: 3, Armoured Deck, Torpedo Belt
Damage: 30/10 In Service: 1942
Crew: 50/16

Length: 554 ft.

Range
24
24
24
24
24
24
14
7
Displacement: 30,610 tons

AD
2
2
2
2
2
2
5
4

DD
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

Speed: 21.0 kts.

Special

Weak

Crew: 1,242

Aircraft

The following describes new air support for the US Navy. The full details of each flight can be found on page 20.

The United States Navy

Weapon
A Turret (2 x 12 in)
B Turret (2 x 12 in)
Q Turret (2 x 12 in)
R Turret (2 x 12 in)
X Turret (2 x 12 in)
Y Turret (2 x 12 in)
Secondary Armament
AA

Boeing B-17: The Flying Fortress is the iconic American bomber of the European theatre
in World War II, dropping more bombs on Germany than any other bomber model. A
durable aircraft it was also by Coastal Command and sank eleven U-boats.
Lockheed Hudson: When the RAF placed a sizeable order for this versatile light bomber
and reconaissance aircraft it was the first significant construction contract for Lockheed.
Over two and a half thousand aircraft were eventually built seeing widespread service
amongst the Allies during the war.
PBY 5 Catalina: The most widely produced flying boat, the Catalina was used for ASW
duties, convoy escort, patrol bombers and transports. Armed with five machine guns for
defence, it was capable of carrying either a bomb or torpedo load, and was responsible for
sinking many submarine sin both the Atlantic and Pacific theatres.
Vought Vindicator: An early dive bomber, the Vindicator was withdrawn from active service in 1943,
proving too vulnerable to Japanese fighters. It was nicknamed the Vibrator, due to the noise and
shaking endured by its crew.

73

The Imperial
Japanese Navy
During their devastating strike on Pearl Harbour and the empires of Europe, the Japanese forces expanded their territory
throughout the Pacific theatre. Though lacking in natural resources, their fighting men were highly dedicated and proved to be
terrible enemies for the forces that clashed against them. In the end, the industrial power of the US became an insurmountable
obstacle, and the final defeat of Japan marked the end of the Second World War.

Errata

The following official changes should be made to ships in the Victory at Sea main rulebook.
Aoba-class Heavy Cruiser: Port and Starboard Torpedoes should have AD of 2 rather than 3.

The Imperial Japanese Navy

Kagero-class Destroyer: In Service Date should be 1939. Torpedo AD should be 4, Depth Charges should have AD of 1.
Kongo-class Battleship: Anti-Aircraft AD should be 3 and not 5.
Nagara-class Cruiser: Secondary Armament should have the Weak trait.

The Imperial Japanese Navy Expanded Fleet List

The following forms the expanded fleet list for the Imperial Japanese Navy. The fleet special rules found in the Victory at Sea
main rulebook apply as normal.
Priority Level: Patrol
Akitsuki-class destroyer
Kagero-class destroyer
Shiratsuyu-class destroyer

Fubuki-class destroyer
Kaiten-class manned torpedo
Tenryu-class light cruiser

Kadai-7-class submarine
Matsu-class destroyer escort
Yubari-class light cruiser

Priority Level: Skirmish


Agano-class light cruiser
Furutaka-class cruiser
Kuma class light cruiser
Sendai-class cruiser

Aoba-class cruiser
Hei-Gata-class submarine
Nagara-class cruiser
Shimikaze-class destroyer

Chitose-class light carrier


Hosho-class light carrier
Oyodo-class light cruiser
Zuiho-class light carrier

Priority Level: Raid


Junyo-class carrier
Myoko-class heavy cruiser
Soryu/Hiryu-class carrier
Tone-class heavy cruiser

Kitakami-class torpedo cruiser


Ryuho-class carrier
Taiho-class carrier
Unry-class aircraft carrier

Mogami-class heavy cruiser


Ryujo-class light carrier
Takao-class cruiser

Priority Level: Battle


Akagi-class carrier
Ise-class carrier
Nagato-class battleship

Fuso-class battleship
Kaga-class carrier
Shinano-class support carrier

Ise-class battleship
Kongo-class battlecruiser
Shokaku-class aircraft carrier

Priority Level: War


Yamato-class battleship

74

Agano-class Light Cruiser

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Agano, Noshiro, Sakawa, Yahagi

The Agano-class was designed as a swift and lightly armoured vessel, a replacement for the now aging Tenryu, Kuma and Nagara.
Four ships were laid down in the class - in practice they were used as destroyer and cruiser leaders. Only the Sakawa survived the
war, to be expended as a target in the Bikini Atoll atomic tests.
Speed: 7
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 9/3
Crew: 29/9

Weapon
A Turret (2 x 6 in)
B Turret (2 x 6 in)
X Turret (2 x 6 in)
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Depth Charges

Range
23
23
23
7
20
20
3

AD
1
1
1
3
4
4
2

Displacement: 8,534 tons

DD
1
1
1

5
5
2
Speed: 35 kts.

Special
Weak
Weak
Weak

AP, Slow-Loading
AP, Slow-Loading
Slow-Loading
Crew: 730

Akagi-class Carrier

Battle

Ships of this class: Akagi

Originally laid down a battlecruiser, the Washington Naval Treaty led to her conversion to an aircraft carrier. Her and her near sister Kaga
straddled the line between carrier and dreadnought reliance. To keep both options open, the ships were designed to be quickly converted to
capital ships. However, by the mid 1930s, the admirals believed the aircraft carrier to be the equal of the capital ship. Akagi was extensively
rebuilt to improve aircraft handling capacity, ending any possibility of later conversion.
Speed: 6
Turning: 1
Target: 4+

Armour: 3+
Special Traits: Carrier
Damage: 38/12 In Service: 1942
Crew: 80/26
Aircraft: 4 flights of Mitsubishi A6M Zeros, 3 flights
of Nakajima B5N Kates, and 3 flights of Aichi D3A Vals

Weapon
Port Turret A (2 x 8 inch)
Port Turret B (2 x 8 inch)
Starboard Turret C (2 x 8 inch)
Starboard Turret D (2 x 8 inch)
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 855 ft.

Range
27
27
27
27
12
7

Displacement: 41,300 tons

AD
1
1
1
1
2
4

DD
1
1
1
1
1

Speed: 31.2 kts.

The Imperial Japanese Navy

Length: 571 ft.

Special Traits: Agile, Aircraft 2


In Service: 1942

Special
Port Firing Arc Only
Port Firing Arc Only
Starboard Firing Arc Only
Starboard Firing Arc Only
Weak

Crew: 2,000

75

Akitsuki-class Destroyer

Patrol

Ships of this class: Akitsuki, Hatsusuki, Niitsuki, Wakatsuki

The basic premise of the Akitsuki-class destroyers was that of task force defence. As
such, they were armed eight of the new 3.9 inch dual purpose guns, considered by
many to be the best Japanese anti-aircraft gun of World War II, whose characteristics
can only be described as superb. They were also heavily armed for anti-submarine
warfare with no less than six depth charge throwers. Unfortunately to meet these
demands, the torpedo load was reduced to a single quad mount.
Speed: 7
Turning: 2
Target: 6+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 4/1
Crew: 12/4

The Imperial Japanese Navy

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Depth Charges
Length: 440 ft.

Special Traits: Agile


In Service: 1942

Range
15
7
20
20
3

AD
2
4
2
2
4

DD
1

5
5
2

Displacement: 3,700 tons

Speed: 33 kts.

Special
Weak

AP, Slow-Loading
AP, Slow-Loading
Slow-Loading
Crew: 300

Chitose-class Light Carrier

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Chitose, Chiyoda

Both carriers were originally laid down as a seaplane tenders, however care
was given during to construction for the rapid conversion to outright carriers.
Both were active as seaplane carriers at the start of the war and both took part
in the Battle of Midway though neither saw combat. As the Japanese became
aware of the importance of carrier aviation, both Chitose and Chiyoda were
converted into light carriers, re-entering service in early 1944.
Speed: 6
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 15/5
Crew: 32/10

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 631 ft.

Special Traits: Carrier


In Service: 1943
Aircraft: 3 flights of Mitsubishi A6M Zeros, and 2 flights of Aichi D4Y Judys
Range
14
7

AD
2
4

DD
1

Displacement: 15,300 tons

Speed: 29.0 kts.

Special
Weak

Crew: 800

76

Fuso-class Battleship

Battle

Ships of this class: Fuso, Yamashiro

The Fuso-class was a more powerful version of the Kongo-class battlecruisers. Outfitted with six twin 14-inch turrets, these ships were
designed with offensive capability in mind and as a result suffered from weak armour. The arrangement of all centreline turrets was not
entirely successful, as the middle Q and R turrets had poor arcs of fire. Between the wars, both ships were modernised with oil-fired boilers,
which reduced their two funnels to one. Armour protection was increased in both quantity and quality and a torpedo bulge added.
Speed: 5
Turning: 1
Target: 4+

Armour: 5+
Special Traits: Aircraft 3, Torpedo Belt
Damage: 36/12 In Service: 1942
Crew: 56/18

Length: 698 ft.

Range
39
39
39
39
39
39
16
7

AD
2
2
2
2
2
2
6
3

DD
2
2
2
2
2
2
1

Displacement: 39,154 tons

Special
AP
AP
AP
AP
AP
AP
Weak

Speed: 24.75 kts.

Crew: 1,400

Hosho-class Light Carrier

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Hosho

From the date of her commission in 1922 to the completion of the


Akagi in 1927, the Hosho served as the most advanced aircraft carrier
in the Imperial Navy, and is often considered the first ship built from
the keel up as a carrier, though she was initially laid down as a tanker
and redesigned during construction. In 1933, she was withdrawn
from the regular fleet and assigned as a training vessel. She remained
in this capacity until the outbreak of the Pacific War and assisted with
a compliment of older aircraft in operations along the Chinese coasts
in 1940. During much of the war, the Hosho was used primarily
for training purposes, but did serve in an air defence capacity at the
Battle of Midway in 1942. Three years later, she sustained damage
during an American air attack. After the war, the Hosho was used as
a repatriation vessel to return Japanese citizens and soldiers home.
Speed: 5
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 11/3
Crew: 22/7

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 541 ft.

The Imperial Japanese Navy

Weapon
A Turret (2 x 14 in)
B Turret (2 x 14 in)
Q Turret (2 x 14 inch)
R Turret (2 x 14 inch)
X Turret (2 x 14 in)
Y Turret (2 x 14 in)
Secondary Armament
AA

Special Traits: Carrier


In Service: 1942
Aircraft: 2 flights of Mitsubishi A5M Claude, and 1 flight of Yokosuka B4Y Jean
Range
15
7

Displacement: 10,500 tons

AD
1
1

DD
1

Speed: 25.0 kts.

Special
Weak

Crew: 550

77

Ise-class Battleship

Battle

Ships of this class: Ise, Hyga

Originally intended as sister ships of the preceding Fuso-class, the Ise-class battleships were considered
sufficiently different to warrant separate classification. Among the differences was a shorter foredeck, a more
closely-grouped secondary armament, a different arrangement of the primary turrets (though the cumbersome
six-twin arrangement was retained). Like most battleships of their era, they retained casemated secondary
armament, and like all Japanese warships of the period, these vessels still relied on mixed (i.e. coal and oil)
firing for their boilers. The values in parenthesis are for Ise-carrier conversion.

The Imperial Japanese Navy

Speed: 5
Turning: 1
Target: 4+

Armour: 5+
Special Traits: Aircraft 3, Torpedo Belt
Damage: 37/12 In Service: 1942 (1943 for carrier version)
Crew: 54/18
Aircraft: 2 flights of Aichi E16A Pauls (carrier version only)

Weapon
A Turret (2 x 14 in)
B Turret (2 x 14 in)
Q Turret (2 x 14 inch)
R Turret (2 x 14 inch)
X Turret (2 x 14 in)
Y Turret (2 x 14 in)
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 708 ft.

Range
39
39
39
39
39
39
15 (11)
7

AD
2
2
2
2
2
2
7 (5)
3 (9)

DD
2
2
2
2
2
2
1

Displacement: 40,169 tons

Special
AP
AP
AP
AP
AP
AP
Weak

Speed: 25.3 kts.

Crew: 1,360

Junyo-class Carrier

Raid

Ships of this class: Hiyo, Junyo

Junyo and Hiyo began life as civilian passenger liners, but were taken
over by the Japanese Navy in 1940 while still on the shipways, and
subsequently converted to carriers. They were equipped with two aircraft
hangars, two lifts, and were the first class of Japanese carriers to have the
funnel incorporated into the structure of the island. Completed in 1942,
Junyo participated in the attacks on US Alaskan bases that accompanied
the Battle of Midway. After the disaster of Midway, she and Hiyo were two
of four large aircraft carriers remaining, and were important units of the
Japanese fleet during the next two years, even though both had a lower
speed and smaller air group than built-for-the-purpose fleet carriers.
Speed: 5
Armour: 2+
Turning: 1
Damage: 28/9
Target: 4+
Crew: 49/16
of Aichi D3A Vals
Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 719 ft.

Special Traits: Carrier


In Service: 1942
Aircraft: 4 flights of Mitsubishi A6M Zeros, 1 flights of Nakajima B5N Kates, and 3 flights

Range
11
7

AD
4
6

DD
1

Displacement: 28,300 tons

Speed: 25.5 kts.

