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Socratic

Smackdown
A VERSATILE DISCUSSION-BASED
HUMANITIES GAME TO PRACTICE
ARGUMENTATION AROUND ANY TEXT
OR TOPIC FOR GRADES 6 THROUGH 12

GAME PACK

Games are powerful


learning tools.
At Institute of Play,
weve seen games
engage students
in exciting and
empowering ways.
Since 2009, weve designed more than 80 classroom games, which have
been prototyped and used by teachers at Quest schools (Quest to Learn
in New York City and CICS ChicagoQuest in Chicago). And now, we cant wait
to share our library of teacher-tested, student-approved games with you!
Game design is a continuous and collaborative process. We would value
your feedback about our games after you play them with your students!
Join our Google+ community to share your thoughts with us and other
educators.

GAME CONTENTS

WHAT IS IN THIS PACKET?


In collaboration with Quest teachers, Institute of Play
developed this set of game materials and supporting
resources for Socratic Smackdown. We invite you to explore
this game pack to help you learn about the game in order to
play it with your students.
PAGE

GAME BASICS

GAME PLAY

10

STUDENT RESOURCES

13

TEACHER RESOURCES

GAME BASICS

WHAT IS IT?
Socratic Smackdown grew out
of a need to support students
in developing and practicing
discussion skills. During the
game, teams of 4-6 students
discuss texts and use textual
evidence to make connections
and ask thought-provoking
questions. Students win points
whenever they make constructive
contributions to the discussion
and lose points if they exhibit
disrespectful behaviors, such as
interrupting their teammates. By
the end of game play, students
have learned how to work
together as teams and a class
and contribute meaningfully to
a discussion. Quest teachers,
like Rebecca Grodner, an 8th
grade English teacher, have seen
amazing changes in student
engagement and discussion skills
during and after game play.

This game you are about to play


created an amazing, authentic
learning space and enabled my
students to become self-directed
learners who were excited to discuss
challenging texts and topics.
Rebecca Grodner, 8th grade
English teacher, Quest to Learn,
New York City

Rebecca Grodner

8th Grade English Language Arts TeacherDesigner, Quest to Learn, New York City
Rebecca Grodner was born and raised
in Chicago and knew she wanted to be a
teacher since she was a 7th grader. After
earning her bachelors degree in English
from New York University, she taught on
the Lower East Side in New York City. In
2012, she joined the faculty at Quest to
Learn to teach 8th grade English Language
Arts. She constantly thinks about how
to better engage her students in learning
and enthusiastically integrates games,
technology, and design thinking into her
teaching. She is also the Literacy Lead at
Quest to Learn and runs an after-school
bullying prevention group. Currently,
Rebecca is continuing her learning by
pursuing a Masters degree in Curriculum
Development and Instructional
Technology at SUNY Albany.

GAME BASICS

THE GOALS

Learning Goal
Students will be able to:
Prepare for discussions
Use a variety of
discussion skills
Ask and answer deep
questions
Build on and refute
others ideas

Game Goal
Earn points and advance
your individual, team, and/or
class score by using different
discussion strategies during
a Socratic Smackdown

GAME BASICS

COMMON CORE
STANDARDS ALIGNMENT
AND OTHER COMPETENCIES

The game materials are aligned to Speaking and Listening


standards for grade 8.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.8.1a

Come to discussions prepared, having read or


researched material under study; explicitly draw
on that preparation by referring to evidence on the
topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas
under discussion.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.8.1b

Follow rules for collegial discussions and decisionmaking, track progress toward specific goals and
deadlines, and define individual roles as needed.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.8.1c

Communication

Use of oral, written, performative, and


visual forms of language to formulate,
exchange, present, and reflect on ideas:
shared understanding is the aim of
communication

Teamwork

Students plan and coordinate work


towards a mutual goal; understand
and regulate themselves as a team
member; demonstrate leadership
skills, including the ability to persuade
and guide others; and resolve conflicts
cooperatively.

Pose questions that connect the ideas of several


speakers and respond to others questions and
comments with relevant evidence, observations,
and ideas.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.8.1d

Acknowledge new information expressed by others,


and, when warranted, qualify or justify their own
views in light of the evidence presented.

