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UNCLASSIFIED

OFFICE OF NAVAL INTELLIGENCE


(U) WORLDWIDE: Worldwide Threat to Shipping (WTS) Report
8 March - 6 April 2016
7 April 2016

(U) Table of Contents


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

(U) Scope Note


(U) Summary
(U) Counter-Piracy and Maritime Crime Announcements and Advisories
(U) Details: Monthly Incidents by Region
(U) Appendix A: Further Contact Information and Resources
(U) Appendix B: Terminology and References

1. (U) Scope Note


(U) The Worldwide Threat to Shipping (WTS) message provides info on piracy threats to, and criminal action
against, merchant vessels and the shipping industry worldwide in the last 30 days. This report is produced primarily
to inform merchant mariners and naval forces.

2. (U) Summary
A. (U) NIGERIA: On 6 April, two soldiers were killed and two expatriate workers were kidnapped as they worked on
a road construction project in the Nembe Local Government Area of Bayelsa State.
B. (U) VIETNAM: On 4 April, Vietnam's Coast Guard seized a Chinese vessel for intruding into its territorial waters.
The ship was carrying more than 100,000 liters of smuggled fuel.
C. (U) INDONESIA: On 3 April, five robbers boarded an anchored container ship in Jakarta Anchorage.
D. (U) NIGERIA: On 1 April, a black speed boat made a suspicious approach on a chemical tanker 41 nm
southwest of Brass.
E. (U) NIGERIA: On 1 April, the Nigerian Navy seized two wooden boats used in transporting about 100,000 liters
of illegally refined diesel fuel.
F. (U) INDONESIA: On 1 April, duty officer onboard a bulk carrier anchored in Samarinda Anchorage.
G. (U) MALAYSIA: On 1 April, eight armed pirates in a speed boat boarded an underway tug 17 nm east of Pulau
Sipadan.
H. (U) BANGLADESH: On 1 April, the Bangladesh Navy detained six robbers from the outer anchorage of the
Chittagong Port and rescued 10 fishermen from their captivity.
I. (U) NIGERIA: On 31 March, the Nigerian Navy announced that it had arrested two suspected river pirates.

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J. (U) INDONESIA: On 30 March, three small boats approached and attempted to board an anchored bulk carrier
in Tg. Priok, Jakarta Anchorage.
K. (U) PERU: On 23 March two robbers wearing face masks boarded an anchored vehicle carrier preparing for
berthing operations in Callao Anchorage No.1.
L. (U) INDONESIA: On 22 March, an unknown number of robbers boarded a berthed product tanker during cargo
operations at Samudra Jetty No.2, Bitung Port.

3. (U) Counter-Piracy and Maritime Crime Announcements and Advisories


A. (U) GULF OF ADEN: Government of Japan convoy schedule for April 2016. To apply for JMSDF
escort, visit http://www.mlit.go.jp/en/maritime/maritime_fr2_000000.html, please contact directly the Anti-Piracy
Contact and Coordination Office, Maritime Bureau, Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MILT),
Japan: Tel: +81-3-5253-8932; Fax: +81-3-5253-1643. Email: INFO-PIRACY@mlit.go.jp. (MSCHOA)
B. (U) GULF OF ADEN: Korean Navy convoy schedule for April 2016. All merchant vessels wishing
to join the convoy group must submit their application forms directly to the ROK naval warship carrying out the
mission. The ROK MTG can be reached directly at INMARSAT: 00-870-773-110-438; Email:
pheonixguardian@navy.mil.kr. (MSCHOA)
C. (U) GULF OF ADEN: Chinese Navy convoy schedule for April 2016. For further information,
please e-mail planavy@navy.mil.cn, or call Tel: 00870 773 120 044; or 441 221 061. (MSCHOA)
D. (U) GULF OF ADEN: Indian Navy convoy escort schedule for April 2016. To register, email
dgcommcentre-dgs@nic.in; or visit www.dgshipping.com. Telephone numbers for contact are: 91-2222614646 or fax at 91-22-22613636. (MSCHOA)
E. (U) GULF OF ADEN: Russian Navy convoy escort schedule for April 2016. For further
information e-mail smb@msecurity.ru; isps@msecurity.ru; or fax +7 (499) 642-83-29. (MSCHOA)