Special
Weak

Crew: 1,224

78

Kaga-class Carrier

Battle

Ships of this class: Kaga

Kaga was originally laid down as a Tosa-class battleship, but the constraints
of newly signed Washington Naval Treaty meant that neither Kaga nor
her sister ship Tosa could be completed. When the aircraft carrier Amagi
was destroyed by an earthquake, while still under construction, it was
decided to replace her with a carrier built on the hull of the incomplete
Kaga. However, the original turret barbettes, magazines and other
equipment to support big gun turrets were retained and the wooden
flight deck designed to be quickly stripped off, thus allowing the rapid conversion of the carrier back to a battleship. However,
by the mid 1930s, the aircraft carrier concept had taken hold and Kaga was extensively rebuilt, ending any possibility of later
converting her to a capital ship.
Speed: 6
Armour: 3+
Special Traits: Carrier
Turning: 1
Damage: 38/12 In Service: 1942
Target: 4+
Crew: 81/27
Aircraft: 4 flights of Mitsubishi A6M Zeros, 5 flights of Nakajima B5N Kates, and 3 flights
of Aichi D3A Vals

Length: 812 ft.

Range
27
27
27
27
11
7

AD
1
1
1
1
5
7

Displacement: 42,541 tons

DD
1
1
1
1
1

Special
Twin-Linked, Port Firing Arc Only
Port Firing Arc Only
Twin-Linked, Starboard Firing Arc Only
Starboard Firing Arc Only
Weak

Speed: 28.3 kts.

Crew: 2,016

Kaiten-class Manned Torpedo

Patrol

The Kaiten was a Type 93 torpedo refitted to carry a pilot on a one-way mission.
The suicide attacks made by these submersibles were even more hazardous than those
carried out by kamikaze aircraft due to poor guidance and control systems - there were
many instances of Kaitens sinking shortly after launch. They were especially vulnerable
to ASW attacks made by aircraft, as they had a very hard time staying at depth.
Speed: 6
Turning: 1
Target: 6+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 1
Crew: 1

Weapon
3,000 lb. Warhead
Length: 48 ft.

The Imperial Japanese Navy

Weapon
Port Turret A (3 x 8 inch)
Port Turret B (2 x 8 inch)
Starboard Turret C (3 x 8 inch)
Starboard Turret D (2 x 8 inch)
Secondary Armament
AA

Special Traits: Submersible


In Service: 1944

Range

Displacement: 9 tons

AD
1

DD
8
Speed: 30 kts.

Special
Super AP
Crew: 1

* The Kaiten uses the Suicide Attack rules found on page 7. They are not automatically destroyed if they miss on their initial
attack roll and may manoeuvre to make further attacks. Before moving a Kaiten, roll one dice; on a 1 the torpedo develops a
fault and is removed from play. The Kaiten may never crash dive and counts as being destroyed if it surfaces. The Kaiten receives
a +1 bonus to its Attack Dice if impacting on a targets beam. ASW aircraft will detect the Kaiten on a 4+ using standard ASW
aircraft rules. Kaitens may be launched from any submarine or surface ship equipped with torpedo tubes. Ships or submarines
that carry a Kaiten lose 2 Attack Dice of torpedoes for the duration of the battle.

79

Kuma-class Light Cruiser/Kitakami-class Torpedo Cruiser

Skirmish/Raid

Ships of this class: Kuma, , Kitakami, Tama

The Kuma-class of light cruisers was a compromise between ocean going scout ships and improved versions of the Tenryu-class.
The goal was the production of an intermediate class cruiser which could act as fleet scout and as a destroyer flotilla command
ship. As a result these 5,500-ton cruisers sacrificed protection for speed and firepower. The Japanese had high hopes for the Long
Lance in the face of the larger American battle line. To that end, the cruisers Oi and the Kitakami were both converted into
torpedo cruisers. They traded half of the main 5.5-inch guns and the aircraft catapult for no less
than 40 torpedo tubes. By the time they rejoined the fleet, Allied forces would no longer accept
night battles except when supported by radar. Even the great range of the Long Lance could not
compete with radar directed gunfire.

The Imperial Japanese Navy

Speed: 7
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 6/2
Crew: 18/6

Special Traits: Aircraft 1 (0 for Kitakami-class)


In Service: 1942 (1941 for Kitakami-class)

Weapon (Kuma-class)
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes

Range
15
7
20
20

AD
3
1
2
2

DD
1

5
5

Special
Weak

One-Shot, Super AP
One-Shot, Super AP

Weapon( Kitakami-class)
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes

Range
15
7
20
20

AD
1
1
10
10

DD
1

5
5

Special
Weak

One-Shot, Super AP
One-Shot, Super AP

* Due to insufficient fire control capabilities, the Kitakami-class may not fire its secondary armament and torpedoes in the same
turn. Further, no more than two targets may be selected for torpedo attacks.
Length: 532 ft.

Displacement: 5,832 tons

Speed: 36 kts.

Crew: 439

Matsu-class Destroyer Escort

Patrol

Ships of this class: Matsu, Momo, Take, Ume,

The Matsu-class escort destroyers were designed as a replacement of naval losses with a shortage of raw materials in mind. They
had a simplified design and were made for swift construction. Despite having a displacement half of previous destroyers, the
Matsu were still heavily armed with anti-aircraft weaponry and quadruple torpedo tubes. Originally ordered in the 1942 Program,
a total of eighteen were built by wars end. The Tachibana-class was a simple Matsu-class designed to cut construction time from
six months to three. A total of thirty-three destroyers were planned but only thirteen were fully completed by wars end.
Speed: 6
Turning: 2
Target: 6+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 3/1
Crew: 8/2

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Depth Charges
Length: 328 ft.

Special Traits: Agile


In Service: 1944

Range
11
5
20
20
3

AD
1
3
2
2
3

DD
1

5
5
2

Displacement: 1,580 tons

Speed: 27.8 kts.

Special
Weak

One-Shot, Super AP
One-Shot, Super AP
Slow-Loading
Crew: 211

80

Myoko-class Heavy Cruiser

Raid

Ships of this class: Ashigara, Haguro, Myoko, Nachi

The Myoko-class heavy cruisers were the first designed after the signing of the
Washington Naval Treaty. As a result, they were the first built under the limitations
imposed by the treaty - design specifications were such that these cruisers would
be more heavily armed, better armoured, and with significantly better underwater
protection than their predecessors, the Aoba-class. All while retaining a 35+ knot
top speed. The resulting cruiser was equipped with five twin 8-inch turrets backed
up with sixteen torpedo tubes. The armour belt was an integral part of the hull
strength, and used an undulating flush deck arrangement and, in an unusual addition for cruisers of the time, an anti-torpedo
bulge was incorporated. Unsurprisingly, the new cruisers exceeded the 10,000 ton treaty limit by nearly 1,000 tons.
Speed: 7
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 13/4
Crew: 31/10

Length: 668 ft.

Range
33
33
33
33
33
11
7
20
20

AD
1
1
1
1
1
2
3
4
4

Displacement: 13,300 tons

DD
1
1
1
1
1
1

5
5
Speed: 35.5 kts.

Special

Weak

Slow-Loading, Super AP
Slow-Loading, Super AP
Crew: 773

Oyodo-class Light Cruiser

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Oyodo

The Oyodo-class was originally designed to act as a flagship for scouting submarine fleets. To that end, they were to be equipped
with two triple 6-inch guns (previously removed from one of the Mogami-class cruisers) forward, and an oversized catapult to
handle six E15k reconnaissance seaplanes aft. Two cruisers were initially authorised, but immediately after Oyodos completion,
all available shipbuilding resources at that yard were reassigned to aircraft carriers. Also, the E15K planes were not ready. Finally,
her original role as submarine command ship was already deemed untenable.
Instead, for a short time she was the flagship of Third Fleet. Later she
became a Combined Fleet flagship when her oversized catapult was replaced
with a smaller, more conventional one and her large hangar converted to
accommodate Fleet Headquarters staff.
Speed: 7
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 11/3
Crew: 24/8

Weapon
A Turret (3 x 6 in)
B Turret (3 x 6 in)
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 630 ft.

The Imperial Japanese Navy

Weapon
A Turret (2 x 8 in)
B Turret (2 x 8 in)
Q Turret (2 x 8 inch)
X Turret (2 x 8 in)
Y Turret (2 x 8 in)
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes

Special Traits: Aircraft 3, Torpedo Belt


In Service: 1942

Special Traits: Aircraft 2


In Service: 1943

Range
30
30
15
7
Displacement: 11,433 tons

AD
1
1
1
2

DD
1
1
1

Speed: 35 kts.

Special
Twin-Linked, Weak
Twin-Linked, Weak
Weak

Crew: 600

81

Ryuho-class Light Carrier

Raid

Ships of this class: Ryuho

The Ryuho entered service as the submarine depot ship Taigei. She
was subsequently removed from service and converted into a light
aircraft carrier. During conversion, Ryuho gained the distinction
of being the only major warship damaged in the Doolittle Raid,
receiving one direct hit. Here wartime career was mostly that of aircraft ferrying and pilot training. However, in 1944 she sailed
with the Combined Fleet to participate in the First Battle of the Philippine Sea, where her flight group was decimated for no hits
against the American fleet.
Speed: 6
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 14/4
Crew: 31/10

The Imperial Japanese Navy

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 707 ft.

Special Traits: Carrier


In Service: 1942
Aircraft: 5 flights of Mitsubishi A6M Zeros, and 1 flight of Nakajima B5N Kates
Range
11
7

AD
2
5

DD
1

Displacement: 16,700 tons

Speed: 26.5 kts.

Special
Weak

Crew: 989

Ryujo-class Light Carrier

Raid

Ships of this class: Ryujo

Ryujo was a one-off design intended to fill out the remaining tonnage allowed
by the Washington Naval treaty. Soon after completion it was discovered that
she, along with nearly an entire generation of warships, were incapable of safe
operation in the open ocean, having attempted to squeeze too much fighting
power into too small hulls. As a result, Ryujo was returned to the shipyards for
three years of extensive reconstruction. Despite these changes, she would see
further reconstruction in 1940.
Speed: 6
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 14/4
Crew: 37/12

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 590 ft.

Special Traits: Carrier


In Service: 1942
Aircraft: 3 flights of Mitsubishi A6M Zeros, and 3 flights of Nakajima B5N Kates
Range
11
7

AD
2
4

DD
1

Displacement: 13,650 tons

Speed: 29.0 kts.

Special
Weak

Crew: 924

82

Shinano-class Support Carrier

Battle

Ships of this class: Shinano

Shinano was laid down as the third of five projected Yamato-class battleships, but construction was suspended prior to the war.
Following the disastrous losses at the Battle of Midway, Shinano was selected for conversion to an aircraft carrier. She was the
largest aircraft carrier, by tonnage, until the commissioning of the supercarrier USS Forrestal, eleven years later. Shinano was
designed as a support carrier, using its extensive machine shops and large fuel capacity to service aircraft operating on other
carriers. She would have a very small operational air group of her
own but a large number of unassigned aircraft to replace losses
on other carriers. Nearly complete, Shinano, escorted by four
destroyers, sailed for Kure for further outfitting. At the time,
none of her internal protection was complete and her crew had
little training in damage control procedures. Within a few hours
of sailing, she was torpedo by the submarine USS Archer-Fish.
Despite four torpedo hits she managed to remain under way.
However, the inexperienced crew was unable to contain the
flooding and Shinano sank several hours later.
Speed: 5
Turning: 1
Target: 4+

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 872 ft.

Range
12
7

AD
7
17

Displacement: 71,890 tons

DD
1

Speed: 27.0 kts.

Special
Weak

Crew: 2400

Shimakaze-class Destroyer

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Shimakaze

Shimakaze was experimental one-off design which resulted in an


extraordinarily large and fast heavy destroyer equipped with no
less than fifteen torpedoes in three quintuple mounts. Ordered
in the 1939 Program, she was the fastest destroyer built by Japan
throughout the war, with an advanced power plant that would prove
to be too expensive to mass-produce. As a result, the original plan for
sixteen ships of her class came to no avail. Shimakaze was sunk by US
Navy carrier-based aircraft in the Philippines area, on 11th November
1944.
Speed: 8
Turning: 2
Target: 6+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 3/1
Crew: 11/3

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Depth Charges
Length: 413 ft.

The Imperial Japanese Navy

Armour: 4+
Special Traits: Armoured Deck, Carrier, Torpedo Belt
Damage: 54/18 In Service: 1944
Crew: 96/32
Aircraft: 4 flights of Mitsubishi A6M Zeros, 1 flights of Nakajima B6N Jills, and 3 flights
of Aichi D4Y Judys

Special Traits: Agile


In Service: 1943

Range
12
5
20
20
3
Displacement: 3,048 tons

AD
1
2
8
8
1

DD
1

5
5
2
Speed: 39 kts.

Special
Weak

Super AP, One-Shot


Super AP, One-Shot
Slow-Loading
Crew: 267

83

Shiratsuyu-class Destroyer

Patrol

Ships of this class: Harusame, Samidare, Shiratsuyu, Yudachi

The Shiratsuyu-class destroyers were modified versions of the Hatsuharu-class, and emerged after Japanese designers corrected the
problem of top heavy ships, a problem that had plagued earlier designs. These ships were the first to equip the quadruple torpedo
launcher, carried in two centreline mounts. A total of ten destroyers of this class were produced, the most famous the Shigure.
Speed: 7
Turning: 2
Target: 6+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 3/1
Crew: 7/2

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedo
Starboard Torpedo
Depth Charges

The Imperial Japanese Navy

Length: 353 ft.

Special Traits: Agile


In Service: 1936

Range
12
5
20
20
3

AD
1
1
4
4
2

DD
1

5
5
2

Displacement: 1,980 tons

Speed: 34 kts.

