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Unit

6: Explore Analytic
Trigonometry

Target 6.1, Day 1


EVALUATE INVERSE TRIGONOMETRIC
FUNCTIONS (S7.1 AND S7.2)

Recall that we can use inverse trigonometric functions to nd


the missing ________________ of right triangles.
Find .

2
1

Which angles have a sine of ? In other words, nd sin-1 .

30 o

150 o

390 o

330 o

Because there are _________________ possible angles whose sine is


, we need to ________________ the domain of our trig functions
in order to get one answer (and therefore ensure our inverse trig
functions are indeed functions).

Lets look at this graphically


with the sine function. Do
you see why we have innite
possible angles?

But what if we only look at the restricted


domain of the sine graph shown in blue.
Now how many angles are possible?

We will also use a restricted domain for the cosine function.

Now that we only have one output (ratio) for one input (angle), we
can look at the inverses of the trig functions. Recall that inverse
functions ______________ domain and range and are symmetrical
about the line ________________.

How to evaluate an inverse trig functions without using a calculator


Is x (the side ratio) in
the domain?

No

Yes
Is the ratio
positive (or 0)?

Undened

No
Adjust your angle by
determining which
quadrant would result in a
negative ratio

Yes
Look up the
angle in your
chart
(use radians!)

Find the exact value of the expression. If there is no value, say it is


undened. Do not use a calculator.
1
1
" 5%
tan (1)
sin $ '
#4&
Remember, youre trying to nd an
angle (in the restriction) whose
tangent is equal to 1.

Why?

" 3%
cos $ '
# 2 &

sin

(1)

tan

( 3 )

Similar restrictions exist when working with the inverses of the


reciprocal functions (csc, sec, and cot). However, well keep it
simple(r) and just use reciprocals* to rewrite the expressions and
proceed as normal.
Find the exact value of the expression. If there is no value, say it is
undened. Do not use a calculator.

csc

(2)

sec

( 2 )

cot

(1)

*cot-1 actually has a range that matches up to cos-1 NOT tan-1. (I know, weird). To avoid this, well only
work with cot-1 in the rst quadrant, where this wont matter.

Use a calculator to nd the approximate value of the expression


rounded to two decimal places. If there is no value, say it is
undened.

cos

sin

(0.8231)

(2 )

tan

" 6%
sec $ '
# 5&

cot

(2)

(3)

Warm Up 6.1, Day 2


Find the exact value of the expression. If there is no value, say
undened. Do not use a calculator.
1
1
1
" 1%
" 3%
cot
3
sin $ '
cos $ '
# 2&
# 2 &

( )

Use a calculator to nd the approximate value of the expression


rounded to two decimal places. If there is no value, say undened.
1
1
1
"1%
sin (3)
sec (3)
cot $ '
#2&

Unit 6: Explore Analytic


Trigonometry
Target 6.1, Day 2
EVALUATE COMPOSITE TRIG
FUNCTIONS, PART A (S7.1)

Today we will take a look at two types of composite trigonometric


functions. They will come in one of the following forms

sin (sin x )
1

Inverse on the inside

or

cos

(cos x )

Inverse on the outside

When the inverse is on the inside of the composite function

No

Undened

Is x (the side ratio)


in the domain of
the inverse
function?

Yes
The trig
functions cancel
out. x is your
answer!

Find the exact value of the composite function. If there is no value,


say it is undened. Do not use a calculator.

sin (sin 1 0.8)

cos ( cos1 )

Verify your results using a calculator.

(
+
"
%
5
tan *tan 1 $ '*)
# 3 &-,

When the inverse is outside the composite function, can we just


cancel out the functions? Try it! Use a calculator to verify your
results.

" %
sin $ sin '
# 4&
1

sin 1 (sin )

What do you think is going on here?

When the inverse is on the outside of the composite function

No

Is x (the angle)
in the restricted
domain of the
original trig
function?

1. Find reference angle


2. Put angle in appropriate Quadrant
based on sign (+ or -)
3. Re-measure angle

Yes
The trig
functions cancel
out. x is your
answer!

Notice that even if we are NOT in the domain of the original trig
function, the answer isnt undened. Why can we still get an
answer?

Find the exact value of the composite function. Do not use a


calculator.

"
5 %
cos $ cos '
#
8 &
1

" 10 %
sin $ sin
'
#
9 &
1

Verify your results using a calculator.

( " 3 %+
tan *tan $ ') # 4 &,
1