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Republic of the Philippines

SURIGAODEL SUR STATE UNIVERSITY


COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING, COMPUTER STUDIES AND TECHNOLOGY
Main Campus, Rosario, Tandag City

Summary Report

On

Airborne Internet

Submitted by:
Kevin Jasper M. Saranza
CS 423 Student

Submitted to:
Born Christian A. Isip
Instructor, CS 423 Seminars and Fieldtrips

Republic of the Philippines


SURIGAODEL SUR STATE UNIVERSITY
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING, COMPUTER STUDIES AND TECHNOLOGY
Main Campus, Rosario, Tandag City
I.

INTRODUCTION

The word on just about every Internet user's lips these days is "broadband."
We have so much more data to send and download today, including audio files,
video files and photos, that it's clogging our wimpy modems. Many Internet users
are switching to cable modems and digital subscriber lines (DSLs) to increase their
bandwidth. There's also a new type of service being developed that will take
broadband into the air. In this paper, we'll learn about the future of the Airborne
Internet. We'll take a look at the networks in development, the aircraft and how
consumers may use this technology.
Land based lines are limited physically in how much data they can deliver
because of the diameter of the cable or phone line. In an airborne Internet, there is
no such physical limitation, enabling a broader capacity. The airborne Internet will
function much like satellite-based Internet access, but without the time delay. The
airborne Internet will actually be used to compliment the satellite and ground based
networks, not replace them. These airborne networks will overcome the last mile
barriers facing conventional Internet access options.

II.

SUB-TOPICS

How AI Works
The aircraft work as hub, and HALO work as wireless network with star
topology (ISP) Internet Service Provider send the data through a gateway to the
hub in the aircraft AI divide the area into different cells. (Mobile cells) each spot
beam serves a single "cell" on the ground in a frequency-division multiplex fashion
with 5-to-1.
The Proteus airplane
The Proteus was developed by NASA It is designed with long wings and low
wing loading It can fly in high-altitude18-foot dish underneath the plane is
responsible for reflecting high-speed data signals from a ground station to users.

Republic of the Philippines


SURIGAODEL SUR STATE UNIVERSITY
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING, COMPUTER STUDIES AND TECHNOLOGY
Main Campus, Rosario, Tandag City
III.

SUMMARY GENERALIZATIONS AND CONCLUSIONS: TOWARD THE


PURSUIT OF BEST PRACTICES

The AI provide high speed internet, it has also many advantage than
satellite communication. This new service will be useful for who live in small village.
The best practices of having this kind of technology is to use it on a good way and
also never stop on finding and produce more development in terms of internet
because we are the only one who will have benefit to it.
Applying this to our Daily life Airborne internet it is more useful on any
places wherein the satellite internet cant reach because the internet that they
provide is done through airborne by flying a plane either it is manned or unmanned.

Republic of the Philippines


SURIGAODEL SUR STATE UNIVERSITY
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING, COMPUTER STUDIES AND TECHNOLOGY
Main Campus, Rosario, Tandag City
REFERENCES

www.studymafia.org
www.airborneinternet.org&&q=related:www.aerosat.come.org/iel5/10432/33126/01
559440.pdf?arnumber=15594begriff=airborneinternet&typ=buchstabe

Republic of the Philippines


SURIGAODEL SUR STATE UNIVERSITY
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING, COMPUTER STUDIES AND TECHNOLOGY
Main Campus, Rosario, Tandag City

Requirement No. 2

On

Airborne Internet

Submitted by:
Kevin Jasper M. Saranza
CS 423 Student

Submitted to:
Born Christian A. Isip
Instructor, CS 423 Seminars and Fieldtrips

Republic of the Philippines


SURIGAODEL SUR STATE UNIVERSITY
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING, COMPUTER STUDIES AND TECHNOLOGY
Main Campus, Rosario, Tandag City
I.

HISTORY

First conceived in 1999, the idea of an Internet communications and delivery


system that is air-based for use by passengers and crew on airplanes has
undergone some revisions over the years, especially as technology continued to
advance during the first decade of the 21st century.
In additional to consumer applications, the airborne Internet is also perceived as
being a means of creating a communications and information network that could be
used in emergency situations or as part of military strategies.
The idea behind the airborne Internet is to eliminate the need for any type of
communications infrastructure that is land-based.
Instead, the equipment needed to create the network would be installed in aircraft
of different types, essentially making it possible to maintain communications and
information flow even if key facilities located on the ground were rendered
inoperable. At the same time, the air-based Internet would have full capability to
interact with land based facilities when and as practical.

II.

SHORT DESCRIPTION

The Airborne Internet is a proposed network in which all nodes would be


located in aircraft. The network is intended for use in aviation communications,
navigation, and surveillance (CNS) and would also be useful to businesses, private
Internet users, and government agencies, especially the military. In time of war, for
example, an airborne network might enable military planes to operate without the
need for a communications infrastructure on the ground. Such a network could also
allow civilian planes to continually monitor each other's positions and flight paths .

III.

HOW IT WORKS ( with illustration)

The concept seems pretty simple, have a plane flying over head in a pattern
carrying long range 4g transmitters, transmitting internet across the city. Looking
into the trigonometry in this, it could potentially cover an area of up to 3040 miles. I
ran some numbers, and to have 2 Beech craft Barons flying so that one was

Republic of the Philippines


SURIGAODEL SUR STATE UNIVERSITY
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING, COMPUTER STUDIES AND TECHNOLOGY
Main Campus, Rosario, Tandag City
always in the air, it would cost $5,000 a day roughly. If you had 5,000 customers,
paying $30 a month for high speed internet from this service, then doesn't this
business ventures sound like it has potential.

