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5133 Detailed Lesson Plan

Bryan Beck
11/19/14
Title: How Stuff Works: Force, Motion, and Energy. First Lesson in the Unit.
Grade Level: Third Grade
Subject/Certification Area: Science and Reading
Time Span: This lesson will be 50 minutes of instruction. The entire unit will be taught over 10
class periods and build upon the previous days lessons.
Materials Needed: computer, projector, internet access, white board, white board markers, selected
books, notebooks, writing utensils
Goals for this Unit (2 or 3 general goals for the unit):
For students to have a clear understanding of the TEKS for force, motion, and energy.
(6) Force, motion, and energy. The student knows that forces cause change and that energy exists
in many forms. The student is expected to:
(A) explore different forms of energy, including mechanical, light, sound, and heat/thermal in
everyday life;
(B) demonstrate and observe how position and motion can be changed by pushing and pulling
objects to show work being done such as swings, balls, pulleys, and wagons; and
(C) observe forces such as magnetism and gravity acting on objects.
Objectives for this Unit (2-4 objectives written in behavioral terms):
1. Students will be able to identify and describe different forms of energy and how they are used
today. They will be able to do this within 80% accuracy.
2. Students will create their own simple machine and explain how the forces of push and pull
affect it in a 3 paragraph essay.
3. Students will experiment with magnetism and gravity. Students will be able to form groups
and research a topic of interest, then present a 5 minute presentation to the class.
Goals for this Lesson:
Students will:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Learn the definition of force, motion, push, and pull and add them to the word wall.
Gain an understanding of basic mechanical energy.
Be introduced to the unit of Force, Motion, and Energy.
Observe and identify forces of push and pull in action.
Read a book from the classroom library related to the lesson.

Objective(s) for this Lesson:


(written in behavioral terms to aid in assessing student performance during Mastery Check;
assistance in writing measurable objectives is given in the section following this one)
1. Students will create a compare and contrast diagram on the whiteboard while observing two
different objects with the assistance of the teacher in a whole-class activity.
2. Paired students will identify examples of push and pull with 80% accuracy after seeing it
modeled by the teacher.
3. Students will choose a book to read from the classroom library and identify two examples of
push and two examples of pull with 100% accuracy.
TEKS may be found at: http://www.tea.state.tx.us/teks/ You must provide not only the TEKS you
will use for this (by number) but also a complete listing of it and how it related to your lesson.
(6) Force, motion, and energy. The student knows that forces cause change and that energy exists
in many forms. The student is expected to:
(A) explore different forms of energy, including mechanical, light, sound, and heat/thermal in
everyday life;
(B) demonstrate and observe how position and motion can be changed by pushing and pulling
objects to show work being done such as swings, balls, pulleys, and wagons; and
(C) observe forces such as magnetism and gravity acting on objects.
How the TEKS are related to the lesson:
The TEKS are directly related to the lesson since the lesson is introducing the unit on force, motion,
and energy. Students will learn what force and energy are and identify examples of push and pull.
This lesson will lead into Newtons Three Laws of Physics, the types of energy, and magnetism and
gravity.
Context/Modifications:
(prior knowledge and/or abilities needed with possible modifications for students with special
needs)
English language learners will be paired with a language partner to help them during discussions.
They can be given extra time to complete assignments and anticipation guides to identify key words
and ideas.
Students with special needs will receive more assistance from the teacher and can be placed in a
group of three instead of two. These students will be given extra time to complete assignments and
a reduced amount of individual work. Assistive technology can be implemented if needed.
Anticipatory Focusing:
(introductory material or activity to "set the stage" and heighten motivation for the lesson)

Similarities and Differences game: The teacher will lead the class by asking the similarities and
differences between a water wheel and a river boat. Students will begin by activating their prior
knowledge and sharing what a water wheel and a river boat are. The teacher will then show these
two short videos:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gMFIypD-MA8
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PN9S4Se800&index=19&list=PLmeMNvmnq_YHEwsBQExGuIGE93N_xu9m3
Students will be able to respond to the whole class with the differences and similarities that they
find. The teacher can prompt them to speak about which wheel is being pushed and which wheel is
being pulled. This will lead into the lesson on forces and motion, specifically push and pull.
Students can make compare and contrast diagram as a whole class on the white board in order to
use visual aids.
Setting Expectations:
(providing clear guidelines for procedures, outcomes, and behavior)
Students will actively participate in whole-class and partner activities. Students will treat others
with respect and demonstrate teamwork. A character award will be given to up to two students for
teamwork and respect. Students will work diligently and silently during individual work activities.
Input:
(information presented to students through one or more teaching strategies with any technology or
other supports; step by step highlights of lesson as it proceeds)
The teacher will use the Glogster interactive poster that he created to introduce the forces of push
and pull. The definitions of force and motion will be explained and there will be examples given.
The teacher will then explain the forces of push and pull with images and short videos.
Bryan Becks Glogster interactive poster: http://bryanwbeck.edu.glogster.com/forces-and-motion/
Modeling:
(demonstrating concepts presented)
Students will identify whether certain actions are examples of push or pull. The teacher will
complete the first three examples with whole-class participation. The teacher will model thinking
aloud and critical thinking to make the correct decision.
Guided Practice:
(practicing concepts presented in a structured environment with close supervision)
Students will then be placed with their weekly reading partners to complete examples four through
ten. Students will need to read the example aloud, discuss the possible answer, agree upon the
answer, and be able to tell why that example is either push or pull. The teacher will walk around the