4. (U) Details: Monthly Incidents by Region


(U) This section lists reports of active violence against shipping, credible threats to shipping, or the potential for a
situation to develop into a direct threat to shipping over the last 30 days. Every effort is made to ensure that
incidents are not double-counted. In the event double-counting is detected, or an incident is later learned to be
different than initially reported, an explanation of the cancellation of the inaccurate report will be made in at least
one message prior to dropping the erroneous report.
A.

(U) NORTH AMERICA: No current incidents to report.

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B.

(U) CENTRAL AMERICA - CARIBBEAN - SOUTH AMERICA:

Figure 1. Central America - Caribbean - South America


Piracy and Maritime Crime
1. (U) PERU: On 23 March two robbers wearing face masks boarded an anchored vehicle carrier preparing for
berthing operations near position 12:01 S - 077:12 W, Callao Anchorage No.1. Duty crewman on routine rounds
noticed movement near the forecastle store and reported it to the duty officer. Master immediately mustered the
crew and asked them to investigate. As the crew approached the forecastle they noticed two robbers jumping
overboard with stolen ships stores. The crew notified the Master that the robbers were wearing a uniform which
resembled the shore watchmans uniform. Incident reported to Harbor Master. (IMB)
2. (U) MEXICO: On 18 March, Mexican military and police personnel searched a shipping container aboard the
container ship MONTE VERDE in the port of Veracruz, finding numerous drums carrying approximately 16 tons of
cocaine paste. The ship had arrived from Panama. (www.fleetmon.com)
3. (U) PANAMA: On 3 March, the US Coast Guard seized more than 12,800 pounds of cocaine and apprehended
four suspected drug smugglers from a self-propelled semisubmersible off the coast of Panama. The submersible
was first detected by a US Customs and Border Protection aircraft, which notified the US Coast Guard Cutter
BERTHOLF, leading to the interception of the vessel about 300 miles southwest of Panama. The cocaine found on
the vessel has a street value of more than $203 million. After removing the drugs and other contraband, the US
Coast Guard scuttled the submersible. (www.gCaptain.com; www.marinelink.com)
4. (U) COLOMBIA: During the week of 14 March, Colombian Navy and police in a coordinated operation found 33
kilograms of cocaine onboard bulk carrier BLUE SEA in Barranquilla. The cocaine was hidden in the rudder trunk,
and a report was received from informant concerning the contraband. Vessel originally loaded a cargo of coal,
destined for France. (www.fleetmon.com)
C.

(U) ATLANTIC OCEAN AREA: No current incidents to report.

D. (U) NORTHERN EUROPE - BALTIC: No current incidents to report.


E.

(U) MEDITERRANEAN - BLACK SEA: No current incidents to report.

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F.

(U) WEST AFRICA:

Figure 2. West Africa Piracy and Maritime Crime


1. (U) NIGERIA: On 6 April, two soldiers were killed and two expatriate workers were kidnapped as they worked on
a road construction project in the Nembe Local Government Area of Bayelsa State. Six gunmen reportedly
ambushed the men, killing the soldiers and taking the hostages before escaping in a boat into the extensive creek
systems of the area. (The Sun - Nigerian Online News)
2. (U) NIGERIA: On 1 April, duty officers onboard a chemical tanker underway near position 03:54 N - 005:41 E, 41
nm southwest of Brass noticed a black speed boat approaching. Master raised the alarm, sent distress messages,
took anti-piracy preventive measures and crew members locked all entrance doors. As the boat closed, nine pirates
armed with AK-47s opened fire at the tanker and attempted to board the tanker several times using ladders and
grappling hook attached with a rope. All non-essential crew members mustered in a safe room. The navy was
contacted but received no response. The IMB Piracy Reporting Centre received information from the ships owners
and immediately informed the Nigerian Navy for assistance. Due to the hardening measures taken by the tanker,
the pirates aborted the attempted boarding and moved away. No injuries to crew members. (IMB; MTISC-GOG)
3. (U) NIGERIA: On 1 April, the Nigerian Navy seized two wooden boats used in transporting about 100,000 liters
of illegally refined diesel fuel. A Nigerian Navy senior officer told journalists in Port Harcourt that three suspects
were arrested on board one of the wooden boats while crew members of the second boat fled on sighting the naval
patrol and that the boats were seized at Akuku-Toru Local Government Area during a routine patrol of waterways in
the state. (www.allafrica.com)
4. (U) NIGERIA: On 31 March, the Nigerian Navy announced that it was working hard to tackle the menace of
piracy on the Bayelsa waterways, having arrested two suspected river pirates. Commodore Yakuku Wanbai,
Commander of the Nigerian Navy Base, Brass, told press reporters at the base that one of the suspects died
shortly after he was arrested. He further said the suspect was part of a four-man gang that recently attacked Ekeni
village in Ezetu Community in Southern Ijaw Local Government Area of Bayelsa. He added that the Navy would
continue to ensure a safe environment for communities within the coastal areas to exist without fear of intimidation
from hoodlums. (www.pulse.ng)

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5. (U) NIGERIA: On 26 March, pirates attacked the chemical tanker SAMPATIKI near position 04:20 N - 005:10
E, approximately 30 nm from the Bayelsa coastline. The pirates ransacked the ship and kidnapped five
crewmembers. (www.fleetmon.com)
6. (U) NIGERIA: Chemical tanker MAXIMUS was hijacked 11 February off Abidjan, Ivory Coast. There were 18
crew members from India, Pakistan, China, South Korea, Sudan and Ghana when the ship was boarded. The
pirates intended to sell the ships 4,700 tons of diesel fuel on the black market and had renamed the ship MT ELVIS
5. On 21 February, the Nigerian Navy boarded the ship and rescued the crew, however; two crew members are still
missing, one Pakistani and one Indian. (www.newsmaritime.com) UPDATE: The kidnapped crewmen were
reportedly released on 20 March. (IMB)
7. (U) NIGERIA: On 11 March, eight pirates in a boat approached an underway tanker near position 02:52 N 004:52 E, 108 nm southwest of the Bayelsa coast. Ships Master raised the alarm, increased speed, commenced
evasive maneuvers, activated SSAS, sent distress messages and informed the shipping company. All nonessential crew members mustered in the citadel. The pirates chased the tanker and told the Master to slow down
claiming to be the navy. At a distance of 50 meters, the lookout identified guns and ladders in the boat. The Master
continued with the evasive maneuvers, fired two parachute rockets and continued with the Mayday calls via VHF.
Due to the hardening measures of the tanker, the pirates aborted the attempted attack and moved away. The
Nigerian Navy responded on VHF to the distress call. (IMB; MTISC-GOG)
8. (U) NIGERIA: On 11 March, a vessel reported being fired upon near position 03:30 N - 005:02 E. (MTISC-GOG)
9. (U) DR CONGO: On 9 March, a cargo ship at anchor was boarded near position 05:57 S - 013:03 E, Boma Port.
Robbers were spotted by duty crewman, alarm raised and crew was mustered. Robbers managed to escape
without stealing anything. (MTISC-GOG)
G.

(U) ARABIAN GULF: No current incidents to report.

H.