GAME PLAY

SETTING IT UP
MATERIALS
Copies of text/topic for game
Question set
Copies of Coach Card, Instant Replay
Card, and Scorecard
All-class scoreboard (if needed)

PREP
1
Student Teams

Divide students into teams of 4 to 6 participants. These teams will


participate in the Socratic Smackdown discussion. Decide if you want to
put students in homogeneous or heterogeneous groups based on your own
criteria.
2

Text/Topic Choice

Choose a text or topic for the Socratic Smackdown discussion. We suggest


that you choose texts about debatable or controversial topics because then
students must use textual evidence to support their ideas and arguments.
(See example of a text and accompanying question set on pp.18-19.)
3

Question Sets

We recommend that the first few times the class plays the game, the teacher
provides a well-crafted list of text-dependent questions. It may be helpful to
give students the questions in advance to allow them to prepare. Questions
may be asked by the teacher, or by students who have been assigned to
ask the questions, whenever they feel it is appropriate. A shorter Socratic
Smackdown could focus only on one teacher-given question at a time.
Ultimately, the teachers goal may be to teach students to create their own
questions for Socratic Smackdown, so that they can teach each other how
to effectively discuss text-based questions. (See example of a text and
accompanying question set on pp.18-19.)
4

Discussion Strategies for Game

Choose the discussion strategies for the game and write them on the
game board assigning point values to these strategies. (See example list of
strategies on p.5 and p.15.)
5

Rubric and Checklist

If needed, create rubric and student checklist of the learning goals for the
game (See sample rubric and checklist on pp.10-12.)

GAME PLAY

RULES
1

Teams of 4 to 6 students will


be given a topic, text, or issue
that will be the focus of the
Socratic Smackdown, as well
as a question set.
Students will prepare answers to
the questions prior to the Socratic
Smackdown.
2

The teacher will reveal which


discussion skill strategies will be
part of the game.
The point value of the different
strategies will also be shared.
3

When it is time for the


Smackdown, the class will set up
chairs in a fishbowl arrangement.
A fishbowl is when there is an inner
circle of 4 to 6 chairsdependent
on the size of the student
discussion teamwithin a larger
circle of chairs.

One student from each team


will be asked to go inside the
Socratic Smackdown ring to
have a 6-minute discussion (or
Smackdown) based on the topic,
text, or issue given earlier.
During the Smackdown, they will
earn points for using discussion
skills. They can also lose points if
they disrupt the discussion.
5

Using the Socratic Smackdown


Scorecard, a number of students
(from 2 to the entire class) will
track points during the 6-minute
Smackdown.
The first time the class plays the
game the teacher can track points
to model scoring.

When 6 minutes is up, the


teacher or a student will collect
all of the Scorecards, determine
the average score for each
student in the discussion team,
and then sum up the average
scores to figure out the team
score.
8

After the Smackdown, the


students in the ring will complete
the Instant Replay Card.
9

After individual and team scores


are revealed, the class will have
a brief discussion to share
thoughts from their Coach Cards.

Students who arent scoring will


complete the Coach Card during
the Smackdown; if all students
are scoring they will then
complete the Coach Card after
the Smackdown.

GAME PLAY

DISCUSSION STRATEGIES
The point value can vary according to the skill that is presently
being learned and practiced by students.
Agree

+1

I agree and to build on an argument.

Disagree

+1

I disagree because to refute an argument.

Question

+1

Ask a probing question to get more details about


someones argument.

Use Evidence +2

Use a quote from the text to support an argument.

Devils
Advocate

+2

Pose a question or situation that is counter to


a persons argument.

Connect

+2

Link a persons argument with another persons


previous statement.

Distract

-1

Distract team or class from discussion.

Insult

-1

Be disrespectful to another person during the discussion.

Interrupt

-1

Speak while another person is speaking.

On the next page is a set of Student Rules that you can print out and give to students to use as a cheat
sheet when they are first playing Socratic Smackdown.

STUDENT RESOURCES

RULES CHEAT SHEET


Sit with your team of
4 to 6 students.
1

Read an assigned text or


research an assigned topic
to answer the questions
in the question set.
2

Listen to which discussion


strategies are going to be
a part of the days Socratic
Smackdown.
3

When it is your teams turn,


sit in the center of the
fishbowl.
4

When your teacher says


go, begin the Smackdown
and try to use as many
discussion strategies as you
can. Listening is key.