room listening in on conversations, redirecting students as necessary, and giving prompts to


students who need assistance. After ten minutes each pair of students will present their answers one
by one until all ten questions have been successfully answered. To make this more of an engaging
activity, a line can be drawn down the middle of the room and both sides can compete to share the
right answers. Sides will alternate sharing their answers. A right answer will reward that team with
one point while a wrong answer will reward the other team with a point.
Checking for Understanding:
(techniques such as questioning used during lesson to assess level of understanding)
For the first lesson in this unit questioning will be the method used to determine understanding.
Later on in the unit students will need to create a project to demonstrate their understanding and
write a short essay. The teacher will ask questions throughout each part of the lesson asking
students to identify push and pull, telling why they are push and pull, and giving their own
examples of push and pull. The teacher can ask if students can identify the ideas of push and pull in
the other subjects they are studying.
Reteach:
(additional explanation of lesson concepts)
The teacher will address the whole class to restate the definitions of force, motion, push, and pull.
These words can be added to the word wall as they will be used many times during the unit. At this
time the teacher will tell students that the ideas of push and pull will be very important concepts for
the next days lessons of Newtons three laws of physics.
Independent Practice:
(practicing concepts presented independently with occasional monitoring)
Students will borrow one of the following books from the classroom library with examples of push
and pull. Students will need to identify two examples of push and two examples of pull in their
book that they bring home and write them down as homework.
List of books:

Duck in the Truck, by Jez Alborough; ISBN: 0064438333


Push and Pull, by Robin Nelson; ISBN: 9780822552994
Forces Make Things Move, by Kimberley Brubaker Bradley, ISBN: 9780064452144
And Everyone Shouted, Pull! : A First Look at Forces and Motion, by Claire Llewellyn;
ISBN: 9781404806566
Cucumber Soup, by Vickie Leigh Krudwig; ISBN: 9781555913809
Big Pumpkin, by Erica Silverman; ISBN: 0590477609
The TeeterTotter, by Joy Cowley; ISBN: 1562707329
Push and Pull (Rookie ReadAbout Science) by Patricia J. Murphy; ISBN: 978051628644
Push and Pull (Yellow Umbrella Books: Science Level A), by Hollie J. Endres; ISBN:
978 0736828802
You Read to Me, Ill Read to You, by Mary Ann Hoberman; ISBN: 9780316013161

Mastery Check:
(utilizing the criterion set in the objective(s) to assess understanding)
Formal and informal assessments can be taken from in-class and homework activities. The teacher
will monitor whole-class, paired, and individual activities to make sure the following objectives
were completed:
1. Students will create a compare and contrast diagram on the whiteboard while observing two
different objects with the assistance of the teacher in a whole-class activity.
2. Paired students will identify examples of push and pull with an 80% accuracy after seeing it
modeled by the teacher.
3. Students will choose a book to read from the classroom library and identify two examples of
push and two examples of pull with 100% accuracy.
Extension:
(provision of additional activities or greater depth to activities required in lesson for certain students
or groups)
1. Students who successfully finish their in-class assignment early can choose another book to
read that relates to the subject of push and pull to gain a deeper understanding of forces.
2. Students can use the computer to learn more about push and pull through an interactive
game. http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/scienceclips/ages/6_7/forces_movement.shtml

Closure:
(drawing lesson to a close with summary; may include incentives or rewards for achievement,
group process, etc.)
The teacher will summarize the important concepts learned during the lesson. Points can be
awarded to students on the winning team for identifying the examples of push and pull. A character
award can be given to one or two students who demonstrated teamwork and respect throughout the
lesson.
Resources:
List of childrens books on the subject of push and pull retrieved from
http://www.uen.org/Lessonplan/preview.cgi?LPid=28150

TEKS retrieved from http://www.tea.state.tx.us/teks/


YouTube videos:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gMFIypD-MA8

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PN9S4Se800&index=19&list=PLmeMNvmnq_YHEwsBQExGuIGE93N_xu9m3

Glogster interactive poster made by Bryan Beck:


http://bryanwbeck.edu.glogster.com/forces-and-motion/
Interactive computer game retrieved from
http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/scienceclips/ages/6_7/forces_movement.shtml