(U) INDIAN OCEAN - EAST AFRICA:

1. (U) ARABIAN SEA: On 20 March, the French Navy destroyer FS PROVENCE seized a large weapons cache
from a dhow in the northern Indian Ocean. The incident took place as the ship operated as part of the
Combined Maritime Forces Combined Task Force 150 which conducts maritime security and counter-terrorism
operations. The dhow was spotted heading towards Somalia by PROVENCE's surveillance helicopter while it was
undertaking routine surveillance in the northern Indian Ocean. Subsequently, PROVENCE boarded the dhow and
ascertained that it was without nationality. PROVENCE then undertook a search of the vessel, during which the
weapons were found. The haul included 2,000-AK47 assault rifles, 49-PKM machine guns, along with mortars and
anti-tank weapons. As the illicit weapons were deemed to be destined for Somalia, they were seized under the
United Nations Security Council mandated arms embargo in accordance with UNSCR 2244 (2015).
(www.meretmarine.com/fr; www.dt.bh)

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I.

(U) EAST ASIA - SOUTHEAST ASIA - INDIAN SUBCONTINENT:

Figure 3. East Asia - Southeast Asia - Indian Subcontinent


Piracy and Maritime Crime

Figure 4. East Asia - Southeast Asia - Indian Subcontinent


Piracy and Maritime Crime

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Figure 5. East Asia - Southeast Asia - Indian Subcontinent


Piracy and Maritime Crime
1. (U) VIETNAM: On 4 April, Vietnamese authorities announced that Vietnam's Coast Guard has seized a Chinese
vessel for intruding into its territorial waters. The ship, carrying more than 100,000 liters of fuel, was stopped near
the northern maritime border the previous week. Vietnamese media say the crew admitted they were supplying fuel
to Chinese fishing boats in the area. The government-owned Vietnam News Agency said the seized vessel had
been disguised as a fishing boat. (www.marinelink.com)
2. (U) INDONESIA: On 3 April, five robbers boarded an anchored container ship using a hook attached with a rope
near position 05:59 S - 106:54 E, Jakarta Anchorage. Alert crew noticed the robbers and raised the alarm. Seeing
the alerted crew, the robbers jumped overboard and escaped. Nothing reported stolen. Incident reported to pilot
station and local agent who then reported to the port police, who went aboard for an investigation. (IMB)
3. (U) INDONESIA: On 1 April, duty officer onboard a bulk carrier anchored near position 00:15 S - 117:34 E,
Samarinda Anchorage heard voices on the forecastle deck. Alarm raised and an announcement was made on the
PA system. As crew rushed to the location, the robbers escaped with stolen ships stores. Master tried to contact
the coast guard but received no response. (IMB)
4. (U) MALAYSIA: On 1 April, eight armed pirates in a speed boat boarded an underway tug near position 04:07 N 118:55 E, 17 nm east of Pulau Sipadan. They stole crew personal belongings then kidnapped four crew members
and escaped. The remaining crew members sailed the vessel to the vicinity of Semporna and soon after a
Malaysian Maritime Enforcement Authority patrol boat escorted the vessel to a safe port. (IMB;
www.m.gulfnews.com)
5. (U) BANGLADESH: On 1 April, the Bangladesh Navy detained six robbers from the outer anchorage of the
Chittagong Port and rescued 10 fishermen from their captivity. The Navy in a statement said one of their ships, the
DURJOY was patrolling in the Bay of Bengal when they heard reports about the fishermen being taken hostage.
The robbers initially demanded a large ransom, but the Navy rescued them within an hour. (www.bdnews24.com)
6. (U) INDONESIA: On 30 March, three small boats approached and attempted to board an anchored bulk carrier
near position 06:00 S - 106:54 E, Tg. Priok, Jakarta Anchorage. Alarm raised and crew mustered. The crew
managed to deter the robbers by using the water cannon. (IMB)