After your teams


Smackdown is over,
complete the Instant
Replay Card.
6

If your team is not


participating in the
Smackdown, you will either
score the Smackdown or
critique the Smackdown.
After the round of Socratic
Smackdown is over and
every team has played, the
final scores will be read
and individual winners
and/or team winners will
be announced.

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SOCRATIC SMACKDOWN

SCORE CARD
PLAYER 1
STRATEGY

POINTS

AGREE

DISAGREE

QUESTION

USE
EVIDENCE

INTERRUPT

TOTAL SCORE

PLAYER 2

PLAYER 3

PLAYER 4

SOCRATIC SMACKDOWN

SCORE CARD
PLAYER 1
STRATEGY

POINTS

TOTAL SCORE

PLAYER 2

PLAYER 3

PLAYER 4

TEACHER RESOURCES

ASSESSMENT GUIDE
There are a number of opportunities to assess student
learning during this game, from using more formal assessment
tools like rubrics to using less formal assessment tools like
reflection questions. In this guide, we include four different
assessment tools:
COMMON CORE RUBRIC
Use this rubric to assess students progress
toward reaching Common Core standards by
circling different aspects of strategies based on
what you observe during a Smackdown.
Ask students to use the rubric to self-assess
their progress toward reaching Common
Core standards

TEACHER CHECKLIST




Use this checklist during a discussion to quickly


record when students approach, meet, or exceed
Common Core standards. Write student names in
the left hand column. Then when a student
approaches, meets, or exceeds a standard, make a
mark in the correct box.
Possible symbols to use with the checklist are:

APPROACHING

MEETS

COACH CARD



Students write down glows (strengths) and grows


(areas of growth) based on what they observe
during a Smackdown. A teacher can ask students
to share out ideas to the class as a reflection
immediately after the discussion.

Some questions to help guide a discussion of


glows and grows are:

Who can give me three glows for this team?

What could this team do better?

What did you learn from this teams discussion

that will improve your own discussion skills?

INSTANT REPLAY CARD





Students in the teams who participated in


the Socratic Smackdown discussion answer the
Reflection Questions to reflect on their strengths
and areas of growth. A teacher can collect these
reflections as part of an assessment.

EXCEEDS

13

SOCRATIC SMACKDOWN COMMON CORE RUBRIC


NAME DATE:
DISCUSSION TOPIC: C L AS S :

STRATEGY

SL.8.1a
Come to discussions
prepared, having read or
researched material under
study; explicitly draw
on that preparation by
referring to evidence on the
topic, text, or issue to probe
and reflect on ideas under
discussion.

SL.8.1b
Follow rules for collegial
discussions and decisionmaking, track progress
toward specific goals and
deadlines, and define
individual roles as needed.

SL.8.1c
Pose questions that
connect the ideas of several
speakers and respond
to others questions and
comments with relevant
evidence, observations, and
ideas.

SL.8.1d
Acknowledge new
information expressed
by others, and, when
warranted, qualify or
justify their own views
in light of the evidence
presented.

EXCELLENT

GOOD

SATISFACTORY

Comes prepared with


required materials
completed with additional
annotations or notes

Comes prepared with


required materials
completed and having read/
researched text or topic

Uses textual evidence


correctly more than 5 times
during conversation

Use textual evidence


correctly at least 5 times
during conversation

Analyzes textual evidence


by comparing multiple
pieces of evidence and
synthesizing for meaning

Analyzes textual evidence


by giving thorough
explanation anytime
evidence is used

Uses new and long-term


discussion strategies
expertly

Uses new and long-term


discussion strategies
consistently

Attempts to use new and


long-term discussion
strategies

Never distracts or interrupts

Distracts or interrupts no
more than once

Distracts or interrupts a few


times

Assists team toward goals


during discussion and
reflects on progress

Demonstrates awareness
of goals, but may not make
progress/reflect

Leads team toward goals


with verbal cues and reflects
on progress

Comes prepared with


required materials
somewhat completed and
having read/ researched
text or topic
Uses textual evidence
correctly 2-4 times during
conversation
Analyzes textual evidence
by giving some explanation
of evidence

