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LESSON PLAN OUTLINE

JMU Elementary Education Program


Whitley Craig
Peak View Elementary School
Second Grade

A. TITLE How Many Pockets?


B. CONTEXT OF LESSON AND UNWRAPPING OF THE STANDARD
It is important for me to preassess any prior knowledge they have about the
estimation and different ways to solve the same problems. The students have showed
they are ready for this lesson because they have been introduced to the idea of solving
problems using multiple methods in a prior CT lesson (Is There Enough Lesson). This
lesson takes their knowledge and builds upon it by requiring them to work with a
larger total.
The students have also been introduced to some important foundational skills
needed for this lesson in prior grades. In first grade, the students mastered:
1.2 The student will count forward by ones, twos, fives, and tens to 100 and backward
by ones from 30.
1.6 The student will create and solve one-step story and picture problems using
basic addition facts with sums to 18 or less and the corresponding subtraction
facts.
1.14 The student will investigate, identify, and describe various forms of data
collection (e.g., recording daily temperature, lunch count, attendance, favorite ice
cream), using tables, picture graphs, and object graphs.
All of these standards show that the students are ready to apply this knowledge in new and
more complex ways.
C. LEARNING OBJECTIVES
Understand what are
the broad
generalizations the
students should begin
to develop? (These are
typically difficult to
assess in one lesson.)

Know what are the


facts, rules, specific data
the students will gain
through this lesson?
(These knows must be
assessed in your lesson.)

Do what are the


specific thinking
behaviors students will
be able to do through
this lesson? (These will
also be assessed in your
lesson.)

The students will:


Understand we can
count the same amount
in multiple ways.

The students will:


Know data is a
collection of facts, such
as numbers, words,
measurements,
observations or even just
descriptions of things.
Know an estimate is a
rough calculation or
judgment of a value,
number, quantity, or
amount.

The students will:


Estimate the sum of two
whole numbers
recognize whether the
estimation is reasonable.
Identify the appropriate
data and the operation
needed to solve an
addition problem where
the data are presented in
a simple table, picture
graph, or bar graph.
Solve addition problems
using data from simple
tables, picture graphs,
bar graphs, and
everyday life situations.

D. ASSESSING LEARNING
Objective

Assessment
What documentation will you
have for each student?

Data Collected
What will your students do
and say, specifically, that
indicate each student has
achieved your objectives?
Students will record at
least two ways they
calculated the number
of pockets.
o Tallies
o Counting
cubes
o Estimation
o Counting by
2s, 5s, 10s
Students will write
about how they
collected data when
they found out how
many pockets each
student had.

Understand we can
count the same amount
in multiple ways.

Students will record


multiple methods for
counting pockets in their
math journals.

Know data is a
collection of facts, such
as numbers, words,
measurements,
observations or even
just descriptions of
things.
Know an estimate is a
rough calculation or
judgment of a value,
number, quantity, or
amount.
Estimate the sum of two
whole numbers
recognize whether the

Students will answer a


question in their math
journals that requires them
to understand data.

Students will answer a


question in their math
journals that requires them
to understand estimation.

Students will write


about how we
guessed before we
did our lesson.

Students will answer a


question in their math
journals that requires them

Students will write


about how we
guessed before we

estimation is
reasonable.

Identify the appropriate


data and the operation
needed to solve an
addition problem where
the data are presented in
a simple table,
Solve addition
problems using data
from simple tables,
picture graphs, bar
graphs, and everyday
life situations.

to understand estimation.

did our lesson.

Students will record what


they did to solve the
pocket problem in their
math journals.

Students will say they


counted by 1s, 2s, 5s,
used the tallies, etc.

Students will record what


they did to solve the
pocket problem in their
math journals.

Students will say they


counted by 1s, 2s, 5s,
used the tallies, etc.

E. MATERIALS NEEDED
Unifix cubes
Clear plastic jar
Tape/rubber band
Chart paper
Student Math Journals
Review Sheet- p.22 to review prior days lesson
F. RELATED VIRGINIA STANDARDS OF LEARNING
2.6 The student, given two whole numbers whose sum is 99 or less, will
a) estimate the sum; and
b) find the sum, using various methods of calculation.
2.8 The student will create and solve one- and two-step addition and subtraction problems,
using data from simple tables, picture graphs, and bar graphs.
G. PROCEDURE
(Include a DETAILED description of each step. Write what you will SAY and
DO.)
Activity Element
Procedures and management
Step-by step procedures including questions and main points
Preparation of the
Prepare Pocket Data Chart by creating a chart with three columns
Learning
titled, How many pockets are we wearing today? Label the second
Environment
column Pockets and the third column, People.
Gather materials
Make copies of review sheet p.22
Introduction of the
Ask the students what data is.
Lesson
o A collection of facts, such as numbers, words,
Engaging Students
measurements, observations or even just descriptions of
things
Ask the students what are some things we could collect data on.
Inform the students that every so often (~10 days), we will collect
data about the number of pockets all the students of the class are
wearing. On each pocket day, the class will gather data about how

many pockets the students are wearing that day.