A used aircraft would cost around $250,000 and around $50,000 to outfit it
with the Transmitters roughly, meaning the total cost would be around $300,000 to
cover a city (50 mile radius) with this, currently, cell phone towers cost 150,000 to
200,000 and in cities, only cover a few miles. Doesn't this seem plausible. This
plane would fly a few miles over the Earth, which is about how far away some cell
towers are from consumers, and there would be air between the plane and the
receiver, not buildings and walls, extending the range. In order for consumers to
pick up on the signal, a home base station would be used that could power ran
antenna to provide high upload and download speeds. The aircraft would
essentially be a "wireless router" in the sky, transmitting all of the data to a base
station that has a backbone connection to the internet
.
IV.

SPECIFIC APPLICATION
Internet-based mobile ad hoc networking (Commercial Application)

Internet-based mobile ad hoc networking is an emerging technology that


supports self-organizing, mobile networking infrastructures. The technology
enables an autonomous system of mobile nodes, which can operate in isolation or
be connected to the greater Internet. Mobile ad hoc networks (Manets) are
designed to operate in widely varying environments, from forward-deployed military

Republic of the Philippines


SURIGAODEL SUR STATE UNIVERSITY
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING, COMPUTER STUDIES AND TECHNOLOGY
Main Campus, Rosario, Tandag City
Manets with hundreds of nodes per mobile domain to applications of low-power
sensor networks and other embedded systems. Before Manet technology can be
easily deployed, however, improvements must be made in such areas as highcapacity wireless technologies, address and location management, interoperability
and security. The authors give an overview of Manet technology and current IETF
efforts toward producing routing and interface definition standards that support it
within the IP suite.
Source:
Published in: IEEE Internet Computing (Volume: 3, Issue: 4)
Page(s):63 - 70 ISSN: 1089-7801 INSPEC Accession Number: 6327296
DOI:10.1109/4236.780962 Date of Publication :Jul/Aug 1999 Date of Current
Version :06 August 2002 Issue Date :Jul/Aug 1999 Sponsored by :IEEE Computer
Society Publisher:IEEE

Minuteman: Forward projection of unmanned agents using the


internet (Military Application)

airborne

In future battlefield operations, autonomous agents such as unmanned


ground vehicles (UGVs) and unmanned airborne vehicles (UAVs) will be projected
to the forefront for intelligence, strike, search and rescue and other tactical
operations. The agents will be organized in clusters in order to carry out such
missions; different clusters may execute different missions simultaneously. During
the mission, the unmanned agents are supported by sensors on the ground and in
the air, and can receive commands and send information back to a command ship,
say. It is clear that efficient communications between agents, and from agents to
sensors and to command posts are critical to mission success. The goal of the
Minuteman project is to develop the concept and initial prototype of an agile,
dynamic, multi-layer "Internet in the sky" architecture that can deliver the "forward
power" of the unmanned missions. The architecture consists of a high speed,
wireless mobile backbone network (MBN) - with point-to-point wireless links. and
local access networks feeding to backbone nodes. The design is extremely
challenging because of the hostile environment, the need for QoS support and the
unpredictable nature of the requirements. The focus of this paper is on scalable
addressing and routing in such a multiplayer mobile environment where UAVs can
fly at speeds exceeding several hundred miles per hour. We exploit the fact that

Republic of the Philippines


SURIGAODEL SUR STATE UNIVERSITY
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING, COMPUTER STUDIES AND TECHNOLOGY
Main Campus, Rosario, Tandag City
agents typically move in groups, and achieve scalability by keeping track of a
"landmark" for each group. This is done using LANMAR, a land-mark ad hoc
routing scheme. The LANMAR scheme originally developed for "flat" ad hoc
networks extends naturally to a network with a physical backbone. Via simulation
we show that LANMAR maintains robust, resilient. rapidly restored connectivity in
the face of agent mobility.
Source:
Published in: Aerospace Conference Proceedings, 2002. IEEE (Volume: 6)
Date of Conference: 2002 Page(s):6-2715 - 6-2725 vol.6
Print ISBN: 0-7803-7231-X INSPEC Accession Number: 7535050 DOI:
10.1109/AERO.2002.1036112 Publisher: IEEE

V.

RELEVANCE TO INDUSTRY NEEDS

The disruptive impact technology used by AirCell and AeroSat has had on
the development of an airborne internet, and to identify various stake holders and
their value propitiation. The airborne internet has the potential to change the way
we fly and spend time when sitting in the plane. In the last fifty years, there has not
been much technological advancement in the air traffic control system. Airplane
operation still depends on current ground control and radar systems that are very
expensive and very difficult to scale. These technologies are also heavily
dependent on humans. There has been much technological advancement outside
of the aviation industry. Establishing an airborne internet is a tremendous
opportunity for everyone. With the help of an airborne Internet, each plane can
transmit its identity, location, and also direct video footage that will help Homeland
security fight against terrorism. The airborne internet has the ability to connect
airplanes not just via a computer on the ground (or via satellite) but directly with
each other, relaying information from other planes in an Internet-like fashion. The
airborne internet is strongly supported by the Pentagon, FAA and NASA. on the
service provider's ability to offer airlines this service at a reasonably good rate.
Source: http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/42349