Asks 3 or more analytical


and evaluative questions
that prompt discussion

Asks at least 2 analytical


and evaluative questions
that prompt discussion

Asks questions, though


they are usually recall
questions

Answers others questions


always using evidence

Answers others questions


consistently with evidence

Answers others questions


without evidence

Synthesizes the ideas of


others and asks questions
related to others ideas

Summarizes and
synthesizes the ideas of
other

Sometimes summarizes
another team members
ideas

Agrees with and deepens


the ideas of others

Agrees with and builds


upon the ideas of others

Agrees with the ideas of


others

Refutes the ideas of others


by playing devils advocate

Disagrees and refutes the


ideas of others

Disagrees with the ideas of


others

Refers to earlier evidence


and statements frequently

Refers back to evidence


used and statements made
by others

Sometimes repeats earlier


evidence or statements
without reference

NEEDS IMPROVEMENT
Does not come prepared
with required materials or
has not read/ researched
text or topic
Uses textual evidence once
correctly or not at all during
conversation
Does not give any
explanation of textual
evidence

Does not use new and longterm discussion strategies


Distracts or interrupts no
more than once
Demonstrates no awareness
of goals

Rarely asks questions and


all questions are recall
Rarely answers questions
Does not summarize
others ideas

Does not agree with others


Does not disagree with
others
Does not refer back to
evidence and statements
made by others

COMMENTS:

14

Student Name
Refers back to evidence used and
statements made by others.

Disagrees and refutes the ideas


of others.

Agrees with and builds upon the


ideas of others.

Summarizes and synthesizes the


ideas of others.

Answers others questions


consistently with evidence.

Asks at least 2 analytical and


evaluative questions that prompt
discussion.

Assists team towards goals


during discussion and reflects on
progress.

Distracts or interrupts no more


than once.

Uses new and long-term


discussion strategies
consistently.

Analyzes textual evidence by


giving thorough explanation
anytime evidence is used.

Uses textual evidence at least 5


times during discussion.

Comes prepared with role sheet


fully filled out and having read/
researched text or topic

SOCRATIC SMACKDOWN TEACHER CHECKLIST

SOCRATIC SMACKDOWN

COACH CARD
NAME DATE:
DISCUSSION TOPIC: C L AS S :

G LOW S

G R OW S

What is the team doing well?

What could the team improve?

COACHING TIP

COACHING TIP

I would have said

I want to ask

SOCRATIC SMACKDOWN

INSTANT REPLAY CARD


NAME DATE:
DISCUSSION TOPIC: C L AS S :

1 What is one thing your team did particularly well during this Smackdown? Give specific examples.

2 What is one thing your team could improve on for the next Smackdown?
How did this problem hinder your discussion? How can the problem be solved?

3 What was the most interesting thing your team discussed and why?

TEACHER RESOURCES

FAQ

How have Quest teaches used


this game?
The beauty of Socratic Smackdown is its
flexibility. Here are some ways Rebecca
Grodner has used the game:
Playing it in small groups, it can
encourage shy students. In large groups,
it can help you focus on specific learning
needs.
Using it as a form of assessment, or as
a practice space for finding supporting
evidence for ones ideas.
Framing it as a game to help students
learn to negotiate conflict. As a
facilitator, some days I found myself
helping students mediate arguments in
their small groups.
GAME PREP

What are additional discussion


strategies to use in the game?
Ask a text-based question
Summarize anothers point
Synthesize ideas from throughout
the argument
What are examples of text-based
questions?
See pp. 21 for an example of a text with a
question set used in an 8th grade English
class at one of our Quest schools.
How do you differentiate this game
for ELL students or students with
disabilities?

Here are some suggestions that we have


found helpful in differentiating Socratic
Smackdown:
Give question sets to students before
the game and allow time for them to
answer the questions, with evidence, on
their own or in collaborative teams.
Provide texts with the same content at
different reading levels. Assign students
to different texts based on their reading
levels, or let students choose the text
they use.
Choose discussion topics that have
high student interest or allow students to
choose topics of interest to discuss.
Practice discussions without a text
to begin with using a familiar topic for
students.
Differentiate teams either
homogeneously or heterogeneously
based on your students needs and the
learning goals of the game.
Give different sets of discussion
strategies for the game to different
student teams based on their learning
needs.
Provide sentence starters for ELL
students.
Allow students outside the discussion
ring to hand Post-its to representatives
inside the ring to help.
Scaffold the discussion. For example,
first 3 minutes for clarifying questions,
3 minutes for interpretation, 3 minutes
for analysis, 3 minutes for evaluation, 3
minutes for last words/predictions.
18