Special
Weak

Slow-Loading, Super AP
Slow-Loading, Super AP
Slow-Loading
Crew: 180

Soryu/Hiryu-class Carrier

Raid

Ships of this class: Soryu, Hiryu

Soryu and Hiryu were typically considered separate classes, but were really semi-sisters. Soryu was slightly smaller and featured a
starboard island, while Hiryu featured a port side island. As opposed to some earlier Japanese carriers these carriers were designed
from the start as aircraft carriers. The values in parenthesis are for the Hiryu.
Speed: 7
Armour: 2+ (3+)
Turning: 2 (1) Damage: 20/6 (22/7)
Target: 4+
Crew: 50/16 (44/14)

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 746 ft.

Special Traits: Carrier


In Service: 1942
Aircraft: 4 flights of Mitsubishi A6M Zeros, 3 flights of Nakajima B5N Kates,
and 2 flights of Aichi D3A Vals

Range
11
7

AD
4
6

DD
1

Displacement: 19,800 (21,900) tons

Special
Weak

Speed: 34.5 (34.3) kts.

Crew: 1,250 (1,101)

Taiho-class Carrier

Raid

Ships of this class: Taiho

Taiho had an armoured flight deck, and an enclosed hurricane bow, unfortunately reducing the size of the hanger bay. She was
sunk during the Battle of the Philippine Sea, when a torpedo attack from the USS Albacore resulted in damage that lead to the
ignition of fuel vapours that had spread throughout the ship as a result of poor damage control.
Speed: 7
Turning: 1
Target: 4+

Armour: 3+
Special Traits: Armoured Deck, Carrier
Damage: 35/11 In Service: 1944
Crew: 70/23
Aircraft: 4 flights of Mitsubishi A6M Zeros, 3 flights of Nakajima B6N Jills, and 4 flights
of Aichi D4Y Judys

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 855 ft.

Range
15
7

AD
2
6

DD
1

Displacement: 37,720 tons

Speed: 33.3 kts.

Special
Weak

Crew: 1,751

84

Tenryu-class Light Cruiser

Patrol

Ships of this class: Tatsuta, Tenryu

The Tenryu-class consisted of a pair of 3,230-ton light cruisers which were intended to act as destroyer leaders. Their design was
essentially that of an enlarged version of a destroyer, with speed emphasized along with the brand new 5.5in gun. Anti-aircraft
weapons were essentially non-existent, amounting to little more than an elderly 3-inch cannon and a pair of light machine guns.
Despite refits in the 1930s, neither cruiser was equipped with the new 24-inch long lance and were thus forced to continue
relying on their older 21-inch type. In the opening stages of World War II, both cruisers were typically assigned as escorts to the
various assault troop convoys and then later as fast transports to Guadalcanal. Tenryu was lost early in the war to a submarine
torpedo attack. Tatsuta was lost approximately two years later to another submarine torpedo attack.
Speed: 7
Turning: 2
Target: 6+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 4/1
Crew: 13/4

Length: 468 ft.

Range
15
7
20
20
3

AD
1
1
3
3
2

Displacement: 3,948 tons

DD
1

4
4
2
Speed: 33 kts.

Special
Weak

AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot
Slow-Loading
Crew: 332

Tone-class Heavy Cruiser

Raid

Ships of this class: Chikuma , Tone

Like the Mogami-class, the Tone-class was originally designed as a series of light cruisers. Their mission was to act as the eyes of the
cruiser fleet. To that end, the Tone-class placed their main armament of four turrets forward of the bridge. This left the aft decks
free for reconnaissance aircraft usage, of which five were carried. Armour was consistent with heavy cruisers of the period but, like
the Myoko-class, the Tone-class included a sizable torpedo bulge. Originally designed with
triple 6-inch turrets, delays in their construction meant that the terms of the Washington
Naval Treaty ended before their completion. It was therefore decided to complete both ships
as heavy cruisers, replacing the 6-inch turrets with twin 8-inch turrets. Neither ship survived
the Pacific War, though both were only sunk late in the war. Chikuma was sunk by American
aircraft at Leyte Gulf, while Tone was also sunk by American aircraft less than a year later.
Speed: 7
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 15/5
Crew: 26/8

Weapon
A Turret (2 x 8 in)
B Turret (2 x 8 in)
Q Turret (2 x 8 inch)
R Turret (2 x 8 in)
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Length: 661 ft.

The Imperial Japanese Navy

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedo
Starboard Torpedo
Depth Charges

Special Traits: None


In Service: 1942

Special Traits: Aircraft 5


In Service: 1938

Range
33
33
33
33
11
7
20
20
Displacement: 15,200 tons

AD
1
1
1
1
2
3
3
3

DD
1
1
1
1
1

5
5
Speed: 35 kts.

Special

Weak

Slow-Loading, Super AP
Slow-Loading, Super AP
Crew: 650

85

Yubari-class Light Cruiser

Patrol

Ships of this class: Yubari

The Yubari was an experimental design, intended to demonstrate the feasibility of


mounting a heavy armament in a small hull. Construction was originally planned
to begin 1917, but was delayed 1920. Design plans were along the lines of the
Furutaka-class cruisers also proposed that year, with the armoured belt forming
part of the ships integral strength. Armament centred around six 5.5-inch guns,
in two single and two twin mountings. One 3-inch anti-aircraft gun and two
machine guns rounded the gunnery outfit, while a pair of twin torpedo tubes
amidships in destroyer fashion provided her heavy hitting power. By 1943, the
single 5.5-inch guns had been replaced with additional, much-needed anti-aircraft guns. Fairly active throughout the war, Yubari,
like so many other Japanese vessels, would be torpedoed and sunk by a US submarine in 1944.

The Imperial Japanese Navy

Speed: 7
Turning: 2
Target: 6+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 4/1
Crew: 13/4

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Depth Charges
Length: 456 ft.

Special Traits: Agile


In Service: 1942

Range
15
7
20
20
3

AD
2
1
2
2
2

DD
1

5
5
2

Displacement: 4,448 tons

Speed: 34.8 kts.

Special
Weak

Slow-Loading, Super AP
Slow-Loading, Super AP
Slow-Loading
Crew: 328

Zuiho-class Light Carrier

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Shoho, Zuiho

In 1936, the decision was made to complete the submarine depot ship
Takasaki, then still under construction, into a carrier. Work on this
project was delayed till 1940, but was completed by December that year.
The carrier was renamed Zuiho. A sister ship, the Shoho, entered service
in two years later. Both ships were equipped with one hangar and their
original diesel motors were replaced with destroyer level turbines and
boilers. Shoho would be sunk early in the war to American dive bombing
and torpedo attacks during the Battle of the Coral Sea. She was the first
carrier loss to the Japanese navy in the Pacific War. The Zuiho lasted until
the end of 1944, when she was destroyed via a combination of torpedoes
and bombs at the Battle of Cape Engano.
Speed: 6
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 14/4
Crew: 31/10

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 672 ft.

Special Traits: Carrier


In Service: 1940
Aircraft: 2 flights of Mitsubishi A6M Zeros and 2 flights of Aichi D3A Vals
Range
11
7

AD
2
3

DD
1

Displacement: 14,200 tons

Speed: 28 kts.

Special
Weak

Crew: 785

86

Aircraft

The following describes new air support for the Imperial Japanese Navy. The full details of each flight can be found on page 20.
Yokosuka D4Y2 Judy: Built as a replacement for the D3A Val, the D4Y2 entered service in large numbers
in 1943. Powered by a liquid cooled V-12 engine (based on German Daimler-Benz DB 600G), the Allied
designated Judy was extremely nimble and was the fastest dive bomber of World War II.
Aichi E16A Paul: This late model twin-float reconnaissance seaplane, designated by the Allies as
Paul, was given hydraulically-actuated dive brakes to allow the E16A to operate as a dive-bomber.
Unfortunately for the Navy, by the time the E16A1 entered service the Allies had gained air
superiority and in consequence these aircraft suffered very heavy losses during 1944. The majority
which survived were later used for Kamikaze operations in the Okinawa area.
Nakajima B6N Jill: The Nakajima B6N Tenzan, designated by the Allies as Jill, was the
Imperial Japanese Navys standard torpedo bomber for the final years of World War II.
Although a highly-effective torpedo bomber, by the time it reached service, the US Navy had
already achieved air superiority over the Pacific, and the type never really had the opportunity
to display its full potential.

Yokosuka B4Y1 Jean: The B4Y1 was regarded only as an interim type by the Japanese
Imperial Navy. The design was a bi-plane with fixed landing gear and an all-metal structure
covered with either metal or fabric. Although primarily used as a carrier-based aircraft,
the B4Y1 was also used as a land-based bomber on occasion. Despite being removed
from frontline naval service by the start of World War II, B4Y1 were operated from the
aircraft carrier Hosho during the Battle of Midway. The B4Y1 aircraft more typically used
as advanced trainers, flying from the carriers Hosho and Unyo until 1943.

The Imperial Japanese Navy

Mitsubishi A5M4 Claude: The Mitsubishi A5M was the worlds first monoplane
shipboard fighter and the direct ancestor of the famous Mitsubishi A6M Zero.
Some A5Ms were still in service at the beginning of World War II and United States
intelligence sources believed the A5M was still the primary Navy fighter, and not the
Zero. Some second line aircraft carriers and air groups continued to use the A5M until
production of the Zero caught up with demand. Most remaining airframes were used
for kamikaze attacks in the closing months of the war.

MXY Okha: The Okha rocket bomb was a suicide aircraft deployed near the end of the
war. The rocket bomb wass released from its carrying plane and would glide until its rocket
engine was engaged to take the aircraft on a high-speed attack run. 850 of these suicide
aircraft were built, most of which were the Type 11. There were variants, but none were
actually used in the war.
Ki-115 Tsurgi: The Ki-115 was a purpose-built suicide aircraft deployed by the Japanese
at the end of World War II. Built of canvas and wood, it was cheap to produce, and had
very crude controls. The Ki-115 was intended to be used in waves of hundreds, with a
projected 8,000 a month to be built. The war ended before the Tsurgi could be deployed
in the numbers intended by the Japanese admiralty.

87

The Italian Navy


It is interesting to speculate what the Italian navy could have achieved had it been better led or handled. Italian enthusiasm for the
war was noticeably lacking, and this led to lacklustre performances in the air, on the ground and at sea. The resulting reputation
for lack of nerve is not really deserved; Italian troops and ships at times fought bravely, especially for a commander or a cause
they believed in, and in other wars of recent history there was nothing wrong with Italian courage or fighting ability. It seems
likely that, had the personnel of the Italian Navy really believed in their cause, their excellent battleships and cruisers might have
covered themselves with glory.

Errata

The following official changes should be made to ships in the Victory at Sea main rulebook.
Littorio-class battleship: Add Torpedo Belt trait.

The Italian Navy Expanded Fleet List

The following forms the expanded fleet list for the Italian Navy. The fleet special rules noted below also apply.

The Italian Navy

Priority Level: Patrol


Adua-class submarine
Navigatori-class destroyer
Priority Level: Skirmish
Abruzzi-class light cruiser
Etna-class light anti-aircraft cruiser
cruiser
Zara-class cruiser

Capitani Romani-class light cruiser

Marcello-class submarine

Da Barbiano-class light cruiser


Luigi Cadorna-class light cruiser

Duca DAosta-class light cruiser


Raimondo Montecuccoli-class light

Priority Level: Raid


Aquila-class defence carrier

Trento-class cruiser

Priority Level: Battle


Caio Duilio-class battleship

Conte di Cavour-class Battleship

Priority Level: War


Littorio-class battleship

Special Rules

The following special rules are applied to fleets of the Italian Navy.

German Radar: Towards the end of the war, a number of Italian ships received Radar sets provided by Germany. Those Italian
ships which have Radar will have a Special Trait which says Radar(German). These systems have the same limitations as those used
by the Germans (see the Victory at Sea main rulebook).
Lack of coordination: One of the things that characterised the performance of the Italian fleet was the lack of co-ordination
between the Aviation and the Fleet. In fact, Aviation needed orders from the supreme command, rather than directly from the
fleets admiral. If an Italian fleet possesses any flights of aircraft, it will suffer a 1 penalty to its Initiative. The penalty does not
apply for carrier launched aircraft, observation aircraft or a fleet that consists entirely of aircraft.

88

Abruzzi-class Light Cruiser

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Abruzzi, Luigi Di Savoia

The Abruzzi-class was the final version of the Condottieri concept to see service, and
represented a considerable advance on the previous classes. Although their outward
appearance was not too dissimilar, they had many important changes, particularly
regarding the protective scheme, for with this class the Italian navy finally decided to
compromise speed for better protection. Not only was the weight of armour increased, it
was also distributed in a better manner, which included a thin strake designed to trigger
the fuses of incoming shells before they reached the main protection, splinter protection
for the upper deck, extension of the main armoured deck to full beam, and considerably
thickened barbette and turret armour.
Speed: 7
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 12/4
Crew: 26/8

Length: 563 ft.

Range
29
29
29
29
12
6
10
10

AD
1
1
1
1
4
3
2
2

Displacement: 11,760 tons

DD
1
1
1
1
1

3
3
Speed: 34 kts.