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7. (U) INDONESIA: On 22 March, an unknown number of robbers boarded a berthed product tanker during cargo
operations near position 01:26 N - 125:11 E, Samudra Jetty No.2, Bitung Port. They broke into the safety locker,
stole ships equipment and escaped unnoticed. The incident was noticed during routine inspection upon departure.
Incident reported to Owners. (IMB)
8. (U) PHILIPPINES: On 27 March, a joint military task force intercepted motor launch FATIMA RADZ-AUNA and
its crew of nine in the waters off Arena Blanco, near Zamboanga. The security forces boarded and searched the
vessel, finding 15,000 pounds of smuggled sugar. The crew of the motor launch could not present import
documents on the shipment of sugar, which came from Sandakan in Sabah. (www.philstar.com)
9. (U) PHILIPPINES: On 26 March, the tug BRAHMA 12 and barge ANAND 12 were attacked and the crew of 10
Indonesian sailors was kidnapped. The crew was transporting coal from Indonesia to the Philippines when they
were hijacked. Subsequent reporting indicates that they were kidnapped by the Abu Sayyaf Group, a Philippinesbased Islamist group notorious for bombings and kidnappings which has pledged allegiance to the Islamic State
group. A large ransom has been demanded for the safe return of the sailors. The tug has been found, while the
barge is still missing. (The Daily Tribune News - Philippines; www.fleetmon.com)
10. (U) MALAYSIA: On 23 March, Malaysian Maritime Enforcement Agency authorities found two ships carrying
approximately 330,000 liters of smuggled diesel fuel near Bintulu. The two vessels involved, the MAJU KERTOU
and SRI PAKNAKHON were also confiscated and both crews detained in the operation. (www.theborneopost.com)
11. (U) INDONESIA: On 22 March, five robbers boarded an anchored bulk carrier near position 06:07 S - 106:52 E,
Tg. Priok, Jakarta. Duty crewman on routine rounds was attacked and hit on the head. One robber stood guard
near the crewman, while the remaining robbers entered the accommodation area. The crewman managed to call
the bridge on a handheld radio. Alarm was raised and crew was mustered. Hearing the alarm and seeing the
alerted crew, the robbers escaped with items stolen from the engine room. (IMB)
12. (U) VIETNAM: On 18 March, the Vietnam Coast Guard caught three vessels from Thailand illegally transferring
fuel to three Vietnamese fishing boats in the southern waters off Khoai Island. One of the Thai boats was carrying
approximately 500,000 liters of diesel with four Thai crewmen and five Cambodians aboard. The two vessels, which
were carrying a total of 190,000 liters of diesel, had five Thai people and 11 Cambodian people on board. There
were no documents for the fuel, according to the Coast Guard Command in the area. All of the boats were escorted
to An Thoi Port in Phu Quoc Island for further investigation. (www.thanhniennews.com)
13. (U) MALAYSIA: On 15 March, Malaysian Maritime Enforcement Agency authorities broke a diesel fuel
smuggling operation about 75 nautical miles from Mukah. They stopped a vessel carrying 100,000 liters of diesel
fuel and found that the crew did not have the proper permits for the cargo. It is believed that the vessels crew
bought diesel from other vessels and resold it to third parties at sea. This was based on the findings of a
transaction book record, receipts of purchase and other documents found on the vessel. (www.theborneopost.com)
J. (U) NORTHEAST ASIA:
1. (U) HONG KONG: On 23 March, Hong Kong Customs authorities inspected a container arriving from Vietnam,
manifested as scrap metal, and instead found 14,000 pounds of giant clams, an endangered species, and 50,000
pounds of dried sea shells. (www.7thspace.com)
K.

(U) PACIFIC OCEAN - SOUTHERN OCEAN: No current incidents to report.

5. (U) Appendix A: Further Contact Information and Resources


(U) This appendix provides contact information for the author of the WTS as well as other entities that can be
contacted with maritime crime reports. It also lists other resources where the WTS is posted and where piracy and
maritime crime incident information can be found.