Implementation of the
Lesson

Inform the students that we are first going to estimate and then
actually find the exact answer.
Ask if anyone knows what estimate is.
o roughly calculate or judge the value, number, quantity, or
extent of.
Start by asking the students how many pockets they think all the
people in our class are wearing today and how they came to that
estimate.
o Some will guess more wildly, while others will take into
account the class size and outfits their classmates are
wearing.
Record their estimates on the board.
Ask the students if they know a way they could use the unifix cubes
to measure how many pockets everyone is wearing.
o Reference back to the prior lesson when children each took
a cube and combined all of them to determine how many
students were in the class.
Share with the students that one way to count the number of pockets
in our class is for each of them to take one cube for each pocket that
they are wearing.
o Demonstrate by taking out the number of cubes for the
number of pockets you have.
o Pass around the bucket of cubes and instruct the students
to take one cube for each of their own pockets and then
pass the cubes to the next student.
o Assign a zero to anyone without pockets.
Show the students the large jar.
Ask them how we can use this large jar and the cubes they just
gathered to get the sum of pockets.
Inform them that you are going to call out a number. If you are
wearing that many pockets, come up and put your cubes in the jar.
o If you have zero pockets, come to the front of the room.
o Ask how many students have no pockets.
o Ask how many cubes they will each put into the large jar.
Use tally marks to keep track of how many students have each
number of pockets. This will allow the students to see another
representation of the same number.
Repeat the two steps above for two, three, etc. pockets.
Ask the students to estimate again the total number of pockets the
class is wearing.
o More than 20? 30?
o Record estimates on board.
Hold up the jar and mark it with tape or a rubber band. This will
serve as a visual reference the next time we complete this yearlong activity and can serve as a method of comparison.
Ask the students how we could find out exactly how many
pockets we are wearing today?
o To ensure accuracy, we will count in multiple ways.

Closure

Clean-Up

o Have one student count by 1s.


o Another by a second method.
o And another by a third method.
o (2s, 5s, 10s)
o Allow students to join in while you point.
Once we have come to a conclusion, record the total on our char
paper, How many pockets are we wearing today?
Read back what our chart says.
Remind students the rubber band/tape will stay on the jar for
future reference when we repeat the activity.
Remind students that we will do this activity every so often and will
keep track of our data over the whole year.
Instruct the students to get out their math journals and write about
their first Pocket Day using the questions on the screen:
o What was the question we were trying to answer?
o What data did we collect?
o How did we use estimation to count the number of
pockets?
o What are two methods we used to calculate the number of
pockets?
o What did we find out? How many pockets were there?
o You may use words, visuals, or a combination to respond
to the prompt.
Inform students they will have 10-15 minutes to do so.
Choose 2-3 students work to share with the class that went about
solving the problems in various and unique ways.
If time allows and students finish early, review the prior days lesson
through the use of page 22. This will be an individual activity.
Put unifix cubes away.
Store poster in safe place, preferably somewhere it can be seen.
Collect review worksheets.

H. DIFFERENTIATION
Differentiation is crucial to ensuring that all students have an opportunity to
learn and show their thinking. One way I am differentiating my lesson is by
allowing students to solve the pocket problem in multiple ways using multiple
methods and tools. This ensures that students are not stuck just because they do not
understand how one method works. A second way I differentiated my lesson was
by allowing students to show their knowledge and thinking through verbal and
written responses. This helps ensure that my perception of a students mathematical
thinking is not altered by a lack of writing skill. For students that finish early, we
will review and extent on the prior days lesson. For students that need extra
guidance, I will circulate the room during journal writing time to assess and prompt
as necessary.
I. WHAT COULD GO WRONG WITH THIS LESSON AND WHAT WILL YOU DO
ABOUT IT?

There are always things that could go wrong in any lesson no matter how much
you plan ahead. It is important to think about some of these things before had so
you can plan on how to combat them. In my lesson there are several aspects that
could need tweaking if they dont go smoothly. First there could be individual
conflicts between the students that are grouped together at tables. If this was noted,
I would first use proximity control to see if they refocus their energy. If that did
not resolve the issue, I would make sure the conflict is not carried over into the
second half of the lesson by regrouping accordingly.
During the group discussion, there are also some things that could put a roadblock
in my lesson plan. Some days classes seem to be all on board with sharing their
ideas, and sometimes they are more hesitant. If I do not get any response in my
beginning discussion questions, I could potentially freeze up and not know where
to go. If there is a lack of response, I will allow the students to discuss with their
partner each question for 30 seconds and then bring it back to group discussion.
This could alleviate potential stress for me and the students.
Thirdly, the students could not know how to get the writing process started
during journal time. For instances like this, I will circulate to prompt and
guide thinking with more probing questions.