Special
Twin-Linked, Weak
Weak
Weak
Twin-Linked, Weak
Weak
AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot
Crew: 640

Aquila-class Defence Carrier

Raid

Ships of this class: Aquila

The Italian Navy

Weapon
A Turret (3 x 6 in)
B Turret (2 x 6 in)
X Turret (2 x 6 in)
Y Turret (3 x 6 in)
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes

Special Traits: Aircraft 4


In Service: 1937

The role of aircraft carriers was undervalued by the Regia Marina, as the navy was
expected to operate in the Mediterranean, close to Italian air bases. This attitude was
best expressed by Mussolini who said Italy itself is an aircraft carrier laid over the
Mediterranean. Accordingly, the fleet air coverage was the responsibility of the Regia
Aeronautica. The Regia Marina would request, on a case by case basis, air coverage
to Regia Aeronautica, which would fulfil these requests if aircraft were available.
Unsurprisingly, this arrangement often left the fleet without air cover, or with the aircraft
arriving to late, or, worse, the aircraft mistakenly attacking Italian ships (as during the
battle of Calabria). When the necessity for an air component travelling with the fleet was clear, it was decided to convert the ocean liner
Roma into an aircraft carrier. As there was already a battleship under construction named Roma, the new carrier was renamed Aquila.
She was nearly complete at the time of the armistice in September 1943, after which she was seized by Germany. Before anything could
be done with her, the Aquila was damaged by a series of Allied air attacks and soon after she was partially scuttled by Italian frogmen.
Speed: 6
Turning: 1
Target: 4+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 28/9
Crew: 57/19

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 680 ft.

Special Traits: Armoured Deck, Carrier


In Service: 1943 (planned)
Aircraft: 11 flights of Re.2001
Range
15
6

Displacement: 28,350 tons

AD
2
10

DD
1

Speed: 30 kts.

Special
Weak

Crew: 1420

89

Capitani Romani-class Light Cruiser

Patrol

Ships of this class: Attilio Regolo, Ciao Marlo, Claudio Druso, Claudio Tiberio, Comello Silla, Giulio Germanico,
Ottaviano Augusto, Paolo Emilio, Pompeo Magno

The construction of the large Le Fantasque and Mogador classes of contretorpilleur by France from the beginning of the 1930s led to some concern
as Italian large destroyers, like the Navigatori-class, would be inferior to the
new French ships. Design work was thus started in 1937 on the esploratori
oceanici (Ocean Scouts). Protection was minimal, limited to some vital parts,
and the maximum speed would be about 41 kts. However, by the late 1930s
the capabilities of reconnaissance aircraft had improved considerably, rendering the need for pure scouting vessels somewhat
superfluous. In consequence, the smaller scouts were reclassified as destroyers and the larger as light cruisers. Only three of the
twelve units ordered entered service with the Italian Navy before the surrender in September 1943.
Speed: 8
Turning: 2
Target: 6+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 5/1
Crew: 17/5

The Italian Navy

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Length: 455 ft.

Special Traits: Radar(German)


In Service: 1942

Range
15
6
10
10

AD
2
2
2
2

DD
1

3
3

Displacement: 5,420 tons

Speed: 40 kts.

Special
Weak
AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot
Crew: 418

Conte di Cavour-class Battleship

Battle

Ships of this class: Conte di Cavour, Giulio Cesare, Leonardo da Vinci


Originally commissioned in 1915, Conte di Cavour and Giulio Cesare (Leonardo da Vinci
was destroyed by sabotage during World War 1) were rebuilt as first generation fast
battleships in a process that left only 40% of the original structure in place. The central
tower was removed, as was one main battery turret. The remaining guns of the same were
upgraded from 305 mm to 320 mm. The new boilers and turbines improved speed from
21.5 knots to 28 knots. Overall, they were good units, even if with weak anti-aircraft and
submarine protections.
Speed: 6
Turning: 1
Target: 5+

Armour: 5+
Damage: 29/9
Crew: 50/16

Weapon
A Turret (3 x 12.6 in)
B Turret (2 x 12.6 in)
X Turret (2 x 12.6 in)
Y Turret (3 x 12.6 in)
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 611 ft.

Special Traits: None


In Service: 1939

Range
33
33
33
33
17
6

AD
3
2
2
3
2
5

DD
2
2
2
2
1

Displacement: 29,100 tons

Speed: 28 kts.

Special

Weak

Crew: 1,261

90

Da Barbiano-class Light Cruiser

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Alberto Di Giussano, Alberico Da Barbiano, Bartolomeo Colleoni, Giovanni Delle Bande Nere
The construction of the French contre-torpilleurs forced the Italian Navy to consider
countermeasures which included a class of large scout cruisers. These ships sacrificed almost all
protection for speed and superior gunpower, like the contre-torpilleurs. The machinery applied
to these cruisers resulted in some very fast and misleading speeds of 42 kts. Part of the reason
was the policy of the Italian Government, which paid a premium to builders for every knot
above the ships contract speed. Unsurprisingly, the builders took every advantage of this and
often forced machinery beyond safe limits. Eventually the practice was stopped as these artificial
speeds bore no resemblance to service speeds.

Speed: 7
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 7/2
Crew: 20/6

Length: 525 ft.

Range
29
29
29
29
12
6
10
10

AD
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

Displacement: 6,954 tons

DD
1
1
1
1
1

3
3
Speed: 36.5 kts.

Special
Weak
Weak
Weak
Weak
Weak
AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot
Crew: 507

Duca DAosta-class Light Cruiser

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Emanuele Filiberto Duca DAosta, Eugenio Di Savoia,

The Italian Navy

Weapon
A Turret (2 x 6 in)
B Turret (2 x 6 in)
X Turret (2 x 6 in)
Y Turret (2 x 6 in)
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes

Special Traits: Aircraft 2


In Service: 1931

This class was yet another extension of the Condottieri concept, and represented another step on the way to producing a good,
all-round cruiser design. It was desired to improve the stability and protection once more, while keeping the armament similar
to that of the previous class. In this new design the weight of armour was increased still more over that of the Montecuccoli.
On trials, following the normal Italian practice of light displacement and forced machinery, the impressive speeds of 37.35Kts
(dAosta) and 37.33kts (Savoia) were achieved.
Speed: 7
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 11/3
Crew: 23/7

Weapon
A Turret (2 x 6 in)
B Turret (2 x 6 in)
X Turret (2 x 6 in)
Y Turret (2 x 6 in)
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Length: 563 ft.

Special Traits: Aircraft 2


In Service: 1935

Range
29
29
29
29
12
6
10
10
Displacement: 10,843 tons

AD
1
1
1
1
4
3
2
2

DD
1
1
1
1
1

3
3
Speed: 36.5 kts.

Special
Weak
Weak
Weak
Weak
Weak
AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot
Crew: 578

91

Etna-class Light Anti-Aircraft Cruiser

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Etna, Vesuvio

In 1939, Siam (now Thailand) placed on order for a pair of general purpose light cruisers which were to be built in Italian yards.
These hulls were subsequently taken over by Italy in 1942, with plans to complete them as anti-aircraft cruisers which also could
also serve as flagships. Designated the Etna-class, the two ships were to be equipped with with six 152mm guns in three newly
designed dual purpose twin mounts. In addition, ten of the the equally new 65mm heavy anti-aircraft guns currently being
designed for the Capitani Romani-class of light cruisers would also be carried, backed by a large number of lighter anti-aricraft
guns. Both ships were still under construction when they were captured by German troops after the surrender of Italy in 1943.
To prevent their use by the Germans, the ships were sunk by the retreating Italians.
Speed: 6
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 6/2
Crew: 23/7

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 505 ft.

Special Traits: Radar(German)


In Service: 1944 (planned)

Range
15
6

AD
2
7

DD
1

Displacement: 6,096 tons

Special
Weak

Speed: 28 kts.

Crew: 580

The Italian Navy

Luigi Cadorna-class Light Cruiser

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Armando Diaz, Luigi Cadorna


Ordered by the Italian Navy as a follow on to the Da Barbiano-class, these two ships had
similar characteristics but were intended to have improved protection and stability. However,
protection ended up being virtually the same, but stability and hull strength were improved.
Otherwise these ships showed no improvement in fighting power over the earlier Da
Barbiano. A late war refit removed would see the removal of the catapult and two aircraft
originally carried for additional light anti-aircraft weapons.

Speed: 7
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 7/2
Crew: 20/6

Weapon
A Turret (2 x 6 in)
B Turret (2 x 6 in)
X Turret (2 x 6 in)
Y Turret (2 x 6 in)
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Length: 525 ft.

Special Traits: None


In Service: 1933

Range
29
29
29
29
12
3
10
10

AD
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1

DD
1
1
1
1
1

3
3

Displacement: 7,113 tons

Speed: 36.5 kts.

Special
Weak
Weak
Weak
Weak
Weak
AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot
Crew: 507

92

Marcello-class Submarine

Patrol

Ships of this class: Barbarigo, Comandante Cappellini, Comandante Fa di Bruno, Dandolo, Emo, Marcello, Monfalcone,
Mocenigo, Morosini, Nani, Provana, Veniero
Compared to a German Class VII C submarine, the Marcellos were much larger, displacing
1,060 tons versus 769. Speed and range between the two classes were almost similar, but
the Marcello had more torpedo tubes than the famous U-Boat. The Marcello-class should
be considered one of the most successful produced by the Italian shipyards and showed very
good qualities; they were fast, structurally robust and relatively manoeuvrable.
Speed: 4/2
Turning: 3
Target: 6+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 3/1
Crew: 3/1

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Forward Torpedoes
Aft Torpedoes
Length: 239 ft.

Special Traits: Agile, Submersible


In Service: 1938

Range
12
1
10
10

AD
1
1
2
2

Displacement: 1,313 tons

DD
1

3
3
Speed: 18/8.5 kts.

Special
Slow-Loading, Weak
AP, Slow-Loading
AP, Slow-Loading
Crew: 57

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Muzio Attendolo, Raimondo Montecuccoli


These two ships continued the improvement of the Condottieri type begun with
the Da Barbiano-class. In comparison to the preceding Luigi Cadorna-class, the new
ships were some 2,000 tons larger, with increased beam and length but without any
noticeable increase in fighting power. However, one of the main benefits of this
increase in displacement was better protection, with increases provided in all areas.

Speed: 7
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 9/3
Crew: 20/6

Weapon
A Turret (2 x 6 in)
B Turret (2 x 6 in)
X Turret (2 x 6 in)
Y Turret (2 x 6 in)
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Depth Charges
Length: 545 ft.

Special Traits: Aircraft 2


In Service: 1935

Range
29
29
29
29
12
6
10
10
3
Displacement: 8,995 tons

AD
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1

DD
1
1
1
1
1

3
3
1
Speed: 37 kts.

The Italian Navy

Raimondo Montecuccoli-class Light Cruiser

Special
Weak
Weak
Weak
Weak
Weak
AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot
Slow-Loading
Crew: 578

93

Aircraft

The following describes new air support for the Italian Navy. The full details of each flight can be found on page 21.
Breda Ba.201: The first purpose built dive bomber developed for the Regia Aeronautica, the Ba.201
was a clean low-wing monoplane with an inverted gull wing. Highly praised by test pilots, except
for a disappointing maximum speed, development work was expanded to include a carrier based
derivative to be deployed on the carrier Aquila. Unfortunately, all available Daimler-Benz DB 601
engines were to be used for fighters, and without a suitable replacement, development of the Ba.201
was abandoned.
Fiat G.50 Freccia: The Fiat G.50 Freccia was the first Italian low-wing monoplane fighter
with an enclosed cockpit and retractable landing gear to go into production, though
Italian pilots felt uncomfortable with the enclosed cockpit itself. Extremely manoeuvrable
thanks to its license built German Daimler-Benz engine, the Freccia was one of the best
fighters during the Spanish Civil War, yet by the time the World War II started, it was
considered underpowered and under armed.

The Italian Navy

Junkers JU-87: Made famous by Germany in the early stages of the war, the Stuka was a welcome addition to the Italian air
force. Italian Stukas took part in the first direct attack on Malta where they enjoyed initial success, but their vulnerability to
enemy fighters remained.
Macchi MC.202 Folgore: The Macchi MC.202 Folgore was a development of its earlier MC.200
Saetta fighter, with a more powerful German Daimler-Benz engine. It proved superior to the Curtiss
P-40 and the Hawker Hurricane and was considered to be a match for the Supermarine Spitfire
Mk. V and the North American P-51 Mustang. Unsurprisingly, Italian pilots loved the plane, and
by late 1942 the Folgores outnumbered all other fighter aircraft in the Regia Aeronautica.
Reggiane Re.2001 Falco II: The Reggiane Re.2001 Falco II served in the Regia
Aeronautica throughout World War II. The new Re.2001 Hawk was an improvement
of the originalRe.2000 which was originally rejected by the Regia Aeronautica because
of its poor engine. Despite being considered on par with the Macchi MC.202, the
Re.2001 was never produced to the same levels. Instead, the Re.2001 was primarily
used as a night fighter, though plans and prototypes were developed converting the
plane into a carrier-based fighter for the unfinished Aquila.
Savoia Marchetti SM.79: A successful design, the Savoia Marchetti SM.79
served as the primary torpedo bomber in the Regia Aeronautica throughout the
war. Originally seeing action in the Spanish Civil War, where the plane served
with distinction, she was a fast bomber that was well suited for torpedo attacks.
Designed in the mid-1930s as a passenger transport, the aircraft was soon
converted to military use and proved to be a reliable bomber, although as the war
progressed was found to be vulnerable to newer, faster, fighter aircraft. Italo Balbo,
the heir apparent to Mussolini, was killed in a friendly fire incident at Tobruk
whilst a passenger in his personal SM.79.

94

The French Navy


It is interesting to speculate how the French fleet might have affected the course of the war, consisting as it did of eight battleships
(with another under construction), an aircraft carrier, seven heavy and 11 light cruisers, 59 destroyers and 81 submarines. This
powerful force was built up to support Frances traditional position as a maritime and colonial power, and was sufficient to
influence events in any theatre. French vessels fought on both sides during the war. The battleship Richelieu served with the allies,
mainly in south-east Asia and with the British East Indies Fleet. Her sister Jean Bart, partially completed and with only one turret
operational, was deployed to Casablanca where she saw action against US forces and was heavily damaged. A number of other
French vessels were lost in the same action, attempting to prevent Allied landings in Algeria and Morocco. French vessel losses to
combat and related causes included 9 cruisers, 39 destroyers and 61 submarines during the course of the war.

