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Domestic violence paper parts ( 9 sources )

#1 A lot of territory. (spread to thin)


The decline and fall of the Roman Empire, which extended throughout most of Western and
Eastern Europe, North Africa, the Arabian Peninsula, and into Asia, occurred slowly over about
three hundred years and being too spread out

Bundy, Kathryn. "Overview Of The Decline & Fall Of The Roman


Empire." Ancient Rome: Overview Of The Decline & Fall Of The
Roman Empire (2011): 1. History Reference Center. Web. 10 Nov.
2015.

#2 military missues with defenceis (troop mismanagement)


Later emperors, including Hadrian and Diocletian; decreased frontier defense during the fourth
century on the eventual fall of the Roman Empire.
McGill, Sara Ann. "Roman Imperial Military." Roman Imperial Military (2011): 1-2. History
Reference Center. Web.
10 Nov. 2015.
#3 Unable to unite the people (Spreat to thin)
sympathy was insufficient to bridge the divides between a sovereign and his subjects and
between an empire and its colonial territories.
DeGabriele, Peter. "Sympathy For The Sovereign: Sovereignty, Sympathy, And The Colonial
Relation In Edward Gibbon's The Decline And Fall Of The Roman Empire." Eighteenth
Century: Theory & Interpretation (University Of Pennsylvania Press) 53.1 (2012): 1-22.
Academic Search Complete. Web. 10 Nov. 2015..
#4 over taxing (economy)
A situation brought about by the decreasing number of available manpower to work the land
and the tendency of the state to over-tax in a bid to compensate for diminishing revenues.
Lafferty, Sean D.W. "Italy in the twilight of the empire: the decline of Roman law and culture
under Theoderic the Great (c. 493-526)." Canadian Journal of History 45.3 (2010): 457+.
Biography in Context. Web. 11 Nov. 2015

#5 things resting on slave work rather than working class. (econemy)


Focusing on slavery as an essential and distinctive feature of the social order in ancient Greece
and Rome to a degree in which production rested on slave labor more than the working class.
Wood, Ellen Meiksins. "Landlords And Peasants, Masters And Slaves: Class Relations In Greek
And Roman Antiquity." Historical Materialism 10.3 (2002): 17-69. Academic Search Premier.
Web. 11 Nov. 2015.

#6 pay for war mementos and other thing (using to much to pay for it/ troops)
Roman generals celebrated their successful campaigns by paying for the putting up of temples,
trophies, and memorials which show their achievements that were mostly decorated with relief
sculptures and paintings.
DE SOUZA, PHILIP1. "War, Slavery, And Empire In Roman Imperial Iconography." Bulletin Of
The Institute Of Classical Studies 54.1 (2011): 31-62. Humanities Source. Web. 11 Nov. 2015.
#7 privet out of country contractors (economy)
The use of contractors to build and maintain public works in Rome and the provinces is a
common feature of Roman building practice in the Republic and early Principate. It reflects a
general tendency in Roman republican administration (also found in other sectors such as taxfarming) to let out state business to private entrepreneurs
Du Plessis, Paul. "The Protection Of The Contractor In Public Works Contracts In The Roman
Republic And Early Empire." Journal Of Legal History 25.3 (2014): 287-314. Criminal Justice
Abstracts with Full Text. Web. *11 Nov. 2015.

#8 (troops) use of ministers in army


Major issues on which discussion is focussed include the extent to which missionaries can be
said to be agents of empire, the significance of missionary critique of imperial practice and the
extent to which missionary activity was a form of cultural imperialism.
Gascoigne, John. "Introduction: Religion And Empire, An Historiographical Perspective."
Journal Of Religious History 32.2 (2012): 159-178. Academic Search Premier. Web. 11 Nov.
2015.

#9 (spread to thin)
huns walked into areas woth little to no resistance.
The Huns caused the collapse of the Roman Empire's frontier security, thereby causing the demise of the western
half of the kingdom in 500 A.D.