TEACHER RESOURCES

FAQ CONTINUED
GAMEPLAY

How do you do Socratic Smackdown


in small groups?
Socratic Smackdown works well in small
as well as large groups. For small groups,
what we do at Quest schools is divide
the students into teams of 3 or 4. Each
student in the team is given a question
set and an Instant Replay Card. One
student is given the two documents plus
the scorecard. The teacher announces
the start of the Smackdown and one
student asks a question. Over the course
of the discussion, one student scores
the Smackdown as the team discusses.
At the end of the Smackdown, the scorer
announces the final tally of points. Then,
they complete the Instant Replay Card
individually and share their answers as a
team to reflect on the discussion.

Why should the discussion last


6 minutes?
After many rounds of Socratic Smackdown,
we have found that 6 minutes is the ideal
length for a short discussion. If you want
students to have a longer discussion with
more questions, then 10 minutes is the
ideal length.
How do you get 100% participation
from students in the game?
To encourage all students in the ring to
participate, you can give out 2 to 3 speaking
tokens to students. Students must use all
of their tokens before the Smackdown can
end. Each time a student speaks, they may
hand in a speaking token.

In small groups, you can also assign


roles to students, such as Director,
Detective, and Lawyer.
The Director asks powerful questions
Do you always give students time to
prepare answers to questions in the
to keep the conversation going.
question set?
Questions must be ripe for discussion
You can modify how students prepare for
and text-based so that the team is
the Socratic Smackdown. When you first
analyzing the text together.
The Detective keeps the conversation
begin playing the game, it is helpful to give
students time to prepare their answers
grounded in the text using evidence,
to the questions in the question set. As
so he/she comes to the conversation
students become more comfortable with
prepared with a lot of quotes that are
Socratic Smackdown, you can give the
interesting to discuss.
The Lawyer brings debate to the teams
question set to students at the start of the
game, so they have to do more on-the-spot dicussion by using controversial ideas to
thinking. Eventually, students can provide
rile up team members, so team
questions for themselves, either before or members defend their opinions more
during the game.
deeply or develop an understanding
19

TEACHER RESOURCES

FAQ CONTINUED



of a different perspective. It is helpful


for Lawyers to anticipate popular
opinions and their counterarguments
before the discussion.

How do you avoid having one student


dominate the Smackdown discussion?
To share the floor, you can use speaking
tokens as a way to both limit domination
of the discussion and encourage 100%
participation. You can also encourage
students to monitor their teams participation themselves by asking different
students questions when they are in the
ring. You can also add a negative point
category for dominating the discussion.

20

EXCERPT FROM PRESIDENT OBAMAS ADDRESS AT THE 67TH

TEXT DEPENDENT QUESTIONS

U.N. GENERAL ASSEMBLY


DATE OF DISPATCH: 25 SEPTEMBER 2012
DISPATCHER: PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA

In Iran, we see where the path of a violent and unaccountable


ideology leads. The Iranian people have a remarkable and
ancient history, and many Iranians wish to enjoy peace and
prosperity alongside their neighbors. But just as it restricts the
rights of its own people, the Iranian government continues to
prop up a dictator in Damascus and supports terrorist groups
abroad. Time and again, it has failed to take the opportunity to
demonstrate that its nuclear program is peaceful, and to meet its
obligations to the United Nations.
So let me be clear. America wants to resolve this issue through
diplomacy, and we believe that there is still time and space to
do so. But that time is not unlimited. We respect the right of
nations to access peaceful nuclear power, but one of the purposes of the United Nations is to see that we harness that power
for peace. And make no mistake; a nuclear-armed Iran is not a
challenge that can be contained. It would threaten the elimination of Israel, the security of Gulf nations, and the stability of the
global economy. It risks triggering a nuclear-arms race in the
region, and the unraveling of the non-proliferation treaty. Thats
why a coalition of countries is holding the Iranian government
accountable. And thats why the United States will do what we
must to prevent Iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon.
We know from painful experience that the path to security and
prosperity does not lie outside the boundaries of international
law and respect for human rights. Thats why this institution
was established from the rubble of conflict. That is why liberty
triumphed over tyranny in the Cold War. And that is the lesson
of the last two decades as well.