Errata

The following official changes should be made to ships in the Victory at Sea main rulebook.
Algerie Class Heavy Cruiser: Anti-Aircraft AD should be 3 and not 2.

Dunkerque-class battleship: A and B turrets should have the AP trait.


Le-Fantasque Class Destroyer: Anti-Aircraft Secondary Weapons AD should be 2 and not 1, Depth Charge AD should be 1
and not 4.

The following forms the expanded fleet list for the French Navy.
Priority Level: Patrol
Argonaute/Diane/Orion-class submarine
Le Fantasque-class destroyer

Bourrasque-class destroyer
Mogador-class destroyer

Chacal-class destroyer

Priority Level: Skirmish


Algerie-class cruiser
Emile Bertain-class cruiser
Suffren-class cruiser

Duguay Trouin-class cruiser


Jeanne dArc-class cruiser
Surcouf-class submarine

Duquesne-class cruiser
La Galissonniere-class cruiser

Courbet-class battleship

Dunkerque-class battleship

The French Navy

The French Navy Expanded Fleet List

Priority Level: Raid


Bearn- class aircraft carrier
Priority Level: Battle
Bretagne Class Battleship
Priority Level: War
Richelieu-class battleship

95

Argonaute/Diane/Orion-class Submarine

Patrol

Ships of this class: Argonaute, Arethuse, Atalante, La Vestale, La Sultane

The Argonaute, Diane and Orion series of 630-tonne submarines were the results of three private
ship yards building to a single naval specification. Intended for coastal patrols, these small
submarines all lacked significant range and endurance. In addition, they were provided with
essentially no torpedo reloads, instead relying on three forward tubes, a dual trainable mount
forward and a triple trainable mount aft. All of the tubes were essentially single shot, with the
aft mount equipped with 1 heavy and two light weight torpedoes. Like their 1,500-tonne type
siblings, these trainable mounts could only be fired from the surface. There were sixteen of these submarines available at the start
of the war. Most were retained by the Vichy government, though a few escaped to be part of the Free French Navy.
Speed: 3/2
Turning: 3
Target: 6+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 3/1
Crew: 3/1

The French Navy

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Forward Torpedoes
Port/Starboard Torpedoes
Port/Starboard Torpedoes
Length: 211 ft.

Special Traits: Agile, Submersible


In Service: 1930

Range
11
4
10
10
5

AD
1
1
2
2
2

DD
1

3
3
2

Displacement: 809 tons

Speed: 14/9 kts.

Special
Weak , Slow-Loading

AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot, (when surfaced only)
AP, One-Shot, (when surfaced only)
Crew: 41

Bretagne-class Battleship

Battle

Ships of this class: Bretagne, Provence, Lorraine

The Bretagne-class carried a main armament of ten 13.4 inch main guns mounted five
twin turrets. These ships saw no action during the First World War and were converted
to oil-fired boilers and modernised during refits throughout the 1920s and early 30s.
Stationed in the Mediterranean on the outbreak of the Second World War, Bretagne and
Provence sailed to Mers el Kebir after the French surrender. The British were worried
that the powerful French Navy might fall into German hands, attacking the French
port following an ultimatum to stand down. Bretagne capsized after blowing up and
Provence was heavily damaged and forced to beach.
Speed: 4
Turning: 1
Target: 5+
Weapon
A Turret (2 x 13.4 in)
B Turret (2 x 13.4 in)
Q Turret (2 x 13.4 in)
X Turret (2 x 13.4 in)
Y Turret (2 x 13.4 in)
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 541 ft.

Armour: 5+
Damage: 27/9
Crew: 45/15
Range
30
30
30
30
30
12
6

Special Traits: None, Aircraft 3 (Lorraine Only)


In Service: 1916 (1940 shown)

AD
2
2
2
2
2
4
1

DD
2
2
2
2
2
1

Displacement: 26,600 tons

Speed: 21 kts.

Special
AP
AP
AP (Bretagne & Provence only)
AP
AP
Weak
(AD 2 for Lorraine)
Crew: 1133

96

Chacal-class Destroyer

Patrol

Ships of this class: Chacal, Jaguar, Leopard, Lynx, Panthre, Tigre

The Chacal-class, or as it was more commonly known, the Jaguar-class, was a


group of six large destroyers (contre-torpilleur) commissioned in the mid 1920s.
Designed as larger, more capable counterparts to the Bourassque-class, they set a
standard for French destroyer design until the mid-1930s. Designed for operations
in the Mediterranean, they were expected to race out from French ports and attack
enemy shipping. As a result they possessed relatively poor endurance and mounted
no anti-submarine weapons, but their greatest concern was woefully inadequate
anti-aircraft fire, especially in the face of the German Luftwaffe. All six were lost
during the war.
Speed: 7
Turning: 2
Target: 6+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 3/1
Crew: 8/2

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes

Range
12
4
10
10

AD
1
1
3
3

Displacement: 3,050 tons

DD
1

3
3
Speed: 35 kts.

Special
Weak
AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot
Crew: 195

Courbet-class Battleship

Battle

Ships of this class: Courbet, France, Ocean, Paris

The Courbet-class mixed the relatively new concept of super-firing main battery turrets with dated
concept of main battery wing turrets, and backed them with a large number of casement mounted
secondary guns. Following the First World War, the surviving ships (France was lost in a collision with
an uncharted rock) were upgraded to oil-fired boilers and given some measure of anti-aircraft armament.
Paris and Courbet took part in the fights at Cherbourg, before evacuating to England. In the wake of the
Armistice, they were both forcibly boarded by British forces. Ocean was scuttled in Toulon to prevent
her from falling into the hands of the Germans.
Speed: 4
Turning: 1
Target: 5+

Weapon
A Turret (2 x 12 in)
B Turret (2 x 12 in)
Q Turret (2 x 12 in)
R Turret (2 x 12 in)
X Turret (2 x 12 in)
Y Turret (2 x 12 in)
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 541 ft.

Armour: 4+
Damage: 26/8
Crew: 43/14

Range
29
29
29
29
29
29
12
6

The French Navy

Length: 392 ft.

Special Traits: Agile


In Service: 1926

Special Traits: None


In Service: 1913 (1940 as shown)

AD
2
2
2
2
2
2
6
1

Displacement: 25,850 tons

DD
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

Speed: 21 kts.

Special

Port Firing Arc Only


Starboard Firing Arc Only

Weak

Crew: 1,069

97

Mogador-class Destroyer

Patrol

Ships of this class: Desaix, Hoche, Marceau, Mogador, Volta

The Mogador-class large destroyers represented the peak of French destroyer development. The design evolved from the extremely
fast Le Fantasque-class, but was further enlarged to carry eight guns in enclosed twin turrets rather than Le Fantasques five guns
in single open mounts. Backed up by no less than ten torpedo tubes, their firepower approached that of a light cruiser. Only in
terms of anti-aircraft firepower did they remain unimproved. A total of six were authorised for construction but only two were
completed by wartime. Mogador was heavily damaged by the British at Mels-el-Kebir and later, both were scuttled at Toulon.
Speed: 8
Turning: 2
Target: 6+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 4/1
Crew: 11/3

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Length: 429 ft.

Special Traits: Agile


In Service: 1939

Range
12
4
10
10

AD
3
1
3
3

DD
1

3
3

Displacement: 3,954 tons

Speed: 39 kts.

Special
Weak

AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot
Crew: 264

Surcouf-class Submarine

Skirmish

The French Navy

Ships of this class: Surcouf

When launched, the Surcouf was the largest submarine in the world,
surpassed in World War II by the Japanese I-400. Her intended role was
that of a commerce raider and her design was intended to maximize this
mission. She had a range of 10,000 miles and could sail for a 90 days. She was
equipped with a Besson MN-411 floatplane in a hanger aft of the tower to
scout for victims and spot for her main battery. Her torpedo outfit included
four forward internal tubes, a quad trainable mount aft and as second quad
trainable mount aft equipped with lightweight torpedoes. She even had a
prison hold for up to 40 captives. But the most striking aspect of her design
was the inclusion of a special, watertight turret forward of the tower which
carried two eight-inch naval guns. Surcouf was a very complex design,
plagued with mechanical troubles. She was difficult and slow to dive, and rolled badly on the surface in rough seas. She was also
so low to the horizon that the effective range of her 8-inch guns was greatly reduced. When war broke out she was in the French
Antilles and by the time she returned to Brest was in need of repairs. When France fell, Surcouf escaped to England, where she
was seized by British sailors. She was subsequently turned over to the Free French who regarded her with pride while the British
Admiralty considered her a joke.
Speed: 4/2
Turning: 2
Target: 6+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 5/1
Crew: 5/1

Weapon
A Turret (2 x 8 in)
AA
Forward Torpedoes
Port/Starboard Torpedoes
Port/Starboard Torpedoes
Length: 360 ft.

Special Traits: Aircraft 1, Submersible


In Service: 1935

Range
12
4
10
10
5

AD
1
1
2
2
2

DD
1

3
3
2

Displacement: 4,304 tons

Speed: 18.5/10 kts.

Special

AP, Slow-Loading
AP, One-Shot, (when surfaced only)
AP, One-Shot, (when surfaced only)
Crew: 118

98

* The observation aircraft can be launched at the start of the next turn on which the submarine surfaced. If the spotter plane is
in the air it can direct gunfire out to 33. The Surcouf s 8-inch guns can be fired on the same turn it surfaces. The submarine
cannot submerge if it takes any damage.

Aircraft

The following describes new air support for the French Navy. The full details of each flight can be found on page 21.
Latcore 298: Based on a French Navy requirement for a torpedo bomber, the Lat 298,
as it came to be known, entered in service in 1938. While capable of carrying a diverse
payload of a torpedo, bombs, or depth charges, its anti-air fit consited of only 3 small
machine guns. The Lat 298 intially some some action in its original role of maritime
patrol and anti-submarine duties, but as the Wehrmacht drove through France, they were
instead used to harass and interdict armoured columns. Despite not having been designed
for this role, they performed reasonably well, suffering less losses than units equipped with
other types.

Potez 63.11A.3: The original Potez 630 was built to meet the requirements
of a heavy fighter. However, more than 700 Potez 63.11 were delivered as
two-seat, light level bombers by wars start. They were an attractive aircraft,
capable of absorbing considerable battle damage. Unfortunately the Potez 63
family, like many French aircraft of the time, simply did not have sufficiently
powerful engines to endow them with an adequate performance. In the stern
test of war more than 220 were destroyed or abandoned, the heaviest losses of
any French bomber type. The Potez 63.11 continued in service with Vichy and Free French forces in North Africa. Production
was resumed under German control and significant numbers used mostly in liaison and training roles.

The French Navy

Morane-Saulnier M.S.406: By virtue of its numbers, the M.S.406 was Frances


most important fighter during the opening stages of World War II. Generally
free of problems, the M.S. 406 was under-powered, weakly armed and lacked
full armour protection when compared to its contemporaries. Unsurpirsely, it
was out-performed by the Messerschmitt Bf 109E during the Battle of France,
resulting in high casualties amongst French pilots, despite their valiant efforts.
The design held its own in the early stages of the war (the so-called Phony War),
but when the war restarted in earnest in 1940, 400 were lost in combat and on
the ground for only 175 kills in return.

99

The Soviet Navy


The Soviet Navy was a fleet that could have been a significant factor in the sea battles of World War II. Internal instability,
communist politics, and an overly cautious policy of deployment kept the Soviet Navy from becoming a major player. Though
having a considerable number of vessels many larger Soviet ships were destroyed and damaged by air attacks while in port. If
fleet deployment and tactics had been better the Russian navy could have been a much more significant force in the War. The
Soviet Navy was divided into four fleets; the Black Sea, Northern, Baltic, and Pacific fleets. Heavy action was seen in the Baltic
and Black Sea while the Pacific fleet had a considerably smaller number of engagements. The Northern fleet distinguished itself
protecting Allied convoys. The Arctic Submarine Brigade distinguished itself as an effective instrument of war, sinking scores of
Axis vessels.
The following list represents the Soviet Navy as it should be played in games of Victory at Sea. There are several what if designs,
allowing players to use the Soviet Navy more effectively than Stalin himself did! Actual deployment of the conjectural ships
would have most likely been in the Baltic and Black Sea fleets though players are free to use them as they wish.

The Soviet Navy Fleet List

The following forms the entire fleet list for the Soviet Navy.

The Soviet Navy

Priority Level: Patrol


Gnevnyi-class destroyer
Tashkent-class destroyer leader

Novik-class destroyer

Series X-class submersible

Priority Level: Skirmish


Chapaev-class light cruiser
Maxim-Gorky class heavy cruiser

Kirov-class heavy cruiser


Murmansk-class light cruiser

Krasnyi Kafkaz-class heavy cruiser


Profintern-class light cruiser

Priority Level: Raid


Project 71-class aircraft carrier

Tallinn-class heavy cruiser

Priority Level: Battle


Archangelsk-class battleship
Project 72-class aircraft carrier
Priority Level: War
Kostromitinova-class aircraft carrier

Gangut-class battleship

Kronstadt-class battlecruiser

Sovietski Soyuz-class battleship

100

Arkangelsk-class Battleship

Battle

Ships of this class: Arkangelsk

Arkangelsk was the Royal Navys Royal Sovereign, transferred to the Soviet Navy in 1944 in order to
fulfil the Russian claim to Italian ships surrendered in 1943. Due to the severe threat from German
U Boats she remained in or around her Northern Fleet base at Kola until the end of the war, and was
finally returned to the UK in 1949 following the delivery of the Italian battleship Giulio Cesare.
Speed: 5
Turning: 1
Target: 5+

Armour: 5+
Special Traits: Torpedo Belt
Damage: 34/11 In Service: 1915
Crew: 39/13

Weapon
A Turret (2 x 15 in)
B Turret (2 x 15 in)
X Turret (2 x 15 in)
Y Turret (2 x 15 in)
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 624 ft.