Heather, Peter. The Huns and the end of the Roman Empire in Western Europe Journal of Gale.
15 Feb. 2013. Web. 12 Nov. 2015

Bundy, Kathryn. "Overview Of The Decline & Fall Of The Roman Empire." Ancient Rome:
Overview Of The Decline & Fall Of The Roman Empire (2011): 1. History Reference Center.
Web. 10 Nov. 2015.
McGill, Sara Ann. "Roman Imperial Military." Roman Imperial Military (2011): 1-2. History
Reference Center. Web.
10 Nov. 2015.
DeGabriele, Peter. "Sympathy For The Sovereign: Sovereignty, Sympathy, And The Colonial
Relation In Edward Gibbon's The Decline And Fall Of The Roman Empire." Eighteenth
Century: Theory & Interpretation (University Of Pennsylvania Press) 53.1 (2012): 1-22.
Academic Search Complete. Web. 10 Nov. 2015.
Lafferty, Sean D.W. "Italy in the twilight of the empire: the decline of Roman law and culture
under Theoderic the Great (c. 493-526)." Canadian Journal of History 45.3 (2010): 457+.
Biography in Context. Web. 11 Nov. 2015
Wood, Ellen Meiksins. "Landlords And Peasants, Masters And Slaves: Class Relations In Greek
And Roman Antiquity." Historical Materialism 10.3 (2002): 17-69. Academic Search Premier.
Web. 11 Nov. 2015.
DE SOUZA, PHILIP1. "War, Slavery, And Empire In Roman Imperial Iconography." Bulletin Of
The Institute Of Classical Studies 54.1 (2011): 31-62. Humanities Source. Web. 11 Nov. 2015.
Du Plessis, Paul. "The Protection Of The Contractor In Public Works Contracts In The Roman
Republic And Early Empire." Journal Of Legal History 25.3 (2014): 287-314. Criminal Justice
Abstracts with Full Text. Web. *11 Nov. 2015.
Gascoigne, John. "Introduction: Religion And Empire, An Historiographical Perspective."
Journal Of Religious History 32.2 (2012): 159-178. Academic Search Premier. Web. 11 Nov.
2015.

Heather, Peter. The Huns and the end of the Roman Empire in Western Europe Journal of Gale.
15 Feb. 2013. Web. 12 Nov. 2015

Gage Rodie
Professors Name
English
11\12\15
Fall of Rome
One of the worlds most vast empires that ruled over all the people with its advanced tactics and
culture; the might of the war machine that drove the conquest of this massive empire. The might

of this war machine sweat across the land lead by a great emperor what was loved by his people
and feared by his enemies. With all the conquest of this unrelenting titan of a nation came wealth
from the spoilers of war and the people that served its cause. It seemed like nothing would bring
down this unrelenting force, this powerhouse was the mighty Empire of Rome. The time of this
giant was; however, coming to an end. The fall of Rome was caused by its failing economy, its
misuse of its military, and rapid expansion.

Rome had many events in its history that lead to its fall. One of the biggest set backs what's
actually one if its prides and that is it conquest. Each time they took land the empire expanded.
eventually it was getting to big for them to handle. The decline and fall of the Roman Empire,
which extended throughout most of Western and Eastern Europe, North Africa, the Arabian
Peninsula, and into Asia, occurred slowly over about three hundred years and being too spread
out (Bundy, 3) This expansion was happening too fast for the empire to properly defend the
borders. Heather was quoted in The Huns and the end of the Roman Empire in Western Europe
to say that The Huns caused the collapse of the Roman Empire's frontier security, thereby
causing the demise of the western half of the kingdom in 500 A.D.
The huns found it easy to come in and take back some of the roman territory causing a strain on
the imperial defenses. This was just one of the issues with the conquered land the romans took. A
major issues that had arrived was the inability to keep the people now under roman rule in line,
to protect them, or even to communicate with them. DeGabriele had done research into the
matter of the unity struggles for the romans and found that, sympathy was insufficient to
bridge the divides between a sovereign and his subjects and between an empire and its colonial
territories. They were unable to connect to the new comers of the empire thus making it hard for

Rome to keep its bonds tight with its lands and people. This was one of the reasons expansion
was proving to be hurting the empire rather than helping.

The Roman empire was still a powerhouse in all regards but they were just talking too much in a
short amount of time. this lead to the unfortunate decline in a regards to military power and
authority that the people of Rome both feared and respected if they were closer to the capital.
McGill, Sara Ann looked into what would have caused the Roman army to lose the confidence of
the people in the frontier and this is what Sara had to say about her research, Later emperors,
including Hadrian and Diocletian; decreased frontier defense during the fourth century on the
eventual fall of the Roman Empire. Now this would is what caused the collapse of the boarders
and eventually lost them the people in the frontier. Having the troops removed cut connections
between the mighty empire and the people out there. One thing that was believed throughout the
empire was religion might help rekindle these lost ties and possibly help in conquests. Soon
enough the church got mixed into the Roman military and ministers were set to battle regimens
were they were to boost morale and help try to enlighten the opposing forces.