1. In paragraph 2, what reasons does


Obama give for why a nuclear-armed
Iran is not a challenge that can be contained?
2. What evidence does Obama give that
Iran has a violent and unaccountable
ideology? What words emphasize ways
in which Iran has demonstrated this
ideology?
3. In paragraph 2, what effect does it
have when Obama says, But that time is
not unlimited immediately after offering time for diplomacy?
4. According to the speech, what does
it mean for a country to make the right
choices?
5. Why does Obama use the phrase
holding the Iranian government accountable rather than stopping the
Iranian government to describe how
other countries should deal with Iran?

History shows that peace and progress come to those who make
the right choices. Nations in every part of the world have traveled this difficult path. Europe, the bloodiest battlefield of the
20th century, is united, free and at peace. From Brazil to South
Africa, from Turkey to South Korea, from India to Indonesia,
people of different races, religions, and traditions have lifted
millions out of poverty, while respecting the rights of their citizens and meeting their responsibilities as nations.

21

Continued Learning
After playing this game, we hope you are inspired to learn more about
games and learning.
Below is additional information to support you
in continuing to build and share your own learning.

We want to hear from you

We want you to share these resources

We want to hear from you about your experience


with this game and game pack.

This resource is free and we want you to share it with


others. When you do use and share it, please know this
resource is licensed under a Creative Commons license.

What worked well?


What would you do differently next time you
play the game?
We welcome stories about how you uses this
game in your classroom.

Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike
CC BY-NC-SA
This license lets others remix, tweak, and build
upon your work non-commercially, as long as
they credit you and license their new creations
under the identical terms.

We want you to learn more


If you are interested in learning more,
please visit these following websites:
Institute of Play
www.instituteofplay.org
Quest to Learn, NYC
www.q2l.org

To view a copy of this license, visit Creative Commons

We want to thank our partners


This game pack is a result of collaborative work
done over the past years between Institute of Play,
Quest to Learn, and CICS ChicagoQuest.

CICS ChicagoQuest
www.chicagoquest.org

We also offer other educator


resources
Q School Design Pack
This pack highlights ten innovative components of the
Quest school model.
Q Curriculum Design Pack
This pack provides tools and methods for you to use to
design game-like curriculum.
Q Games and Learning Design Pack
This pack provides tools and methods for you to use to
modify and design games for your classroom.

22

About Institute of Play


We design experiences
that make learning
irresistible.
The Institute pioneers new models
of learning and engagement. We
are a not-for-profit design studio,
founded in 2007 by a group of game
designers in New York City. We are
now home to an interdisciplinary
team of designers, strategists
and learning practitioners. Our
first project was the design and
implementation of an innovative
New York City public school, called
Quest to Learn.

At the core of the


experiences we design
are games, play and
the principles that
underlie them.
Using these principles, we have
created institutions, games,
programs, events, digital platforms
and products. Our work unlocks the
transformative power of people
as seekers and solvers of complex
problems, risk takers, inventors
and visionaries. We work wherever people are: in communities,
businesses, schools, cultural and
civic institutions.

We empower people to
thrive as active citizens
in a connected world.
We are not preparing for a distant
future. We are about meeting
people where they are and igniting
their potential now. We work with
a diverse set of partners to make
it happen, such as Electronic Arts,
Intel, Educational Testing Service,
the Mozilla Foundation, the Smithsonian, Parsons the New School
for Design, Chicago International
Charter Schools, DePaul University,
E-Line Media and others.

A selection of our work


GlassLab

TeacherQuest

Play@ Your Org

An unprecedented collaboration
between leaders in the commercial
games industry and experts in
learning and assessment, GlassLab
aims to leverage digital games
as powerful, data-rich learning
environments that improve the
process of learning with formative
assessments teachers can trust.

A fresh approach to professional


development, TeacherQuest
is a unique blended learning
program designed to empower
teachers as designers, increase
student engagement and reimagine what teaching can be
through games and game-like
learning.

With a hands-on exploration


of games and design, Play@
Your Org workshops are
designed to help businesses,
cultural institutions and other
organizations integrate the
power of play-based learning
in their work to maximize
participation and engagement.

For more information, please visit www.instituteofplay.org


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