Range
29
29
29
29
12
5

AD
2
2
2
2
4
8

Displacement: 35,390 tons

DD
3
3
3
3
1

Speed: 23 kts.

Special
AP
AP
AP
AP
Weak

Crew: 997

Ships of this class: Chapaev, Chkalov, Frunze, Kuibyshev, Ordzhonikidze, Zhelezniakov

Skirmish

These ships were a development of the Kirov-class, but developed more along the lines of British and American light cruisers with
a heavy 6 armament. The first five ships were completed, although too late to see action in World War II. The final two were
captured incomplete and broken up by the Germans.
Speed: 7
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 15/5
Crew: 33/11

Weapon
A Turret (3 x 6 in)
B Turret (3 x 6 in)
X Turret (3 x 6 in)
Y Turret (3 x 6 in)
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Length: 659 ft.

Special Traits: Aircraft 2


In Service: 1946

Range
27
27
27
27
12
6
10
10
Displacement: 15,000 tons

AD
1
1
1
1
1
5
2
2

DD
1
1
1
1
1

4
4
Speed: 34 kts.

The Soviet Navy

Chapaev-class Light Cruiser

Special
Twin-Linked, Weak
Twin-Linked, Weak
Twin-Linked, Weak
Twin-Linked, Weak
Weak

AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot
Crew: 840

101

Gangut-class Battleship

Battle

Ships of this class: Gangut, Marat, Sevastopol


Commissioned in 1911, these unusual battleships were the first Russian
dreadnoughts. They saw little action in the Great War or the Russian Civil
War.

Speed: 5
Turning: 1
Target: 5+

Armour: 4+
Damage: 23/7
Crew: 45/15

Weapon
A Turret (3 x 12 in)
P Turret (3 x 12 in)
Q Turret (3x 12 in)
X Turret (3 x 12 in)
Secondary Armament
AA

Range
26
26
26
26
12
6

Port/Starboard Torpedoes 10

The Soviet Navy

Length: 590 ft.

Special Traits: Radar (1944+)


In Service: 1911

AD
3
3
3
3
4
6
3

DD
2
2
2
2
1

Special

Weak

AP, Slow Loading

Displacement: 23,000 tons

Speed: 23 kts.

Gnevnyi-class Destroyer

Patrol

Ships of this class: Gnevnyi, Rezkiy


Another Italian-inspired design, the Gnevnyi-class formed the backbone of the Russian
destroyer force. Their relatively lightweight construction made them susceptible to
heavy seas; one ship was seriously damaged in storms and another broke up and sank.
As with many pre-war destroyer designs, they were vulnerable to aircraft, with seven
ships sunk in air attacks.

Speed: 7
Turning: 2
Target: 6+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 3/1
Crew: 9/3

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Depth Charges
Length: 370 ft.

Special Traits: Agile


In Service: 1936

Range
12
4
10
10
3
Displacement: 2,380 tons

AD
1
1
3
3
4

DD
1

4
4
1
Speed: 37 kts.

Special
Weak

AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot
Slow-Loading
Crew: 246

102

Kirov-class Heavy Cruiser

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Kirov, Voroshilov

As with the uncompleted battleships, these ships were designed with Italian assistance,
and displayed a clear relationship to their Mediterranean cousins. Kirov served in the
Baltic where she served in the defence of Leningrad before going on the offensive in
1944. Voroshilov served in the Baltic, where she was heavily damaged by mines in
1942, returning to service two years later.
Speed: 7
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 10/3
Crew: 29/9

Weapon
A Turret (3 x 180mm)
B Turret (3 x 180mm)
X Turret (3 x 180mm)
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes

Range
28
28
28
8
6
10
10

AD
1
1
1
2
5
2
2

Displacement: 9,950 tons

DD
1
1
1
1

4
4
Speed: 34 kts.

Special
Twin-Linked
Twin-Linked
Twin-Linked
Weak

AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot
Crew: 734

Kostromitinova-class Aircraft Carrier

War

Ships of this class: Kostromitinova

Kostromitinova was the last serious wartime carrier design, again based partly on the Royal Navys Illustrious design; she was a
step up from the previous Project 72 and featuring an enlarged air group, heavier surface and AA armament and additional lift
capacity.
Speed: 6
Turning: 1
Target: 4+

Armour: 3+
Special Traits: Armoured Deck, Carrier
Damage: 38/12 In Service: 1945
Crew: 72/24
Aircraft: 7 flights of IL-10 or SB-2, and 11 flights of Yak-9

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 918 ft.

The Soviet Navy

Length: 626 ft.

Special Traits: Aircraft 2


In Service: 1938

Range
12
6
Displacement: 51,200 tons

AD
4
10

DD
1

Speed: 30 kts.

Special
Weak

Crew: 1,800

103

Krasnyi Kavkaz-class Heavy Cruiser

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Krazni Kavkaz

Krasnyi Kavkaz was originally a light cruiser of the Svetlana-class, started in 1916.
She was finally completed in 1932 as a heavy cruiser with an improved propulsion
system, although woefully under gunned in comparison to heavy cruisers of other
navies. Krazni Kafkaz was stationed in the Black Sea during World War II, and was
heavily damaged by Luftwaffe aircraft in 1942.
Speed: 6
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 9/3
Crew: 34/11

Weapon
A Turret (1 x 180mm)
B Turret (1 x 180mm)
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes

The Soviet Navy

Length: 556ft.

Special Traits: Aircraft 1


In Service: 1932

Range
37
37
8
5
10
10

AD
1
1
2
3
3
3

Displacement: 9,030 tons

DD
1
1
1

4
4
Speed: 29 kts.

Special

Weak

AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot
Crew: 850

Kronshtadt-class Battlecruiser

Battle

Ships of this class: Kronshtadt, Sevastopol

These ships were authorised for construction in 1938 and laid down the following year. The start of the war halted their
construction and both were broken up incomplete. The original design saw these ships carrying 10 guns but the final approved
design was to have used 12 guns (as shown here). Pre-war goodwill from Germany even saw a proposal to replace the 12 guns
with German made 15 guns.
Speed: 7
Turning: 1
Target: 4+

Armour: 4+
Special Traits: Aircraft 4
Damage: 36/12 In Service: 1942
Crew: 72/24

Weapon
A Turret (3 x 12 in)
B Turret (3 x 12 in)
Y Turret (3 x 12 in)
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 816ft.

Range
44
44
44
16
8
Displacement: 38,360 tons

AD
3
3
3
2
2

DD
2
2
2
1

Speed: 33 kts.

Special

Weak

Crew: 1,800

104

Maxim Gorky-class Heavy Cruiser

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Kaganovich, Kalinin, Maxim Gorky, Molotov


Similar to the Kirov-class, these ships differed in detail. The first two ships served
valiantly in the Baltic and Black Seas respectively. The second pair was built on the
Pacific coast. Despite being completed in 1944, they did not take part in hostilities
against Japan when Russia declared war in 1945.
Speed: 7
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 10/3
Crew: 38/12

Weapon
A Turret (3 x 180mm)
B Turret (3 x 180mm)
X Turret (3 x 180mm)
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Length: 626 ft.

Special Traits: Aircraft 2


In Service: 1938

Range
28
28
28
8
6
10
10

AD
1
1
1
2
5
2
2

Displacement: 9,792 tons

DD
1
1
1
1

4
4
Speed: 34 kts.

Special
Twin-Linked
Twin-Linked
Twin-Linked
Weak

AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot
Crew: 963

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Murmansk

Murmansk was originally the US light cruiser Milwaukee, transferred to the


Soviets as compensation for not receiving surrendered Italian ships in 1943.
She spent her Russian wartime career with the Northern Fleet operating out of
Murmansk until 1949, when she was returned to the US.
Speed: 7
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 18/6
Crew: 64/21

Weapon
A Turret (3 x 180mm)
X Turret (3 x 180mm)
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Length: 555 ft.

The Soviet Navy

Murmansk-class Light Cruiser

Special Traits: Aircraft 3


In Service: 1944

Range
25
25
21
5
10
10
Displacement: 9,508 tons

AD
1
1
2
3
3
3

DD
1
1
1

4
4
Speed: 34 kts.

Special
Weak
Weak
Weak

AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot
Crew: 458

105

Novik-class Destroyer

Ships of this class: Bystri, Iziaslav, Lenin, Kapitan Kern, Desna, Stalin, Zabiyaka, Zinoviev

Patrol

The Novik-class was laid down and launched between 1911 and 1915.
At the outbreak of World War I, they were the fastest and most powerful
destroyers afloat. Stout, well built ships, they had a good reputation and
were well regarded by their crews and senior officers. During World
War II they were generally better regarded than ships of later design.
They served in all the Russian fleets and were extensively altered.
Speed: 7
Turning: 2
Target: 6+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 2/1
Crew: 10/3

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Depth Charges

The Soviet Navy

Length: 336 ft.

Special Traits: Agile


In Service: 1936

Range
12
4
10
10
3

AD
1
1
5
5
4

Displacement: 1,280 tons

DD
1

3
3
1
Speed: 36 kts.

Special
Weak

AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot
Slow-Loading
Crew: 160

Profintern-class Light Cruiser

Skirmish

Ships of this class: Chervona Ukraina, Profintern

Like Krasnyi Kavkaz, these ships were originally part of the World War I Svetlanaclass. They were completed essentially to the original design, with their main
armament in individual mounts rather than turrets and with inadequate propulsion
(they were designed for 29 knots but never exceeded 22). Both ships served in the
Black Sea during World War II. Chervona Ukraina was sunk by the Luftwaffe in
November 1941.
Speed: 4
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 8/2
Crew: 34/11

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Length: 506ft.

Special Traits: Aircraft 1


In Service: 1927

Range
20
5
10
10
Displacement: 8,000 tons

AD
4
3
3
3

DD
1

4
4
Speed: 22 kts.

Special
Weak

AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot
Crew: 852

106

Project 71-class Aircraft Carrier

Raid

Project 71 was to have seen two 13,000 ton light aircraft carriers completed by 1942. Although the design was progressed no
actual construction work started. They were to have carried 45 aircraft with two catapults, and would have had distinctive turned
down funnels, similar to the Japanese Akagi.
Speed: 6
Turning: 1
Target: 5+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 14/4
Crew: 48/16

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 640 ft.

Special Traits: Carrier


In Service: 1942 (Projected)
Aircraft: 5 flights of Su-2, and 3 flights of I-16 or Yak-9
Range
12
6

AD
2
6

DD
1

Displacement: 13,150 tons

Speed: 30 kts.

Special
Weak

Crew: 1,200

Project 72-class Aircraft Carrier

Battle

Project 72 was a more ambitious carrier design, influenced both by the German Graf Zeppelin (which was visited by a Russian
delegation in 1941) and the British Illustrious. A heavy AA armament was embarked following lessons learnt from Allied navies
in the early stages of the war.
Armour: 3+
Damage: 29/9
Crew: 48/16

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 820 ft.

Special Traits: Armoured Deck, Carrier


In Service: 1944 (Projected)
Aircraft: 6 flights of IL-10 or SB-2, and 4 flights of Yak-9

Range
8
6

AD
2
8

DD
1

Displacement: 28,800 tons

Speed: 30 kts.

The Soviet Navy

Speed: 6
Turning: 1
Target: 4+

Special
Weak

Crew: 1,200

Series X-class Submarine

Patrol

This was a class of 53 boats in two sub-classes (Series X and Xbis). These boats were typical
of the Russian submarine fleet and in common with other classes, they were numerous but
accomplished little. Eighteen were sunk in action and one in an accident. Most of the losses were
due to mines.
Speed: 3/2
Turning: 2
Target: 6+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 3/1
Crew: 2/1

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Forward Torpedoes
Aft Torpedoes
Length: 192 ft.

Special Traits: Submersible


In Service: 1936

Range
4
4
10
10
Displacement: 708 tons

AD
1
1
2
1

DD
1

4
4
Speed: 13/9 kts.

Special
Slow-Loading, Weak

AP, Slow-Loading
AP, Slow-Loading
Crew: 40

107

Sovietski Soyuz-class Battleship

Ships of this class: Sovietski Byelorussiya, Sovietski Rossiya, Sovietski Soyuz, Sovietski Ukrania

War

Four ships were authorised in 1938, later reduced to three, with a planned in service date of 1941. The design was developed
by Admiral Isakov, and was a development of a design submitted by Italian designers two years previously. The first three units
were laid down in 1938-39 but construction was halted in 1941 when the hulls were 75% complete. The ships were dismantled
during the late 1940s, although there were plans drawn up to complete them as designed, or to convert them into missile-armed
battleships for the post-war Soviet Navy.
Speed: 6
Turning: 1
Target: 4+

Armour: 6+
Special Traits: Aircraft 4, Armoured Deck, Torpedo Belt
Damage: 52/17 In Service: 1940
Crew: 80/26

Weapon
A Turret (3x 16 in)
B Turret (3x 16 in)
X Turret (3x 16 in)
Secondary Armament
AA

The Soviet Navy

Length: 889 ft.

Range
45
45
45
16
6

AD
3
3
3
4
7

Displacement: 65,150 tons

DD
3
3
3
1

Speed: 28 kts.