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(U) Contact
(U) Originator of this WTS report requests consumer feedback. Originator will incorporate all anti-shipping events
and violence against the maritime industry into this weekly message where appropriate. To aid in our reporting,
please add the Office of Naval Intelligence (ONI) to your normal corporate and organizational reporting
requirements. The 24-hour watch can be reached at +1 (301) 669-4053.
(U) Other Resources
(U) This Worldwide Threat to Shipping Report is posted at the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agencys Maritime
Safety site: http://msi.nga.mil/NGAPortal/MSI.portal. The International Maritime Bureau (IMB) also publishes a live
piracy report based on reporting from the IMB Piracy Reporting Centre in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, listing all piracy
and armed robbery incidents in the last ten days: http://www.icc-ccs.org/. The PAWW and WTS Reports are posted
weekly on the ONI Intel Portal: http://www.oni.navy.mil/Intelligence_Community/piracy.htm.

6. (U) Appendix B: Terminology and References


(U) This appendix is provided to promote consistent use of accurate terms of reference in reporting and also
identifies those references that were used to gather the information contained in this report. ONI welcomes
comment and suggestions for addition or amendment.
(U) Terminology
(U) In order to promote consistent use of accurate terms of reference, the following have been adopted to describe
the range of criminal anti-shipping activity and impediments to safe navigation in our worldwide reporting and
analysis. Please note that these terms relate to observable activity and are independent of target vessel status and
exclude actions by governmental powers in lawful pursuit of their authorities:

(U) Attempted Boarding Close approach or hull-to-hull contact with report that boarding paraphernalia were
employed or visible in the approaching boat.

(U) Blocking Hampering safe navigation, docking, or undocking of a vessel as a means of protest.

(U) Boarding Unauthorized boarding of a vessel by persons not part of its complement without successfully
taking control of the vessel.

(U) Firing Upon Weapons discharged at or toward a vessel.

(U) Hijacking Unauthorized seizure and retention of a vessel by persons not part of its complement.

(U) Kidnapping Unauthorized forcible removal of persons belonging to the vessel from it.

(U) Robbery Theft from a vessel or from persons aboard the vessel.

(U) Suspicious Approach All other unexplained close proximity of an unknown vessel.

(U) Sourcing
(U) ONI derives information in this report from direct reporting and analysis of reports from the following agencies
and commercial sources.

Agence France Presse (AFP)


Associated Press (AP)
Baltic and International Maritime Council (BIMCO), Denmark
BBC News

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EU Naval Forces (EU)


Fairplay (FP), London
Informa Group (INFO), formerly LLP, Llp Limited, London
International Maritime Bureau (IMB), London and Kuala Lumpur
International Maritime Organization (IMO), London
gCaptain
Latitude38.com (LAT) website
Lloyd's List (LL), daily, London
Local Media (LM)
LSS-SAPU.com (LSS)
Maritime Administration (MARAD), U.S.
The Maritime Executive (website)
Maritime Security Centre - Horn of Africa (MSCHOA)
Maritime Security Council (MSC), U.S.
Maritime Trade Information Sharing Centre - Gulf of Guinea (MTISC-GoG)
National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA), Navigation Safety System
North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), Brussels
Office of Naval Intelligence (ONI) (analysis and comment)
Operator (owner or operator of affected vessel)
Overseas Security Advisory Council (OSAC)
Regional Cooperation Agreement on Combating Piracy and Armed Robbery against Ships in Asia,
Information Sharing Center (ReCAAP ISC)
Reuters
Royal Australian Navy (RAN)
Royal New Zealand Navy (RNZN)
Seafarers Assistance Program (SAP), Kenya
Tradewinds (TW)
United Kingdom Maritime Trade Organization (UKMTO)
United Press International (UPI)
U.S. Maritime Liaison Office (MARLO) Bahrain
U.S. Coast Guard (USCG)
U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS)

(U) ICOD: 6 April 2016


(U) The PAWW and WTS Reports are posted each week on the ONI Intel Portal and can be found at:
http://www.oni.navy.mil/Intelligence-Community/Piracy

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