Gascoigne, John. too a look on this topic and compiled some information, Major issues on
which discussion is focused on the extent to which missionaries can be said to be agents of the
Roman Empire, the significance of missionary critique of imperial practice and the extent to
which missionary activity was to be used. This was not the only change that was brought to help
try to use military forces to bring a union of the Roman people and the Empire they served. In an
attempt to boost the people's opinion and celebrate the victories of the mighty empire the soldiers

built monuments. Roman generals celebrated their successful campaigns by paying for the
putting up of temples, trophies, and memorials which show their achievements that were mostly
decorated with relief sculptures and paintings. (DE SOUZA 21) They thought it necessary to
celebrate but these they spent so much time money and manpower to make the monuments and
such.
The mighty Roman Empire has entered a stage from the military's spending and its rapid
expansion that lead them to a bit of a pickle. They needed more buildings to hold everyone in the
new lands after the tours of conquest left cities in ruin. So they needed money to fund
reconstruction, which lead to over taxation on its people. Lafferty the author for the Canadian
Journal of History had said, A situation brought about by the decreasing number of available
manpower to work the land and the tendency of the state to over-tax in a bid to compensate for
diminishing revenues. The manpower used to help construct these monuments from the soldiers
and the new homes, business, and public areas were made mostly under slave labor. Focusing
on slavery as an essential and distinctive feature of the social order in ancient Greece and Rome
to a degree in which production rested on slave labor more than the working class. (Wood 4)
Slaves were not the only ones getting the jobs from the working class in Rome. Private
contractors were being outsourced for construction and other jobs from other countries that had
not yet fell to Rome or from nations at war with them along with a few random ones from Rome
that would leave. The use of contractors from all over to build and maintain public works in
Rome and the provinces is a common feature of Roman building practice in the Republic and
early principe. It reflects a general tendency in Roman republican administration (also found in
other sectors such as tax-farming) to let out state business to private entrepreneurs (Du Plessis
3) This would eventually lead to the economic downfall of the massive titan known as Ancient

Rome. The Taxation being raised for fill in the lost revenue would wear on the people and the
empire would find that using private contractors would leave them losing more money for each
new building made.

The story of Romes fall contributes to a number of thing that no one at the time could see before
it was too late. Rome was at one point a massive powerhouse that seemed to be unstoppable for
the longest time. This monster on the battlefield used superior tactics and better equipment to
outsmart and overpower its opponents. Its borders seemed endless as it rapidly took over its
neighboring lands in a sea of bronze and blood. People both feared and respected this nation of
elites as they became part of it, willing or not. All of this success in battle and the wealth it had
seemed to be unending as more and more came in from each passing conquest and the cities that
erected from it. However, the end seemed near as the noticeable decline in moral on the frontier
became apparent. The realization that the military was not in a good position or even in areas that
barbarians were coming from which costed the Romans time, money, land, and people.
Following this was the realization of the economic backlash from the monuments and new
buildings and constructions. Having used Slaves to make most of the construction projects lead
to having wasted materials when the barbarians not only took the land but the people, slaves, and
materials. The wealth was depleting each day a the contractor's charged for their work each day
and more of them came
along as new buildings were still being constructed. The people looked to this collapsing giant
would find this process would not happen overnight, but for 400 years as it bled out slowly from
all these factors. They are the land that were claimed by the barbarians, the monuments from the
once great conquests taken and for all the romans knew were probably destroyed and smelted

down if they were made from bronze, and the slaves in the frontier were surely captured and
used as labor or freed and now working with the forces that arrived to kill this wounded beast
that the romans had made their empire into. Rome was a wondrous place that seemed like its
empire would never fall. But like all Good things it began to come to an end. The killing blows
were the misuse of the military, rapid expansion, and an economic decline that took 400 years to
officially kill the mightiest empire the world had ever seen. The romans made their mistakes of
rapid expansion which gave them a lot of land fast, but they lacked the manpower to keep it safe
and connected with the rest of the empire. The military was unmatched on the battlefield, yet off
they were mismanaged and misplaced or off doing other tasks that would prove to cost the
empire time, money, or even people. With all the expansion money and riches came in from the
conquest and victories that the army made possible; however, these riches that would flow into
the empires pockets would eventually find its way out just as fast if not faster thanks to the new
homes and cities that needed to be build and the contractors that would make them and maintain.
All three of these lead into a cycle that just kept spinning and spinning until there was nothing
left and the inevitable collapse of the Roman Empire happened. For The Romans, it was because
of failing economy, its misuse of its military, and rapid expansion.