Special
Super AP
Super AP
Super AP
Weak

Crew: 2,000

Tallin-class Heavy Cruiser

Raid

Ships of this class: Tallin

Tallin began life as the German Lutzow of the Hipper-class, and was to have been named Petropavlovsk. The German invasion of
Russia put paid to plans for her completion and instead she was used as a static battery in the defence of Leningrad.
Speed: 7
Turning: 2
Target: 5+

Armour: 3+
Damage: 19/6
Crew: 64/21

Weapon
A Turret (2 x 8 in)
B Turret (2 x 8 in)
X Turret (2 x 8 in)
Y Turret (2 x 8 in)
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Length: 681ft.

Special Traits: Aircraft 3


In Service: 1942

Range
37
37
37
37
13
8
10
10
Displacement: 18,750 tons

AD
1
1
1
1
2
3
3
3

DD
1
1
1
1
1

3
3

Special

Weak

AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot

Speed: 32.5 kts.

Crew: 1,600

108

Tashkent-class Destroyer Leader

Patrol

Ships of this class: Tashkent

Tashkent was built in Italy and was regarded as the most handsome ship in the Soviet
Navy. Unusually for a ship in a fleet that used grey as its standard colour scheme,
she was painted a distinctive sky blue, earning her the nicknames Blue Beauty or
The Blue Cruiser. AA defence was her Achilles heel, and she was lost in 1942 to a
Luftwaffe attack, although many of her guns were salvaged and transferred to other
ships. Tashkent served with the Black Sea Fleet
Speed: 8
Turning: 2
Target: 6+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 4/1
Crew: 10/3

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
Depth Charges
Length: 458 ft.

Special Traits: Agile


In Service: 1937

Range
12
4
10
10
3
Displacement: 3,200 tons

AD
2
1
5
5
4

DD
1

4
4
1
Speed: 39 kts.

Special
Weak

AP, One-Shot
AP, One-Shot
Slow-Loading
Crew: 250

The following describes new air support for the Soviet Navy. The full details of each flight can be found on page 21.
Ilyushin Il-4: A medium bomber used extensively in the Baltic region as a torpedo bomber.
The Il-4 could also be used for extended range bombing missions and several made highly
publicized raids on Berlin. Over 5000 were built.
Yak-9: A typically Russian rugged and dependable fighter, the Yak-9 was one of the standard Soviet
land based fighters of WW2. The Yak-9K variant was one of the models proposed for service on the
Project 72 Class carriers.

The Soviet Navy

Aircraft

Ilyushin IL-10: A tough, no-nonsense attack aircraft, the IL-10 was a development of the legendary
Il-2 Sturmovik. A marinised version was considered for use as a strike aircraft on board the Project 72
class carriers.
Polikarpov I-16: The I-16 was short, stubby and almost comical in appearance. However, appearances
can be deceptive. When it entered service in 1934 the I-16 was one of the worlds most advanced fighter
aircraft. Its performance was less spectacular by the 1940s but its manoeuvrability was still sufficient
to give it a fighting chance against an ME109. Over 7000 were built. The I-16 was one of the aircraft
considered for use on the Project 71 Class carriers.
Tupolev SB-2 Katyusha: The SB-2 (also known as the ANT-40) was (at the time of its design) an
advanced twin engined high speed bomber. Its performance advantage had fallen away by 1941, but
even so it performed well. A marinised version was considered for use on the Project 72 class carriers.
The SB-2 can carry either bombs or a torpedo, not both at the same time.
Sukhoi Su-2 Ivanov: The Su-2 (despite its designation this was the first aircraft designed by
Pavel Sukhoi) was a land based tactical bomber. Over 500 were built, but suffered heavy losses
to the Luftwaffe in the opening days of Germanys advance into the Soviet Union. A variant of
the Su-2 was proposed for service as a strike and torpedo bomber on the Project-71 class carriers.
The Su-2 can either carry bombs or a torpedo, not both at the same time.

109

Civilian Shipping
The civilian ships detailed here expand the list of vessels of commerce and transport. These ships are interchangeable for scenarios
that involve merchant vessels, though some will take the place of more than one swapped ship, as shown in their descriptions.

Liner
During the 1920s and 1930s, liners plied the seaways as the ultimate symbol
of travel luxury. After September 1939, many were requisitioned and served
as fast troop transports, carrying thousands of troops across the globe. Due to
its massive structure, a liner is worth four civilian ships.
Speed: 7
Turning: 1
Target: 4+

Armour: 2+
Special Traits: None
Damage: 57/19 In Service: 1939
Crew: 99/33

Weapon
AA

Range
4

Civilian Shipping

Length: 1,019 ft.

AD
2

Displacement: 82,000 tons

DD

Speed: 33 kts.

Special

Crew: 1,100 + 3,000 troops

Troop Ship
Whilst the big liners represented the glamorous end of conveying armies around the
globe (if such a word can be applied to those duties) smaller cargo liners performed as
valuable a role carrying both troops and supplies. A troop ship is worth three civilian
ships.
Speed: 5
Turning: 1
Target: 5+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 20/7
Crew: 28/10

Weapon
AA
Length: 550 ft.

Special Traits: None


In Service: 1939

Range
4

AD
1

Displacement: 20,000 tons

DD

Speed: 25 kts.

Special

Crew: 200 + 500 troops

Oil Tanker
Tankers provided the life blood for nations and their armed forces. They often represented the
single most important ships within convoys. The most famous example during World War II
was the SS Ohio which reached Malta as part of the Pedestal Convoy her arrival saved the
island. An oil tanker counts as two civilian ships.
Speed: 1
Turning: 1
Target: 6+
Length: 500 ft.

Armour: 2+
Damage: 10/4
Crew: 2/1

Special Traits: None


In Service: 1930

Displacement: 10,000 tons

Speed: 12 kts.

Crew: 50

* If an oil tanker is hit by a torpedo, or if the ship is on fire at the beginning of a turn, roll a dice. On a roll of a 6 the ship
explodes and sinks immediately.

110

Ammunition Ship
As well as fuel, armies and navies need enormous amounts of ammunition to function.
Ammunition ships were vital to the war effort, but also posed a severe risk to their own
forces in company. An ammunition ship is worth three civilian ships.
Speed: 3
Turning: 1
Target: 4+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 16/5
Crew: 3/1

Weapon
Secondary Armament
AA
Length: 455 ft.

Special Traits: None


In Service: 1939

Range
8
4

AD
1
1

Displacement: 16,000 tons

DD
1

Speed: 16 kts.

Special
Weak

Crew: 90

* If an ammunition ship is hit by a torpedo, bomb or gun of 6 or more, or if the ship is on fire at the beginning of a turn, roll
a dice. On a roll of 6 the ship explodes and sinks immediately. Any ships (except submerged submarines) within 5 take 1d6
damage. This is reduced by -1 per inch distance away from the ammunition ship (for example, a destroyer 4 from an exploding
ammunition ship rolls a 6; it takes 2 points of damage).

Raider / Armed Merchant Cruiser

Speed: 3
Turning: 1
Target: 4+

Armour: 2+
Damage: 16/5
Crew: 3/1

Weapon
Secondary Armament (6)
Port Torpedoes
Starboard Torpedoes
AA
Length: 475 ft.

Civilian Shipping

Allied and Axis nations alike pressed cargo liners and other ships into service as
auxiliary warships. In particular the British organised regular patrols by armed
merchant cruisers aimed at intercepting and capturing blockade runners, while
Germany operated a number of highly successful commerce raiders such as
the Stier and Kormoran (the latter was credited with sinking HMAS Sydney). A
raider counts as five civilian ships, an armed merchant as four.
Special Traits: Aircraft 1 (raider only)
In Service: 1939

Range
12
10
10
4

Displacement: 16,000 tons

AD
3
2
2
1

DD
1
3
3

Speed: 16 kts.

Special
Weak
Slow Loading, AP (raider only)
Slow Loading, AP (raider only)

Crew: 90

111

Bretagne
Bretagne-class
-class Battleship

Courbet
Courbet-class
-class Battleship

Gangut-class
Gangut
-class Battleship

Kostromitinova
Kostromitinova-class
-class Aircraft Carrier

Arkangelsk
Arkangelsk-class
-class Battleship

Kronshtadt-class
Kronshtadt-class Battle
Battlecruiser
cruiser

Project 71
71-class
-class Carrier

Project 72
72-class Carrier
Shore Battery

Shore Battery

Shore Battery

Shore Battery

Soviets
Sovietski
ki Soyuz
Soyuz-class Battle
Battleship
ship

Copyright 2007 Mongoose Publishing. Permission granted to photocopy for personal use only.

Bellona
Bellona-class
-class Cruiser

Dido (1st Group)


Group)-class
-class Cruiser

Dido (2
(2nd Group)-class
Group)-class Cruiser

Group)-class Cruiser
Dido ((33rd Group)-class

Emerald
Emerald-class
-class Cruiser

Emerald
Emerald-class
-class Cruiser

Bellona
Bellona-class
-class Cruiser

Curacoa
Curacoa-class
-class Cruiser

Coventry-class
Coventry
-class Cruiser

Coventry-class
Coventry
-class Cruiser

C-class Cruiser

Danae-class
Danae
-class Cruiser

Danae-class
Danae
-class Cruiser

Delhi-class
Delhi
-class Cruiser

Delhi-class
Delhi
-class Cruiser

Dido (1st Group)


Group)-class
-class Cruiser

C-class Cruiser

Dido (2nd Group)-class


Group)-class Cruiser

Effingham
Effingham-class
-class Cruiser

Curacoa
Curacoa-class
-class Cruiser

Dido ((33rd Group)-class


Group)-class Cruiser

Arethusa-class
Arethusa-class Cruiser

Effingham
Effingham-class
-class Cruiser

Arethu
Arethusa
sa-class
-class Cruiser

Copyright 2007 Mongoose Publishing. Permission granted to photocopy for personal use only.

Activity
Activity-class
-class Escort Carrier

Audacious
Audacious-class
-class Fleet Carrier

Ameer
Ameer-class
-class Escort Carrier

Audacity
Audacity-class
-class Escort Carrier

Archer-class
Archer-class Escort Carrier

Avenger
Avenger-class
-class Escort Carrier

Argus-class
Argus
-class Fleet Carrier

Colossus
Col
ossus-class
-class Light Aircraft Carrier

Attacker
Attacker-class
-class Escort Carrier

Campania-class
Campania
-class Escort Carrier

Copyright 2007 Mongoose Publishing. Permission granted to photocopy for personal use only.

Swiftsure-class
Swiftsure-class Cruiser

Hunt-class
Hunt
-class Destroyer Escort

Roberts-Class Monitor

Hawkins-class
Hawkins-class Cruiser

Hawkins-class
Hawkins-class Cruiser

Kent-class
Kent-class Cruiser

London
Lo
ndon-class
-class Cruiser

Surrey-class
Surrey-class Cruiser

Surrey-class
Surrey-class Cruiser

Swiftsure-class
Swiftsure-class Cruiser

Tiger
Tiger-class
-class Cruiser

Flower-class
Flower-class Corvette

Flower-class
Flower-class Corvette

Hunt-class
Hunt
-class Destroyer Escort

Loch
Loch-class
-class Frigate

Loch
Loch-class
-class Frigate

U-class Submarine

U-class Submarine

Roberts-Class Monitor

Kent-class
Kent-class Cruiser

Fiji-class
Fiji-class Cruiser (Ceylon Group)

Tiger
Tiger-class
-class Cruiser

London
Lo
ndon-class
-class Cruiser

Fiji-class
Fiji-class Cruiser (Ceylon Group)

Copyright 2007 Mongoose Publishing. Permission granted to photocopy for personal use only.

Courageous
Courageous-class
-class Aircraft Carrier

Renown
Renown-class
-class Battlecruiser
Battlecruiser (Refit)

Eagle
Eagle-class
-class Aircraft Carrier

Lion
Lion-class
-class Battleship
Battleship

Furious
Furious-class
-class Aircraft Carrier

Queen Elizabeth-class
Elizabeth-class Battleship
Battleship (Warspite)

Hermes
Hermes-class
-class Fleet Carrier

Queen Elizabeth-class
Elizabeth-class Battleship
Battleship (Barham)

Implacable-class
Implacable
-class Aircraft Carrier

Indomitable
Indomitable-class
-class Aircraft Carrier

Copyright 2007 Mongoose Publishing. Permission granted to photocopy for personal use only.

Pretoria Castle
Castle-class
-class Escort Carrier

Vanguard
Vanguard-class
-class Battleship
Battleship

Vindex-class
Vindex-class Escort Carrier

N3-class
N3
-class Battle
Battleship
ship

Unicorn
Uni
corn-class
-class Light Aircraft Carrier

Resolution-class
Resolution-class Battleship
Battleship

Project Jade Aircraft Carrier

G3-class
G3-class Battlecruiser
Battlecruiser

Malta-class
Malta
-class Aircraft Carrier

Merchant Aircraft Carrier

Copyright 2007 Mongoose Publishing. Permission granted to photocopy for personal use only.

Kaga-class
Kaga
-class Carrier

Ryuho
yuho-class
-class Light Carrier

H39-class
H39
-class Battle
Battleship
ship

Fuso-class
Fuso
-class Battleship
Battleship

Junyo-class
Junyo
-class Carrier

O-class Battle
Battlecruiser
cruiser

Hosho
Hosho-class
-class Light Carrier

Ise-class
Ise
-class Battleship
Battleship

Akagi-class
Akagi-class Carrier

Chitose-class
Chitose-class Light Carrier

Copyright 2007 Mongoose Publishing. Permission granted to photocopy for personal use only.

Series X-class
X-class Submarine

Luigi Cadorna-class
Cadorna-class Light Cruiser

Kirov
Kirov-class
-class Heavy Cruiser

Maxim Gorkiy-class
Gorkiy-class Cruiser

Profintern-class
Profintern-class Light Cruiser

Profintern-class
Profintern-class Light Cruiser

Series X-class
X-class Submarine

Murmansk
Murmansk-class
-class Light Cruiser

Tashkent-class
Tashkent-class Destroyer Leader

Tashkent-class
Tashkent-class Destroyer Leader

Krasnyi Kavkaz
Kavkaz-class
-class Heavy Cruiser

Chapaev
Chapaev-class
-class Light Cruiser

Chapaev
Chapaev-class
-class Light Cruiser

Tallin-class
Tallin
-class Heavy Cruiser

Tallin-class
Tallin
-class Heavy Cruiser

Luigi Cadorna-class
Cadorna-class Light Cruiser

Krasnyi Kavkaz
Kavkaz-class
-class Heavy Cruiser

Kirov
Kirov-class
-class Heavy Cruiser

Novik
Novik-class
-class Destroyer

Murmansk
Murmansk-class
-class Light Cruiser

Maxim Gorkiy-class
Gorkiy-class Cruiser

Gnevnyi-class
Gnevnyi
-class Destroyer

Novik
Novik-class
-class Destroyer

Gnevnyi-class
Gnevnyi
-class Destroyer

Copyright 2007 Mongoose Publishing. Permission granted to photocopy for personal use only.

Shinano-class
Shinano-class Support Carrier

Ryujo
yujo-class
-class Light Carrier

Taiho-class
Taiho-class Carrier

Zuiho
Zuiho-class
-class Light Carrier

Soryu/Hiryu
Soryu/Hiryu-class
-class Carrier

Wyoming-class
Wyoming
-class Battleship
Battleship

Wasp
Wasp-class
-class Carrier

Tennessee-class
Tennessee-class Battle
Battleship
ship

Conte di Cavour-class
Cavour-class Battle
Battleship
ship

AquilaAquila
-class Defence Carrier

Copyright 2007 Mongoose Publishing. Permission granted to photocopy for personal use only.

Sangamon
Sangamon-class
-class Escort Carrier

New Mexico-class
Mexico-class Battleship
Battleship

Ranger
Ranger-class
-class Carrier

Nevada-class
evada-class Battleship
Battleship

Bogue
Bogue-class
-class Escort Carrier

Pennsylvania-class
Pennsylvania-class Battleship
Battleship

Casablanca
Casablanca-class
-class Escort Carrier

Lexing
Lexington
ton-class
-class Carrier

Independence
Independence-class
-class Ligh
Lightt Carrier

Long Is
Island
land-class
-class Escort Carrier

Copyright 2007 Mongoose Publishing. Permission granted to photocopy for personal use only.

Mogador
Mogador-class
-class Destroyer

Sphkreuzer Scout Cruiser


Sp

Marcello-class
Marcello-class Submarine

Argonaute-class
Argonaute-class Submarine

Chacal
Chacal-class
-class Destroyer

Chacal
Chacal-class
-class Destroyer

Mogador
Mogador-class
-class Destroyer

Emden-class
Emden
-class Light Cruiser

M-class Cruiser

M-class Cruiser

P-class Cruiser

Type 39 Torpedo Boat

Type 39 Torpedo Boat

ZH1
ZH1-class
-class Destroyer

ZH1
ZH1-class
-class Destroyer

Sphkreuzer Scout Cruiser


Sp

P-class Cruiser

Marcello-class
Marcello-class Submarine

Surcouf-class
Surcouf-class Submarine

Emden-class
Emden
-class Light Cruiser

Argonaute-class
Argonaute-class Submarine

Da Barbiano
Barbiano-class
-class Light Cruiser

Surcouf-class
Surcouf-class Submarine

Da Barbiano
Barbiano-class
-class Light Cruiser

1
1

Copyright 2007 Mongoose Publishing. Permission granted to photocopy for personal use only.

Omaha
Omaha-class
-class Light Cruiser

Etna-class
Etna-class Anti-Aircraft Cruiser

Baltimore-class
Baltimore-class Heavy Cruiser

Alaska
laska-class
-class Large Cruiser

Northampton-class
Northampton
-class Heavy Cruiser

Northampton-class
Northampton
-class Heavy Cruiser

Omaha
Omaha-class
-class Light Cruiser

Abruzzi-class
Abruzzi-class Light Cruiser

Porter
Porter-class
-class Destroyer Leader

Porter
Porter-class
-class Destroyer Leader

Capitani Romani
Romani-class
-class Light Cruiser

Da Barbiano
Barbiano-class
-class Light Cruiser

Da Barbiano
Barbiano-class
-class Light Cruiser

Duca DAosta-class
DAosta-class Light Cruiser

Duca DAosta-class
DAosta-class Light Cruiser

Etna-class
Etna-class Anti-Aircraft Cruiser

Capitani Romani
Romani-class
-class Light Cruiser

Baltimore-class
Baltimore-class Heavy Cruiser

Gridley
Gridley-class
-class Destroyer

Abruzzi-class
Abruzzi-class Light Cruiser

Alaska
laska-class
-class Large Cruiser

Cleveland-class
Cleveland-class Light Cruiser

Gridley
Gridley-class
-class Destroyer

Cleveland-class
Cleveland-class Light Cruiser

Copyright 2007 Mongoose Publishing. Permission granted to photocopy for personal use only.

Matsu-class
Matsu-class Destroyer Es
Escort
cort

Tone-Class Heavy Cruiser

Agano
Agano-class
-class Light Cruiser

Akitsuki-class Destroyer

Kitakami
itakami-class
-class Light Cruiser

Kitakami
itakami-class
-class Light Cruiser

Matsu-class
Matsu-class Destroyer Es
Escort
cort

Myoko
Myoko-class
-class Heavy Cruiser

Oyodo
Oyodo-class
-class Light Cruiser

Oyodo
Oyodo-class
-class Light Cruiser

Shimakaze-class
Shimakaze-class Destroyer

Shiratsuyu-class
Shiratsuyu
-class Destroyer

Shiratsuyu-class
Shiratsuyu
-class Destroyer

Tenryu-class
Tenryu
-class Light Cruiser

Tenryu-class
Tenryu
-class Light Cruiser

Tone-Class Heavy Cruiser

Shimakaze-class
Shimakaze-class Destroyer

Agano
Agano-class
-class Light Cruiser

Kuma-class
Kuma
-class Light Cruiser

Myoko
Myoko-class
-class Heavy Cruiser

Akitsuki-class Destroyer

Schleswig Holstein Class PrePre-Dread


Dreadnaught
naught

Kuma-class
Kuma
-class Light Cruiser

Schleswig Holstein Class PrePre-Dread


Dreadnaught
naught

1
1

Copyright 2007 Mongoose Publishing. Permission granted to photocopy for personal use only.

Armed Merchant Cruiser

Yubari-class
Yubari-class Light Cruiser

Tanker

Tanker

Liner

Troop Ship

Troop Ship

Raider

Raider

Armed Merchant Cruiser

Liner

Yubari-class
Yubari-class Light Cruiser

Roberts-class
Roberts-class Monitor

Roberts
Roberts-class
-class Monitor

Erebus-class Monitor

Erebus-class Monitor

Ammunition Ship

Ammunition Ship

Kaiten

Kaiten

Kaiten

Kaiten

Kaiten

Kaiten

Coastal Forces

Coastal Forces

Coastal Forces

Coastal Forces

Coastal Forces

Coastal Forces

Copyright 2007 Mongoose Publishing. Permission granted to photocopy for personal use only.

Junkers Ju-87

Reggiane Re.2001
Falco II

Junkers Ju-87

Reggiane Re.2001
Falco II

Junkers Ju-87

Reggiane Re.2001
Falco II

Junkers Ju-87

Reggiane Re.2001
Falco II

Fiat G.50 Freccia

Junkers Ju-87

Reggiane Re.2001
Falco II

Aichi E16A Paul

Nakajima B6N Jill

Vought Vindicator

Aichi E16A Paul

Nakajima B6N Jill

Vought Vindicator

Aichi E16A Paul

Nakajima B6N Jill

Vought Vindicator

Aichi E16A Paul

Nakajima B6N Jill

Vought Vindicator

Breda Ba.201

Fiat G.50 Freccia

Breda Ba.201

Macchi MC.202
Folgore

Fiat G.50 Freccia

Breda Ba.201

Macchi MC.202
Folgore

Fiat G.50 Freccia

Breda Ba.201

Macchi MC.202
Folgore

PBY5 Cat
Cataqlina
aqlina PBY5 Cat
Cataqlina
aqlina PBY5 Cat
Cataqlina
aqlina PBY5 Cat
Cataqlina
aqlina

Macchi MC.202
Folgore

Fiat G.50 Freccia

Potez 63.11A.3

Lat
Latco
core 298

Potez 63.11A.3

Moraine-Saulnier
#M.S.406

Lat
Latco
core 298

Potez 63.11A.3

Moraine-Saulnier
#M.S.406

Lat
Latco
core 298

Potez 63.11A.3

Moraine-Saulnier
#M.S.406

Lat
Latco
core 298

Potez 63.11A.3

Moraine-Saulnier
#M.S.406

Lat
Latco
core 298

Moraine-Saulnier
#M.S.406

Copyright 2007 Mongoose Publishing. Permission granted to photocopy for personal use only.

Fairey Firefly

Gloster Gladiator

Blackburn Roc

Fairey Albacore

Fairey Firefly

Gloster Gladiator

Blackburn Roc

Fairey Albacore

Fairey Firefly

Gloster Gladiator

Blackburn Roc

Fairey Albacore

Fairey Firefly

Gloster Gladiator

Blackburn Roc

Fairey Albacore

Fairey Firefly

Gloster Gladiator

Blackburn Roc

Fairey Albacore

Fw-200 Condor
Condor

Heinkel He-111

Heinkel He-177
He-177

Messerschmitt MeMe-110
110

Fw-200 Condor
Condor

Heinkel He-111

Heinkel He-177
He-177

Messerschmitt MeMe-110
110

Fw-200 Condor
Condor

Heinkel He-111

Heinkel He-1
He-177
77

Messerschmitt Me-110
Me-110

Blackburn Skua

Fw-200 Con
Condor
dor

Heinkel He-111

Heinkel He-1
He-177
77

Messerschmitt MeMe-110
110

Fairey Barracuda II

Blackburn Skua

Fairey Barracuda II

Blackburn Skua

Fairey Barracuda II

Blackburn Skua

Fairey Barracuda II

Hawker Typhoon

Short Sunder
Sunderland
land

Hawker Typhoon

Short Sunder
Sunderland
land

Hawker Typhoon

Short Sunder
Sunderland
land

Hawker Typhoon

Short Sunderland
Sunderland

Hawker Typhoon

Short Sunder
Sunderland
land

Copyright 2007 Mongoose Publishing. Permission granted to photocopy for personal use only.

Ilyushin Il-4
Ilyushin Il-4

Spotter

Spotter

Nakajima B6N Jill

Spotter

Nakajima B6N Jill

Spotter

Ilyushin Il-4

Nakajima B6N Jill

Ilyushin Il-4

Nakajima B6N Jill

Ilyushin Il-4

MXY Okha

MXY Okha

MXY Okha

MXY Okha

Polikarpov I-16

MXY Okha

Polikarpov I-16

Mitsubishi A5M4 Claude

Sukhoi Su-2 Ivanov

Polikarpov I-16

Mitsubishi A5M4 Claude

Sukhoi Su-2 Ivanov

Polikarpov I-16

Mitsubishi A5M4 Claude

Sukhoi Su-2 Ivanov

Mitsubishi A5M4 Claude

Mitsubishi A5M4 Claude

Ki-115 Tsurgi

Sukhoi Su-2 Ivanov

Tupolev SB-2
Katyusha

Yak-9
Ki-115 Tsurgi

Yokosuka D4Y2 Judy

Tupolev SB-2
Katyusha

Yak-9

Ki-115 Tsurgi

Yokosuka D4Y2 Judy

Tupolev SB-2
Katyusha

Yak-9

Ki-115 Tsurgi

Yokosuka D4Y2 Judy

Tupolev SB-2
Katyusha

Yak-9

Ki-115 Tsurgi

Yokosuka D4Y2 Judy

Yokosuka B4Y1 Jean Yokosuka B4Y1 Jean Yokosuka B4Y1 Jean Yokosuka B4Y1 Jean Yokosuka B4Y1 Jean

Yokosuka D4Y2 Judy

Copyright 2007 Mongoose Publishing. Permission granted to photocopy for personal use only.

Coastal Forces

Coastal Forces

Coastal Forces

Coastal Forces

Coastal Forces

Coastal Forces

Coastal Forces

Coastal Forces

Coastal Forces

Coastal Forces

Coastal Forces

Coastal Forces

Coastal Forces

Coastal Forces

Coastal Forces

Coastal Forces

Coastal Forces

Coastal Forces

Coastal Forces

Coastal Forces

Shore Batterry

Shore Batterry

Shore Batterry

Shore Batterry

Shore Batterry

Shore Batterry

Shore Batterry

Shore Batterry

Shore Batterry

Shore Batterry

Shore Batterry

Shore Batterry

Shore Batterry

Shore Batterry

Shore Batterry

Shore Batterry

Shore Batterry

Shore Batterry

Shore Batterry

Shore Batterry

Shore Batterry

Shore Batterry

Shore Batterry

Shore Batterry

Coastal Forces

Coastal Forces

Coastal Forces

Coastal Forces

Coastal Forces

Coastal Forces

Coastal Forces

Coastal Forces

Coastal Forces

Coastal Forces

Copyright 2007 Mongoose Publishing. Permission granted to photocopy for personal use only.

Civilian Shipping

Available FREE every month at www.mongoosepublishing.com

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